Article Results for "Award"

AIA Dallas Design Awards

The 2013 AIA Dallas Design Awards honored designs that respond to unique cultural, social, environmental, and contextual challenges.

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AIA Brazos Design Awards

The 2013 AIA Brazos Design Awards honored designs that respond to unique cultural, social, environmental, and contextual challenges.

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AIA Dallas 2013 Firm of the Year

Michael Malone Architects has been selected by AIA Dallas as the recipient of its 2013 Firm Award. The firm is being recognized for fostering a culture of commitment to the design community through its practice, publication, and professional involvement.

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Transformative Grant for The Contemporary Austin

The Contemporary Austin was awarded a $9 million grant that will be used by the museum to create a sculpture garden on its 12-acre lakeside estate of Laguna Gloria.

COMMON CROSSINGS (DETAIL) COURTESY THE ARTIST AND ZACH FEUER GALLERY.
PHOTO BY DAVE MEAD.
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Call For Entries: 2014 Brick in Architecture Awards Members Only

The call for entries for the 2014 Brick in Architecture Awards was announced.

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Lower Rio Grande Valley AIA Design Awards Members Only

Award winners announced for the Lower Rio Grande Valley AIA’s 2013 Design Awards.

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AIA San Antonio Design Awards Members Only

Award winners announced for AIA San Antonio’s 2013 Design Awards.

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TASA/TASB

by: Texas Architect Staff

The 2012 Exhibit of School Architecture spon¬sored by the Texas Association of School Admin¬istration (TASA) and the Texas Association of School Boards (TASB) Convention awarded the Caudill Award to Lady Bird Johnson Middle School in Irving designed by Corgan Associates.

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AIA San Antonio Design Awards

by: Texas Architect Staff

Recipients of the 2012 AIA San Antonio Design Awards were announced in November 2012. Selecting from 45 entries representing 24 San Antonio firms, the jury recognized three projects — Cross Timbers by Lake|Flato; Raymond Russell Park, Projects 1 & 2 by Diane Hays leading a student team; and Rockridge Gardens by Tobin Wells Smith — with Honor Awards.

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AIA El Paso Design Awards

by: Texas Architect Staff

Recipients of the 2012 AIA El Paso Design Awards were announced in November 2012. The El Paso County Family Youth and Services Center by Wright & Dalbin Archtiects, Albert Bacon Fall Mansion by ARTchitecture, and E.G. Chayo Community Center by Alvidrez Architecture all received Honor Awards

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John Staub Awards

by: Texas Architect Staff

The Institute of Classical Architecture & Art (ICAA) recognized projects across the state for their achievements and contributions to preserving and advancing the classical tradition in architecture, urbanism, and the allied arts. The 2012 John Staub Awards for Residential Architecture were presented to five projects.

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2012 Charles E. Peterson Prize

by: Texas Architect Staff

A student team from the University of Texas at Austin School of Architecture was recently awarded the 2012 Charles E. Peterson Prize for their measured drawings of Austin’s North-Evan Chateau submitted to the Historic American Building Survey (HABS).

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Deadline for Submission to the AIA Committee on the Environment (COTE) Top Ten and Top Ten +

by: Texas Architect Staff

The AIA Committee on the Environment is currently accepting nominations for the 2013 AIA COTE Top Ten Green Projects Awards.

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AIA Fort Worth Design Awards

Recipients of the 2013 AIA Fort Worth Design Awards were announced in January. Six firm projects and five student works were singled out for excellence in design as part of the chap¬ter’s Honors and Awards Program.

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Menil Receives AIA Twenty-Five Year Award

Renown for its diffusion of natural light, the roof of the Menil Collection comprises 300, 25-mm-thick, ferrocement leaves, which protect the building from the light and heat of the Texas sun. Completed in 1981 by Renzo Piano, the Menil received the 2013 AIA 25-Year Award.

Hester + Hardaway Photography
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McAllen Library Interior Honored by AIA

MS&R created the largest single-story library in the United States by rehabilitating an abandoned Walmart in McAllen. The creative use of forms, materials, patterns, and colors to organize the interior space earned the interior design team a 2013 AIA Honor Award.

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CLIDE Awards Call for Entries

The North Central Texas Council of Governments is currently accepting applications for its Celebrating Leadership in Development Excellence (CLIDE) Awards.

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AIA West Texas Design Awards

Two Midland-based firms, Rhotenberry Wellen Architects and Travis Durham Architects were honored with AIA West Texas Design Awards.

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AIA Austin Design Awards

by: TA Staff

Texas Architect features AIA Austin’s 2013 Design Awards. The competition recognizes outstanding architectural projects by members and promotes public interest in architectural excellence.

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AIA Houston Recognizes Student Proposals

by: TA Staff

Texas Architect features a student-led design competition hosted by AIA Houston’s Committee on Architecture for Health (CAH).

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Texas Firm Among Global Sustainability Award Winners

San Antonio’s Lake|Flato Architects was among the five architects from around the world to receive a prestigious 2013 Global Award for Sustainable Architecture. Principal Ted Flato represented the firm at the ceremony and symposium at the Cité de l’architecture & du patrimoine in Paris.

PHOTO OF THE GLOBAL SUSTAINABILITY AWARD WINNERS BY GASTON FRANÇOIS BERGERET, COURTESY LAKE|FLATO ARCHITECTS.
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Simplicity and Restraint

by: Catherine Gavin, Editor

The 2013 Texas Architects Design Awards jurors: Ann Beha, FAIA, of Ann Beha Architects in Boston; Julie Eizenberg, AIA, of Koning Eizenberg in Santa Monica; and Douglas Stockman, AIA, of el dorado in Kansas City honored a refreshing batch of 11 projects for their design excellence.

PHOTO OF HILLSIDE RESIDENCE BY CASEY DUNN PHOTOGRAPHY. PHOTO OF WEBB CHAPEL PARK
PAVILION BY EDUARD HUEBER/ARCHPHOTO. PHOTO OF FIRE|BEACH HOUSE BY ANDREW POGUE.
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AIA Houston 2013 Design Awards

Texas Architect features the AIA Houston’s 2013 Design Awards.

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Notes on a Jury

by: Brian William Kuper, AIA

Texas Society of Architects 2013 Design Awards jurors: Ann Beha, FAIA, Ann Beha Architects, Boston; Julie Eizenberg, AIA, Koning Eizenberg in Santa Monica, Calif.; and Douglas Stockman, AIA, el dorado, Kansas City, Mo. awarded 11 designs as this years winners.

PHOTOS BY JULIE PIZZO WOOD.
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Hillside Residence

by: Canan Yetmen

This renovation and addition to an existing Austin bungalow by Alterstudio Architecture is a strong architectural idea existing easily alongside a distinct lack of pretension.

Casey Dunn Photography
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Design Shop

by: Bang Dang

Dan Shipley’s Design Shop is a subtle statement in the successful layering of materials.

Charles Davis Smith and Joshua Fortuna
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Renovation of 714 Main Street

by: Gerald Moorhead, FAIA

Using the original 1930s drawings, Schwarz Hanson Architects reconstructed the entire base 714 Main Street in Fort Worth — and this was just the beginning of the work to bring the building back to life.

Daniel Stober andJohn Roberts, AIA
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1221 Broadway

by: Jack Murphy

Lake|Flato Architects successfully converted an abandoned apartment complex into a viable and interesting design at 1221 Broadway in San Antonio.

Chris Cooper and Frank Ooms
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Webb Chapel Park Pavilion

by: Catherine Gavin

With its surprising cantilever and thin slits of blue sky framed in bright yellow, Cooper Joseph Studio’s Webb Chapel Park Pavilion in Dallas is a straightforward, yet playful design.

Eduard Hueber/ArchPhoto
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Fire|Beach House

by: Aaron Seward

Surrounded by sandburs, the sea breeze, and a wide airstrip, the Fire|Beach House in Galveston is a surprising piece of contemporary architecture.

Andrew Pogue
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Roy Kelly Terminal and Parking Garage

by: Ben Koush

Powers Brown Architecture created a safe and inviting street presence with the clean lines and bright lights of the Roy Kelley Terminal and Parking Garage in Bryan.

Dror Baldinger, AIA
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T3 Parking Structure

by: Rebecca Roberts

Parking has never been so pretty; the T3 Parking Structure in Austin, by Danze Blood Architects, uses design to redefine the typically banal experience of parking.

Whit Preston
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Kathlyn Joy Gilliam Collegiate Academy

by: Ron Stelmarski, AIA

SHW Group’s Kathlyn Joy Gilliam Collegiate Academy redefines the public school building typology and looks to a bright the future.

Luis Ayala
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Health Services Building, Arizona State University

by: Eurico R. Francisco, AIA

Lake|Flato knows how to make an understated and entirely appropriate addition to the heart of a campus. Their design for the Health Services Building at Arizona State University says a lot about sitting well in one’s context.

Bill Timmerman
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LifeWorks Sooch Foundation Youth and Family Resource Center

by: Ingrid Spencer

Miró Rivera Architects’ LifeWorks building in East Austin stands out as a powerful example of elegance and sustainability meeting a very tight budget.

Paul Finkel
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Making Light: The Menil Collection Receives 25-Year Award

by: Ben Koush

The Menil Collection, designed by Renzo Piano with Richard Fitzgerald & Associates and inaugurated in 1987, was selected by the Texas Society of Architects for its 25-Year Award.

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Texas Society of Architects Honor Awards

The Texas Society of Architects announces the recipients of our 2013 Honor Awards.

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Austin Aquatic Center


Architect: Runa Workshop

Runa Workshop’s Austin Aquatic Center integrates landscape and architecture to create a water management system with real ecological benefits.

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R J Marfa


Architect: Rand Elliott, FAIA, of Elliott + Associates Architects

The minimalist design R J Marfa by Rand Elliott, FAIA, of Elliott + Associates Architects strips out everything unnecessary to become an object in the landscape.

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Thick Skinned Regionalism


Architect: Matt Fajkus Architecture

Thick Skinned Regionalism flips a typical construction model on its head and starts with the section rather than the plan.

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Fashion[ING] Objects


Architect: Matt Fajkus Architecture

Matt Fajkus Architecture proposes a wall made of coat hangers for a runway show.

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Award-Winning Rehab Project Saves Formerly ‘Endangered’ Caruth Home

by: Jonathan P. Rollins, AIA

The rehabilitation of the historic Caruth Homeplace – located just west of Central Expressway and south of Northwest Highway – is a landmark achievement for the property’s owner, the Communities Foundation of Texas. By recognizing the project with its 2011 Sense of Place Award, Preservation Dallas has emphasized the significance of this transformation from a derelict building included on its 2007 Most Endangered List to a revitalized architectural treasure.

Photos by Carolyn Brown Courtesy Communities Foundation of Texas
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AIA Fort Worth 2011 Design Awards

by: Tom Manganiello, Assoc. AIA

Recipients of the AIA Fort Worth’s 2011 Excellence in Design program were announced on Oct. 18 at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth. Jurors for the annual competition were Julie VandenBerg Snow, FAIA, of Julie Snow Architects in Minneapolis; Chris Carson, FAIA, of Ford Powell & Carson Architects & Planners in San Antonio; and Mark T. Wellen, AIA, of Rhotenberry Wellen Architects in Midland.

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AIA LRGV 2011 Design Awards

by: Texas Architect Staff

The jury for the Lower Rio Grande Valley AIA chapter’s 2011 Design Awards Jury selected four projects for recognition. Jurors were Thomas Hayne Upchurch, AIA, of Brenham; Rick del Monte, FAIA, of Dallas; Donna Kacmar, FAIA, of Houston.

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Blanco Public Library


Architect: Brett Wolfe, Assoc. AIA

For a planned expansion of the public library in Blanco, designer Brett Wolfe, Assoc. AIA, drew inspiration from F.E. Ruffini’s 1885 limestone courthouse that looms over the center of town about a half-mile away.

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Prototype Housing for Modest Means


Architect: Edward M. Baum, FAIA

Edward M. Baum, FAIA, seeks to provide an alternative to traditional single-family homes by clustering four 1,350-sf residential units that share common interior walls and rigorously controlling construction costs.

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‘Dust to Dust’


Architect: Laura Bryant and Chelsea Vargas

Their proposal for a 990-acre cemetery earned students from UT Austin’s School of Architecture an Honor Award in the 2011 ASLA Student Awards sponsored by the American Society of Landscape Architects.

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Atascocita Springs Elementary School

by: Noelle Heinze

For the design of Atascocita Springs Elementary School in Humble, the architects of PBK integrated elements that support its science and math curricula while also reflecting the town’s rich tradition in energy production. Interactive kiosks allow students to log the school’s consumption of water, natural gas, and electricity—exercises that tie the building’s sustainable design features to grade-level appropriate curriculum.

Jud Haggard Photography
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Garden Ridge Elementary School

by: Stephen Sharpe, Hon. TSA

SHW Group’s design of Garden Ridge Elementary School places the library at the center of campus, with a planted roof above and tubular skylights that draw daylight into the reading areas. Both elements are used as part of the school’s science curriculum, along with above-ground cisterns that collect rainwater and teach students about conservation of natural resources.

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Nominations Due Feb. 29 for Preservation Texas Awards

Preservation Texas’ 2012 Honor Awards program is open to any individual, organization, business, or agency that is involved with historic preservation in Texas. All projects, activities, or individual service must have been completed between January 2009 and December 2011. Nomination forms and information on award categories are posted at preservationtexas.org. Applicants will be notified by May 1, 2012 as to the status of their award nomination. Awards will be based on the quality of the project, its presentation, significance, and uniqueness. The impacts of the nominee’s project on the community will also be considered.

