AIA Austin Jury Conversation

AIA Austin gathered its 2016 Design Awards jury for an evening of conversation. – photo by Patrick Wong On the eve of Design Awards judging, AIA Austin gathered its distinguished jury for a panel discussion about their work and individual points of view. Carol Ross Barney, FAIA, of Chicago’s Ross Barney Architects, Nonya Grenader, FAIA, associate director of Rice University’s Building Workshop and principal of her own small firm, Linda Taalman, of Los Angeles’ Taalman Koch, and Angela Watson, AIA, of Boston’s Shepley Bulfinch, represented a diverse mix of projects and opinions, making for a lively conversation. The panel was moderated…

UT Austin to Install Living Wall Five Years in the Making

The wall will be built over a honeycomb-shaped trellis and extend to the ground – rendering courtesy UTSOA On May 16, volunteers will come together to install a living wall at The University of Texas at Austin. The project is funded by the school’s Green Fee Award. Spearheaded by UT Austin Vice President for Operations Pat Clubb, the living wall project is being shepherded by Assistant Professor Danelle Briscoe. The idea for the wall was put forth by a former Austin city councilman, Chris Riley. The first wall will be installed on the northwest corner of the school of architecture, with others…

Lake|Flato Home Wins AIA Housing Award

Hog Pen Creek's boardwalk connects the main house with a guest space and lake pavillion. – photo by Casey Dunn Lake|Flato’s Hog Pen Creek Residence, featured in the September/October 2014 issue of Texas Architect, has been honored with a 2016 AIA Housing Award. The project is one of 10 across the country being honored, and the only one in Texas. This is not the first award for the project, which has also received AIA San Antonio’s 2013 Merit Award and a 2014 TxA Design Award. A courtyard is open to the outdoor environment – photo by Casey Dunn The house, a harmonious combination…

San Antonio River Barge Design Winner Announced

Houston's METALAB has been chosen as the winner of AIA San Antonio's river barge design competition. METALAB's festive barge can be changed to accomodate different uses – rendering courtesy AIA San Antonio AIA San Antonio announced the winner of its river barge design competition on Friday. Houston’s METALAB created the winning design, a barge inspired by papel picado with various deck components to accommodate different uses.  METALAB's colorful concept ties in to San Antonio's image – photo courtesy AIA San Antonio When announcing the winner of the contest, which launched in 2015 and resulted in proposals from 12 teams, Mayor of San…

Texas A&M Students Creating Designs for New Mavericks Facility

Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban discusses student work – photo courtesy Texas A&M Bryan Trubey, FAIA, director of HKS’ sports and entertainment division (learn more in the March/April 2016 issue of Texas Architect) and a group of graduate students from the Texas A&M University College of Architecture are working with Mark Cuban to design a new practice facility for his team, the Dallas Mavericks. Cuban hopes to build the facility within the next two years at an as yet undetermined site in Dallas. In the meantime, the students are presenting their ideas, which will not be built, as an exercise in learning to work on high profile projects…

River Barge Design Competition Finalists Announced

Finalist Luna Architecture's proposed redesign of San Antonio's iconic river barge – rendering courtesy AIA San Antonio In honor of San Antonio’s upcoming 300th anniversary in 2018, AIA San Antonio has sponsored an international design competition to re-imagine the River Walk’s iconic river barge (see our earlier post about the competition here). The contest is seeking to discover a barge that is more sustainable, serving commuters as well as tourists. This includes making the fleet of barges entirely electric.  METALAB's proposed barge – rendering courtesy AIA San Antonio On February 22, the City of San Antonio and AIA San Antonio announced the contest’s three…

Everything Old is New Again

Construction progresses under the beamed ceiling at 500 Chicon – photo by Elizabeth Hackler 500 Chicon, with its exposed brick, soaring roof beams, and center atrium, is already beautiful. But the things that we love most about the building are also the things that cause challenges when attempting a renovation. In order to improve its functionality, changes to the HVAC system and acoustics needed to be made. The exposed brick walls lend character, but they lack insulation completely. The open nature of the space allows light to reach deeper into the basement, but it also allows sound to travel without impediment.…

Intersecting Interests

In 1971, the Los Angeles-based artist Robert Irwin embarked on a solitary driving tour of the country’s perimeter. A year earlier, he had completed an installation at the Museum of Modern Art that — while unnoted by the art world — had led to an important personal breakthrough, leading him to leave his studio for good and embark on a new phase of a career in which he has routinely questioned and shed the inessential. The MOMA installation transformed a small, squat room through three site-specific interventions indicated by the title of the work: ”Fractured Light” — “Partial Scrim Ceiling”…

Healthcare International

The winning scheme for a new hospital in Denmark by WHR Architects, in association with KHR Arkitekter and Arup International, reflects a respect for its 100-year-old historical context in Copenhagen while offering Danish health care an infusion of American healthcare design.   Anthony Haas, WHR principal, said the Danish government launched a healthcare campaign years ago to bring high quality care to their citizens. They sought international best practices for new methods to deliver health care and wanted to apply those lessons for a blended solution. The capital region of Denmark’s vision to provide world-class health care included a 2020…

For Humanity

What better product of Architecture than a smile on the face of a child?  Following the earthquake that added insult to the injury already consuming the people of Haiti, there came a call from Architecture for Humanity for architects to help. As third responders, our efforts would focus on stabilization first and only later on reconstruction. In my 12 or so trips to Haiti over four and a half years, I watched this process and how our architectural training and use of design added value to the recovery and to the lives of the Haitian people. Answering that call was…