Architects Talking to Architects: Ryan Flener, Assoc. AIA

Ryan Flener, Assoc. AIA, received his B.Arch in 2010 from the University of Tennessee College of Architecture & Design, where he was heavily influenced by the historical relationships between body and building. An intern architect at Good Fulton & Farrell, Flener has been actively involved with the Communications Committee since moving from his hometown of Louisville, Kentucky in late 2011. Ryan resides in downtown Dallas, where he often finds himself submerged in musical endeavors with The Town Planners, and in architectural design research under The Planning Agency. Ryan Flener, Assoc. AIA. – photo by Nicholas McWhirter Where did you grow up? I grew up…

Architects Talking to Architects: Francisco Gomes, AIA

Francisco Gomes, AIA, is co-founder of Gomes+Staub Architecture in Austin, and assistant professor at The University of Texas at Austin School of Architecture. Since 1999, Gomes + Staub has offered architectural services for modern residential and public buildings. Currently, the practice is designing projects sited in Austin, Marble Falls, and Redding, Connecticut. With my son Ansel, illustrating the rapt attention for each other that unconditional love engenders. – photo courtesy Francisco Gomes, AIA Where do you find inspiration? I find considerable inspiration in construction. Not just the materials and technical assemblies of our buildings, but the people, tools, and cultures of their construction.…

Justin Oscilowski, Assoc. AIA, Contributing to the Craft

Justin Oscilowski, Assoc. AIA, of PageSoutherlandPage jumped at the chance to volunteer for our 2013 Convention Committee and played a key role in transforming the ideas for our Craftsmen's Square into reality. Texas Architects' Robert Bennett interviewed him about his experiences. Justin Oscilowski, Assoc. AIA – photo by Acme Brick How did you first get started as a volunteer with Texas Architects? Well, I started working for Larry Speck in May of 2012 at Page Southerland Page, and he’d mentioned to me that he really wanted to see the young architects at the firm get more involved in the community — to start…

2013 Convention Survey

Our 2013 Annual Convention and Design Expo was a great success! With over 400 attendees more than we had at last year's convention in Austin, more continuing education sessions than ever before, and a sold-out Design Expo, we had one of our biggest and boldest conventions yet. But, we can always improve. That's why we're asking all attendees to please fill out this brief 10-question question survey about your experiences during the convention, and how we can provide more service and more opportunities for all members of the architectural industry.  Your feedback and suggestions will help make our 75th Annual Convention,…

2013 Convention Attendee Continuing Education Credit

Certificates and Credit Your 2013 Texas Society of Architects Learning Unit Hours have been successfully tabulated. You can review your Continuing Education Certificate here. Please print out your certificate for your own records. This is the most important documentation of your convention attendance. Your AIA transcripts have also been updated. If you are an AIA Architect, Associate, or Emeritus member, please review your recorded hours here. Please be aware that the AIA stopped requiring and recording all Sustainable Design credit in 2012. You can view their official announcement here. All AIA transcripts currently show a total of 0.0 SD hours. However, the Texas…

More Than Skin Deep: University of Houston’s New Medical Building

At six stories tall, the recently completed Health and Biomedical Sciences Building stands out among the neighboring parking garages in the southeast corner of the University of Houston campus. The 167,000-sf project expands the College of Optometry's research and clinical operations. These areas became more important after the university became a Tier One research institution in 2011. Shepley Bulfinch of Boston, with architect of record Bailey Architects of Houston, succeed in delivering the requisite spaces, and clad them in a trio of clever, cost-effective facade solutions. A variety of programs are stacked vertically in this medical facility: ambulatory services, laser eye surgery…

What Starts Here …

Even an Aggie would have to admit that The University of Texas at Austin has an impressive campus. The Spanish-Mediterranean buildings that define its core are stately to be sure, but so too are the landscaped malls and courtyards in between them. Framed by the red tile roofs that pop against the blue of the Texas sky, these outdoor rooms are as recognizably part of the campus as the buildings themselves.  As the university has grown, it has faced the opportunities and challenges that come with building on a campus defined by a historic core. Some eras produced better buildings…

The Blaffer Reworked

Art museums have become patrons of architecture. More than most building types, they encourage innovation; they may take more risks; and they frequently look to make a mark. Though the project for the Blaffer Art Museum at the University of Houston was primarily an interior renovation with only a small addition, the design is ambitious and less predictable than many university buildings. Recent museum architecture around the world has often provided a new sign, an iconic image for its institution. This is likewise the case with the new Blaffer, as transformed by the New York firm WORKac, with its bright and playful glass…

Texas Architects Board Responds to AIA Restructuring

As our members may know from a previous blog entry by John Nyfeler, FAIA, the AIA Board is considering a change in its structure. The AIA governance proposal may be found here. While board structure may not be a “hot” topic among AIA members, it is the mechanism that allows member voices to be transmitted to the AIA Board of Directors. How well that works — or doesn’t work — should be of high interest to AIA members and was for the most recent meeting of the Texas Architects Board of Directors.  After considerable discussion, the Texas Architects board unanimously approved the following…

Completing the Circle

When it opened in the fall of 1950, St. Stephen’s Episcopal School looked like a wilderness outpost. The campus lay eight miles west of Austin, on an oak-covered ridge overlooking the unspoiled Hill Country. At that time, only five buildings were complete and the roads were unpaved. In this raw landscape, Rev. William Brewster established a groundbreaking new school — one that would become the first co-ed Episcopal school in the United States and the first racially integrated boarding school in the South. The progressive nature of the school began with its architecture: Brewster and St. Stephen’s co-founder Bishop John…