Article Results for "Austin"

PageSoutherlandPage Thinks Forward

by: Catherine Gavin

Begin¬ning January 1, 2014, PageSoutherlandPage will be known simply as Page. The rebrand¬ing effort makes it clear that Page is focused on “design that makes lives better.”

courtesy Page
Page 17

AIA Austin Latinos in Architecture

by: Paul Medrano, AIA

As part of the Austin community, AIA Austin Latinos in Architecture strives to be a positive influence for Latino students who aspire to become architects.

PHOTO COURTESY AIA AUSTIN LATINOS IN ARCHITECTURE
Page 19

Kenneth E. Bentsen, FAIA (1926–2013)

by: Stephen Fox

Important Houston architect Kenneth Edward Bentsen, FAIA, died on September 24, 2013.

PHOTO OF KENNETH E. BENTSEN, FAIA, COURTESY HIS FAMILY.
Page 19

Susan Lynn Williamson (1958–2013)

by: Joel Warren Barna

Susan Lynn Williamson of Austin, a former editor of Texas Architect magazine, died October 10, 2013.

PHOTO OF SUSAN LYNN WILLIAMSON COURTESY HER FAMILY.
Page 21

Fosu Marina and Master Plan

by: OTA+

Austin-based OTA+ designed a new master plan and marina for the Fosu Lagoon area of Cape Coast, Ghana. The project proposes Africa’s tallest building.

Page 24

Embracing the Edge

by: Brett Koenig Greig
Architect: Bercy Chen Studio

The Edgeland House in Austin rises from the earth giving little hint to people on the street about what lies below the tall grasses growing on the roof.

Paul Bardagjy
Page 26

Austin’s Ecological Affluence

by: Dean J. Almy, AIA

A series of urban design initiatives could establish Austin’s green infrastructure as the preeminent agent of a new compact and connected city.

PHOTO BY DAVID SUCSY. RENDERING OF DEVELOPMENT STUDY BY KEN SMITH LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT AND TEN EYCK LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS. RENDERING OF THE GROVE BY MICHAEL VAN VALKENBURG ASSOCIATES. PHOTO OF THE TUNNEL EXCAVATION BY TODD SPENCER. PHOTO OF THE UT AUSTIN STUDIO BY MURRAY LEGGE, FAIA. PHOTO BY THOMAS MCCONNELL. RENDERING OF PROPOSED URBAN STRUCTURE BY UT AUSTIN TUFLAB. RENDERING OF SOUTH AUSTIN WATERFRONT COURTESY AIA SDAT.
Page 54

Waller Creek Update

by: Ingrid Spencer

Since selecting a winning design by Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates and Thomas Phifer and Partners last fall, Austin’s Waller Creek Conservan¬cy has continued sprinting forward with its plans to transform the 1.5-mile creek corridor from ne¬glected waterway to vibrant downtown destination.

PHOTO OF THE TUNNEL EXCAVATION BY TODD SPENCER. PHOTO OF THE UT AUSTIN STUDIO BY MURRAY LEGGE, FAIA.
Page 57

Block 21

by: Canan Yetmen
Architect: Andersson-Wise Architects (Design Architect) and BOKA Powell (Architect of Record)

Andersson-Wise Architects’ Block 21 is one of the most successful mixed-use developments in downtown Austin.

Andrew Pogue, Art Gray, Jonathan Jackson, Thomas McConnell,
and Tim Hursley
Page 66

Transformative Grant for The Contemporary Austin

The Contemporary Austin was awarded a $9 million grant that will be used by the museum to create a sculpture garden on its 12-acre lakeside estate of Laguna Gloria.

COMMON CROSSINGS (DETAIL) COURTESY THE ARTIST AND ZACH FEUER GALLERY.
PHOTO BY DAVE MEAD.
Page 93

Myriad Botanical Gardens

by: Ben Koush

Downtown Oklahoma City’s Myriad Botani¬cal Gardens received a huge face-lift from The Office of James Burnett in collaboration with David Epstein, AIA, of Gensler’s Austin office.

PHOTO COURTESY THE OFFICE OF JAMES BURNETT.
Page 96

Society of Architectural Historians in Austin Members Only

by: Gerald Moorhead, FAIA

The 67th Annual Conference of the Society of Architectural Historians (SAH) will be held in Austin April 9–13.

PHOTO BY DAVID SCHALLIOL COURTESY SOCIETY OF ARCHITECTURAL HISTORIANS
PHOTO OF THE GREAT CREATE COURTESY NASHER SCULPTURE CENTER
Page 19

Printing 16th-Century Vaults

by: Catherine Gavin

UT Austin’s Benjamin Ibarra is looking at historic buildings through a technological lens.

PHOTO AND RENDERING BY BENJAMIN IBARRA SEVILLA
Page 96

Pollen at Play Members Only

by: Jen Wong
Architect: Pollen Architecture and Design

African sands fill the polycarbonate panels that clad Pollen Architecture and Design’s studio building in East Austin.

Photography Victoria Samnubaris and Julie Pizzo Wood
Page 56

Louis Kahn Plays the Organ

by: Philip Hendren, AIA

Once upon a time in 1970, Louis Kahn played the organ for a crowd of 400 in Austin.

PHOTOS BY PHILIP HENDREN, AIA
Page 33

Michael Van Valkenburgh on Austin’s Waller Creek

by: Texas Architect Staff

With construction of the Waller Creek tunnel well under way in Austin, the $146.5-million effort to transform the long-neglected flood plain has afforded a new vision for the city.

MICHAEL VAN VALKENBURGH ASSOCIATES INC.
AND THOMAS PHIFER AND PARTENERS
Page 10

The Bike Shed

by: Canan Yetmen

In a changing South Austin neighborhood, Minguell-McQuary Architecture+Design’s Bike Shed is a simple building that embodies a much larger design ethos that takes its cues from the past even as it keeps one eye focused on the future.

JOSE MINGUELL
Page 68

Uchiko

by: Texas Architect Staff

Completed in June 2010 by Michael Hsu Office of Architecture, Uchiko is a 4,954-sf sister restaurant to one of Austin’s popular restaurants, Uchi, which is operated by Chef Tyson Cole.

Paul Bardagjy
Page 55

hopdoddy

by: Texas Architect Staff

The popular Austin burger spot, hopdoddy reflects recent trends in restaurant design. Located in West Anderson Plaza, which was renovated by Levy Architects, the interior build out was completed by Aubrey Carter Design Office in collaboration with their client Chuck Smith.

Casey Dunn, Matt Lankes
Page 58

The windCatcher and prairieHouse

by: Texas Architect Staff

The Austin firm Specht Harpman Architects proposes passive systems for two very different homes in arid climates. The windCatcher looks to ancient traditions while the prairieHouse reimagines a former Texaco station.

Page 19

...with Clovis Heimsath, FAIA

by: Lawrence Connolly, AIA

Although, keeping up with him has never been easy, Clovis Heimsath, FAIA, is a testament to architecture being a calling and not a profession — his practice and his lifestyle are seamless.

Julie Pizzo Wood
Page 60

AIA STAD Program and Report for Austin’s South Shore Central

by: Texas Architect Staff

AIA Austin was proud to partner with the City of Austin and six other consultants chosen to participate in AIA’s Sustainable Design Assistance Team (SDAT) program.

Page 65

2012 Charles E. Peterson Prize

by: Texas Architect Staff

A student team from the University of Texas at Austin School of Architecture was recently awarded the 2012 Charles E. Peterson Prize for their measured drawings of Austin’s North-Evan Chateau submitted to the Historic American Building Survey (HABS).

Page 65

Sustained Experience: Lead Pencil Studio’s “Diffuse Reflection Lab”

by: Matt Fajkus, AIA

Artists Annie Han and Daniel Mihalyo of Lead Pencil Studio are well-suited to explore the interstitial space between the fine and applied arts. “Diffuse Reflection Lab,” at the University of Texas at Austin Visual Arts Center, is a good example of their careful negotiation between the realms of art and architecture.

Jill Chan and The Artists
Page 10

Retail Development and Design

by: Catherine Gavin

Retail design has the potential to go beyond just creating an interesting clean space for product presentation. This issue of Texas Architect looks at how good planning and design create effective community spaces and individual stores with a sense of place.

NorthPark Center and Omniplan
Page 5

Austin Community College at Highland Mall


Architect: Barnes Gromatzky Kosarek Architects

Austin’s Highland Mall sits largely abandoned. However Barnes Gromatzky Kosarek Architects’ proposal for the redevelopment of a former department store, into a new Austin Community College campus, floods the interior with light and activates the exterior with student gathering spaces.

Barnes Gromatzky Kosarek Architects, Elizabeth A. Day
Page 21

AIA Fort Worth Design Awards

Recipients of the 2013 AIA Fort Worth Design Awards were announced in January. Six firm projects and five student works were singled out for excellence in design as part of the chap¬ter’s Honors and Awards Program.

Page 17

Standing Up to the Strip Mall

by: Rebecca Roberts

Building code necessitated a blast wall at the Met Retail site in Austin. Studio 8 Architects took the opportunity to customize the building’s aesthetic and break from typical highway architecture.

Andy Mattern; Brian Mihealsick
Page 36

Buy Local

by: Catherine Gavin

In the ever-changing world of retail design, flexibility, simplicity, curb appeal, and storage are fundamental to continued success. Keepers, Eliza Page, and Rogue Running, all local Austin retailers, were pioneers of downtown shopping — and their continued relevance is a prom¬ising sign

Jud Haggard Photography, Casey Woods Photography, Juan Carlos DeLeon
Page 40

Irreconcilable Differences Resolved

by: Lawrence Connolly, AIA

The new United States Federal Courthouse in Austin designed by Mack Sogin Merrill Elam Architects meets a stringent security design paradigm and is flooded with natural light. This unconventional civic structure is perfect for Austin’s sensibilities.

Casey Dunn
Page 32

A Romanesque Rebirth

by: J. Brantley Hightower, AIA

The 1899 Comal County Courthouse in New Braunfels is the latest addition to the list of restored Texas courthouses. Originally designed by James Riely Gordon, Austin-based Volz & Associates fully restored the original design and finishes.

Brian Mihealsick; Brantley Hightower, AIA
Page 42

In the Trenches with Emily Little, FAIA

by: Canan Yetmen

Judging by the dozens of construction projects currently underway in Austin’s historic core, preservation architect Emily Little, FAIA, won’t be getting bored any time soon.

Nicole Mlakar
Page 71

CELA Annual Conference

The 2013 Council of Educators in Landscape Architecture (CELA) conference took place at the University of Texas at Austin on March 27–31.

PHOTO BY ROBERT MILLMAN
Page 75

Pelli Clarke Pelli-Designed Computing Center Opens at UT Austin

The Pelli Clarke Pelli-designed 232,000-sf state-of-the-art Bill & Melinda Gates Computer Science Complex and Dell Computer Science Hall (GDC), is the new home of the University of Texas at Austin’s Computer Science Department.

GDC PHOTO BY PAUL FINKEL, COURTESY UT COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES
Page 76

Waller Creek’s Creek Show

by: Octavia Hayes

Creek Show proposes to transform Austin’s Waller Creek into an active venue for art, architecture, and landscape architecture. A series of temporary installations will appear along the 1.5-mile site in an attempt to surprise and delight the community.