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Teaching Tool

by: Donna Kacmar, FAIA

As soon as you’ve parked your car (mine was parked in one of the spaces reserved for high-efficiency vehicles) and walk toward Gloria Marshall Elementary School, you realize this is not your average public school building. The covered path leads you past an “eco-garden”—laid out with individual planting beds for each grade and an adjacent pond, both fed by runoff from the roof drains and rainfall captured in an above-ground 5,000-gallon cistern.

Luis Ayala
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Clearly Inviting

by: Eurico R. Francisco, AIA

Richland College, a member of the Dallas County Community College District (DCCCD), was dedicated in 1972, and it welcomed its first students that same year. Designed as a collaboration between Perkins & Will of Chicago and the Oglesby Group of Dallas, the campus is located on a suburban setting in north Dallas.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA
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Ricardo Legorreta Vilchis (1931-2011)

by: Edward R. Burian

Considered by many to be an ambassador for Mexican culture, world-renowned architect Ricardo Legorreta, Hon. FAIA, died in Mexico City on Dec. 30 at the age of 80. Among the best known contemporary architects of Mexico, Legorreta received numerous awards and his work was extensively published. Legorreta received the 2000 AIA Gold Medal for his life’s work of inspiring architecture. His passing marks the end of an era of modern architecture in Mexico and the region.

Graciela Iturbide
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AIA Honors Rice Design Alliance

by: TA Staff

The Rice Design Alliance is one of two recipients of 2012 Institute Honors for Collaborative Achievement, an award presented annually by the AIA to recognize and encourage distinguished achievements of allied professionals, clients, organizations, architect teams, knowledge communities, and others who have had a beneficial influence on or advanced the architectural profession.

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Evans Named AIA Young Architect

by: TA Staff

One Texan – James M. Evans, AIA, of Houston – is among the 13 recipients of the 2012 AIA Young Architects Award. Young Architects are defined by the AIA as professionals who have been licensed 10 years or fewer regardless of their age. The award honors individuals who have shown exceptional leadership and made significant contributions to the profession early in their careers.

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AIA San Antonio Design Awards

After carefully evaluating 60 entries from 24 local architectural firms, jurors for AIA San Antonio’s 2011 Design Awards program announced their selections during ceremonies held on Nov. 4 at Pearl Stable. Attendees also celebrated the recipients of the chapter’s Studio Awards, its Twenty-Five Year Award, and its annual Mayor’s Choice Award honoring a publicly funded architectural project.

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AIA LRGV Studio Awards

by: TA Staff

Two awards were presented by AIA Lower Rio Grande Valley in the chapter’s 2011 Studio Awards program. Carolina Civarolo, AIA, of Boultinghouse Simpson Architects in McAllen, received the Spark Award for Digital Media for the proposed renovation and expansion of the University of Texas–Pan American’s College of Business Administration in Edinburg. Ortiz Architecture & Environment in Weslaco was recognized with a Design Award for an Unbuilt
Project for its Weslaco Family Care Center & Occupational Medicine Clinic.

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AIA Fort Worth Student Design Awards

by: Tom Manganiello, Assoc. AIA

During AIA Fort Worth’s awards banquet held on Jan. 24, three student projects were recognized for design excellence. The lone Honor Award was presented to Ace Academy by John Paul Rysavy and Daniel Shumaker, both students at the University of Texas at Austin.

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Speakers Announced for Texas Society of Architects’ 73rd Convention

by: Texas Architect Staff

The Texas Society of Architects 2012 Annual Convention and Design Expo, October 18-20, in Austin, presents two distinguished keynote speakers who will examine the role of design in the context of the convention’s theme, “Influence.” One is an activist and innovator who helped create the High Line — a public park built atop an abandoned, elevated rail line in New York; the other is the award-winning host and radio producer of 99% Invisible. Attend the convention to hear the unique perspectives of Robert Hammond and Roman Mars.

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AIA Houston Design Awards

AIA Houston’s 2012 design awards competition resulted in recognition for 21 projects in eight categories out of a total of 127 entries. Eligibility was limited to projects completed within the last five years and located within the Houston metropolitan area or designed by an architect working in the Houston metropolitan area.

Houston Ballet photo by Nic Lehoux; Brockman Hall Photo by Peter Aaron /OTTO; Roy Kelly Garage photo By Dror Baldinger , AIA
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2012 Honorary AIA Member Awards

Three Texas residents have been elected to honorary membership in the American Institute of Architects (AIA) — one of the highest honors bestowed by the Institute upon a person outside the profession of architecture. The designation is reserved for those otherwise ineligible for membership but who have rendered distinguished service to the profession of architecture or to the allied arts and sciences.

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residential architect Award Winner

A Texas house is among 36 winning projects out of nearly 800 entries in the 2012 residential architect Design Awards program. Lake|Flato, of San Antonio, received one of three Merit Awards in the Single-Family Housing category for the Miller Ranch Porch House in Vanderpool.

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veloCity


Architect: Peter Muessig, Rice School of Architecture

Rice School of Architecture student Peter Muessig has been recognized as a winner in the “Conceptual Projects” category of the 2012 AIA Houston design awards program for his entry entitled “veloCity: Mapping Houston on the Diagonal” (see full awards story on page 18).

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Library is San Antonio’s First City-Owned LEED Gold Project

The Parman Library at Stone Oak in San Antonio, designed by Marmon Mok, is the first city-owned project to be awarded LEED Gold Certification by the U.S. Green Building Council.

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Texas Firms among AIA COTE Award Winners

On April 19, the American Institute of Architects’ Committee on the Environment (AIA–COTE) announced its Top Ten projects for 2012. This year’s batch of winners highlights community ties, social equity, and attentiveness to water issues. One Texas firm and three national/international firms with offices in Texas are among the winners.

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2012 AIA Austin Design Awards

AIA Austin’s 2012 Design Awards competition resulted in recognition for 15 projects in three categories out of a total of 112 entries.

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For Goodness' Sake

by: Larry Paul Fuller

There is good architecture. And then there is good architecture … as in architecture for the public good. This year’s statewide design award winners — 13 projects from Dallas, Houston, San Antonio, and Austin — are a case in point. I was struck, during the awards jury process, by how intent the jurors were on recognizing certain entries, not only for their merit in terms of design (even design merit as broadly defined), but also for their capacity to fulfill client aspirations for the public good.

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Notes on a Jury

by: Brian William Kuper, AIA

Our 2012 Design Awards jury met at the Texas Architects headquarters in Austin on June 7 and 8 to review the 227 entries submitted in this year’s program. As Chair of the 2012-2013 Design Committee, I enjoyed the privilege of being present during the deliberations of three distinguished and insightful jurors: Angie Brooks, AIA, of Brooks + Scarpa in LA; Eddie Jones, AIA, of Jones Studio in Phoenix; and James Timberlake, FAIA, of Kieran Timberlake in Philadelphia.

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Brownwood Park Pavilions

by: Eurico Francisco

The pavilions at Brownwood Park in north Dallas seem deceptively simple. The three structures — conceived by architect Joe McCall, FAIA, as “The Huddle” —appear at first to be a lighthearted concoction of shapes, colors, and textures. Get closer, though, and a clear idea supported by design rigor becomes evident.

Craig D. Blackmon, FAIA; Joe McCall, FAIA
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Cotillion Park Pavilion

by: Eurico Francisco, AIA

Cotillion Park is located in northeast Dallas, just south of Highway I-635, and is surrounded by single-family homes in a stable middleclass neighborhood. A baseball field and tennis courts occupy the majority of the park, but there is also a small playground and, adjacent to it, a new pavilion – Cotillion Park Pavilion.

Mell Lawrence, FAIA
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Cathedral of Hope Interfaith Peace Chapel

by: Lawrence Connolly, AIA

As the dynamic second phase of an ambitious masterplan, the chapel resembles clumps of milk-white Jello that have been jiggled and huddled together on a bed of lettuce. A derivative of several previous projects, the IPC has three hierarchal components that lean into each other to form a step stool ascending from the vestibule to the chapel and its 40-ft-tall apse.

James Wilson; Michael Palumbo; Cunningham Architects
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TM Advertising

by: Michael Friebele, Assoc. AIA

Finding the “Beautiful Truth” has long been the focus of TM Advertising in Dallas. It is a central notion that aims to capture the spirit and passion of their clients in a way that translates to the consumer audience. The firm of nearly 50 has been able to do so through a body of personnel that each bring their own sort of passion to the field but seamlessly come together to create a body of work that is immensely expressive and powerful. Recognizing the need for a space to define the future of the company, TM ultimately landed in one of the flanking arms of the Victory Park Plaza adjacent to the American Airlines Center

Bruce Damonte
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McGarrah Jessee Building

by: Adapted from “Midcentury Update,” by Stephen Sharpe, Hon. AIA Texas Architect, March/April, 2011

McGarrah Jessee’s relocation to larger quarters in downtown Austin neatly coincided with the home-grown creative agency’s bursting out of its regional sphere of influence. Affectionately known as McJ, the company has steadily ratcheted up its staffing level as its roster of clients has expanded and its recognition has gone national. Now, after having outgrown its former offices in a converted warehouse, McJ has re-established its base of operations in the Starr Building, a modernist landmark completed in 1954 and designed by local firm Kuehne, Brooks and Barr for the offices of American National Bank. The project achieved widespread acclaim at the time for its distinctively crisp interiors by Florence Knoll and a monumental mural created in situ by Seymour Fogel.

Thomas McConnell
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I-35 Makeover

by: Canan Yetmen

Downtown Austin’s east-west streets are sliced in half by the northsouth artery of IH-35. To the west, downtown rises, its sparkling towers radiating progress. To the east, the city of days past lingers, its
neighborhoods of humble homes and local businesses resolute. The freeway, elevated at the heart of the city, creates a physical and spiritual divide that has plagued Austin for decades.

Mike Osborne; Jett Butler; Thomas McConnell
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Kimber Modern B&B

by: Aaron Seward

As urban infill lots go, the roughly 12,000-sf triangular site that is now home to the Kimber Modern Bed & Breakfast presented Baldridge Architects with more than its fair share of challenges. For one, the rather
small plot rose 25 feet in elevation from the curb to the back lot line, a precipitous pitch. Furthermore, neighboring establishments created conditions that most would find undesirable for a boutique design hotel.

Casey Dunn
Page 54

UT Austin Visual Arts Center

by: Thomas Hayne Upchurch, AIA

In the past there has been a sense of aloofness characterizing the Art Building on the UT Austin campus. Located on the northeast corner of San Jacinto and 23rd Street, across from Royal–Memorial Stadium, the two-story building has stood at a distance from the public. Although its main entry on the west side was connected to street level by a prominent exterior stair, the building’s solid volumes revealed little about its interior activities. Yet the south elevation of this mid-century modern building expressed a slight undulation in the soft orange brick veneer, rising to a cap of contrasting white concrete barrel vaults. These details created a bit of visual interest and a hint of greater possibilities within.

Frank Ooms
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Houston Food Bank

by: Ardis Clinton, AIA

Hope. Simply stated, it is the message of a new facility, on a mission to ultimately end hunger. Nestled in a warehouse district outside of downtown, the Houston Food Bank (HFB) building gleams with its spirited green color and metal cladding. The new 308,000-sf facility is the nation’s largest Feeding America food bank and source of food for hunger relief charities in 18 southeast Texas counties. Beyond feeding the hungry, the Houston Food Bank provides community services and education programs aimed at promoting good nutrition, assistance with federal and state Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Programs, job training, and employment help — all in an effort to break the cycle of food insecurity.

Slyworks Photography
Page 62

BioScience Research Collaborative at Rice University

by: Jason T. Chan, AIA

At the intersection of Rice University’s historic and growth axes is the BioScience Research Collaborative, a ten-story 477,000-sf translational research facility designed to facilitate multi-institutional research collaboration between Rice and various institutes from Texas Medical Center. This interdisciplinary facility embraces a wide range of disciplines, from chemistry to bioengineering, from organizations supporting startup research companies to the National Space Biomedical Research Institute — all with emphasis on improving human wellness through research.

Cesar Rubio Photography
Page 66

Tellepsen Family Downtown YMCA

by: Adapted from “The Big Picture,” by Val Glitsch, FAIA Texas Architect, July/August, 2012

In 2008 the YMCA of Greater Houston announced the imminent replacement of Kenneth Franzheim’s Italian Renaissance-inspired ten-story edifice that had provided classrooms, exercise facilities, and 132 single-room residential units since 1941. Aspiring to move in a more “family-friendly” direction, the organization stated the primary goal of the new 115,000-sf facility would be to assume a stronger community presence in downtown Houston.

Aker Imaging, Thomas McConnell
Page 70

Military Hospital Addition

by: J. Brantley Hightower, AIA

Fort Sam Houston in San Antonio has served the medical needs of men and women in uniform since the 1870s. During that time, the complex grew incrementally until 1995 when a new facility was built to consolidate the Fort’s hospital operations. Containing over a million square feet of space, the massive Brooke Army Medical Center (BAMC – pronounced “Bam-See”) was clad in heavy masonry that gave it a somewhat institutional quality. While BAMC was functional, the needs of contemporary combat medical practice are constantly evolving and when the decision was made to absorb most of the operations of a nearby Air Force medical facility into the complex, a significant expansion became necessary to create what would eventually be known as the San Antonio Military Medical Center.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA
Page 74

Haven for Hope

by: Dror Baldinger, AIA

Haven for Hope Homeless Transformational Center is a groundbreaking project aimed at ameliorating homelessness in San Antonio. It emerged from the shared vision of two philanthropists: business leader Bill Greehey, and Phil Hardberger, Mayor of San Antonio from 2005-2009. Since its first-phase completion in 2008, Haven for Hope’s operational model has inspired other American cities to reassess their approaches to addressing homelessness.

