A&M Students to Design, Build Home for Housing Needs Initiative

In an initiative that addresses the profound societal challenges of meeting the housing needs of the estimated nine billion people that will be on the planet by 2050 while simultaneously reducing buildings’ energy use, students from all disciplines at Texas A&M’s College of Architecture will design and build a single-family residence during the 2012-2013 academic year. The project is part of A&M’s new college-wide Real Projects initiative.

Image: Falls Creek Ranch subdivision, a rural area about 3 miles from downtown Bryan. Students will design/build a home during the 2012-13 academic year. Photo courtesy of A&M College of Architecture.

 

“Architecture, construction science, visualization and landscape architecture and urban planning students and faculty will all contribute in a truly interdisciplinary effort,” said Mark Clayton, a professor of architecture who is spearheading the project with other faculty.

Students are partnering with the Brazos Valley Affordable Housing Corporation to design and construct a home in the Falls Creek Ranch subdivision, a relatively undeveloped area with a rural flavor approximately three miles northwest of downtown Bryan.

“The project will provide students with a learning experience focused on public service and environmental sustainability,” said the Real Projects proposal put forth by 15 faculty members representing all four of the college's academic departments.

To spotlight the initiative and recruit student participants, a Real Projects Inception Symposium will be held 7 p.m. Sept. 12, in the Preston Geren Auditorium. The project launch will include a panel discussion with project faculty and college administrators.

The yearlong project, Clayton said, will provide students with first-hand experience in all stages of creating a structure. Architecture students engaged in the project will address energy-efficient building design, construction science students will learn about scheduling and cost estimating, and planning and land development students will learn about regional, global and societal impact of development.

Read an article about the project here.

 



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