RENDERINGS COURTSEY DESIGN WORKSHOP, BALDRIDGE ARCHITECTS, LEGGE LEWIS LEGGE, AND THOUGHTBARN
Page 8

Seher Shah’s “Constructed Landscapes”

by: Rachel Adams

With degrees in art and architecture, artist Seher Shah’s areas of interest include overlapping historical and geographical elements, reconstructing modernist architecture and urban monuments, and examining futurist landscapes.

PHOTO OF “OBJECT RELIC (UNITÉ D’HABITATION)” COURTESY THE ARTIST.
PHOTO OF “OBJECT REPETITION (LINE TO DISTANCE)” BY JULIE WOOD PIZZO.
Page 10

Everyday Object Transformed

by: Rebecca Roberts

For an Austin fashion show, MF ARchitecture created “Fashion[ING] Objects,” and illuminated wall created from 5,000 hangers that served as the entry to the catwalk.

“FASHION[ING] OBJECTS” PHOTOS COURTESY MF ARCHITECTURE.
Page 12

AIA Austin Design Awards

by: TA Staff

Texas Architect features AIA Austin’s 2013 Design Awards. The competition recognizes outstanding architectural projects by members and promotes public interest in architectural excellence.

Page 14

A New Lease on Life

by: Ingrid Spencer

Austin-based Miró Rivera Architects designed a sustainable and economical building, full of natural light, for the not-for-profit LifeWorks in East Austin.

Paul Finkel and Michael Hsu
Page 52

WJE Office Building

by: TA Staff

When PageSoutherlandPage proposed using high thermal mass concrete walls as a means of reducing energy consumption in the new office building for Austin engineers Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates, the team saw it as an interesting case for experimentation.

Casey Dunn Photography
Page 74

Honoring O’Neil Ford with a Pan-American Publication Feast at UT Austin

by: Rafael Longoria

In their discussions of modern architecture in Latin America, the “O’Neil Ford Duographs” (O’NFD) display an editorial predilection for abstraction, formal clarity, and tectonic integrity.

PHOTOS BY ELIZABETH HACKLER.
Page 28

Latitudes: Architecture in the Americas

by: Barbara Hoidn

Architecture in the Americas is an annual two-day event explores contemporary “American” architecture. This year’s event brought together architects from New York, Texas, Mexico, Chile, Argentina, and Brazil.

PHOTOS BY MICHAEL MORAN/OTTO.
Page 31

Hillside Residence

by: Canan Yetmen

This renovation and addition to an existing Austin bungalow by Alterstudio Architecture is a strong architectural idea existing easily alongside a distinct lack of pretension.

Casey Dunn Photography
Page 38

T3 Parking Structure

by: Rebecca Roberts

Parking has never been so pretty; the T3 Parking Structure in Austin, by Danze Blood Architects, uses design to redefine the typically banal experience of parking.

Whit Preston
Page 66

LifeWorks Sooch Foundation Youth and Family Resource Center

by: Ingrid Spencer

Miró Rivera Architects’ LifeWorks building in East Austin stands out as a powerful example of elegance and sustainability meeting a very tight budget.

Paul Finkel
Page 78

The Buttrey Building’s Transformation for Peddle

Alterstudio Architecture’s design for a young firm embraces both Austin’s late 19th-century Buttrey Building’s age and the client’s creative ethos.

Casey Dunn Photography
Page 86

Attorneys at Law

Gensler designed a new open office for a young Austin law firm, Weisbart Springer Hayes.

Casey Dunn Photography
Page 92

... with TEX-FAB

by: Scott Marble

TEX-FAB led by Brad Bell, Kevin Patrick McClellan, Andrew Vrana, and Kory Bieg, is changing the status quo in terms of digital design and fabrication. Scott Marble details how their new approach to workflows is the way of the future.

Nicole Mlakar and Kory Bieg
Page 95

Campus Public Art Programs

by: Audrey McKee

The University of Texas at Austin’s Landmarks and Rice University’s Public Art Program both feature successful public art installations that offer lessons for architects.

photos by Julie Pizzo Wood.
Page 18

Lines, Numbers, and Colors

by: Matt Fajkus, AIA

The University of Texas at Austin’s Landmarks program recently procured a pair of works by Sol LeWitt and a new “Skyspace” by James Turrell — impressive additions to an already respectable collection of sculptures

“CIRCLE WITH TOWERS” COURTSEY THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN. PHOTO BY MARK MENJIVAR.
DETAILS OF “THE COLOR INSIDE.” COURTSEY THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN. PHOTO BY PAUL
BARDAGJY. WALL DRAWINGS COURTESY OF THE ESTATE OF SOL LEWITT. PHOTOS BY MARK MEJIVAR.
Page 20

Obituary: In Memory of Natalie de Blois, FAIA (1921–2013)

by: Emily Little, FAIA

In 1980, when Natalie de Blois, FAIA, hit Austin, she dove into local politics, zoning issues, and Barton Springs Pool with gusto. She also just happened to be a woman who had designed some of the most innovative modern buildings in the United States.

PORTRAIT COURTESY SOM. PHOTO OF THE UNION CARBIDE BUILDING
BY EZRA STOLLER/ESTO. COURTESY SOM. PHOTOS OF SOM BUILDINGS BY EZRA STOLLER/ESTO. COURTESY SOM. PHOTOS
OF GINGERBREAD BUILD-OFF AND BOOK COVER COURTESY AIA HOUSTON.
Page 23

Texas Society of Architects Honor Awards

The Texas Society of Architects announces the recipients of our 2013 Honor Awards.

Page 29

What Starts Here…

by: Brantley Hightower, AIA

Even an Aggie would have to admit that The University of Texas at Austin has an impressive campus. Three new buildings: Belo Center for New Media, Norman Hackerman Building, and the College of Liberal Arts Building push the envelope and interpret design guidelines in creative ways.

PHOTO BY TOM BONNER. PHOTOS OF THE BELO CENTER BY S.FRANCES. PHOTO OF THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS BY DROR BALDINGER.
UT AUSTIN MASTER PLAN BY SASAKI ASSOCIATES. COURTSEY PAGESOUTHERLANDPAGE.
Page 33

Austin Aquatic Center


Architect: Runa Workshop

Runa Workshop’s Austin Aquatic Center integrates landscape and architecture to create a water management system with real ecological benefits.

Page 40

Fashion[ING] Objects


Architect: Matt Fajkus Architecture

Matt Fajkus Architecture proposes a wall made of coat hangers for a runway show.

Page 44

Williamson County Regional Animal Shelter


Architect: Connolly Architects & Consultants

Connolly Architects & Consultants’ Williamson County Regional Animal Shelter is a smart, clear plan with features that enhance the safety and welfare of the animals and people who use the facility.

Hester + Hardaway
Page 102

Austin Animal Center


Architect: Jackson & Ryan Architects

Jackson & Ryan Architects’ Austin Animal Center has several design features that increase the chances that its dogs, cats, and rabbits will find “forever” homes.

Mark Scheyer
Page 108

Not A Little Cozy Affair

by: Al York, AIA
Architect: Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (Design Architect, 1966–67) and Overland Partners (Design Architect, 20

In 1966, as Gordon Bunshaft was putting pencil to trace for the design of the new presidential library and museum in Austin, Lyndon Baines Johnson was a giant.

Thomas McConnell
Page 68

Completing the Circle

by: Brett Koenig Greig
Architect: Andersson-Wise Architects

An ambitious partnership between St. Stephen’s Episcopal School and Andersson-Wise Architects has transformed the original Fehr & Granger campus with five new buildings.

Andrew Pogue Photography
Page 85

A Vocabulary of Speed

by: Aaron Seward
Architect: Miró Rivera Architects

An iconic red, tube-steel tower presides over the Circuit of the Americas (COTA) — Austin’s new Formula 1 track/performance venue by Miró Rivera Architects.

Paul Finkel, Michael Hsu, Ted Parker, Jr., Tomas Segura,
Cris DeWitt, Dorna Sports, and Merrick Ales
Page 94

Blanco Public Library


Architect: Brett Wolfe, Assoc. AIA

For a planned expansion of the public library in Blanco, designer Brett Wolfe, Assoc. AIA, drew inspiration from F.E. Ruffini’s 1885 limestone courthouse that looms over the center of town about a half-mile away.

Page 22

‘Dust to Dust’


Architect: Laura Bryant and Chelsea Vargas

Their proposal for a 990-acre cemetery earned students from UT Austin’s School of Architecture an Honor Award in the 2011 ASLA Student Awards sponsored by the American Society of Landscape Architects.

Page 22

AIA San Antonio Design Awards

After carefully evaluating 60 entries from 24 local architectural firms, jurors for AIA San Antonio’s 2011 Design Awards program announced their selections during ceremonies held on Nov. 4 at Pearl Stable. Attendees also celebrated the recipients of the chapter’s Studio Awards, its Twenty-Five Year Award, and its annual Mayor’s Choice Award honoring a publicly funded architectural project.

Page 14

AIA Fort Worth Student Design Awards

by: Tom Manganiello, Assoc. AIA

During AIA Fort Worth’s awards banquet held on Jan. 24, three student projects were recognized for design excellence. The lone Honor Award was presented to Ace Academy by John Paul Rysavy and Daniel Shumaker, both students at the University of Texas at Austin.

Page 18

Grand Hotel Austin at Waller Creek

Designed by Gensler’s local office to be the city’s tallest structure, the 47-story hotel is planned for a 1.75-acre site located next door to the Austin Convention Center in the southeastern quadrant of downtown. Ground breaking is set for August, with construction tentatively scheduled to be complete in 2015.

Page 20

Marking the Land

by: Matt Fajkus, AIA

Modernist sculptor Constantin Brancusi famously said, “Architecture is inhabited sculpture.” That raises the question: Is sculpture uninhabitable architecture?

Paul Bardagjy, Jacob Termansen, Robert Boland, Marsha Miller, Overland Partners | Architects
Page 24

Campus Reunion

by: J. Brantley Hightower, AIA

At the west entrance to the campus of the University of Texas at Austin stands the Spanish Mediterranean inspired Texas Union. Built in 1932 to serve as the center of social activities of the growing university, by the end of the twentieth century the location of the Union had become much less central due to the campus’ eastward expansion.

Chris Cooper Photography
Page 39

Twin Oaks Library

by: Neolle Heinze

Twin Oaks Library, designed by h+uo architects, replaces a former branch library located in leased storefronts in south Austin.

Paul Bardagjy
Page 61

Four Texas Teams Chosen as Semifinalists in Waller Creek Design Competition

Four Texas firms are among a nationwide total of nine that were chosen Jan. 30 as semifinalists for the Waller Creek Conservancy design competition, from a pool of 31 entries. The competition calls for a redesign of a 1.5-mile stretch of city parkland and urban space along Waller Creek in downtown Austin.

Page 66

Images of Texas' Past Archive Online

Texas Archive of the Moving Image (TAMI) is actively searching for any film or video collections referencing Texas or made by Texans. The Texas Historical Commission (THC) recently provided several such films to TAMI, including episodes of the 1950s television program “Texas in Review” that includes a segment on the historic French Legation in Austin.

Page 67

Speakers Announced for Texas Society of Architects’ 73rd Convention

by: Texas Architect Staff

The Texas Society of Architects 2012 Annual Convention and Design Expo, October 18-20, in Austin, presents two distinguished keynote speakers who will examine the role of design in the context of the convention’s theme, “Influence.” One is an activist and innovator who helped create the High Line — a public park built atop an abandoned, elevated rail line in New York; the other is the award-winning host and radio producer of 99% Invisible. Attend the convention to hear the unique perspectives of Robert Hammond and Roman Mars.