Hester + Hardaway, Scott Adams Photography
Page 78

Preservation Texas Announces 2012 Honor Awards

Preservation Texas recently announced its 2012 Honor Awards, which includes 10 awards and a special commendation recognizing the best of preservation in Texas. Individuals and projects in Austin, Dallas, Galveston, Houston, Marshall, San Antonio, and West Texas received awards.

Courtesy of Preservation Texas
Page 117

UT Dallas Building Recognized with Metal Architecture Award

A new entrance to the University of Dallas campus, designed by Page Southerland Page, has received a 2012 Metal Architecture Design Award for “Interiors.” The Visitor Center and University Bookstore was one of 10 projects recognized in various award categories. The awards highlight creativity in the metal construction industry and the use of steel in innovative design.

Courtesy Page Southerland Page
Page 118

Texas Society of Architects 25-Year Award

by: Willis Winters, FAIA

Temple Emanu-El in Dallas, one of the most distinguished works of contemporary architecture in Texas built during the 1950s, has been recognized by a jury to receive the Texas Society of Architects 25-Year Award for 2012.

Craig D. Blackmon, FAIA
Page 13

Texas Architects 2012 Honor Awards

During its 73rd Annual Convention in Austin, Texas Society of Architects recognized the following as this year’s Honor Awards recipients for significant contributions to the architectural profession and the quality of the built environment.

Page 14

Liz Lambert Receives 2012 Cornerstone Award

The Texas Society of Architects recently named Austin hotelier Liz Lambert as the recipient of its 2012 Cornerstone Award.

Page 16

FED_Scraper

This fantastical concept emerged from the premise that government transforms the way we occupy and inhabit space. It was honored at the 2012 Texas Architects Studio Awards program, which annually recognizes excellence in unbuilt architectural design.

Page 21

Fire/Beach House

Conceived as a primary fire and rescue support for Galveston Island, this Fire and Rescue Station was honored at the 2012 Texas Architects Studio Awards program, which annually recognizes excellence in unbuilt architectural design.

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Itinerant Oil Worker Housing (I.o.W.H.)

I.o.W.H. proposes a quick, low-cost, sustainable, multifamily housing option for a better quality of living for oil-field workers in Encinal, Texas. This project was honored at the 2012 Texas Architects Studio Awards program, which annually recognizes excellence in unbuilt, often strictly conceptual, architectural design.

Page 22

VeloCity: Mapping Houston on the Diagonal


Architect: Peter Muessig

This bold idea for elevating the bicycle culture of Houston was one of five winners from the 2012 Texas Architects Studio Awards program, which annually recognizes excellence in unbuilt, often strictly conceptual, architectural design.

Page 23

Gdansk Museum of the Second World War

World Ward II began in the city of Gdansk, Poland on September 1, 1939, this concept for the museum commemorates the event. The proposal was one of the five winners of the 2012 Texas Architects Studio Awards program, which annually recognizes excellence in unbuilt, often strictly conceptual, architectural design.

Page 24

San Antonio Announces Design Awards

by: TA Staff

After jurors evaluated 48 entries from 17 local architectural firms, the AIA’s San Antonio chapter announced the recipients of its 2010 Design Awards during a dinner and ceremony at the Pearl Stable on Oct. 27.

Page 16

Four Awards from Fort Worth Jury

by: Tom Manganiello

Four projects were recognized for excellence in design at the AIA Fort Worth’s 2010 Design Award Program held Oct. 5 at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth.

Page 19

AIA El Paso Presents Awards

by: Robert Garland, III

This year’s AIA El Paso Design Awards program was juried by eight steemed architectural educators from Universidad Autonoma de Ciudad Juarez, located just across the international border. The jury met for two days and reviewed a total of 34 entries, ultimately recognizing five projects with awards for design excellence in four categories.

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Selecting the Best of Public Schools

by: Bill T. Wilson

As a juror for the 2010 Exhibit of School Architecture sponsored by the Texas Association of School Administrators and the Texas Association of School Boards (with support from the Texas Society of Architects), I spent the better part of a week in July studying the latest work of some of my fellow Texas architects. The experience renewed my appreciation of the range of educational design being built across our state and the lasting impact that educators, administrators, policymakers, and, of course, architects can have in shaping the spaces and places where we educate our children.

Page 68

Award-Winning Workplace

by: Stephen Sharpe

About a year ago, when the staff of Texas Architect decided that this edition would focus on workplace design, no one could have foreseen the coincidence that the Texas Society of Architects/AIA itself would be relocating offices as the issue went to press. In another remarkable concurrence, the move takes TSA to the former home of fd2s, which was featured on the cover of the July/August 2002 edition. That issue was also dedicated to the subject of workplace design.

Page 5

Rochofskys Named Honorary AIA

by: TA Staff

For their deep involvement in community-based organizations promoting architecture, art, and education, the AIA this year confers honorary membership on Howard and Cindy Rachofsky of Dallas.

Page 10

Speck Awarded AIA Topaz Medallion

by: TA Staff

Lawrence Speck, FAIA, professor and former dean at the University of Texas at Austin School of Architecture and a principal of Page Southerland Page, has been awarded the American Institute of Architects’ 2011 Topaz Medallion for Excellence in Architecture Education.

Page 12

AIA Honors Lake/Flato, Wyly, DAF

by: TA Staff

Among the recipients of 2011 AIA Institute Honors are two projects with Texas connections and the Dallas Architecture Forum.

Page 14

KRob Highlights Drawing Excellence

by: Julien Meyrat

The results of the 2010 Ken Roberts Memorial Delineation Competition were announced in November at the Dallas Museum of Art. Commonly known as “KRob,” the contest was established 36 years earlier by AIA Dallas to recognize excellence in the art of architectural delineation (originally hand-rendered works but later expanded to include computer-assisted drawings).

Page 16

The Shape of Texas and Austin Firm Recognized with 2011 THC Awards

by: TA Staff

Each year the Texas Historical Commission recognizes individuals, organizations, and programs that have achieved success in efforts to preserve the state’s architectural heritage. Included in the 2011 THC program are awards for The Shape of Texas radio program and the Austin architecture firm Clayton & Little Architects.

Page 19

Houston Announces Design Awards

by: Theodora Batchvarova

A diverse jury with a broad spectrum of interests and experience met at the Architecture Center Houston on Feb. 25 to evaluate a wide variety of submittals in this year’s AIA Houston Design Awards competition. Eligibility was limited to projects completed within the last five years and located in the Houston metropolitan area or designed by an architect working in the Houston metropolitan area.

Page 20

Livestrong HQ in COTE Top Ten

by: TA Staff

The American Institute of Architects’ Committee on the Environment has included Lake/Flato Architect’s Livestrong Foundation’s headquarters among its 2011 Top Ten Green Projects, a national program that celebrates sustainable design excellence. Livestrong, located in Austin, was this year’s sole Texas honoree.

Paul Hester
Page 14

KAUST Receives AIA/ALA Library Award

by: TA Staff

The American Institute of Architects and the American Library Association (ALA) recently bestowed the ALA Library Building Award to the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) in Thuwal, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Sam Fentress
Page 14

AIA Honors Overland’s Haven for Hope

by: TA Staff

Haven for Hope, a San Antonio homeless assistance center designed by Overland Partners, was recognized with two AIA Honor Awards during the AIA national convention in New Orleans. The project, completed last year, was the only one in Texas to receive either an AIA Housing Award or an AIA/HUD Secretary’s Award.

Page 16

AIA Austin Presents Design Awards

by: Tamara L. Toon

AIA Austin honored 10 projects in its 2011 Design Awards Celebration. From a total of 77 submittals, the distinguished jury of architects selected three for Honor Awards, six for Citations of Honor, and one unbuilt project for a Studio Award.

Page 18

Firm Philosophy

by: Stephen Sharpe, Hon. TSA

Lake/Flato Architects is well known for exemplary design. Every year the firm’s commitment to producing the highest quality work is rewarded by design juries. In this edition you’ll find features on five Lake/Flato projects selected for 2011 Design Awards out of a total of 12 winners in the Texas Society of Architects annual competition.

Photos Courtesy Lake/Flato  Architects
Page 10

25-Year Award for Fountain Place’s Prismatic Tower, Urban Waterscape

by: TA Staff

Since its completion in 1986, Fountain Place in downtown Dallas has been praised for both the geometrical precision of its 60-story tower clad in green glass and the extraordinary six-acre urban space that unfurls at its base.

Photos by Craig Blackmon, FAIA, Blackink Architectural Photography
Page 18

Notes on the Jury

by: Michael Malone, AIA

On May 20, the 2011 design awards jury met to review the 257 entries submitted in this year’s program. The distinguished jury consisted of three exceptional professionals with diverse practice and professional experiences, along with a considerable love of architecture and design.

Photos By Julie Pizzo
Page 38

Armstrong Oil & Gas

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: Lake|Flato Architects (design); Bothwell Davis George Architects (architect of record)

In adapting a century-old machine shop for use as commercial offices, Lake/Flato Architects has preserved the essence of the building’s brawny, tradesman-like character. Yes, the interior has been reconfigured as elegantly austere workspaces, but everywhere are relics of its industrial past.

Frank Ooms
Page 40

Arthouse at the Jones Center

by: J. Brantley Hightower
Architect: LTL Architects

While it is not unusual for a renovation project to transform an individual building, it is noteworthy when such a project begins to change how people relate to the city around them.

Michael Moran
Page 44

ASU Polytechnic Campus

by: Christine Noble
Architect: Lake|Flato Architects (design); RSP Architects (architect of record)

When building in the desert, landscape and climate dominate the discussion. This is the case for Lake/Flato Architects’ Arizona State University Polytechnic Campus where weathered steel screens, trellises covered with climbing vines, and a progression of courtyards create visual and experiential layers that respond to and reflect the colors and textures of its unique environment.

Bill Timmerman
Page 48

Brockman Hall for Physics

by: Donna Kacmar
Architect: KieranTimberlake

Kieran Timberlake has synthesized difficult technical requirements, environmental responsibility, and architectural craft in the new 110,000-sf Brockman Hall for Physics on the Rice University campus.

Peter Aaron/ESTO; Paul Hester; R. Kevin Butts
Page 52

Brown Residence

by: Mark T. Wellen
Architect: Lake|Flato Architects

The Phoenix area is rich in the tradition of masterful architects weaving eloquent designs into the powerful desert landscape. Wright, Soleri, and others have produced spirited designs, engaging their buildings in a dialogue with their austere settings.

Bill Timmerman
Page 56

Cabin on Flathead Lake

by: Thomas Hayne Upchurch
Architect: Andersson-Wise Architects

Projecting into the southern end of Flathead Lake in northwestern Montana is a small peninsula of scattered ponderosa pines, towering over a terrain of steep cliff, ridges, and ravines, sloping down to the water’s edge.

Art Gray
Page 60

Cutting Horse Ranch

by: Bart Shaw
Architect: Lake|Flato Architects

Cutting Horse Ranch, located on 175 acres in rural Parker county near Fort Worth, is dedicated to the breeding and training of competition cutting horses.

Frank Ooms
Page 64

Full Goods Warehouse and Il Sogno

by: Vincent Canizaro, PhD
Architect: Lake|Flato Architects (design); Durand-Hollis Rupe Architects (architect of record)

A visit to the Pearl development just North of downtown San Antonio underscores the promise of thoughtful, incremental urban placemaking. The 22-acre site was the home of Pearl Brewery until beer production ceased in 2001.

Casey Dunn
Page 68

Rainwater Court

by: Andrea Exter
Architect: Dick Clark Architecture in association with Architecture for Humanity

A game-changer in more ways than one, Rainwater Court inspires hope and creates new opportunities for more than 600 children and other residents of Mahiga, a rural Kenyan community.

Turk Pipkin; Greg Elsner; Christy Pipkin; Christina Tapper
Page 72

Sam Houston Tollway Northeast Toll Plazas

by: Jesse Hager
Architect: RdlR Architects

Bridges are a cherished design problem. The clear span represents a common exercise for architecture students exploring essential concepts of structure, tension, and compression. Regrettably, architects are seldom commissioned to design a bridge project.

Chad McGhee; Mark Gaynor
Page 76

Singing Bell Ranch

by: Bart Shaw
Architect: Max Levy Architect

The term Max Levy, FAIA, uses to describe the weekend house he designed for Singing Bell Ranch is “ranch pragmatism.” The clients asked for a design that was functional and simple, which Levy provided in the form of an elongated rectangle oriented on an east-west axis to catch the prevailing breezes.“

Charles Smith
Page 80

Sisters’ Retreat

by: Matt Fajkus
Architect: Mell Lawrence Architects

Located on a semi-urban 7.5-acre lot more than a few miles West of Austin, Sisters’ Retreat encompasses a shared pool house and play area for the families of two siblings, set amongst their small compound of homes. The site, surrounded by tall grass and within walking distance of Lake Austin, is reached by a short meander from the residences.

