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2015 Design Conference: CRAFT

*****The 2015 Design Conference is SOLD OUT. To be placed on the waitlist, you must complete the Registration Form and submit it to arlena@texasarchitects.org. If you are enrolled from the waitlist, you will be notified by email.***** During the Fourth Annual Design Conference, explore how Craft — the art and science of how materials come together to make architecture — has influenced the creation of architecture in the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries. The conference will be framed by a discussion of O’Neil Ford and how he blended both historic and modern ideas about craft to create an architecture that is uniquely suited to its…

A Living Building in North Texas

Fifteen miles outside Decatur is an unassuming, low-slung pavilion with sloped gable roofs. With its simple material palette and geometries, the building recedes into the flat terrain and swaying grasses, subtly but deliberately connecting visitors with the landscape. Windows facilitate the connection: A meeting room’s smaller apertures are cut low to accommodate seated viewers, while kitchen windows invite visitors to stand at the counter. A generous gathering space opens to a courtyard with a large live oak tree on the east; on the west, a porch takes advantage of an expansive view of the prairie.  The Betty and Clint Josey…

Discovering Craft in Denton

TxA Design Committee Chair Brantley Hightower, AIA, invites you to join him in Denton for keynote presentations, tours, and much more at our Fourth Annual Design Conference: CRAFT. At the end of February, I am planning to drive from San Antonio up the I-35 corridor. I will not stop in either Dallas or Fort Worth, but will instead continue north another half-hour to the small town of Denton. Although it is a lovely place to visit in its own right, my reason for making this particular trip will be to attend the Texas Society of Architects’ 2015 Design Conference: CRAFT.…

A Texas Architect: The life and work of O’Neil Ford

June 15, 2012 Ashley Grant / Senior Staff Writer ntdaily.com Ford, who died in 1982, is behind the distinguished design of the Little Chapel in the Woods at Texas Woman’s University, the gazebo that still stands on UNT campus near the Language building, renovations at the Emily Fowler Public Library and many other buildings in the city. Ford’s Story Born in Pink Hill, Texas, Ford moved to Denton in 1917. His Texas roots heavily influenced his architectural design style, said Peggy Riddle, director of the Denton County Courthouse-on-the-Square Museum. “Because Texas is known for its heat, most of his structures…