Page 16

Bungalow Modern

by: Canan Yetmen

In Austin’s richly diverse and energetic East Side neighborhoods, a rebirth is taking place. The addition of the Heywood Hotel on East Cesar Chavez Street represents the latest addition to a burgeoning and thriving East Side culture. Nestled comfortably among the barbecue joints, tacquerias and local shops that have so far eluded big-box homogenization, the hotel builds respectfully on the neighborhood’s considerable charms.

Casey Dunn
Page 60

In the Light with Charles K. Thompson, FAIA

by: Larry Paul Fuller

It’s a Monday morning at Archillume Lighting Design in Austin. Founder Charles Thompson, FAIA, is just now back from a four-day road trip on his 2009 Harley Davidson Ultra Classic. His time on the open road to Big Bend and back has helped to recharge his energy and clear his mind. So he’s ready for whatever awaits him.

Julie Pizzo
Page 67

Propaganda Hair Group

Dick Clark Architecture designed Propaganda Hair Group’s leased, 1,700-sf shell space within the Gables 5th Street Commons building in downtown Austin. The client requested a loft-like space with an open plan, minimal furnishings, and wood and concrete textures. The design focuses on ways to differentiate program areas within a single space, while offering an open atmosphere.

Paul Bardagjy
Page 75

Two Texas Design Firms among Four Waller Creek Competition Finalists

Two Texas design firms are among four design teams that have been chosen as finalists in an international competition to revitalize Austin’s downtown Waller Creek. More than 30 teams entered the competition late last year, and nine semifinalists were chosen in January.

Page 77

To Your Good Health

by: Larry Paul Fuller

In this edition about design for healthcare and wellness, we look at good buildings of both types. But the role of architects in public health goes far beyond their work on the hospitals, clinics, and fitness facilities routinely associated with these two categories. The broader purview includes their role in shaping more livable, sustainable, and healthy communities — the premise being that there is a direct correlation between the design of a community and the health of its people.

Photos by Michael Moran
Page 5

John S. Chase, FAIA (1925-2012)

by: Stephen Fox

John Saunders Chase died in Houston on March 29, 2012, at the age of 87. Chase was the first African American to enroll in and graduate from the architecture program at the University of Texas at Austin (March 1952), the first African American to be registered as an architect in Texas (1954), the first architect of his race in Texas to become a member of the American Institute of Architects (1954), and also the first architect of his race in Texas to be elected to Fellowship in the AIA (1990).

Archival photo courtesy Center for American History; Humanities Building © Gerald Moorhead, FAIA; Portrait by Robert Pandya, courtesy The Alcalde
Page 8

Registration Opens Mid July for Texas Architects Convention

by: TA Staff

Online registration opens mid July for the Texas Society of Architects Convention and Design Expo, October 18-20, in Austin. This year, the convention’s theme is “Influence.”

Page 13

2012 AIA Austin Design Awards

AIA Austin’s 2012 Design Awards competition resulted in recognition for 15 projects in three categories out of a total of 112 entries.

Page 16

Health Center, El Cantón, Honduras

by: TA Staff

A small health center for the agrarian village of El Cantón in Honduras is being constructed as the implementation of the winning entry in the “Building Health Challenge” design competition staged in January by Global Architecture Brigades among its university chapters nationwide.

Page 18

everyday

by: Larry Paul Fuller

Like the other two books highlighted here, everyday, by Leonard Volk, will be part of the featured activities (including book-signings by authors) in the AIA-Austin-hosted Reading Room at the Texas Society of Architects Convention and Design Expo in Austin October 18-20.

Page 20

Austin Historical Survey Wiki Seeks Participants

The City of Austin Historic Preservation Office has been working in partnership with the University of Texas at Austin (UT) School of Architecture Historic Preservation program to develop a participatory, wiki-inspired web application to support the comprehensive survey of Austin’s historic resources. The community launch took place June 4. The Heritage Society of Austin has partnered on this project by assisting in securing funding and providing volunteer support in adding
content to the Wiki.

Page 73

Remembering the Tejanos

by: Larry Paul Fuller

Back in the year 2000, McAllen physician Cayetano Barrera was visiting the Texas Capitol grounds when he noticed that none of their 18 monuments recognized the story of Texas’ early Spanish and Mexican explorers and settlers — an account that dates back to 1519 when Spaniards first arrived on the coast.“ In fact, the history of Texas was being told as if it all started with Anglos at the battle of the Alamo,” says Jaime Beaman, AIA, of Casa Bella Architects in Austin.

Rick Patrick Photography, Julie Pizzo
Page 76

For Goodness' Sake

by: Larry Paul Fuller

There is good architecture. And then there is good architecture … as in architecture for the public good. This year’s statewide design award winners — 13 projects from Dallas, Houston, San Antonio, and Austin — are a case in point. I was struck, during the awards jury process, by how intent the jurors were on recognizing certain entries, not only for their merit in terms of design (even design merit as broadly defined), but also for their capacity to fulfill client aspirations for the public good.

Page 7

73rd Annual Convention Features Revamped CE Lineup

by: Texas Architect Staff

The Texas Society of Architects Continuing Education Committee has spent the past year reviewing and selecting educational programs for the Society’s 73rd Convention in Austin, Oct. 18-20.

Dror Baldinger, AIA
Page 12

Notes on a Jury

by: Brian William Kuper, AIA

Our 2012 Design Awards jury met at the Texas Architects headquarters in Austin on June 7 and 8 to review the 227 entries submitted in this year’s program. As Chair of the 2012-2013 Design Committee, I enjoyed the privilege of being present during the deliberations of three distinguished and insightful jurors: Angie Brooks, AIA, of Brooks + Scarpa in LA; Eddie Jones, AIA, of Jones Studio in Phoenix; and James Timberlake, FAIA, of Kieran Timberlake in Philadelphia.

Page 28

McGarrah Jessee Building

by: Adapted from “Midcentury Update,” by Stephen Sharpe, Hon. AIA Texas Architect, March/April, 2011

McGarrah Jessee’s relocation to larger quarters in downtown Austin neatly coincided with the home-grown creative agency’s bursting out of its regional sphere of influence. Affectionately known as McJ, the company has steadily ratcheted up its staffing level as its roster of clients has expanded and its recognition has gone national. Now, after having outgrown its former offices in a converted warehouse, McJ has re-established its base of operations in the Starr Building, a modernist landmark completed in 1954 and designed by local firm Kuehne, Brooks and Barr for the offices of American National Bank. The project achieved widespread acclaim at the time for its distinctively crisp interiors by Florence Knoll and a monumental mural created in situ by Seymour Fogel.

Thomas McConnell
Page 46

I-35 Makeover

by: Canan Yetmen

Downtown Austin’s east-west streets are sliced in half by the northsouth artery of IH-35. To the west, downtown rises, its sparkling towers radiating progress. To the east, the city of days past lingers, its
neighborhoods of humble homes and local businesses resolute. The freeway, elevated at the heart of the city, creates a physical and spiritual divide that has plagued Austin for decades.

Mike Osborne; Jett Butler; Thomas McConnell
Page 50

Kimber Modern B&B

by: Aaron Seward

As urban infill lots go, the roughly 12,000-sf triangular site that is now home to the Kimber Modern Bed & Breakfast presented Baldridge Architects with more than its fair share of challenges. For one, the rather
small plot rose 25 feet in elevation from the curb to the back lot line, a precipitous pitch. Furthermore, neighboring establishments created conditions that most would find undesirable for a boutique design hotel.

Casey Dunn
Page 54

UT Austin Visual Arts Center

by: Thomas Hayne Upchurch, AIA

In the past there has been a sense of aloofness characterizing the Art Building on the UT Austin campus. Located on the northeast corner of San Jacinto and 23rd Street, across from Royal–Memorial Stadium, the two-story building has stood at a distance from the public. Although its main entry on the west side was connected to street level by a prominent exterior stair, the building’s solid volumes revealed little about its interior activities. Yet the south elevation of this mid-century modern building expressed a slight undulation in the soft orange brick veneer, rising to a cap of contrasting white concrete barrel vaults. These details created a bit of visual interest and a hint of greater possibilities within.

Frank Ooms
Page 58

Preservation Texas Announces 2012 Honor Awards

Preservation Texas recently announced its 2012 Honor Awards, which includes 10 awards and a special commendation recognizing the best of preservation in Texas. Individuals and projects in Austin, Dallas, Galveston, Houston, Marshall, San Antonio, and West Texas received awards.

Courtesy of Preservation Texas
Page 117

Texas Architects Convention Offers ARE Study Classes

The Texas Society of Architects and AIA Austin are offering three specialized study classes on the Architect Registration Examination (ARE) during the Texas Architects 73rd Annual Convention and Design Expo, Oct. 18-20, in Austin. The classes are “Tips and Tricks for using the NCARB Practice Software”; “Archibowl - Come on Down!”; and “NCARB and You: IDP, ARE, and Certification.”

Page 119

Catherine Gavin Appointed Editor of Texas Architect

Texas Architect has welcomed Catherine Gavin to Austin as editor of the magazine, effective with the January/February issue.

Holly Reed
Page 8

Texas Architects 2012 Honor Awards

During its 73rd Annual Convention in Austin, Texas Society of Architects recognized the following as this year’s Honor Awards recipients for significant contributions to the architectural profession and the quality of the built environment.

Page 14

Liz Lambert Receives 2012 Cornerstone Award

The Texas Society of Architects recently named Austin hotelier Liz Lambert as the recipient of its 2012 Cornerstone Award.

Page 16

Team Selected for Linear Park in Downtown Austin

As the culmination of an international competition to revitalize Austin’s downtown Waller Creek, a team led by Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates (MVVA) and Thomas Phifer and Partners has been selected to design a 1.5-mile-long linear park. The announcement was made October 18.

Waller Creek Conservancy
Page 71

Balcones House

by: Al York, AIA

The Austin firm Pollen Architecture and Design has created a home that ties itself tightly to a dramatic landscape of densely-packed small hills and steep valleys.

Patrick Wong; Whit Preston; Casey Dunn; Lars Frazer; Bill Salens
Page 26

Redeveloping Student Life

by: Lawrence Speck, FAIA, David Sharratt, and Samuel Wilson

Is it possible for architecture to transform, not just the physical character of a place, but also the behavior and patterns of life of people who live there? Can we think of redevelopment, not just in terms of changing buildings and spaces, but also in terms of altering interactions, attitudes, and lifestyles? Architects would tend to answer “yes” to both questions. And, fortunately, there is evidence to back them up.

Brian Mihealsick, Thomas McConnell, and Chris Cooper
Page 42

Architects Plan Advocacy Day at Capitol for Grass-Roots Lobbying of Legislators

by: TA Staff

On Jan. 25, the Texas Society of Architects/AIA will sponsor its first Advocates for Architecture Day at the State Capitol, an event that is expected to attract 200 architects for individual constituent-legislator conferences. With the event taking place during the first weeks of the biannual Texas Legislature, the agenda calls for the architects to meet with elected officials to advocate for their support of measures intended to enhance the built environment and maintain the integrity of the architectural profession.

Elizabeth Hackler
Page 11

Enfield Residence

by: Thomas Hayne Upchurch
Architect: Frank Welch & Associates

Being the architect on the house for his daughter, Liz Tirrell, and her family, was “like a surgeon operating on his own daughter,” says Frank Welch, FAIA. While he admits to being “very nervous” about the project, she recalls the experience as “fun” and one that offered fresh insights into her father’s extraordinary design skills.