Hester+Hardaway Photographers, JH Jackson Photography
Page 84

Texas Society of Architects Presents 2011 Honor Awards

The Texas Society of Architects announces its 2011 Honor Award recipients. The annual awards recognize significant contributions to the architectural profession and the quality of the built environment. Honor Awards were presented in October during the Texas Society of Architects’ 72nd Annual Convention.

Page 10

Pitts Medal Goes to Cowan For Lifetime Achievement

by: Andrea Exter

Described as a “legend” by his peers, Tommy N. Cowan, FAIA, is a dedicated and lifelong leader. His interest in design and architecture began in the fifth grade when a teacher invited him to compete in Austin’s Wellesley Junior Art Show. Two of Cowan’s architectural drawings were submitted and both won top honors.

Page 14

Firm Award: Richter Architects

In spite of being based in out-of-the-way Corpus Christi, Richter Architects has consistently produced award-winning work over three decades while also striving for the betterment of the profession through influential participation in the American Institute of Architects. For its exemplary contributions at all levels of the AIA and within its local community, the Texas Society of Architects has recognized Richter Architects with its 2011 Firm Award.

David Richter FAIA
Page 16

AIA Dallas Announces Design Awards

by: Jim Henry, AIA

A total of 13 projects were recently recognized with Design Awards by AIA Dallas. The chapter’s annual awards program celebrates the work of local architects, as well as the efforts of clients and consultants toward achieving design excellence. Three levels of awards – Honor, Merit, and Citation – were presented by two separate juries, one for built projects and a separate panel for unbuilt work, during different events.

Page 25

AIA Brazos Honors Five Projects

by: Elizabeth Price, AIA

Five projects were recognized in July with AIA Brazos Design Awards from a total of 16 entries. Jurors were Michael Malone, AIA, of Michael Malone Architects in Dallas; Emily Little, FAIA, of Clayton & Little Architects in Austin; and Mark T. Wellen, AIA, of Rhotenberry Wellen Architects in Midland.

Page 29

2011 Studio Awards

by: Stephen Sharpe, Hon. TSA

This year’s jury met on June 29 in the studio of Marlon Blackwell Architect in Fayetteville, Ark., to assay 50 entries in the Texas Society of Architects’ Studio Awards program.

Page 34

Texas Tech’s Green Future

by: Stephen Sharpe

This edition covers a broad sweep of variations on the “Design for Education” theme, from new facilities for private and public schools to an award-winning architecture course at UT Arlington that is now improving the everyday experiences of Arlington residents. There’s also a news article about a green roof on the campus of UT El Paso, an unlikely – but so far successful – attempt at sustainable design in a desert climate.

Brian Rex
Page 5

AIA El Paso Awards 7 Projects

by: Frederic Dalbin

On Oct. 30, AIA El Paso recognized seven projects at its 2009 Design Award Banquet held at the historic Camino Real Hotel in downtown El Paso. Four projects received a Design Award and two projects received an Honorable Mention.

Page 16

AIA LRGV Announces Design Awards

by: James Rodriguez

During its annual award banquet on Dec. 12, AIA Lower Rio Grande Valley announced the results of its 2009 Design Awards program. The selections were made by a jury that met in Houston during the TSA convention in October.

Page 16

Ten Projects Honored in San Antonio

by: TA Staff

AIA San Antonio announced the results of its 2009 Design Awards at a ceremony at Pearl Stable on Nov. 4. Eight projects from 49 entries were selected for Design Awards in three categories: Honor, Merit, and Citation. The Mayor’s Choice Award and the 25-Year Award were also announced at the event.

Page 19

Nine Awards Presented by AIA FW

by: Bart Shaw

On Oct. 6, the jury for AIA Fort Worth’s 2009 Design Awards program convened at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth. They viewed 40 projects submitted by local architects before deciding on the nine they selected for distinction.

Page 20

Arlington Re-Imagined

by: Susan Appleton

One year after her course, The Everyday City, was recognized with an AIA Education Honor Award, University of Texas at Arlington Assistant Professor Wanda Dye has tasked her architecture students with improving the everyday life of all Arlington residents. Through collaboration with City of Arlington staff, their work is a natural extension of the investigations they undertook for The Everyday City. In that class, Dye asked them to re-imagine the most mundane and banal aspects of the suburban environment.

City of Arlington Urban Design Center, Andrew Oxley, Carlos Sierra
Page 31

New Texas Fellows Announced

by: TA Staff

Fourteen Texans are among the 134 architects elevated by the AIA to its prestigious College of Fellows, an honor awarded to members who have made contributions of national significance to the profession.

Page 10

AIA Honor for Texas Architect

by: Stephen Sharpe

For 60 years, the members of TSA have financially supported Texas Architect through their dues while also contributing in various ways toward making the magazine one of the best AIA component publications. That long-term collective effort is being recognized this year by the AIA with an Institute Honor for Collaborative Achievement bestowed as part of the 2010 AIA Honor Awards program.

Page 11

AIA Recognizes Brochstein Pavilion

One Texas project – the Brochstein Pavilion at Rice University by Thomas Phifer and Partners – is among 14 projects recognized with 2010 Institute Honor Awards for Architecture.

Page 11

Malarkey Named ‘Young Architect’

Brian Malarkey, AIA, of Kirksey in Houston is among nine honorees in this year’s list of AIA “Young Architects.” The Young Architects Award is given to individuals who have shown exceptional leadership and made significant contributions to the profession in an early stage of their architectural career.

Page 12

AIA Corpus Christi Awards Three Projects

The Corpus Christi chapter of the AIA announced its 2009 Design Award winners on Dec. 15. Nineteen entries were received with work completed between 2005 and 2009, and the submittals were judged by a distinguished jury of architectural peers from outside the area. Richter Architects was awarded all three honors.

Page 12

Cynthia Woods Mitchell (1922-2009)

by: Barrie Scardino

Cynthia Woods Mitchell – like Ima Hogg, Dominique de Menil, and Jane Blaffer Owen – was an influential and discerning woman who changed the cultural and architectural landscape of the Houston area. Also like the others, Cynthia Mitchell had an eye for aesthetic perfection and a passion for beauty.

Mitchell Family
Page 15

UTSA Team Places in HABS Contest

by: Stephen Sharpe

A team of students from the University of Texas at San Antonio has been recognized with the 2009 Kenneth Lanier Anderson Prize by the Texas Architectural Foundation (TAF) for measured drawings of the Spanish Governor’s Palace in San Antonio. The prize was presented in November in conjunction with the annual Charles E. Peterson Prize organized jointly by the National Park Service, the Athenaeum of Philadelphia, and the American Institute of Architects to highlight student work for the Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS).

UTSA Collecge of Architecture
Page 19

AIA Houston Awards 13 Projects

by: TA Staff

Thirteen projects were selected for 2010 AIA Houston Design Awards. The jury – Brian Johnsen of Johnsen Schmaling Architects in Milwaukee, Wis.; Juan Miró, AIA, of Miró Rivera Architects in Austin; and Amanda Kolson Hurley, executive editor of Washington, D.C.-based Architect magazine – met Feb. 26 at the Architecture Center Houston to review 132 entries from 59 local firms. Awards were presented March 25 at the Rice Hotel in Houston.

Page 19

Gail Thomas Named Honorary AIA

by: TA Staff

The American Institute of Architects (AIA) has awarded honorary membership to Gail Thomas, Ph.D., president and CEO of the Trinity Trust Foundation. Honorary membership is one of the highest honors the AIA can bestow on any person outside the profession of architecture. Thomas, a Dallas resident, was recognized for her efforts to improve cities and for her support of the arts and architecture.

Page 20

Jury Selected for Design Awards

by: TA Staff

With the deadline having passed on April 23 for the 2010 TSA Design Awards, three jurors have been selected to review this year’s entries on May 21 at the TSA offices. The jurors are Adèle Naudé Santos, FAIA, dean of MIT’s School of Architecture and Planning and a principal of Santos Prescott and Associates in San Francisco; Tom Phifer, FAIA, of Thomas Phifer and Partners in New York; and Edward Bosley, director of the Gamble House in Pasadena, Calif., and an art historian on the faculty of the USC’s School of Architecture. They were chosen by the TSA Design Awards Committee, chaired by Michael Malone, AIA.

Page 23

AIA/HUD Award for Dallas Initiative

by: TA Staff

Congo Street Green Initiative in Dallas by Building Community Workshop recently received a 2010 American Institute of Architects/U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Secretary’s Award in the category of community-informed design.

’Before’ Photo Courtesy Building Community Workshop; ‘After’ photo courtesy Noe Medrano
Page 11

AIA Austin Awards 15 Projects

by: Rick Price

Fifteen projects were selected for the 2010 AIA Austin Design Awards in April. The jury was comprised of Merrill Elam, AIA, of Mack Scogin Merrill Elam Architects in Atlanta, Ga.; Marlon Blackwell, FAIA, of Marlon Blackwell Architect in Fayetteville, Ark.; and Michael Imber, FAIA, of Michael G. Imber Architects in San Antonio. The three jurors reviewed over 100 submittals at the AIA Austin Center for Architecture.

Page 16

Jury Chosen for TSA Studio Awards

by: TA Staff

This year’s TSA Studio Awards will be judged by three Arizona architects, each respected for design work and commitment to sustainable architecture. Comprising the jury is Wendell Burnette, FAIA, of Wendell Burnette Architects in Phoenix; John Kane, FAIA, a founding principal of Architekton in Tempe: and Philip Weddle, AIA, of Weddle Gilmore Black Rock Studio in Scottsdale.

Page 19

Casa Verde

Casa Verde, a conceptual project by Houston’s Morris Architects, was one of three projects awarded an Honorable Mention in the 2009 Dallas Urban Re:Vision international design competition that challenged participants to transform a 2.5-acre downtown parking lot into an entirely self-sustaining mixed-use, mixed-income development.

Page 20

Reading Into the Numbers

by: Stephen Sharpe

The annual TSA Design Awards program provides an intriguing snapshot of the state of architectural design in Texas. While nowhere near comprehensive in depicting a multifaceted profession, each year’s collection of winners nonetheless offers a survey of contemporary trends and the occasional flash of creative brilliance. Beyond its beauty-contest aspects, the program may also reveal insights into current economic conditions through the level of participation.

istockphoto, nikada
Page 7

S.A. Tower Wins 25-Year Award

by: Stephen Sharpe

During the 1960s, as several cities planned to build high-profile vertical symbols of their ambitions toward global prominence, San Antonio erected the Tower of the Americas as the theme structure for HemisFair ’68.

Dissection of the Tower, 1966 (Folder 2:7), UTS A’s Institute of Texan Cultures Library Collection of HemisFair ‘68 Materials, 1965-1994, MS 292, Special Collections, UTSA Library. Postcard (Folder 504:5), San Antonio Fair, Inc., Records, 1962-1995, MS 31, Special Collections, University of Texas at San Antonio Library.
Page 15

Design Awards 2010

by: Lawrence Connolly

After seven hours of uninterrupted work on May 21, this year’s TSA Design Awards jury finalized its selections. The jury began with 200 entries, keeping 61 from that total in the first round, and finished a second round with 21 before ultimately choosing the 11 projects featured on the following pages.

Illustration BY Betsy Cooper
Page 35

Cinco Camp

by: Ed Soltero
Architect: Rhotenberry Wellen Architects

When Malcolm McLean devised the now-ubiquitous metal shipping container in the 1950s, his idea transformed the cargo transport business. The movement of goods on a global scale was greatly facilitated by what became known as inter-modal steel building units.

Hester + Hardaway
Page 36

Grauwyler Park Branch Library

by: Gregory Ibanez
Architect: Oglesby Greene

In a famous Letter to the Editor in Architectural Record, architect Andres Duany labeled the four types of architectural consumers—patrons, clients, customers, and martyrs. Although he was writing in reference to housing, let’s (with apologies to Mr. Duany) apply the same categories to municipal architecture.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA; Kristin Winters, AIA
Page 40

The Lance Armstrong Foundation Headquarters

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: Lake/Flato Architects in collaboration with the Bommarito Group

Entering the Lance Armstrong Foundation (Livestrong) headquarters is an exercise in transition—from busy streetscape through serene garden to an open, sunlit interior. Transition also characterizes the conversion of the 1950s-era warehouse into the Livestrong offices, considering that a wide variety of the project’s materials were salvaged from the original structure.

Casey Dunn; Paul Hester
Page 44

La Lomita Chapel Restoration

by: Michael E. Allex
Architect: Kell Muñoz

Upon hi s death in 1861, a French merchant from Reynosa named Rene Guyard, bequeathed a tract of land along the Rio Grande near present-day Mission to two Catholic priests “for the propagation of the faith among the barbarians.” Thus began the 150-year history of La Lomita Chapel as a rendezvous point for Oblate missionaries in their travels through the wild borderlands.

Rebecca Rivera; MPC Studios; Nicki Martinez
Page 48

Mod Cott: Guest House

by: Murray Legge, AIA
Architect: Mell Lawrence Architects

A view of the limitless horizon can have a transforming effect. Watching the landscape stretch out across miles can cast a spell over even the most world-weary, especially from a high point where one is transfixed by the subtly shifting light over a wide space, cloud shadows cast across the land, a wild storm approaching from afar.

Mell Lawrence, FAIA; Jacob Termansen
Page 52

PSU Overlook Pavilion

by: Sean Burkholder
Architect: Overland Partners Architects

Integrating architecture into any given context while maintaining design integrity is a fine art. Architects must constantly walk the line between over- or under-contextualizing a building to support its strength as a unique entity within its environment. Somewhere between total disregard to surroundings and cliché facsimiles of geologic or biologic imagery, a good architect can find a project’s meaning without being overt. Such sought-after balance has been gracefully achieved by Overland Partners with the firm’s new Overlook Pavilion at Penn State University.

