2016 Prosperity Conference

Registration Deadline: August 11 TxA PROSPERITY CONFERENCE The word on the street is that our economy is booming and all is well in our industry. But maybe there are still questions to be asked and ways to improve your business. What is the Texas economy looking like now — what is ahead? Are we changing the way our firms operate to take advantage of the highs and protect the company when the inevitable lows return? What best practices can be shared to strategize our growth? How do we “get what we want” for the firm? For our clients? For our staff?  Explore these questions and more…

J. Riely Gordon Art Contest Winners Announced

Winners from all of the categories for the J. Riely Gordon art contest proudly display their prizes. – photo courtesy Mieko Mahi At the J. Riely Gordon Conference this past weekend in Hallettsville, winners of the first J. Riely Gordon art contest were announced. The contest, judged by TxA 2016 President Paul A. Bielamowicz, AIA, Brantley Hightower, AIA, and Emily Little, FAIA, challenged entrants to illustrate some aspect of Gordon’s life or work in any medium.  Moses Adams with his grand prize-winning model of Gordon's Kahn and Stanzel Building – photo courtesy Mieko Mahi Prizes were awarded in children’s and adult…

Michael Malone, AIA, on Reasons to Attend the TxA Prosperity Conference

Why attend the Texas Prosperity Conference? To spend an exciting weekend with colleagues learning about growth strategies for small firms, achieving final success, risk management, and the current economic conditions in Texas. But don’t just take our word for it. Michael Malone, AIA, TxA's immediate past-president, founding principal at Maxwell Malone Borson Architects, and one of the brains behind the new conference, gives us his take: It has been observed that as professionals, architects are often ill equipped to address and deal with the realities of architecture as a business. The very things that draw us to the profession sometimes engage our focus and…

2016 Emerging Design + Technology: Call for Papers

Download the 2016 Call for Papers The TxA Emerging Design + Technology conference brings experimental research and exploration among academics and practitioners to a broad audience of designers, practicing architects, construction industry executives, building products manufacturers, students, and other researchers. It takes advantage of the collection of over 3,000 representatives of these fields at the Texas Society of Architects Annual Conference and Design Expo to create a forum for sharing new ideas being formulated in schools of architecture and elsewhere. Selected academics and researchers will have the opportunity to present their papers during three 90-minute sessions at the Texas Society of Architects 77th Annual Conference and…

2016 Design Conference: Designing + Building

Architecture Tours and Learning Opportunities February 12–14​ Amarillo/Palo Duro Canyon   Palo Duro Canyon illustration by Bryce A. Weigand, FAIA ​                                                                           ONLINE REGISTRATION IS NOW CLOSED Onsite registration available in Amarillo on Friday, February 12. See below for more details. During our Fifth Annual Design Conference, we will explore the relationship between designing and building — between the act of imagining what could be and the act…

2016 Design Awards Jurors Announced

The Texas Society of Architects is proud to announce the jurors for our 2016 Design Awards competition. We look forward to their presence in Austin on May 5–6, when they convene to decide our winners. As a reminder, Design Award entries can be submitted here and will be accepted until March 31.  The work of Thomas Hacker, FAIA, has largely dealt with public institutions: libraries, schools, museums, theaters, and places of public assembly. To them he has brought both artistic skill and a keen sensitivity to the nature of public use. His buildings have an understated dignity based on the beauty of…

2016 Texas Trailbreak Reception

The AIA National Convention will be held in Philadelphia on May 19–21 – photo by Ed Yackovich via Wikimedia Commons The Texas Society of Architects will host our annual Texas Trailbreak reception during the 2016 AIA National Convention in Philadelphia. Join us to celebrate the newest Texas Fellows and AIA award winners. Enjoy cocktails, appetizers, entertainment, and a spectacular view of the city as you reconnect with friends and colleagues.  The 2016 Texas Trailbreak Reception will take place Friday, May 20, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Loews Philadelphia Hotel. Meet us at the Howe Room and Terrace on the 33rd floor to honor the…

2016 Design Conference: Architects Invade Amarillo

Welcome to Amarillo – photo by Alan R Photography Last month, architects from around the state made their way to the Texas Panhandle for the Texas Society of Architect’s Fifth Annual Design Conference. This event is an opportunity for practitioners to meet for a weekend of lectures and tours that focus on a specific aspect of design. This year’s conference, held on February 12–14, explored the relationship between designing and building. It was held in Amarillo and in nearby Palo Duro Canyon State Park, whose iconic Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) projects provided a historical precedent for the discussion. The conference opened with a downtown…

At Home on the Border

Participants in the 23rd Annual Building Communities Conference of the Lower Rio Grande Valley Chapter of the American Institute of Architects began the two-day conference at South Padre Island with a daylong preconference tour on September 24 that focused on the domestic architecture of the border city of Brownsville. Guided by the City of Brownsville’s Heritage Officer Roman McAllen, Assoc. AIA, and Downtown Manager and Brownsville Film Commissioner Peter L. Goodman, the 40-plus tour participants cut a cross section through the architectural history of this border city of 180,000 people. The tour began at Market Square in the heart of downtown…

Follow the Light

On the subterranean beer garden’s creek-side deck, a picnic table is packed with a young professional bunch in rapt conversation, men with their backs to the water oblivious to the glowing presence creeping up the wall behind them. From Waller Creek below, looking up at them and the rest of the Austin skyline, the beast is visible in full: a ghostly creature emerging from the murky depths, its long legs, made of flexible LED Neon lights, frozen in mid-leap, looking as desperate as any other Austin-dweller for a good seat at a bar patio downtown. This is “Waller Phantasm,” University of Texas…