Charles David Smith
Page 33

Traces of UTSOA’s First Century

by: Allison Gaskins

This past fall, the University of Texas at Austin’s School of Architecture celebrated its centennial with various symposia, lectures, and gatherings held under the banner of “UTSOA 100: Traces & Trajectories.”

J. Hal Box, Perkins + Will, RNL Design, Austin History Center/Austin Public Library
Page 84

Speck Awarded AIA Topaz Medallion

by: TA Staff

Lawrence Speck, FAIA, professor and former dean at the University of Texas at Austin School of Architecture and a principal of Page Southerland Page, has been awarded the American Institute of Architects’ 2011 Topaz Medallion for Excellence in Architecture Education.

Page 12

The Shape of Texas and Austin Firm Recognized with 2011 THC Awards

by: TA Staff

Each year the Texas Historical Commission recognizes individuals, organizations, and programs that have achieved success in efforts to preserve the state’s architectural heritage. Included in the 2011 THC program are awards for The Shape of Texas radio program and the Austin architecture firm Clayton & Little Architects.

Page 19

Water-Wise

by: Lawrence Connolly
Architect: Barnes Gromatzky Kosarek Architects

The lower Colorado River’s expansive watershed touches on the lives of more than one million residents of 56 counties in central Texas. Managing supplies of drinking water from the river and harnessing its powerful flow for hydroelectricity are part of the Lower Colorado River Authority’s multi-faceted mission. However, the public utility’s most visible role involves the controlled release of water through six dams along the river’s 600-mile run to the Gulf of Mexico.

Thomas McConnell, Greg Hursley
Page 34

Midcentury Update

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: McKinney York Architects

McGarrah Jessee’s relocation to larger quarters in downtown Austin neatly coincides with the home-grown creative agency’s bursting out of its regional sphere of influence. Affectionately known as McJ, the company has steadily ratcheted up its staffing level as its roster of clients has expanded and its recognition for innovative and hugely successful advertising and branding campaigns has gone national. In December, after having outgrown its former offices in a converted warehouse, McJ re-established its base of operations in a former bank building, a midcentury treasure that had fallen on hard times.

Thomas McConnell
Page 52

Catalyst for Enlivening Austin’s Center, ‘Great Streets’ Proceeds Block by Block

by: Stephen Sharpe

Over a decade i n development, the City of Austin’s capital improvements program called Great Streets is changing the character of its downtown by broadening sidewalks and adding amenities to enhance the pedestrian realm.

Mike Knox, Jorge Rousselin, City of Austin
Page 14

Sisters’ Retreat

by: Matt Fajkus
Architect: Mell Lawrence Architects

“Light, space and order—these are the things that humans need just as much as they need bread or a place to sleep.” Le Corbusier’s observation of these three essential elements comes to mind when visiting the Sisters Retreat pool house and pavilion by Mell Lawrence Architects. Though the project possesses the typical attributes one might associate with a small recreational program, the unique quality of the design is manifest both in the overall layout as well as in its materiality and detailing, all of which embrace light in nuanced ways.

Mell Lawrence, JH Jackson Photography
Page 34

Sweet Leaf Tea Headquarters

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: Wiese Hefty Design Build

Designed by San Antonio firm Wiese Hefty Design Build, the Austin headquarters of Sweet Leaf Tea highlights the company’s brand while also displaying its eclectic office culture. The architects used building information modeling (BIM) software to design the almost 8,000-sf space, which is an adaptive reuse of a 1918 building in the Penn Field office complex.

Philip Thomas
Page 69

After Closing Gavel of Regular Session, TSA Sees Benefits to Architects Statewide

by: Stephen Sharpe

When the 82nd Legislature convened in January, expectations were low for the state’s architectural profession. The biggest issue facing lawmakers was a historic budget shortfall, which meant that new taxes might be levied on professional services, including those performed by architects.

Elizabeth Hackler
Page 10

Hal Box, FAIA: Visionary Educator

by: Lawrence Speck

Hal Box, FAIA, had a greater impact on architectural education in Texas than any single individual in the state’s history. He was a visionary and a consummate doer. He imagined a much more prominent position for Texas architecture in a national and international context, and he worked tirelessly and skillfully to use architectural education as a means to reach that ambitious goal.

Box Family, Marsha Miller, UT Austin School of Architecture
Page 12

Livestrong HQ in COTE Top Ten

by: TA Staff

The American Institute of Architects’ Committee on the Environment has included Lake/Flato Architect’s Livestrong Foundation’s headquarters among its 2011 Top Ten Green Projects, a national program that celebrates sustainable design excellence. Livestrong, located in Austin, was this year’s sole Texas honoree.

Paul Hester
Page 14

AIA Austin Presents Design Awards

by: Tamara L. Toon

AIA Austin honored 10 projects in its 2011 Design Awards Celebration. From a total of 77 submittals, the distinguished jury of architects selected three for Honor Awards, six for Citations of Honor, and one unbuilt project for a Studio Award.

Page 18

Mopac Trailhead

The design initiative by Miró Rivera Architects proposes a series of activity zones for a segment along the Lady Bird Lake Hike and Bike Trail in Austin where the trail extends underneath heavily trafficked Mopac Expressway (Loop 1).

Page 23

Unwrapped

by: Wendy Price Todd
Architect: Clayton&Little Architects

Structures from every era of a city’s history are of immeasurable importance to the texture of a community and its sense of place. Intangible sentiments can link people to buildings through experience, memory, or imagination. Yet, many factors can lead to the decline and even the demolition of a historical structure.

Casey Dunn
Page 46

Arthouse at the Jones Center

by: J. Brantley Hightower
Architect: LTL Architects

While it is not unusual for a renovation project to transform an individual building, it is noteworthy when such a project begins to change how people relate to the city around them.

Michael Moran
Page 44

Sisters’ Retreat

by: Matt Fajkus
Architect: Mell Lawrence Architects

Located on a semi-urban 7.5-acre lot more than a few miles West of Austin, Sisters’ Retreat encompasses a shared pool house and play area for the families of two siblings, set amongst their small compound of homes. The site, surrounded by tall grass and within walking distance of Lake Austin, is reached by a short meander from the residences.

Hester+Hardaway Photographers, JH Jackson Photography
Page 84

Pitts Medal Goes to Cowan For Lifetime Achievement

by: Andrea Exter

Described as a “legend” by his peers, Tommy N. Cowan, FAIA, is a dedicated and lifelong leader. His interest in design and architecture began in the fifth grade when a teacher invited him to compete in Austin’s Wellesley Junior Art Show. Two of Cowan’s architectural drawings were submitted and both won top honors.

Page 14

AIA Brazos Honors Five Projects

by: Elizabeth Price, AIA

Five projects were recognized in July with AIA Brazos Design Awards from a total of 16 entries. Jurors were Michael Malone, AIA, of Michael Malone Architects in Dallas; Emily Little, FAIA, of Clayton & Little Architects in Austin; and Mark T. Wellen, AIA, of Rhotenberry Wellen Architects in Midland.

Page 29

Artful Infill

by: Jacqui Dodson, AIA

Driving along Austin’s 11th Street just east of downtown, the first things you’ll notice are the vivid colors – bright red, vibrant orange, and
intense yellow – on the exterior of the East Village Lofts.

Ryan Michael
Page 66

Arthouse at the Jones Center


Architect: Lewis Tsurumaki Lewis

Arthouse, the oldest statewide contemporary visual arts organization in Texas, is renovating and expanding its Jones Center space in downtown Austin.

Page 26

Campus Engagement

by: Justin Allen Howard
Architect: Prozign Architects; Sasaki Associates

Established in the heart of East Texas in 1917 and nestled among the region’s majestic pine forest, Stephen F. Austin University is quietly nurturing its student- focused campus life. The new Baker Patillo Student Center, completed in March 2007, has blossomed into a vibrant, 24-hour “town center” for the university and the town of Nacogdoches.

Richard Payne
Page 58

Preservation Texas: ‘Endangered’ Places

Each year since 2003 the nonprofit Preservation Texas presents its list of “Texas’ Most Endangered Places,” and this year’s roster of seven places, including the San Jacinto Battlefield Historic Site in Harris County. The organization’s objective is to call attention to significant places that its leadership deems imperiled by an uncertain future.

Gerald Moorhead
Page 21

Belo Center for New Media

Following a competition among 15 firms, a new 120,000-sf Belo Center for New Media is being designed by Lawrence Group Architects for the University of Texas at Austin. Serving as a northwest gateway to the campus, the building will expand facilities for the College of Communication.

Page 24

‘Lost’ in the Borderlands

by: Stephen Fox

Austin architect W. Eugene George’s classic work, Lost Architecture of the Río Grande Borderlands, has returned to print in a handsome new edition.

Page 27

Second Act

by: Lawrence Connolly
Architect: Boora Architects; CCS & H

The 3,000-seat Nancy Lee and Perry R. Bass Concert Hall is the flagship theater of the University of Texas at Austin’s performing arts complex. Originally opened in 1981, the hall boasted an unusually large stage and generous back-of-house areas that effectively accommodated large-scale opera and dance productions. However, following the adoption in 1999 of more stringent campus-wide fire and life safety standards, the university hired Boora Architects of Portland, Oregon, to study remedial options.

Park Street; Len Allington
Page 52

AIA Houston Awards 13 Projects

by: TA Staff

Thirteen projects were selected for 2010 AIA Houston Design Awards. The jury – Brian Johnsen of Johnsen Schmaling Architects in Milwaukee, Wis.; Juan Miró, AIA, of Miró Rivera Architects in Austin; and Amanda Kolson Hurley, executive editor of Washington, D.C.-based Architect magazine – met Feb. 26 at the Architecture Center Houston to review 132 entries from 59 local firms. Awards were presented March 25 at the Rice Hotel in Houston.

Page 19

‘Looking into the Distance’

The conceptual project by UT Austin architecture students Brian Bedrosian and William Huie received first-place recognition in the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture International Student Design Competition.

Page 25

DeWitt County Courthouse

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: TWC Architects

Located in Cuero’s downtown historic district, DeWitt County Courthouse (1896) is a Recorded Texas Historic Landmark, State Archeological Landmark, and is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. Having undergone a total interior “modernization” in 1953, the courthouse was restored in 2008 by TWC Architects of Austin as part of the Texas Historic Courthouse Preservation Program administered by the Texas Historical Commission.

Page 69

AIA Austin Awards 15 Projects

by: Rick Price

Fifteen projects were selected for the 2010 AIA Austin Design Awards in April. The jury was comprised of Merrill Elam, AIA, of Mack Scogin Merrill Elam Architects in Atlanta, Ga.; Marlon Blackwell, FAIA, of Marlon Blackwell Architect in Fayetteville, Ark.; and Michael Imber, FAIA, of Michael G. Imber Architects in San Antonio. The three jurors reviewed over 100 submittals at the AIA Austin Center for Architecture.

Page 16

Waller Creek Master Plan

“Tailor the District,” a concept for reinvigorating a downtrodden corner of downtown Austin, uses Waller Creek as the central seam around which patches of social fabric (i.e., places of local commerce, open space, and entertainment venues) are stitched together by a unified circulation network.

Page 20

Cotillion Pavilion

Designed by Mell Lawrence Architects of Austin, the Cotillion Pavilion replaces an existing shade structure at Cotillion Park in northeast Dallas. Scheduled for completion later this year, the project is part of the City of Dallas Park and Recreation Department’s long-range strategic plan to restore or replace aging picnic pavilions throughout the city.