Jeffrey Totaro
Page 56

Pearl Stable

by: Douglas Lipscomb, AIA
Architect: Ford, Powell & Carson Architects and Planners

Upon seeing the renovated Pearl Stable one can fully appreciate how past generations respected even the most prosaic of structures. The stable building was originally constructed in 1894 to house the horses that pulled the beer wagons of the Pearl Brewing Company. The elegance of the original two-story, elliptical structure derives from the simplicity of its plan – with horse stalls arranged on the ground floor around its perimeter and its core – and the richness of the corbelled and patterned brick on the exterior. The second floor served as the hay loft from which feed could be dropped through the chutes to the horses below. At the center of the roof was a handsome cupola that provided ventilation to the stables.

Paul Bardagjy
Page 60

Sid W. Richardson Visual Arts Center

by: Rebecca Boles
Architect: Gideon Toal

Fort Worth Country Day ha s the cache t of bei ng one of the premier college preparatory programs in North Texas. In existence since 1963, Fort Worth Country Day offers K-12 instruction on its campus in southwest Fort Worth. Students become accustomed to the feel of a college campus as they change classes and circulate among separate academic buildings throughout the school day. Covered walkways, an abundance of trees, and landscaping with mature plantings are evidence that the school’s leadership sees the importance of an appropriate setting in creating an environment for learning.

Craig Kuhner
Page 64

Stone Creek Camp

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: Andersson-Wise Architects

“Beauty alone doesn’t hold your interest for very long. You want things to be a little… scary. But the kind of awe that derives from nature is extraordinarily tranquil.” So muses Arthur Andersson, AIA, in the recently published Natural Houses that features several projects designed by Andersson-Wise Architects, the Austin firm led by him and Chris Wise, AIA. Prominently showcased in the book is Stone Creek Camp, a backwoods hideaway built on a ridge overlooking Flathead Lake in rural northwestern Montana. The elegantly rusticated encampment comprises eight small buildings strategically arrayed across the steeply sloping site, each positioned to foster an individual and collective sense of refuge.

Art Gray
Page 68

GSA Regional Field Office

by: Filo Castore
Architect: Leo A Daly/LAN + PageSoutherlandPage; A Joint Venture

Rising above congested freeways, oversized houses, and drab strip malls, a new architectural landmark has been added to Houston’s horizon. A product of the General Service Administration’s Design Excellence Program, the austere and impressive governmental GSA Regional Field Office emerges from the nondescript suburban landscape with its simple form and emerald skin.

Tim Hursley
Page 72

East Windsor Residence

by: Ingrid Spencer
Architect: alterstudio architects

According to Kevin Alter, the 4,200-sf, three -story East Windsor Residence is essentially a one-bedroom loft because the top floor “has all the pleasures and attributes of a penthouse and then it expands down to give you all this other stuff.” The project was designed by Alter, along with alterstudio architects co-principal Ernesto Cragnolino, AIA, with a focus on the third level, which boasts 270-degree views and contains the master suite, kitchen, and main living area. But the “other stuff” found on the remaining two levels completes this finely crafted house in dynamic and dramatic ways.

Paul Finkel; Jonathan Jackson
Page 76

TSA Announces 2010 Honor Awards

by: Noelle Heinze

During its 71st annual convention in San Antonio, Oct. 14-16, the Texas Society of Architects recognized the following as this year’s Honor Award recipients for significant contributions to the architectural profession and the quality of the built environment.

Page 11

Firm Award Goes to Overland Partners

by: TA Staff

In recognition of its distinguished architecture and significant contributions to the architectural profession and the community, Overland Partners Architects of San Antonio was presented with the 2010 TSA Architecture Firm Award on Oct. 15 during the Texas Society of Architects/AIA convention.

Page 15

Another Peterson Prize for UTSA

by: Stephen Sharpe

A project by architecture students at the University of Texas at San Antonio to document the Heermann Store, a single-story commercial building erected in 1892 in rural southwest Bexar County, has been recognized with a 2010 Charles E. Peterson Prize.

UTSA Collecge of Architecture
Page 19

AIA Dallas Selects Award Winners

by: Brian William Kuper, AIA

Two juries – one judging the built projects and another the unbuilt – for AIA Dallas’ 2010 Design Awards program presented 16 awards following deliberations in late September at the Dallas Center for Architecture. A total of 117 submittals, 74 built and 43 unbuilt, were entered by members of the local chapter.

Page 23

NE Texas Awards Six Projects

by: TA Staff

Six projects by members of AIA Northeast Texas were recognized in the chapter’s 2010 Design Awards program. Jurors viewed a total of 15 entries before making their selections on Oct. 14 at the Center for Architecture in San Antonio.

Page 25

Studio Awards 2010

by: Stephen Sharpe

On July 16, a jury of three Arizona architects met in Phoenix to selecte unbuilt projects for honors in the 2010 TSA Studio Awards. The jury chose four entries from 80 submittals. The awarded projects are featured on the following pages, along with comments from the jury.

Page 28

Studio Awards 2010


Architect: Max Levy, FAIA

Color Clock House was conceived as a speculative house for a developer of an enclave of sustainable homes in Dallas.

Page 29

Studio Awards 2010


Architect: student s of Architecture Design VI Studio at Prairie View A&M School of Architecture

Page 30

Studio Awards 2010


Architect: C. Graham Beach , J . Brantley Hightower, aia, and Jennifer Young

The concept for edgeHouse explores the architectural potential of a house that fully exploits the unique social and environmental dualities of Marfa.

Page 31

Studio Awards 2010


Architect: Bengie Daniels, AIA, Derek Keck , Jon Gately, and Michael Day

Pegboard is a sustainable and expandable shelter for the people in the African nation of Ghana.

Page 32

Clyde Porter Receives AIA Young Award

by: Stephen Sharpe

For his efforts to encourage minority, under-served, and low-income students to pursue careers as architects, the American Institute of Architects’ Board of Directors has selected Clyde Porter, FAIA, as the 2009 recipient of the Whitney M. Young Jr. Award.

Page 10

AIA El Paso Awards 7 Projects

by: Fred Perez, AIA

The jury in AIA El Paso’s 2008 awards program recognized seven projects for design excellence. From more than 25 entries submitted in four categories – commercial, interiors, residential, and future projects – the jury presented two Honor Awards, four Merit Awards, and one Honorable Mention.

Page 16

AIA San Antonio Presents Design Awards

by: AIA San Antonio Staff

After jurors carefully evaluated 53 entries from 20 local architectural firms and one individual AIA member, the AIA San Antonio chapter announced the winners of its 2008 Design Awards. A total of 13 projects were recognized with awards in early November. Kell Muñoz topped the list with five awards.

Page 18

AIA Fort Worth Awards Nine Projects

by: Bart Shaw

The jury for AIA Fort Worth’s 2008 Design Awards convened Oct. 14 at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth where they sifted through 40 projects before selecting nine for distinction.

Page 20

5 Design Awards for AIA Northeast Texas

by: Brett Patrick, AIA

The Northeast Texas chapter of the AIA presented five design awards at its annual Christmas party and chapter meeting on Dec. 2. The winning projects for this biannual event were selected from a field of 18 entries representing seven firms.

Page 22

Andy Dekaney High School

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: SHW Group

Andy Dekaney High School recently received the 2008 Caudill Award, the highest honor given in the TASA /TASB Exhibit of School Architecture. Based on findings that students perform better in small groups, “Instruction Should Drive Construction” was the guiding philosophy for SH W Group’s design of the 486,000-square-foothigh school sited on 80.7 acres in Houston’s Spring Independent School District.

Richard Payne, FAIA
Page 69

Parra Named 2009 AIA Young Architect

by: TA Staff

Camilo Parra, AIA, of Houston is among eight recipients of the 2009 AIA Young Architects Award. The national honor is presented to professionals who have been licensed 10 years or less regardless of their age.

Page 10

Pulse

Designed by Helen Pierce of PierceWorkshop in San Antonio, Pulse recently won the $8,000 DawnTown 2008 Award sponsored by the Miami Downtown Development Authority.

Page 22

AIA Awards Texas Housing Projects

Two projects by Texas firms are among the 17 residential buildings recognized in the 2009 AIA Housing Awards. The awards program, now in its ninth year, was established to recognize the best in housing design and promote the importance of good housing as a necessity of life, a sanctuary for the human spirit, and a valuable national resource.

Photos by (left) Hester & Hardaway and (right) Charles Davis Smith, AIA
Page 12

Lake/Flato’s Shangri La in Top Ten Green

Lake/Flato Architects’ Shangri La Botanical Gardens and Nature Center in Orange is among the Top Ten Green Projects for 2009 as recognized by the AIA’s Committee on the Environment (COTE). Each year the national award celebrates excellence in sustainable architecture and design solutions that protect and enhance the natural environment.

Photo by Hester + Hardaway
Page 12

TSA Design Awards Jury Selected

by: TA Staff

Three highly respected designers will judge the entries in the 2009 TSA Design Awards program. The jurors will be Philip Freelon, FAIA, president of the Freelon Group in Raleigh-Durham, N.C.; Mary Margaret Jones, FASLA, president of San Francisco-based landscape architecture firm Hargreaves Associates; and Rick Joy, AIA, of Rick Joy Architects in Tucson. The jury is set to meet May 15 in Austin.

Page 17

Hariri to Lead Studio Awards Jury

Gisue Hariri of Hariri & Hariri Architecture in New York City, has been selected to lead the 2009 Texas Society of Architects Studio Awards jury. This year’s TSA Studio Awards will be judged separately from the Design Awards, and the deadline for entries has been set later in the year to encourage more students to participate in the competition.

Page 17

AIA Houston Recognizes 12 Projects

by: Christian Sheridan

AIA Houston honored 12 projects at its 53rd annual Design Awards Dinner held on March 26 at the Rice Hotel’s Crystal Ballroom. Winners were selected from 115 entries in six categories: architecture, residential architecture, interior architecture, renovation/restoration, urban design, and on the boards.

Page 18

Vision 2030: West Dallas Gateway

Recognized with a 2009 Great Places Award, co-sponsored by the Environmental Design Research Association and Metropolis magazine, the West Dallas Gateway suggests redevelopment strategies for a blighted, post-industrial area of the city.

Page 22

AIA Austin Awards 15 Projects

by: Rick Price

On April 18, AIA Austin recognized 15 projects at its 2009 Design Awards Gala held at the historic Browning Hangar on the redeveloped grounds of former Mueller Municipal Airport. Of the 115 submitted projects, 14 received Design Awards and one received a Studio Award.

Page 17

Fierce Competition

by: Stephen Sharpe

The effects of the economic downturn are now clearly apparent across the state. The evidence is rendered in less-than-optimistic forecasts as firms cautiously plan for 2010. The recession is brought into sharper relief when compared with the robust business climate enjoyed by design professionals for a decade prior to last year’s fourth quarter.

Photo courtesy University Health Syst em
Page 7

TSA 25-Year Award Recognizes Parker Chapel on Trinity Campus

by: Stephen Sharpe

The Margarite B. Parker Chapel is essentially unchanged since completed in 1966, a pink-brick Romanesque duomo at the spiritual center of O’Neil Ford’s idealized hill-town campus of Trinity University.

left Photo by W. Eu gene George, FAIA ; right photo courtesy ford powell & carson
Page 15

AIA Brazos Awards 3 Projects

by: J.P. Grom, AIA

AIA Brazos held a jury on Aug. 6 for the chapter’s biannual design awards program. Jurors included Dror Baldinger, AIA, of Marmon Mok Architects, Brantley Hightower, AIA, of Lake/Flato Architects and Stephen Sharpe, the editor of Texas Architect. From a total of nine projects submitted, the jury selected three for recognition.

Page 27

Design Awards 2009

The 2009 TSA Design Awards jury met in Austin on May 15 to view 261 submittals of built work. The jurors were Mary Margaret Jones, FASLA, of Hargreaves Associates (San Francisco, Cambridge, and New York); Rick Joy, AIA, of Rick Joy Architects (Tucson); and Philip Freelon, FAIA, of the Freelon Group (Durham, N.C.)

Illustrations by Bryce Weigand
Page 39

Eclectic Ensemble

by: Lawrence Connolly
Architect: Dick Clark Architecture with Michael Hsu Design Office

When Antoine Predock, FAIA, was in midst of conceiving the new Austin City Hall, he commented that the city was “terminally democratic.” He made the remark after his design survived a protracted review process that included more than a dozen town meetings and hearings before the City Council. A similar sort of public scrutiny – albeit on a smaller, neighborhood scale – resulted when Dick Clark Architecture added a zoning non-compliant residential building to its 1400 South Congress mixed-use project.

Paul Bardagjy; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 40

Terminal Clarity

by: Gregory Ibanez
Architect: Corgan with HKS and HNTB

Discussing Dallas Fort Worth International Airport Terminal D and its selection for a 2009 TSA Design Award, juror Philip Freelon, FAIA, said, “We thought that the project was a very good example of a public building, very prominent, but it still was handled with quite some sensitivity. We all have been in airports, probably more than we’d like, and this is one where you actually feel a sense of light and airy space, which is relaxing. Natural light was well used, and the high volume of the space gives it an open and comfortable feeling. We thought it was well worthy of an award.”

Craig Blackmon, FAIA; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 44

A Sonnet to Dwell In

by: Eurico R. Francisco
Architect: Buchanan Architecture

The area just north of downtown Dallas known as Oak Lawn is rich and diverse in demographics, land use, and building types. Having matured over time, Oak Lawn has evolved into a neighborhood of restaurants, churches, hotels, offices, and a varied assemblage of residential buildings.

Jason Franzen; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 48

Garden Spot

by: Michael Malone
Architect: Cunningham Architects

From the street Cunningham Architects’ House in the Garden is a beautifully conceived and executed object, partially shielded behind an iconic wall constructed of stainless-steel wire grid and filled with fragments of slag glass. This idealized garden villa – really a giant porch – provides a delightful way to both view and inhabit a highly personalized landscape. It’s a thoughtful and well organized bit of place making; surprisingly its greatest success is as a foil and extension of an outdoor space that was originally part of the adjacent house.

James F. Wilson, Gisela Borghi; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 52

Concrete Poetry

by: Jeffrey Brown, AIA
Architect: Elliott + Associates Architects

This word painting by Rand Elliott, FAIA, explains how he wants people to understand his latest award-winning project, ImageNet of Houston. Employing poetry or manifestoes to describe one’s work is not uncommon these days. Indeed, such material appears to be a prerequisite of the current media culture that promotes “starchitects,” “signature architects,” and one-hit wonders. Supportive text is, we are led to believe, required reading. If a building appears mundane, baffling, or otherwise underwhelming, just refer to the narrative. Within the architect’s words, we are told, lies the true meaning which will assure in our prosaic times that, yes, this is Architecture.

Scott McDonald, Hedrich Blessing; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 56

Haven for Art

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: Laguarda Low Architects

Once just another nondescript, single-story building indistinguishable from its neighbors that together comprise a light-industrial district wedged between downtown Dallas and the Trinity River, the Light & Sie Art Gallery now stands out. The reconfigured entry, framed by a box of aluminum panels, asserts a refined presence that quietly commands attention amid the clutter of storefronts along Leslie Street on the city’s near-west side. The 13,000-sf project is one of the latest examples in a transformative trend for the area where a few of the shopworn buildings have been repurposed as showrooms for the design trade and retail galleries for contemporary art.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 60

Elegant Tribute

by: Geof Edwards
Architect: Poteet Architects

Approaching the Linda Pace Foundation from the east, visitors are confronted with a strikingly graphic text piece on the building’s canvas-like facade, a short poem by Daniel Edgar Martinez: “beauty…it rubs against one’s tongue, it hangs there, hurting one, insisting on its own existence, finally it gets so one cannot stand the pain, then one must have beauty extracted.” It’s an “in your face” message that transcends its purpose as a public art piece and could describe the transformation of a derelict 1940sera auto paint shop into what is now the subtle and powerful beauty of the Linda Pace Foundation.

Chris Cooper Photography; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 64

Folia Fictus

by: Jenny Kiel
Architect: Dillon Kyle Architecture

Once the site of an identical apartment building as the building the gallery now inhabits, is where the designers Dillon Kyle and Cedar Baldridge imagined a parking lot built for the artists of the gallery. The parking lot is actually used more by the guests and owners of the gallery but it makes a nod to the artwork inside. It is a unique integration of art, landscape, and function.

Casey Dunn Photography; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 68

Cross-Cultural Delight

by: Rick Lewis
Architect: Jackson & Ryan Architects

Although San Antonio’s iconic settings are significant especially when weighed for their economic benefits to Texas’ third largest city, the broader story of her heritage, traditions and, most importantly, her people is to be found in quarters beyond the shadows of high-rise downtown hotels.

Mark Scheyer/Houston; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 72

Inspired Display

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: Overland Partners

Aglow at night like a gigantic Chinese paper lantern, the Lenora and Walter F. Brown Asian Art Wing, designed by Overland Partners of San Antonio, inserts a luminous minimalism into the crenellated, century-old former Lone Star Brewery that houses the San Antonio Museum of Art. The architects have maintained the subtle rhythms of the circa-1900 brewery while deftly introducing a sleek, modern horizontal complement to the venerable, vertical brick structure.

Paul Bardagjy Photography, Terry Manning Photography; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 76

Catalyst for Creativity

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: HKS

The comprehensive renovation of a circa-1970 Brutalist office building has yielded a comfortable and award-winning home for the innovate research being conducted by the University of Texas at Dallas Center for BrainHealth. Designed by HKS, with Kyley Harvey leading the effort, the 63,000-sf project was completed in late 2006.

Blake Marvin/HKS; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 80

Enlightened Living

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: MJ Neal Architects

Wolfe Den, by MJ Neal, AIA, represents the Austin architect’s fifth TSA Design Award. The 2,300-sf residence, designed for a young professional couple, is a study in layers, light, and logic, and stands out in subtle contrast to Neal’s previous award-winning work, which includes Twin Peaks (2003), Ramp House (2004), Anthony Nak (2005), and Farley Studio (2007). “This is a much more subtle work than Ramp House and Twin Peaks. The division of space is central to this project,” says Neal, when asked to define the difference between this home and the three others (Twin Peaks comprises two side-by-side dwellings) on the same south Austin street. Sited in an eclectic neighborhood populated by mostly 1930s-era homes interspersed with hip makeovers, Wolfe Den is bordered on the east by a one-story bungalow and on the west by the strikingly modernist Ramp House. Further down the block are Twin Peaks.

Viviane Vives
Page 84

TSA Announces 2009 Honor Awards

by: Noelle Heinze

During its 70th annual convention in October, the Texas Society of Architects recognized the following as this year’s Honor Award recipients for significant contributions to the architectural profession and the quality of the built environment.

Page 11

Peterson Is First Woman To Receive Top TSA Honor

by: Mary Carolyn Hollers George

Carolyn Peterson, FAIA, is the forty-first recipient of the Texas Society of Architect’s highest award – the Medal for Lifetime Achievement in Honor of Llewellyn W. Pitts FAIA – presented annually to a TSA member for contributions to the profession of architecture and their community. From its inception in 1968 until this year, the honor’s awardees have been exclusively male.

photo courtesy Ken Slavin
Page 15

TSA Firm Award Goes to PSP

by: TA Staff

In honor of its significant contributions to the architectural profession and the community, the 2009 TSA Firm Award was presented to PageSoutherlandPage during the Texas Society of Architect/AIA convention on Oct. 23.

image courtesy PageSoutherlandPage;
Page 16

Studio Awards 2009

Since 2004, the Texas Society of Architects has sponsored the TSA Studio Awards to recognize the best in unbuilt work by architectural students and faculty, as well as by architects practicing in the state. Prior to this year, submittals were reviewed by the same jurors who judged the TSA Design Awards.

Page 30

Studio Awards 2009


Architect: Brave /Architecture

Where the historical covered bridge protected the structure from the elements, this reinterpretation permits the elements to pass through the structure. Located in the Texas Hill Country, the Sorensen Bridge is the addition of a structure to an existing bridge spanning 50 feet across Sandy Creek near New Ulm. The creek divides 220 acres of private property that belongs to an entrepreneur whose business is selling tube steel.

Page 30

Studio Awards 2009


Architect: SHW Group

While undergoing tremendous political and socio-economic transition in light of the post-Saddam Hussein regime change, Kurdistan is embracing education and the power it has to transform a nation. This has led to a desire for schools that can serve as catalysts for the transformation, and the new Transformational School will become a prototype for introducing twenty-first-century educational methods.

Page 31

Studio Awards 2009


Architect: Morris Architects

Bird watching presents untapped potential for the hospitality industry. With as many as 47.8 million American’s calling themselves “birders,” a niche market for hotel design has been previously overlooked. Morris Architects designed an approach that can make this great pastime a sensory, exciting experience for anybody—professional naturalists, hobbyists, or those in search of a luxurious retreat experience.

Page 32

Studio Awards 2009


Architect: Bart Shaw, AIA

FEMA trailers are by their nature temporary and by their character demoralizing. What if a permanent solution could be deployed quickly enough to help people retain their community, spirit, and viability? Lift:Home was developed for this purpose.

Page 33

Studio Awards 2009


Architect: Nicholas Richardson

Simulation helps designers see virtual space as more than just a mirror of reality, allowing the user to test the potential realities – site conditions, material properties, lighting, and the laws of physics – of a design before constructing it at full scale.

Page 33

Studio Awards 2009


Architect: Hernan Molina

The project proposes to redevelop Valencia’s old harbor in Spain that represents the commitment of the city with a modern spirit, rich in options and aspirations. This project of renovation and master planning intends to recover the harbor in a sustainable manner. The project proposes: 1) to create a waterfront where none currently exists; 2) to integrate the port into the city; 3) to suitably separate the port and non-port uses; 4) to order traffic circulation along the seafront; 5) to resolve the area in which the dry river bed joins the sea; 6) to conserve and recover the heritage of the area; 7) to propose a suitable combination of public and private uses; and 8) to consider pre-existing uses for their integration into a sustainable environment.

Page 34

Studio Awards 2009


Architect: Jeremy Olbrys

The 89,000-sf museum in downtown Lima exhibits Peru’s collection of ancient and contemporary textiles while also providing spaces for research, preservation, education, and social/community events. It also utilizes lighting, scale, and spatial experience to properly display textiles.

Page 35

Studio Awards 2009


Architect: Miró Rivera Architects

Death and humans’ response to it have long held the power to bind cultures together and create places that transcend time and custom. Our collective respect for the dead and where they are laid to rest reaches across cultures like few other human experiences. It is the commonality of this reverence that guides the creation of Yarauvi, a necropolis at the center of the Dead Sea.

Page 36

AIA San Antonio Announces Awards

From the 58 projects entered in the 2007 AIA San Antonio Design Awards, jurors selected two for Honor Awards, three for Merit Awards, and five for Citation Awards. In addition, the jury recognized two of the award-winning projects for sustainable design. During ceremonies held Oct. 24 at the recently renovated Pearl Stable, two other awards were announced—the Mayor’s Choice Award honoring a publicly funded architectural project and the chapter’s 25-Year Design Award for a project `that has stood the test of time.

Page 16

AIA Fort Worth Awards 5 Projects

by: Ivonne Levin, AIA

The local chapter of the AIA recognized four projects in the General Design category and one project in the Mayor’s Award category in ceremonies that took place at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth. The members of the 2007 jury were Julie Eizenberg, AIA, of Koning Eizenberg Architecture in Los Angeles; Errol Barron, FAIA, of Errol Barron/Michael Toups in New Orleans; and Kevin Alter, Assoc. AIA, of Alterstudio Architects in Austin.

Page 18

AIA Dallas Celebrates Design Excellence

The Dallas chapter of the American Institute of Architects announced the 2007 design award winners during its annual Design Awards Announcement and Celebration Party in the AT&T Victory Plaza on Sept. 19, 2007.

Page 20

AIA Honors McKittrick with Kemper Award

Thomas McKittrick, FAIA, of Houston is the 2008 recipient of the Edward C. Kemper Award for his contributions to the profession through service to the American Institute of Architects. In 1991, he was honored with TSA’s Llewellyn W. Pitts Award (now called the Lifetime Achievement Medal), the Society’s highest recognition for an architect member.

Page 22

AIA LRGV Presents 3 Awards

The Lower Rio Grande Valley chapter of the AIA honored local architectural projects during its 2007 Holiday and Design Awards Celebration held in McAllen.

Page 22

Carl Wunsche Sr. High School

by: Megan Braley
Architect: SHW Group

Carl Wunsche Sr. High School is a career academy located in the Spring Independent School District of Houston. SH W Group oriented the 273,178-square-foot school around three academic towers that each focuses on a specialized area of study.

Richard Payne, FAIA
Page 63

LaGrone Advanced Technology Complex

by: Megan Braley
Architect: PBK Architects

The 120,792-square-foot LaGrone Advanced Technology Complex, located in the Denton Independent School District, includes 16 academies that provide students with trade-specific technical skills. PBK Architects of Dallas has uniquely designed each academy to reflect a specific professional working environment that facilitates increased learning through experience.

Jud Haggard
Page 65

Sky Harbour Elementary

by: Megan Braley
Architect: Pfluger Associates Architects

The 98,620-square-foot Sky Harbour Elementary School, located in the Southwest Independent School District of San Antonio, has been transformed from a solid concrete, windowless building into a series of welcoming, light-filled spaces. Pfluger Associates of San Antonio created a two-story classroom addition with a new administrative area.

Clem Spalding; Michelle Dudley, AIA
Page 67

West Brazos Junior High

by: Megan Braley
Architect: SHW Group

West Brazos Junior High School, located in the Columbia- Brazoria Independent School District of Brazoria, is the first LEE D certified public school in Texas. SH W Group designed the 91,500-square-foot building to fit into its natural surroundings.

Richard Payne, FAIA
Page 68

Thirteen Texans Elevated as AIA Fellows`

Thirteen Texans, along with 103 other honorees, have been elected AIA Fellows by the 2008 Jury of Fellows in Washington, D.C. The announcement was made on Feb. 29. From a membership of more than 81,000, the AIA has fewer than 2,600 members distinguished in fellowship, which requires at least 10 years of membership and significant architectural contributions on a national level.

Page 9

AIA Honors Austin Firm’s Work

Anthony Nak Flagship Store, a high-end jewelry boutique designed by MJ Neal Architects of Austin, has been recognized with a 2008 AIA Honor Award for Interior Architecture. Located in downtown Austin, Anthony Nak represents the only project with a Texas connection among this year’s slate of winners.