Page 20

Hideaway in Plain Sight

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: David Heymann, Architect

Set on the crest of a prominent hill west of downtown Austin and oriented to command an unobstructed view of the skyline, the Hilltop House itself is visible from many points around the city.

David Heymann; Paul Bardagjy
Page 38

View from the Top

by: Mark Oberholzer, AIA
Architect: Ziegler Cooper Architects

Distant views of central Austin have a way of appearing suddenly as a result of Austin’s perch on the edge of the Hill Country. Until recently, downtown’s most visible landmark has been the icily geometric Frost Bank Tower, built in 2004 and reaching 515 feet high, offering a counterpoint to the occasional warm glow of the University of Texas Tower to the north of downtown and the Victorian dome of the Texas State Capitol.

McConnell Photography
Page 52

Paggi House

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: J Square Architecture

Sited on a bluff overlooking Austin’s downtown skyline and Lady Bird Lake, the Paggi House recently underwent renovations that restore the original 1840s structure while adding a contemporary twist. Re-imagined by J Square Architecture, the 5,523-sf restaurant, which once served as an inn and a family home, gained a new roof, outdoor bar/dining space, restroom, and office.

J Square Architecture; Rebecca Fondren Photography
Page 58

Revamped Arthouse to Open in Fall

by: Noelle Heinze

Austin’s Arthouse at the Jones Center is set to re-open Oct. 22 after a $6 million renovation and expansion. The 20,830-sf contemporary arts center makes its debut with an inaugural exhibit, More Art about Buildings and Food, by Jason Middlebrook.

Images Courtesy Arthouse
Page 16

Hutto City Hall Complex

Austin-based architecture and planning firm Antenora Architects recently completed the schematic design phase for a new Hutto City Hall, with an adjacent multi-purpose building and municipal park.

Page 25

The Lance Armstrong Foundation Headquarters

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: Lake/Flato Architects in collaboration with the Bommarito Group

Entering the Lance Armstrong Foundation (Livestrong) headquarters is an exercise in transition—from busy streetscape through serene garden to an open, sunlit interior. Transition also characterizes the conversion of the 1950s-era warehouse into the Livestrong offices, considering that a wide variety of the project’s materials were salvaged from the original structure.

Casey Dunn; Paul Hester
Page 44

Stone Creek Camp

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: Andersson-Wise Architects

“Beauty alone doesn’t hold your interest for very long. You want things to be a little… scary. But the kind of awe that derives from nature is extraordinarily tranquil.” So muses Arthur Andersson, AIA, in the recently published Natural Houses that features several projects designed by Andersson-Wise Architects, the Austin firm led by him and Chris Wise, AIA. Prominently showcased in the book is Stone Creek Camp, a backwoods hideaway built on a ridge overlooking Flathead Lake in rural northwestern Montana. The elegantly rusticated encampment comprises eight small buildings strategically arrayed across the steeply sloping site, each positioned to foster an individual and collective sense of refuge.

Art Gray
Page 68

East Windsor Residence

by: Ingrid Spencer
Architect: alterstudio architects

According to Kevin Alter, the 4,200-sf, three -story East Windsor Residence is essentially a one-bedroom loft because the top floor “has all the pleasures and attributes of a penthouse and then it expands down to give you all this other stuff.” The project was designed by Alter, along with alterstudio architects co-principal Ernesto Cragnolino, AIA, with a focus on the third level, which boasts 270-degree views and contains the master suite, kitchen, and main living area. But the “other stuff” found on the remaining two levels completes this finely crafted house in dynamic and dramatic ways.

Paul Finkel; Jonathan Jackson
Page 76

Barton Place

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: BOKA Powell Architects

Designed by BOKA Powell Architects, Barton Place is a six-story, multi-building condominium complex located south of downtown Austin. Six buildings and an elevated plaza landscaped with native plants rest above a twolevel underground parking garage.

Patrick Wong
Page 85

Worst-Case Scenario

by: Stephen Sharpe

In contrast to the photographs that illustrate the mixed-use projects profiled in this edition’s feature section, the University Park development in Austin is not a pretty picture. The owner’s ambitious plans for a high-density urban village on 23 acres along I-35 just north of downtown have fizzled, leaving a half-empty office building to stand alone amid an otherwise abandoned construction site. Tenants are angry, neighbors are frustrated, and everyone else is wondering how things went so wrong.

Roma Austin
Page 5

Cedar Park Recreation Center

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: PBS&J

The City of Cedar Park commissioned PBS&J of Austin to provide architectural and engineering services for the development of a 50,000-sf community and recreation center located in the city’s evolving downtown district.

Roy Mata
Page 61

Worst-Case Scenario

by: Stephen Sharpe

For the past four years, the members of AIA Austin have volunteered their time to teach elementary school students in their area about architecture. Their most recent efforts culminated in November with displays at UT Austin of models the kids devised to illustrate the lessons they have learned. This year’s program reached more than 315 students from third, fourth, and fifth grades.

John Cameron, Assoc. AIA
Page 5

Texas State University Master Plan

Developed by Broaddus & Associates of Austin with Baltimore-based Ayers/Saint/Gross as consultants, the master plan for Texas State University in San Marcos was launched in 2004 to address a projected student enrollment increase of 30,000 and a need for additional academic facilities for 2015 and beyond.

Page 26

The Blanton That Could Have Been

by: J. Brantley Hightower

While studying at UT Austin in the spring of 1998, my classmates and I had the opportunity to attend a series of public lectures given by the seven short-listed architects for the Jack S. Blanton Museum of Art. The list was impressive and when Herzog & de Meuron was ultimately chosen we were thrilled by the prospect of what the Swiss firm would design. The insertion of a thoughtful work within the Spanish Mediterranean-style campus was certainly something to be eagerly anticipated.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA ; Illustration by Richard Carman, courtesy Herzog & de Meuron and UT Austin
Page 27

Mexican Modern In East Austin

by: Mario L. Sanchez, PhD
Architect: Cotera+Reed Architects

Founded in 1987, Southwest Key Programs, a national non-profit group based in Austin, manages a variety of social programs to benefit disadvantaged youth and their families. Intending for its new headquarters to act as a tool for neighborhood revitalization, the organization selected a site in a traditionally under-served area of the city to locate the Southwest Key East Austin Community Development Project.

Mike Osborne
Page 52

Educating the Educators

by: James Kirkpatrick AIA

Who knew that homework was still being assigned so many years after completing school? In preparation to sit on the jury for the 2008 TASA/TASB Exhibit of School Architecture, I spent about 30 hours studying the 96 entries prior to the meeting in Austin. I combed through all of them at least four times, all the while keeping in mind the criteria—design, educational appropriateness, innovation, process of planning, sustainability, and value

Page 68

Outlook for a Downturn

by: Stephen Sharpe

Just how troublesome are current economic conditions in Texas? To gain insight, Texas Architect invited six architects to join a roundtable discussion where they were asked to assess their local markets and offer near-term forecasts. The roundtable discussion took place in Austin on Jan. 19.

Julie Pizzo; original photography by istock and shutterstock
Page 30

Artistic Makeover

by: Lawrence Connolly
Architect: Nelsen Partners in association with Zeidler Partnership

n its metamorphosis from the “turtle shell”-domed Lester E. Palmer Auditorium, the Joe R. and Teresa Lozano Long Center for the Performing Arts had several false starts over the course of two decades. The project’s protracted gestation has ultimately yielded a more stripped-down facility than that suggested during its early stages, however, the new structure respectfully acknowledges its iconic forebear while doing more with less.

Dan Gruber; Thomas McConnell; G. Russ Images
Page 40

AT&T Conference Center

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: HKS Architects (architect of record) and Lake|Flato Architects (design architect)

The AT &T Executive Education and Conference Center opened in 2008 on the University of Texas campus in Austin. Designed by Lake/Flato Architects, in collaboration with HKS, the conference center “…adheres to goals of the campus master plan by borrowing very specifically from the materials of the campus as well as the massing and the fenestration of the original 40 acres,” said principal design architect David Lake, FAIA .

Blake Martin, HKS
Page 70

TSA Design Awards Jury Selected

by: TA Staff

Three highly respected designers will judge the entries in the 2009 TSA Design Awards program. The jurors will be Philip Freelon, FAIA, president of the Freelon Group in Raleigh-Durham, N.C.; Mary Margaret Jones, FASLA, president of San Francisco-based landscape architecture firm Hargreaves Associates; and Rick Joy, AIA, of Rick Joy Architects in Tucson. The jury is set to meet May 15 in Austin.

Page 17

The Art of Deference

by: Mark Oberholzer, AIA
Architect: Kallman, McKinnell & Wood Architects in association with Booziotis & Company Architects

A glimpse through the front doors of the Blanton Museum of Art reveals a soft blue light—it’s the new piece, Stacked Waters, a cast acrylic site-specific installation by artist Teresita Fernández. Wrapping around the walls of the atrium, Stacked Waters suffuses the space with unexpected and atmospheric light against the backdrop of the main stair hall. The effect illustrates how the Blanton is, in many ways, a deferential building— a backdrop not just to art on the inside but to the campus on the outside as well.

Emory Photography; Scott Melcer
Page 56

The Park on Barton Creek

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: Merriman Associates/Architects

The Park on Barton Creek combines corporate office functionality with the natural setting of the South Austin greenbelt. Designed by Merriman Associates/Architects, the project features two five-story, 100,000-squarefoot buildings set along the western edge of the site to minimize impact to the heavily wooded Barton Creek.

Squire Haskins Photography
Page 62

AIA Austin Awards 15 Projects

by: Rick Price

On April 18, AIA Austin recognized 15 projects at its 2009 Design Awards Gala held at the historic Browning Hangar on the redeveloped grounds of former Mueller Municipal Airport. Of the 115 submitted projects, 14 received Design Awards and one received a Studio Award.

Page 17

Archives of the Episcopal Church

The Archives of the Episcopal Church, designed by Studio 8 Architects of Austin, is a five-story, 70,000-sf building that will be the new home for the church’s national archives, which are currently housed in a late-1950s campus as part of the Southwest Episcopal Seminary

Page 21

Austin’s Upscale Downtown

by: Stephen Sharpe

On June 25 construction on the Austonian residential tower reached the height of 51 floors, making it the tallest building in Austin. The project, designed by Ziegler Cooper Architects, will ultimately top out later this year at 56 floors (683 feet with glass crown) above Congress Avenue.

Images courtesy Ziegler Cooper Architects
Page 32

Canyon Village

by: Lawrence Connolly
Architect: Alejandro Aravena; Cotera+Reed Architects

For St. Edward’s Universit y to achieve a desired national prominence as an institution of higher learning, President George E. Martin set out in 2001 to double the student enrollment to 4,000 by 2010. Martin knew that would require significant capital improvements, so he commissioned Philadelphia’s H2L2 to masterplan the 498-acre hilltop campus.

Cristobal Palma Photography; Andy Mattern,
Artimbo.com
Page 54

Design Awards 2009

The 2009 TSA Design Awards jury met in Austin on May 15 to view 261 submittals of built work. The jurors were Mary Margaret Jones, FASLA, of Hargreaves Associates (San Francisco, Cambridge, and New York); Rick Joy, AIA, of Rick Joy Architects (Tucson); and Philip Freelon, FAIA, of the Freelon Group (Durham, N.C.)

Illustrations by Bryce Weigand
Page 39

Eclectic Ensemble

by: Lawrence Connolly
Architect: Dick Clark Architecture with Michael Hsu Design Office

When Antoine Predock, FAIA, was in midst of conceiving the new Austin City Hall, he commented that the city was “terminally democratic.” He made the remark after his design survived a protracted review process that included more than a dozen town meetings and hearings before the City Council. A similar sort of public scrutiny – albeit on a smaller, neighborhood scale – resulted when Dick Clark Architecture added a zoning non-compliant residential building to its 1400 South Congress mixed-use project.

Paul Bardagjy; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 40

Enlightened Living

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: MJ Neal Architects

Wolfe Den, by MJ Neal, AIA, represents the Austin architect’s fifth TSA Design Award. The 2,300-sf residence, designed for a young professional couple, is a study in layers, light, and logic, and stands out in subtle contrast to Neal’s previous award-winning work, which includes Twin Peaks (2003), Ramp House (2004), Anthony Nak (2005), and Farley Studio (2007). “This is a much more subtle work than Ramp House and Twin Peaks. The division of space is central to this project,” says Neal, when asked to define the difference between this home and the three others (Twin Peaks comprises two side-by-side dwellings) on the same south Austin street. Sited in an eclectic neighborhood populated by mostly 1930s-era homes interspersed with hip makeovers, Wolfe Den is bordered on the east by a one-story bungalow and on the west by the strikingly modernist Ramp House. Further down the block are Twin Peaks.

Viviane Vives
Page 84

Ella Wooten Park Pool House

by: Susan Butler
Architect: Studio 8 Architects

The Ella Wooten Park Pool House, designed by Studio 8 Architects, is located within the redevelopment of Austin’s former Mueller Airport. The park serves as a public gathering place that embodies the city in both its locally derived design and emphasis on green technology.

Andy Mattern
Page 89

Feds Break Ground in Austin

The U.S. General Services Administration broke ground Sept. 2 on a long-awaited federal courthouse in downtown Austin, an event made possible by the federal lawmakers authorized $116 million for the project when Congress passed the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act earlier this year.

Image Courtesy General Services Administration
Page 16

Natural Adaptation

by: Mark Oberholzer, AIA
Architect: GS&C

When Graeber Simmons & Cowan began the design of Advanced Micro Device’s (AMD) new campus in southwest Austin, it was with an appreciation of the environmentally sensitive nature of the site, consisting of 59 acres with varying topography and ecology. GS&C has set a new standard for the region’s corporate campuses in his attempt not just to satisfy environmental criteria but to incorporate them for the benefit of AMD’s culture and the buildings’ users.

Greg Hursley; Patrick Wong; Benedict Kim
Page 62

Efficient Infill

by: Carl Gromatzky, AIA
Architect: Jacobs

The University of Texas at Austin has a rich history of campus planning. Previous plans, especially those by Cass Gilbert and Paul Cret in the early twentieth century, contributed immeasurably to the overall quality of the campus environment. Buildings erected during that era both defined and responded to outdoor spaces, the two components coalescing to create the public realm of the UT campus.

Paul Bardagjy
Page 68

Efficient Infill

by: Carl Gromatzky, AIA
Architect: McKinney York Architects

The University of Texas at Austin has a rich history of campus planning. Previous plans, especially those by Cass Gilbert and Paul Cret in the early twentieth century, contributed immeasurably to the overall quality of the campus environment. Buildings erected during that era both defined and responded to outdoor spaces, the two components coalescing to create the public realm of the UT campus.

McConnell Photography
Page 68

Citibank Offices

by: Susan Butler
Architect: Marmon Mok

The 17,500-sf Citibank, built on an in-fill site at 5th and Rio Grande streets in downtown Austin, includes a street-level retail banking lobby, four drive-through lanes, and two upper floors for offices of commercial banking. Marmon Mok designed the $5 million project.

Dror Baldinger, AIA; Lawrence Lander
Page 74

AIA Fort Worth Awards 5 Projects

by: Ivonne Levin, AIA

The local chapter of the AIA recognized four projects in the General Design category and one project in the Mayor’s Award category in ceremonies that took place at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth. The members of the 2007 jury were Julie Eizenberg, AIA, of Koning Eizenberg Architecture in Los Angeles; Errol Barron, FAIA, of Errol Barron/Michael Toups in New Orleans; and Kevin Alter, Assoc. AIA, of Alterstudio Architects in Austin.

Page 18

Creole Influence Along the Border

by: Stephen Fox

The Lower Río Grande Valley chapter of the American Institute of Architects kicked off its fifteenth annual conference on Sept. 27 with a day-long tour of nineteenth-century architecture in the border cities of Brownsville and Matamoros, Tamaulipas. Called “A Tale of Two Cities,” the tour was led by Gregory Free, principal of an Austin design firm specializing in historical restoration.

Courtesy Wayne Bell, FAIA
Page 27

Quiet Standout

by: J. Brantley Hightower
Architect: Perkins+Will

The study of campus architecture in Texas is truly a lesson in cultural diversity. Just by sampling schools in the University of Texas System, one would observe everything from a Beaux-Arts rendering of Spanish Mediterranean motifs on the Austin campus to a playful reinterpretation of Bhutanese monasteries in El Paso.

James Steinkamp
Page 44

All Aboard!

by: Stephen Sharpe

Commuter rail is returning to Austin, bringing with it several transit oriented developments (TOD) that will drive the creation of new live/work/play neighborhoods centered around at least eight train stations. Perhaps as early as this fall, Austin will join Dallas and Houston in reviving urban rail travel as a means to reduce traffic congestion and as a catalyst for thoughtful intracity planning. That means more people in and around Austin will have the option of leaving their cars at home.

map courtesy City of Austin Neighborhood Planning & Zoning Department; rendering courtesy MWM Design Group
Page 5

AIA Honors Austin Firm’s Work

Anthony Nak Flagship Store, a high-end jewelry boutique designed by MJ Neal Architects of Austin, has been recognized with a 2008 AIA Honor Award for Interior Architecture. Located in downtown Austin, Anthony Nak represents the only project with a Texas connection among this year’s slate of winners.

Page 11

CNU Set to Convene in Booming Austin To See Changes, Honor Local Urbanist

by: Stephen Sharpe

When hundreds of architects and urban planners convene here in March for the Congress of the New Urbanism’s CNU XVI, one of their main topics of conversation will be: Can Austin be a truly great city?

Page 11

Pfluger Bridge Extension

The project will extend the James D. Pfluger Bicycle and Pedestrian Bridge northward to connect the Lady Bird Lake hike-and-bike trail to the Lamar Corridor and downtown. The bridge, completed in 2001, is named in the memory of James D. Pfluger, FAIA, who helped push the City of Austin’s development of the popular lakeside trail system.

Page 20

Urban Aerie on 2nd Street

by: Wendy Price Todd
Architect: Page Southerland Page

Casey Dunn
Page 38

Mixing It Up in SoCo

by: Lawrence Connolly
Architect: Dick Clark Architecture and Michael Hsu Design Office

Anyone who has visited Austin’s eclectic strip of retail and restaurants along South Congress knows the SoCo entertainment district to be a vortex of bohemian conviviality. The city’s head-long rush to grow and densify is readily apparent along the wide avenue that stretches below downtown. SoCo encompasses a few commercial blocks comprised of small buildings, none more than three stories tall. Residential neighborhoods back up to the businesses, and the homeowners are notorious for opposing the slightest change in the street frontage.

Paul Bardagjy
Page 50

Austin’s Emerging Projects

Austin's Emerging Projects

Page 76

Jury Selected for 2008 Design Awards

The jury for the 2008 TSA Design Awards will be arts writer Judith Dupré and architects Steven Ehrlich, FAIA, and Billie Tsien, AIA. The three are scheduled to meet June 27 in Austin to review entries and make their selections. The deadline for entries is May 30.

Page 22

A World of Small Wonders

by: Thomas Hayne Upchurch
Architect: Karlsberger

Healthcare architecture has made significant strides over the past 20 years to provide environments that are more sensitive to the needs of patients, families, physicians, and staff. There is a greater understanding that wellness and healing are supported not only by advances in medicine and technologies in diagnostics and treatment, but also by the quality of the building’s environment. Designed for the Seton Healthcare Network by Karlsberger of Columbus, Ohio, the Dell Children’s Medical Center of Central Texas in Austin builds on these improvements to the healthcare environment and takes its design to an even higher level while also achieving ambitious goals for environmental stewardship.

John Durant; Thomas McConnell
Page 34

Nature’s Sway

by: Murray Legge, AIA

Built on the banks of Lake Bastrop this interfaith chapel forms a contemplative moment within the pine forest just east of Austin. Commissioned by the Boy Scouts of America Capitol Area Council, the open-air structure hosts all manner of religious gatherings. The gate-like structure, oriented east to west, frames a view across the lake of the setting sun.

images by Murray Legge, AIA
Page 80

Buy Local

by: Stephen Sharpe

A recent article in the real estate section of the Austin American-Statesman called attention to a growing demand among homebuyers for “Texas contemporary.” The interest is such that even production homebuilders are beginning to introduce spec models patterned after the regional vernacular of the Hill Country.

Photo by Steven Vaughan; courtesy the Michael Malone Studio at WKMC Architects
Page 5

Museum Hopes Third Time a Charm For New Home in Downtown Austin

by: Wendy Price Todd

The Austin Museum of Art’s announcement in February of a joint venture with Hines of Houston marks the third time since the 1980s that hopes have been raised for a new downtown AMOA home.

Page 14

AIA Austin Awards Seven Projects

by: Brian Carlson

AIA Austin honored seven projects during the chapter’s 2008 Awards and Honors Gala held on April 19 at the Mexican American Cultural Center. The projects were selected from a pool of 65 entries submitted by local firms.

Page 18

A Little Room

The Los Angeles team of Amy Wynne and Mark Leveno received the Grand Prize (including $1,000) in the Temporary Outdoor Gallery Space Temporary Outdoor Gallery Space (TOGS) Ideas Competition sponsored by Art Alliance Austin and AIA Austin.

Page 22

Historical Fusion

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: Curry Boudreaux Architects

To drive the backroads of rural Texas is to travel through history. Just below the surface of many small towns, a palpable immigrant heritage dwells. The signs are sometimes obvious, the annual festivals celebrating a community’s cultural origins and the museums dedicated to preserving the locals’ ethnic roots. Also, the old churches, many built by the hands of those who settled the area, often serve as tangible reminders of the unique narrative of a peoples’ journey from faraway native lands in their quest for a new, more tolerant home.

G. Lyon Photography, Inc.
Page 36

Cultural Monument

by: Edward Burian
Architect: CasaBella Architects + Del Campo & Maru

The recently completed first phase of the Mexican American Cultural Center (MACC) for the Cultural Affairs Division of the City of Austin’s Parks and Recreation Department is dedicated to the creation, preservation, presentation, and promotion of Mexican-American cultural arts and heritage. Envisioned as a resource both for the local community and visitors through education and community participation, the center focuses on fostering an understanding and appreciation of Hispanic culture, as well as ambitiously featuring indigenous cultures of Americas. The programs and educational curriculum at the MACC includes the visual arts, theater, dance, literature, music, multi-media, and the culinary arts.

Paul Bardagjy
Page 52

6th & Brushy

by: Megan Braley
Architect: Lawrence Group Architects

The new 30,374-square-foot mixed-use building, named 6th & Brushy, is part of the first generation of live-work properties to be built in east Austin. The project is located at the corner of 6th and Brushy streets, two blocks east of Interstate 35.