Page 11

CNU Set to Convene in Booming Austin To See Changes, Honor Local Urbanist

by: Stephen Sharpe

When hundreds of architects and urban planners convene here in March for the Congress of the New Urbanism’s CNU XVI, one of their main topics of conversation will be: Can Austin be a truly great city?

Page 11

THC Awards $56M for Courthouses

The Texas Historical Commission in January awarded nearly $56 million to 17 counties in its latest round of matching grant under the auspices of its nationally recognized Texas Historic Courthouse Preservation Program. The counties set to receive funds in Round V of the program are Cass, Cooke, Fannin, Hall, Hamilton, Harris, Hood, Kendall, La Salle, Lavaca, McCulloch, Mills, Potter, Randall, Roberts, San Augustine, and Trinity.

Page 18

AIA Houston Awards 16 Projects

by: Kimberley Hickson, AIA

AIA Houston honored 16 projects during the chapter’s fifty-second annual Design Awards Dinner held on March 27 at the Rice Hotel. Winners were selected from 117 entries.

Page 16

Jury Selected for 2008 Design Awards

The jury for the 2008 TSA Design Awards will be arts writer Judith Dupré and architects Steven Ehrlich, FAIA, and Billie Tsien, AIA. The three are scheduled to meet June 27 in Austin to review entries and make their selections. The deadline for entries is May 30.

Page 22

Lake/Flato Receives AIA Housing Award

Lake/Flato Architect’s Lake Tahoe Residence is among 19 projects recognized in the 2008 AIA Housing Awards. The competition, now in its eighth year, was established to spotlight the best in housing design and promote the importance of good housing as a necessity of life, a sanctuary for the human spirit, and a valuable national resource.

Page 22

McAllen Convention Center

by: Megan Braley
Architect: Gignac Architects (architect of record); Thompson, Ventulett, Stainback & Associates (design archite

Brian Gassel, TVS
Page 62

AIA Austin Awards Seven Projects

by: Brian Carlson

AIA Austin honored seven projects during the chapter’s 2008 Awards and Honors Gala held on April 19 at the Mexican American Cultural Center. The projects were selected from a pool of 65 entries submitted by local firms.

Page 18

AIA Lubbock Recognizes 12 Projects

by: Laura N. Bennett

In November, AIA Lubbock presented its 2007 Design Awards at the Merket Alumni Center on the Texas Tech University campus. The competition is held every other year to spotlight the talents of architects from the Lubbock area.

Page 20

‘Home on the Range’

by: James Kirkpatrick AIA
Architect: Hahnfeld Hoffer Stanford

Weatherford, the county seat of Parker County, is the headwaters of the West. When you imagine cowboys driving cattle through a small townin the “Old West,” Weatherford could easily be that town.

Chad David
Page 48

Excellence Endures

by: Stephen Sharpe

In theory, the task of selecting the TSA 25-Year Award is fairly simple. The jury’s work this year, however, posed a dilemma—to recognize the best of the lot or to reject it because of tragic events in its past. Of the five nominees one clearly stood out. But as magnificent as the Fort Worth Water Gardens is, no one who knows the park’s history can brush aside the fact that six people have died in accidents there since its opening in 1974.

Photo by Darin Norman, AIA
Page 7

Water Gardens Picked for 25-Year Award

by: Stephen Sharpe

Having enthralled visitors since its opening in 1974, yet despite the grim fact that six people have died there in two harrowing accidents, Philip Johnson’s idyllic Fort Worth Water Gardens is recognized this year with the Texas Society of Architects’ 25-Year Award. The project notably instills the agitated urban landscape with a refreshing serenity at the south edge of downtown, on a formerly blighted site adjacent to the municipal convention center.

Photo by Darin Norman, AIA
Page 12

TSA Announces 2008 Honor Awards

by: TA Staff

The Texas Society of Architects has announced this year’s Honor Award recipients. The awards recognize significant contributions to the architectural profession and the quality of the built environment and will be presented during the 69th Annual TSA Convention Oct. 23-25 in Fort Worth.

Page 14

TSA Architecture Firm Award

Founded in 1953 by Harvey V. Marmon Jr. and Edward Mok, Marmon Mok is now led by Stephen R. Souter, FAIA, who has served as managing partner since 1988; William Reeves, AIA; Greg Houston, AIA; Dror Baldinger, AIA; Carlos Moreno, AIA; Mary Bartlett, AIA; Braint Harkiewicz, AIA; and Montgomery Howard, AIA.

Page 16

Lubbock Recognizes 12 Design Projects

by: Laura N. Bennett

[Editor’s note: Due to an editing error, a news story in the July/August edition about AIA Lubbock’s Design Awards inadvertently omitted the projects’ architecture firms. The complete list follows.] AIA Lubbock presented its 2007 Design Awards on Nov. 29, 2007.

Page 24

Jury Duty

by: Michael Rey, AIA

This year’s jury event comprised an 11-hour marathon that resulted in the selection of 15 Design Awards and four Studio Awards. Meeting on June 27 in the TSA conference room, the three jurors began their work at 8:30 a.m.

Page 40

2008 Design Awards Jury

Last February TSA’s Design Awards Committee, with representatives from almost all of the 17 AIA chapters across Texas, gathered in Austin to elect a jury for this year’s program. Texas has been privileged to host a variety of astounding critics throughout the Design Award’s 57-year history. This year was no exception. Billie Tsien, AIA; Steven Ehrlich, FAIA; and Judith Dupré accepted the challenge of reviewing 267 Design Award entries and 87 Studio Award entries. The ensuing deliberations showcased each juror’s individual perspective and approach to their work.

Page 41

AMLI II

by: Wendy Price Todd
Architect: PageSoutherlandPage

Located in downtown Austin ’s fledgling 2nd Street District, the new 18-story AMLI II integrates 35,000 square feet of ground-level retail space, four and one-half levels of above-ground parking, an activity deck on the fifth level above the garage, and 231 rental apartments on 17 floors.

Casey Dunn
Page 42

Concrete Studio

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: Mell Lawrence Architects

Mell Lawrence, FAIA
Page 46

Design Exploration Center

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: GBA Architecture

Faced wit h the imminent demolition of a World War II-vintage structure adjacent to the University of Houston’s College of Architecture, school officials devised a metamorphosis that not only honors the original building’s utilitarian design but also enhances scholarship on the urban campus.

Hester + Hardaway Photographers
Page 50

Edcouch Fine Arts Center

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: Kell Muñoz

The tallest building in the delta region of the Lower Rio Grande Valley is also the first important civic building to be erected in more than 30 years to serve the small towns of Edcouch and Elsa. Sharing resources in a combined public school district, the towns are located halfway between Harlingen and Edinburg.

Chris Cooper Photography
Page 54

Friends Meetinghouse

by: Jon Thompson
Architect: Lake|Flato Architects

Lake /Flat o Architects ’ recent addition to the San Antonio Friends Meetinghouse represents the firm’s second phase for the local community of the Religious Society of Friends. Both phases of the Friends Meetinghouse create a concrete expression of the inner centering that is fundamental to the Quaker faith.

Chris Cooper Photography
Page 58

George Allen Sr. Courthouse

by: Jonathan P. Rollins, AIA
Architect: Rees Associates

The addition to and renovation of the George Allen Sr. Courthouse building consolidates all 45 of the Dallas County civil courts, formerly located in three buildings, into one central location. Providing 210,000 square feet of new pace, the addition stacks its program with the highest traffic family court spaces on the bottom, served by escalators.

Craig Blackmon, FAIA
Page 62

Indian Bean Guesthouse

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: FARO STUDIO

About an hour outside of Louisville, Kentucky, on 250 acres of rolling fields, a former tobacco farm plays host for a family’s weekend retreats—and now for their friends, too.

Jason Schmidt; Frank Doring
Page 66

Karbach Residence

by: Lawrence Connolly
Architect: Tim Cuppett, AIA

Located just two blocks from the State Capitol, the three-story 20 x 150-foot sliver at 811 Congress represents one of the few remaining historic buildings in downtown Austin. The structure, originally built in 1874 and used over the years to house a series of retail establishments, had been ravaged by fire and abandoned when Dennis Karbach bought the property to turn it into a residence. He hired Tim Cuppett, AIA, to help him realize the potential for the 9,000-sq. ft. shell hidden beneath an outmoded 1950s-era perforated-metal brise soleil.

Paul Bardagjy; Woody Welch; Tim Cuppett
Page 70

Lake Austin Residence

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: Lake|Flato Architects

Designed as a “village by a canal ,” this waterside residence integrates a series of small-scale, gable-roofed buildings with a narrow site along an inlet of Lake Austin. The architects of Lake/Flato once again have exhibited their adroit touch with materials and adeptness for capturing abundant outdoor views. Clustered like a rustic encampment, the individual buildings are designed to seamlessly blend their interiors with the exterior environment.

Patrick Y. Wong; Paul Hester
Page 74

Lost Pines Chapel

by: Lawrence Connolly
Architect: LZT Architects

Set adjacent to the east shore of Lake Bastrop, the new non-denominational openair chapel at the 400-acre Lost Pines Boy Scout Camp provides a memorable meditative experience, especially at dusk when the rustic structure frames a vista of the sun setting over the lake.

Murray Legge, AIA
Page 78

Oak Court

by: Michael Malone
Architect: Buchanan Architecture

Few architects’ legacies have been more controversial than that of mid-century modernist Edward Durrell Stone. As his buildings age, they don’t engender the passion for restoration often associated with the work of his peers. Buchanan Architecture’s recent restoration and remodel of Oak Court – a palatial Stone design in Dallas from 1956 – offers a clear signal that, despite any prejudices, there is value in Stone’s buildings.

James F. Wilson
Page 82

Residence 1414 Renovation

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: Miró Rivera Architects

As one of two Miró Rivera projects selected for Design Awards this year, the renovation of this 1940s house required a fine balance between modern updates and traditional aspects of the original design.

Paul Finkel – piston design
Page 86

Seton Medical Center

by: Emma Janzen
Architect: PageSoutherlandPage

Seton Medical Center, the largest medical and surgical acute care center in Austin, was in desperate need of a facelift. In 2005, Seton commissioned PageSoutherlandPage to expand and renovate its 1970s-era brick building. The scope of the expansion included 110,000 square feet of new facilities, including a day surgery center, a chapel with adjacent garden, a main entranceway, and a “front door image” for the hospital. When the work was completed, both the physical identity of the building and its capacity were improved.

Tim Griffith Photographer
Page 90

Trail Restroom

by: Dror Baldinger
Architect: Miró Rivera Architects

An assemblage of 49 Corten steel plates arrayed in a coil-like shape, Miró Rivera Architects’ Trail Restroom is a captivating work of brutal simplicity.

Paul Finkel –piston design; Paul Bardagjy Photography; Kraig Becker
Page 94

U.S. Courthouse

by: Mark T. Wellen
Architect: PageSoutherlandPage

The U.S. Courthouse in Alpine was universally admired by this year’s Design Awards jury for its simplicity of form and masterful response to the setting. The courthouse was a product of the U.S. General Service Administration’s Design Excellence Program with PageSoutherlandPage’s Austin office as the architect selected for the project.

Chris Cooper Photography
Page 98

Biomedical Learning Center

by: TA Staff
Architect: SHW Group

The SHW Group, an Austin-based architectural and planning firm best known for its educational building design, developed the University of Texas at Brownsville’s Biomedical Research Laboratories and Community Sciences Building.

Mark Trew Photography
Page 102

Bracken Bat Cave

by: TA Staff
Architect: Overland Partners Architects

Overland Partners of San Antonio has designed the environmentally sensitive 36,000-square-foot Bracken Bat Cave Nature Reserve in Comal County. The visitor’s center rests atop the underground cavern that harbors the world’s largest bat colony, home to more than 40 million Mexican free-tailed bats.

Page 104

Near Northside Study

by: TA Staff
Architect: William Truitt, AIA

The purpose of Near Northside Study conducted by William Truitt, AIA, of the University of Houston, is three-fold: to illuminate existing problems of large open-space neighborhoods that are often overlooked in inner-city studies; to highlight the potential for such neighborhoods to positively impact the larger urban area; and to propose new adjacencies that allow for growth in targeted areas over the next 30 years.

Page 106

University Research Study

by: Richard B. Ferrier, FAIA
Architect: Firm X

The University Research Study , completed by R.B Ferrier, FAIA, expands on traditional methods of architectural representation through a series of conceptual watercolor drawings. Ferrier, an associate professor at UT Arlington, teaches conceptual drawing as part of graduate design studio courses.

Page 108

High Expectations

by: Joyce Chandran

When architects from Leo A Daly’s Dallas office and engineers from its sister company, Lockwood, Andrews & Newnam in Houston, were tasked with designing a transportation facility for the Houston Independent School District, all parties concluded that it was an opportunity to set a new standard in industrial building design.

Page 144

AIA Dallas Presents Design Awards

by: AIA Dallas Staff

Ten local architectural firms, plus a student design studio from the University of Texas at Arlington, earned top honors Sept. 18 at AIA Dallas’ 2008 Design Awards presented in an open-air ceremony on AT&T Plaza at Victory Park.

Page 16

Austin Firm Garners International Award

Miró Rivera Architects’ Pedestrian Bridge was among three projects receiving top tier recognition in the 2006 The Architectural Review Awards for Emerging Architecture. Considered the best international award for young architects, the annual program celebrates the work of designers under the age of 45 who are at the start of their independent careers.

photo by Paul Finkel
Page 14

San Antonio Announces Design Awards

Twelve projects received awards in A IA San Antonio’s 2006 Design Awards. The projects were announced on Oct. 25 at a ceremony held at the Pearl Stable. The awards presentation served as the finale of the chapter’s second annual “Architecture Month.”