McConnell Photo
Page 71

House Proud

by: Heather McKinney, FAIA

Lisa Germany’s latest book, Great Houses of Texas, was published this year by Harry N. Abrams Publishing Company illustrated with photographs by Grant Mudford. The author recently answered questions posed by Austin architect Heather McKinney, FAIA.

Page 31

Lessons from Rome

by: Taeg Nishimoto

“Lessons from Rome” explores the enduring impact of the ancient metropolis on Robert Venturi, Tod Williams, Thomas Phifer, and Paul Lewis. The four architects are Fellows of the American Academy in Rome (AAR) whose experiences there continue to inform their design work. Curated and produced by Smilja Milovanovic-Bertram, an assistant professor at the UT Austin School of Architecture, the exhibition juxtaposes photographs of Rome with images of the architects’ subsequent work. The exhibition, funded through grants from the Graham Foundation for Advanced Visual Studies and UT Austin, opens on Oct. 20 at Texas A&M University’s College of Architecture.

Pantheon photo by Smilja Milovanovic-Bertram; Cranbrook School Natatorium photo by Michael
Page 35

2008 Design Awards Jury

Last February TSA’s Design Awards Committee, with representatives from almost all of the 17 AIA chapters across Texas, gathered in Austin to elect a jury for this year’s program. Texas has been privileged to host a variety of astounding critics throughout the Design Award’s 57-year history. This year was no exception. Billie Tsien, AIA; Steven Ehrlich, FAIA; and Judith Dupré accepted the challenge of reviewing 267 Design Award entries and 87 Studio Award entries. The ensuing deliberations showcased each juror’s individual perspective and approach to their work.

Page 41

AMLI II

by: Wendy Price Todd
Architect: PageSoutherlandPage

Located in downtown Austin ’s fledgling 2nd Street District, the new 18-story AMLI II integrates 35,000 square feet of ground-level retail space, four and one-half levels of above-ground parking, an activity deck on the fifth level above the garage, and 231 rental apartments on 17 floors.

Casey Dunn
Page 42

Concrete Studio

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: Mell Lawrence Architects

Mell Lawrence, FAIA
Page 46

Karbach Residence

by: Lawrence Connolly
Architect: Tim Cuppett, AIA

Located just two blocks from the State Capitol, the three-story 20 x 150-foot sliver at 811 Congress represents one of the few remaining historic buildings in downtown Austin. The structure, originally built in 1874 and used over the years to house a series of retail establishments, had been ravaged by fire and abandoned when Dennis Karbach bought the property to turn it into a residence. He hired Tim Cuppett, AIA, to help him realize the potential for the 9,000-sq. ft. shell hidden beneath an outmoded 1950s-era perforated-metal brise soleil.

Paul Bardagjy; Woody Welch; Tim Cuppett
Page 70

Lake Austin Residence

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: Lake|Flato Architects

Designed as a “village by a canal ,” this waterside residence integrates a series of small-scale, gable-roofed buildings with a narrow site along an inlet of Lake Austin. The architects of Lake/Flato once again have exhibited their adroit touch with materials and adeptness for capturing abundant outdoor views. Clustered like a rustic encampment, the individual buildings are designed to seamlessly blend their interiors with the exterior environment.

Patrick Y. Wong; Paul Hester
Page 74

Residence 1414 Renovation

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: Miró Rivera Architects

As one of two Miró Rivera projects selected for Design Awards this year, the renovation of this 1940s house required a fine balance between modern updates and traditional aspects of the original design.

Paul Finkel – piston design
Page 86

Seton Medical Center

by: Emma Janzen
Architect: PageSoutherlandPage

Seton Medical Center, the largest medical and surgical acute care center in Austin, was in desperate need of a facelift. In 2005, Seton commissioned PageSoutherlandPage to expand and renovate its 1970s-era brick building. The scope of the expansion included 110,000 square feet of new facilities, including a day surgery center, a chapel with adjacent garden, a main entranceway, and a “front door image” for the hospital. When the work was completed, both the physical identity of the building and its capacity were improved.

Tim Griffith Photographer
Page 90

Trail Restroom

by: Dror Baldinger
Architect: Miró Rivera Architects

An assemblage of 49 Corten steel plates arrayed in a coil-like shape, Miró Rivera Architects’ Trail Restroom is a captivating work of brutal simplicity.

Paul Finkel –piston design; Paul Bardagjy Photography; Kraig Becker
Page 94

U.S. Courthouse

by: Mark T. Wellen
Architect: PageSoutherlandPage

The U.S. Courthouse in Alpine was universally admired by this year’s Design Awards jury for its simplicity of form and masterful response to the setting. The courthouse was a product of the U.S. General Service Administration’s Design Excellence Program with PageSoutherlandPage’s Austin office as the architect selected for the project.

Chris Cooper Photography
Page 98

Biomedical Learning Center

by: TA Staff
Architect: SHW Group

The SHW Group, an Austin-based architectural and planning firm best known for its educational building design, developed the University of Texas at Brownsville’s Biomedical Research Laboratories and Community Sciences Building.

Mark Trew Photography
Page 102

The Shore

by: Emma Janzen
Architect: WDG Architecture Dallas

Located adjacent to Lady Bird Lake in Austin’s developing 27-acre Waterfront District, The Shore is a 22-story residential complex combining the luxury of lakeside living with the convenience of downtown accessibility. Designed for High Street Residential, a subsidiary of Dallas-based Trammell Crow Company, the complex sits within walking distance of the public hike and bike trail, Sixth Street’s nightlife, and the central business district.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA
Page 111

Interstate 35 Makeover

Ever since 1962, when construction was completed on Interstate 35 through downtown Austin, the elevated highway effectively bisected the city between a prosperous west and a neglected east. Commissioned by the Downtown Austin Alliance to devise a solution to that perceived division, local firm Cotera + Reed Architects has imagined a permanent installation for a two-block section between Sixth and Eighth streets.

Page 20

Central Texas by the Book

The complex development issues affecting Austin and the surrounding region are best understood when viewed as interwoven layers of culture and history suffused with equal amounts of enlightened leadership, misguided policies, good fortune, and poor planning.

Page 28

Ronald Goes Platinum

by: Laurie Zapalac
Architect: Eckols & Associates AIA

It is hard for most of us to imagine the range of emotions and needs that a family experiences when a child is sick enough to require hospitalization. The staff and designers of the new Ronald McDonald House in Austin have clearly given this a lot of thought. The project offers a welcome refuge for parents and loved ones who keep vigil as their child undergoes treatment nearby at the Dell Children’s Medical Center. The latest of a national network built by Ronald McDonald House Charities, the Austin facility also merges purposeful design with sustainability. The architects’ success in creating an energy-efficient building has been recognized with the highest rating by the U.S. Green Building Council, making the Ronald McDonald House in Austin one of only three buildings in Texas to achieve LEED Platinum.

Wade Griffith
Page 46

Green All Over

by: Jonathan P. Rollins, AIA
Architect: HDR Architecture, Inc.

McKinney Green was the first LEED Platinum pre-certified shell and core project in Texas, to date one of only three in the state to achieve the highest rating from the U.S. Green Building Council. Sustainability was established as a priority at the outset of the project by developer West World Holding Inc., a division of a Netherlands-based company. Advocating an integrated process, their intent was to build on knowledge gained from this project in future U.S. projects. After HDR was selected as the architect, Austin Commercial Construction was engaged early in the process for its experience in managing information as well as its record of completed projects.

Mark Trew Photography
Page 58

Mueller Central

by: Emma Janzen
Architect: Studio 8 Architects

When the Robert Mueller Municipal Airport shut down in 1999, the Austin City Council chose Catellus Development Group to transform the 711-acre site into a mixed-use “urban village.” As part of the development, local architectural firm Studio 8 was commissioned to design the first component—the renovation of an existing building that housed a private air terminal and an administrative office building.

McConnell Photography
Page 63

Austin Firm Garners International Award

Miró Rivera Architects’ Pedestrian Bridge was among three projects receiving top tier recognition in the 2006 The Architectural Review Awards for Emerging Architecture. Considered the best international award for young architects, the annual program celebrates the work of designers under the age of 45 who are at the start of their independent careers.

photo by Paul Finkel
Page 14

Tight Site

by: Susan Williamson
Architect: Susman Tisdale Gayle

The new middle school building at St. Andrew’s Episcopal School in Austin represents one more step in a journey begun more than 15 years ago when school officials first collaborated with Austin architects Susman Tisdale Gayle. Over the years, STG has worked with the school to create a gracious campus composed of buildings set among large oaks and centered around what STG principal Jim Susman, AIA, calls “the community green”—the school’s athletic field.

Casey Dunn; Jeffrey Ervin
Page 34

Austin’s Search for Civic Substance

by: Dean Almy

IF all goes according to plan, on the morning of Feb. 25 the five-story structural frame that was once part of a planned $124-million office building for the Intel Corporation will be imploded to make way for a new federal courthouse. The skeletal remains of the unfinished project, abandoned by Intel in 2001 after a downturn in the technology sector, loomed for six years over the southwestern quadrant of downtown.

illustration by dean almy; opposite PAGE, ILLUSTRATION BY BLACK + VERNOOY ARCHITECTS AND URBAN PLANNERS
Page 22

Ullrich Water Treatment Plant Expansion

by: Courtnay Loch
Architect: CasaBella Architects

In constructing the $72 million Ullrich Water Treatment Plant expansion, the design team faced the challenge of addressing the community’s concerns while still adhering to the programmatic requirements.

Mike Osborne
Page 50

Dell Children’s Hospital in Austin Seeks First LEED Platinum Health-Care Rating

by: Jeanette Wiemers

On June 27, the Dell Children’s Medical Center of Central Texas will open its doors as the first hospital in the world expected to achieve platinum LEED certification from the U.S Green Building Council. Located on approximately 32 acres of the site formerly occupied by Austin’s Robert Mueller Municipal Airport, the four-story pediatric facility will replace the downtown Children’s Hospital of Austin with a complex three times its size.

renderings courtesy karl sberger architecture
Page 17

Jury Selected for TSA Design Awards

The jury for the 2007 TSA Design Awards has been confirmed, with jurors scheduled to meet June 22–23 to review entries. The jury’s selections will be published in the September/October 2007 edition of Texas Architect. The awarded projects’ architects and owners will be honored during ceremonies at the TSA annual convention set Oct. 18-20 in Austin.

Page 21

The Austonian

Breaking ground later this year, Ziegler Cooper Architects’ 55-story highrise of luxury condominiums will tower 680 feet above Congress Avenue in downtown Austin. The $200 million project, scheduled to be completed in 2009, is expected to be the city’s tallest building.

Page 23

Roadside Attraction

by: Michael Rey, AIA
Architect: John Grable Architects

In the early 1940s, the strip of asphalt known then as Austin Road served as a lively portal to the city that many San Antonians fondly recall for its many amusements. Lined on both sides by diners, motor courts, and nightclubs, Austin Road was a place where families enjoyed chocolate malts on a hot summer day and young couples danced the night away. Now called Austin Highway, visitors and locals alike headed there back then to lose themselves in the simple pleasures that San Antonio is still known for today.

Chris Cooper
Page 50

AIA Austin Awards 17 Projects

by: Brian Carlson

AIA Austin honored 17 projects during the chapter’s 2007 Awards and Honors Gala held on May 12 at the Texas Memorial Museum on the University of Texas campus. The projects were selected from a pool of 65 entries submitted by local firms

Page 15

Instant Community

by: Carl Gromatzky, AIA
Architect: JPRA Architects

The growing trend toward mixed-use developments in the United States is a welcome change from developments of the recent past where zoning more or less dictated single-use districts and led to an overall homogenization of our urban environment. And while they have much to offer, these new mixed-use developments have challenges to overcome if they are to thrive. It is clear that for them to function as relatively self-sufficient, sustainable communities, lessons must be incorporated from urban neighborhoods that have grown up over decades or, in some cases, centuries.

Paul Bardagjy; R. Greg Hursley
Page 34

Art at the Domain

by: Jeanette Wiemers

Art is important to Austinites, says Lauren Harris, director of mall marketing at the Domain, so the project’s developer installed 22 works by local artists to enhance the uniqueness of the setting

Photo by R. Greg Hursley
Page 37

Stonewedge

by: Lawrence Connolly
Architect: Tim Cuppett, AIA

A prestigious Congress Avenue address and the excitement of living in the middle of downtown Austin wasn’t enough for Dennis Karbach. He also wanted suburban amenities in his five-bedroom townhouse, including a three-car garage, an outdoor swimming pool, and a yard. His architect was unfazed, despite the daunting challenge of meeting those needs in an old 20 x 150-foot, cave-like building.

Paul Bardagjy; Woody Welch; Tim Cuppett
Page 38

TSA Announces 2007 Honor Awards

by: TA Staff

The Texas Society of Architects has announced its annual Honor Awards to recognize significant contributions to the architectural profession and the quality of the built environment. The Honor Awards will be presented during the TSA annual convention to be held Oct. 18-20 in Austin.

Page 13

UT Austin Enters Third Solar Decathlon

by: Michael Garrison

Students at the University of Texas at Austin have a unique opportunity to design, fabricate and test the possibilities of combining renewable energy and contemporary dwelling design through their participation in the Solar Decathlon house competition. The program began in 2000, and UT students have participated in each of the three events that have taken place since then.

Photos courtesy UT Austin School of Architecture
Page 19

TSA Convention Preview: Exhibitors

The Texas Society of Architects is pleased to announce the list of companies participating in the 2007 Expo in Austin (current as of August 1). Expo dates are October 18-19 at the Austin Convention Center. Make plans now to visit their booths, pick up new product information, ask a question, or just see a friend. Keep and use this handy guide as a reference tool. With over 200 companies listed, you will find products to fulfill your architectural needs.

Page 98

NYC’s Stern to Design Bush Library

While its exact site on the SMU campus remains undeclared, the architect of the future Bush Library is known—Robert A.M. Stern Architects of New York City. The architect selection was made public in late August. Stern’s office beat out two Texas firms that also had been short-listed, Lawrence W. Speck Studio of Page Southerland Page in Austin and Overland Partners of San Antonio.

Page 14

Seaholm Mixed-Use Development

Redevelopment of the decommissioned Seaholm Power Plant (built 1950-1958) in Austin will transform the 7.8-acre site with a mix of office space, retail shops, condominiums, a boutique hotel, and special event space along the north shore of Lady Bird Lake (formerly Town Lake).

Page 16

Ballet Austin Sets the Stage

by: Jacqui Dodson, AIA
Architect: The Bommarito Group

Ballet Austin has been a fixture in the Austin arts community for more than 50 years. So when the ballet company and its academy, the fourth largest classical ballet academy in the nation decided to relocate to Austin’s ever-emerging Central Business District at the corner of 3rd and San Antonio, the idea fit like Cinderella’s slipper.

Casey Dunn Photography
Page 54

UT Austin’s SNAP House Comes Home

by: Samantha Randall

Following its return home in October from the 2005 Solar Decathlon, held in Washington, D.C., the University of Texas at Austin School of Architecture’s SNAP House began phase two of an already remarkable life. The 800-sf experimental, pre-fabricated dwelling has been donated for use as affordable housing in a neighborhood not far from the university campus. The house will be hooked into the Austin Energy grid, supplying enough power to eliminate the utility bills for its tenants while also supporting the needs of two adjacent homes.

Courtesy Solar Decathlon
Page 10

Vision Restored

by: Ben Heimsath
Architect: Ford Powell & Carson Architects and Planners

Clara Driscoll’s spirit looms over Laguna Gloria, her 1916 Mediterranean-style villa set along the banks of the Colorado River in Austin. Though she died in 1945, her personal touch remains palpable throughout the five-story house she and her husband Harry Sevier, a former state legislator, built on 28 acres formerly owned by Stephen F. Austin. The grounds in particular still bear her imprint, featuring landscaping inspired by gardens she had enjoyed while traveling in England and Italy.

Matthew Fuller; courtesy tbg partners
Page 24

AIA Austin Awards Eleven Projects

AIA Austin honored 11 projects during the chapter’s 2006 Awards and Honors Gala held on Feb.25 at the Seaholm Power Plant. The projects were selected from a pool of 69 entries submitted by local firms.

Page 14

LBJ High School Theater

Located on one of Austin’s arts magnet school campuses, the LBJ High School Theater establishes a revitalized arts presence within a setting of utilitarian academic buildings. The theater building, designed by Austin-based LZT Architects, is composed of inner and outer shells, with the baffled walls of the interior expressed as colorful planes on the building’s exterior.

Page 16

Inspired Connection

by: Lawrence Connolly
Architect: Miró Rivera Architects

With the delightfully unexpected and resourceful use of materials, Miró Rivera Architects has designed and supervised construction of a footbridge over an inlet of Lake Austin that pays homage to the site’s sensitive wetlands. The footbridge is the firm’s third completed project of a master plan for an eight-acre lakefront site that includes a three-acre inlet/lagoon. Preceding the bridge were a boat house and a guest house, with the main house planned as the next – and largest – component of the complex. Half of the residential site is designated as wetlands that serve as a migratory stop for egrets, cranes, and swans, and as such the site is regulated by the Texas Parks and Wildlife and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

Paul Finkel
Page 26

Staff Changes at Texas Architect

A close look at the masthead on the opposite page will clue alert readers to the departure of Art Director Rachel Wyatt and Associate Publisher Linda Trinh, as well as the promotion of Ashley St. Clair from assistant editor to art director. Rachel, who joined the TA staff in November 2004, is the new associate art director at Texas Monthly. Linda, after almost two years with the TA staff, has taken a position with Bulldog Solutions in Austin as a marketing campaign manager

Page 5

Taniguchi Set to Unveil Revised Design this Summer for Asia House Houston

by: Ronnie Self

Yoshio Taniguchi, best known in the U.S. for his recent expansion of the Museum of Modern Art in New York City, will unveil his latest schematic design for Houston’s Asia House later this summer. The client, Asia Society Texas, has acquired two facing parcels totaling 78,000 square feet along one block of Southmore Boulevard between Caroline and Austin streets in the city’s Museum District. The 35,000-sq. ft. facility is expected to open in summer 2009 and will serve as a venue for cultural, artistic, educational, and business exchange.

courtesy asia society texas
Page 10

Advanced Micro Devices

In April 2005, Advanced Micro Devices announced plans for a new campus on a 59-acre tract at the southern edge of Austin to house its design and administrative staff. AMD hired Graeber Simmons & Cowan Architecture of Austin to design a masterplan as well as the individual components.

Page 16

Cool Spaces

by: Frank Jacobus
Architect: Barnes Gromatzky Kosarek Architects; Goetting & Associates; Jaster-Quintanilla (joint venture)

The 2002 expansion of the Austin Convention Center, a near doubling of the facility’s size, as well as the concurrent construction of a new convention center hotel, prompted city officials to consider an important question: Where will all those additional people park? Ultimately, the officials decided on a project that paired the city’s Convention Center Department and Austin Energy, the municipal electrical utility, and created 650-plus parking spaces while also providing chilled water for downtown customers.

Thomas McConnell
Page 36

University Federal Credit Union

by: Jennifer Lee
Architect: Antenora Architects

University Federal Credit Union’s new Brodie Lane branch in Austin illustrates the institution’s rethinking of its marketing strategy. According to the architect, the goal was to design a visually striking landmark that would reflect the advances in technology within the banking world while not alienating UFCU’s long-standing, less digital-savvy members.

Paul Bardagjy
Page 47

UT Austin Team Travels to Italy with Ideas for Rebuilding New Orleans and Environs

by: Jason Sowell; Frank Jacobus

A team of faculty and students from The University of Texas at Austin’s School of Architecture (UTSOA) has been invited to contribute its research and design ideas for the revitalization of New Orleans to the Venice Biennale. The exhibition, organized under the theme “Cities, Architecture and Society,” will run from Sept. 10 to Nov. 19.

illustrations courtesy UT Austin School of Architecture
Page 19

Austin City Lofts


Architect: Page Southerland Page

This 82-unit, 14-story tower provides an anchor and landmark for a new mixed-use district in the southwest quadrant of downtown. A three-story, horizontal, stone volume houses the entry lobby, deep stacked porches, and a modest retail strip off a shady arcade. Parking for 164 vehicles is tucked behind and below.

Tim Griffith Photography
Page 34

Cup City


Architect: Legge Lewis Legge

Cup City, a temporary interactive lounge sponsored by Starbucks, was constructed over the course of the three-day Austin City Limits Music Festival using 41 (6 x 15-foot) fence panels, zip ties, and approximately 25,000 pieces of garbage.

Legge Lewis Legge
Page 42

Floating Box House


Architect: Peter L Gluck and Partners, Architects

Surrounded by a grove of more than 200 live oaks, the house is located just outside Austin and stands between the city’s new urban skyline and its rural past.

Paul Warchol
Page 48

Footbridge


Architect: Miró Rivera Architects

With a design inspired in the reeds that line the edges of the lake, this pedestrian bridge is a light structure integrated with its setting. The bars/reeds intertwine at the abutments and “grow” over the bridge, camouflaging and turning it into a symbiotic, almost invisible link.

Paul Finkel
Page 50

Texas Hillel


Architect: Alterstudio Architects with Black + Vernooy Architecture and Urban Design

The design focused on two principal goals—to orchestrate an inviting building that would encourage students to venture within and to create a place where spirituality would be part of everyday life, not something removed to a sacred sphere.

Paul Bardagjy
Page 72

TSA studio Awards

by: Stephen Sharpe

The review of Studio Award entries followed the jury’s finalizing its selections for Design Awards. From the 48 submittals, the jury kept 14 for a second round before deciding to award seven projects. Three of them in particular garnered praise from the jurors—Square of Circles by Jay Smith, AIA, of Dallas; Houston Skyscraper by Michael Kross, an architecture student at Rice University; and Design>Build>Texas by architecture students at UT Austin.

Page 78

Block 21 Mixed-Use Development

Planned as the third-tallest building in downtown Austin, the 30-story building will include a hotel and condominium tower, as well as street-level restaurants, a 30,000-sq. ft. children’s museum, and a 1,000-seat studio for live recordings of public television’s Austin City Limits.

Page 18

Home for Homeless

by: Lauren Woodward Stanley, Lars Stanley
Architect: LZT Architects; Herman Thun, AIA; Murray Legge, AIA; Val Fuger, AIA; Alex Martinez; Luciana Misi; Do

In the ARCH (Austin Resource Center for the Homeless) the City of Austin has a facility that invites its transient residents to join the community. Designed by LZT Architects of Austin and completed in 2004, the building is located at a busy downtown corner (just four blocks from its central corridor, Congress Avenue) and makes the most of its multi-faceted character, housing an impressive variety of resources within its stout concrete frame. Indeed, the uncommon facade it presents to the street is testament to the many parties involved in realizing such a project.

Thomas McConnell Photography
Page 32
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