Page 15

AIA Fort Worth Awards Seven Projects`

by: Ivonne Levin, AIA

AIA Fort Worth recognized seven projects at the chapter’s 2006 Design Awards ceremony held at the Modern Art Museum.

Page 16

National Trust Awards Two Sites in Texas

In November, the National Trust for Historic Preservation presented its National Preservation Honor Award to projects in Texas—The Southwest School of Art and Craft in San Antonio and Socorro Mission in El Paso. The projects were among 21 national award winners honored in the National Trust’s annual awards.

courtesy library of congress; courtesy national trust
Page 17

Gloria Cisneros Pre-Kindergarten

by: Andi Beierman
Architect: SHW Group

Gloria Cisneros Pre-Kindergarten received the Caudill Award, the highest honor given in the 2006 TASA /TASB Exhibit of School Architecture. Designed specifically with four-year-old students in mind, the 45,793-sf school provides an environment that encourages children to feel welcome.

Mark Trew
Page 49

Excellence in Brick

by: Jaime Powell
Architect: Richter Architects

In a once charming neighborhood now in desperate need of a facelift, the construction of an award-winning, new elementary school has ignited a long-awaited neighborhood revitalization.

David Richter, FAIA ; Larry Rose
Page 70

Northeast Texas 2006 Design Awards

by: Brett Patrick, AIA

Seven projects were recognized at the Northeast Texas AIA annual Christmas party and chapter meeting. The jury panel consisted of Kenneth Apel, AIA, of HKS in Dallas; Gary Kirchoff, AIA, of HH Architects in Dallas; and Andrew Vernooy, AIA, dean of the Texas Tech School of Architecture

Page 15

Texas Projects Receive AIA Honors

Three projects in Texas were among the 29 projects recognized this year with AIA’s Honor Awards, the profession’s highest recognition of works that exemplify excellence in three categories—architecture, interior architecture, and urban design. The annual competition attracted a total of almost 700 entries, with independent juries reviewing submittals in each of the categories.

Page 17

Hoogeboom Selected as AIA Young Architect

Lonnie D. Hoogeboom, AIA, a partner in the Houston firm of Natalye Appel + Associates LLC, is one of six recipients of the 2007 AIA Young Architect Award. Hoogeboom was previously honored with TSA’s Award for Young Professional Achievement in 2006.

Page 19

AIA Houston Awards 19 Projects

by: Geoffry Brune, AIA

AIA Houston honored 19 projects during the chapter’s 2007 Design Awards Dinner held on April 5 at the Majestic Metro Theater. The projects were selected from 136 entries submitted by local firms.

Page 19

Jury Selected for TSA Design Awards

The jury for the 2007 TSA Design Awards has been confirmed, with jurors scheduled to meet June 22–23 to review entries. The jury’s selections will be published in the September/October 2007 edition of Texas Architect. The awarded projects’ architects and owners will be honored during ceremonies at the TSA annual convention set Oct. 18-20 in Austin.

Page 21

25-Year Award Nominations Due June 1

The TSA 25-Year Award is an important public outreach program that focuses much-deserved attention on distinguished Texas architecture of enduring significance. The annual award recognizes a building or ensemble of buildings completed 25 to 50 years before, which has retained its central form, character, and architectural integrity.

Page 21

AIA Austin Awards 17 Projects

by: Brian Carlson

AIA Austin honored 17 projects during the chapter’s 2007 Awards and Honors Gala held on May 12 at the Texas Memorial Museum on the University of Texas campus. The projects were selected from a pool of 65 entries submitted by local firms

Page 15

Rigorous Inquiry

by: Stephen Sharpe

‘I think we’re being a little too tough,’ suggested Peter Bohlin, FAIA, as he and his two fellow jurors were finalizing their decision on this year’s Studio Awards. From a roster of 65 unbuilt entries, the jury had selected only one for an award.

Page 7

NorthPark Center Honored with TSA’s 25-Year Award

by: Stephen Sharpe

“It was the most amazing opening and we were all just delighted,” a beaming Raymond D. Nasher told a reporter after more than 150,000 people attended the grand opening of the developer’s latest project, NorthPark Center, on Aug. 19, 1965.

top photo by craig blackmon, faia; bottom photo courtesy omniplan
Page 11

TSA Announces 2007 Honor Awards

by: TA Staff

The Texas Society of Architects has announced its annual Honor Awards to recognize significant contributions to the architectural profession and the quality of the built environment. The Honor Awards will be presented during the TSA annual convention to be held Oct. 18-20 in Austin.

Page 13

AIA Brazos Awards Two Projects

AIA Brazos recognized two projects in the chapter’s 2007 Design Awards. The projects were selected by a jurors Wes Good, AIA, of Kirksey; Lonnie Hoogeboom, AIA, of Natalye Appel & Associates; and Donna Kacmar, AIA, of architect works

Page 23

Design Awards 2007

by: Bryce A. Weigand, FAIA

Having observed this year’s Design Awards jury, I have several thoughts. One is, why doesn’t the Texas landscape/cityscape reflect more significantly the fine work that Texas architects submitted in this year’s design award program?

Photos by Ashley St. Clair
Page 30

Casa 218

by: J. Brantley Hightower
Architect: Candid Rogers Architect

While many Texas cities have experienced a renaissance of downtown residential development, this trend has been curiously absent in San Antonio.

Chris Cooper
Page 32

Chinati Gallery

by: Mark T. Wellen
Architect: Ford Powell & Carson Architects and Planners

Andy Mattern
Page 36

Christ Church

by: Donna Kacmar
Architect: Leo A Daly/LAN + PageSoutherlandPage, A Joint Venture

Timothy Hursley
Page 40

Farley Studio

by: Richard Wintersole
Architect: M.J. Neal Architects

After a chance encounter in a Fort Worth bar, things turned out pretty well for Kyle and Angela Farley. It was there the bartender introduced Kyle, a golfer and artist, to MJ Neal, AIA, who just happened to be teaching a design studio at the University of Texas at Arlington.

Viviane Vives; M.J. Neal, AIA
Page 44

Frame/Harper House

by: Ben Koush
Architect: Stern and Bucek Architects

Genius sometimes strikes quickly. According to one of those quintessential Texas stories, architect Harwood Taylor designed his residential masterpiece for childhood friend David Frame and his wife Gloria during a flight from Midland to Houston in Frame’s private plane in 1958.

Hester + Hardaway
Page 48

House at Wind Point

by: Michael Malone
Architect: Max Levy Architect

It’s not difficult to imagine William Butler Yeats sitting in the sublime inglenook of Max Levy’s House at Wind Point composing his poem The Lake Isle of Innisfree.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA; Max Levy, FAIA
Page 52

Menil House

by: Bruce Webb
Architect: Stern and Bucek Architects

The house Philip Johnson designed for John and Dominique de Menil in the Briarwood subdivision introduced the International Style to Houston’s opulent and architecturally conservative River Oaks neighborhood.

Hester + Hardaway
Page 56

NorthPark Center

by: Jonathan P. Rollins, AIA
Architect: Omniplan

As a second generation project for both owner and architect, the expansion of NorthPark Center both completes and refines the original design.

Craig Blackmon, FAIA
Page 60

Penn State SALA

by: Charles Rosenblum
Architect: Overland Partners Architects; WTW Architects

More than bringing together two allied disciplines of design education at Penn State, the new Stuckeman Family Building for the School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture also connects two campus grids at a pivotal point.

Jeffrey Totaro/ESTO
Page 64

Roma Plaza

by: Mario L. Sanchez, PhD
Architect: Kell Muñoz Architects

On the Rio Grande, midway between Laredo and Brownsville, Roma is the stellar setting for an award-winning civic design by Kell Muñoz Architects of San Antonio.

Chris Cooper; Dustin Brown
Page 68

Royal Bank of Scotland

by: William Rios, AIA
Architect: DMJM Rottet

Royal Bank of Scotland (RBS), an international financial institution offering diverse banking service to retail and corporate clients, appropriately maintains offices in downtown Houston.

Benny Chan
Page 72

Satterfield & Pontikes

by: Chris Koon, AIA
Architect: Kirksey

The new corporate headquarters in Houston for Satterfield & Pontikes Construction represents a rare building type where both the contractor and the client are one and the same.

Jud Haggard
Page 76

Triple-S Steel

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: Lake/Flato Architects

Glimpsed from a half-mile away, the first sight of Triple-S Steel Supply’s new facility in San Antonio is a welcome anomaly amidst the industrial landscape of the former Kelly Air Force Base.

Chris Cooper
Page 80

zeroHouse


Architect: Specht Harpman

ZeroHouse is a 650-square-foot prefabricated house designed to operate autonomously, with no need for utilities or waste connections. It generates its own electrical power, collects and stores rainwater, and processes all waste.

Page 84

IIDA Awards Five Interiors Projects

by: Megan Braley

In August, the Texas/Oklahoma chapter of the International Interior Design Association awarded its 2007 Design Excellence Awards to five entries. The winning projects were selected in the institutional, retail, healthcare, residential, and corporate categories. In addition, eight projects received Honorable Mention awards and three projects were presented the coveted Pinnacle Award.

Page 11

Zachry Construction Corporation

by: Megan Braley
Architect: Kell Muñoz Architects

The Employment & Conference Center of Zachry Construction Corporation is the first building to be LEED certified in San Antonio. Designed by Kell Muñoz Architects of San Antonio specifically with sustainable features in mind, the project was awarded Gold Certification by the U.S. Green Building Council, making it the fifth building in Texas to receive this high distinction.

Rick Hunter
Page 51

AIA’s Kemper Award Honors Tittle

James D. Tittle, FAIA, of the Tittle Luther Partnership in Abilene is the 2006 recipient of the Kemper Award for Service to the Profession. The Kemper Award, named in memory of the national AIA’s first executive director, recognizes individuals who contribute significantly to the profession of architecture through service to the AIA.

Page 8

AIA LRGV Presents Design Awards

Four projects received Honor Awards in AIA LRGV’s 2005 Design Awards competition, held on Sept. 15 during the TSA annual convention. The jury—Val Glitsch, FAIA, of Val Glitsch FAIA Architect; Stephen Sharpe, editor of Texas Architect; and Mark Wellen, AIA, of Rhotenberry Wellen selected the award recipients from 17 entries.

Page 18

Three Projects Take El Paso Awards

Three projects received awards in AIA El Paso’s 2005 Design Awards ceremony on Oct. 27. The projects were reviewed by a panel of eight jurors, all staff members of the New York City firm of Holzman Moss Architecture— Malcolm Holzman, FAIA; Michael Connolly; Steve Benesh; Jose Reyes, AIA; Chiun Ng; Lyna Vuong; Matt Kirschner; and Curtis Pittman.

Page 18

San Antonio Announces Design Awards

AIA San Antonio honored 12 projects during the chapter’s 2005 Design Awards ceremony held at the Witte Museum’s Prassel Auditorium on Nov. 3. The projects were selected from a pool of 44 entries submitted by more than 20 local firms.

Page 20

Grading School Design

by: Bob Hackler

Thirty years ago I left teaching in the public school classroom and headed for graduate school and a degree in architecture at Texas A&M. Nine years of classroom duty have greatly influenced my perception of what constitutes quality educational environs for students and faculty. They were an influence again while serving last year as a juror for TASA/TASB’s annual school design award program.

Page 54

Tivy High School

by: Ashley St. Clair
Architect: Pfluger Associates, Architects with Artisan Group, Inc.

Designed by Pfluger Associates, Tivy High School received the Caudill Award, the highest honor given in the 2005 TASA /TAS B Exhibit of School Architecture. Having long outgrown the district’s previous high school building, Kerrville ISD opened the 269,302-sf school in August 2003.

Robert Fiertek; Gary Hatch
Page 55

Richardson High School

by: Ashley St. Clair
Architect: PBK Architects, Inc.

Previously serving grades 10-12, Richardson High School admitted 720 freshmen earlier this year. PBK Architects designed the campus renovations and additions to provide space for the increased student population. The project received TASA /TAS B Exhibit of School Architecture awards in the value, design, educational appropriateness, and process of planning categories.

Jud Haggard Photography
Page 59

Mansfield Timberview High School

by: Ashley St. Clair
Architect: Huckabee & Associates, Inc.

Completed in May 2004, Mansfield Timberview High School received awards in the value, design, and educational appropriateness categories in the 2005 Exhibit of School Architecture. Huckabee & Associates designed the 420,000-sf campus using cost-effective building solutions to minimize maintenance expenses for the life of the campus structures, including a total masonry system and terrazzo floors.

Paul Chaplo
Page 62

Spicewood Elementary School

by: Ashley St. Clair
Architect: Fromberg Associates, Ltd.

Completed in May 2004, Spicewood Elementary received awards in the value, design, & process of planning categories in the 2005 Exhibit of School Architecture. Modeled after another local elementary school campus designed by Fromberg Associates, the architects incorporated lessons learned and updated the materials palette to reflect the school’s rural Hill-Country setting

Randy Fromberg, AIA
Page 63

2005 Golden Trowel Awards

by: Lawrence Connolly

The Texas Masonry Council’s Golden Trowel Awards is one of the three awards programs for Texas architects, the other two being TSA and the Texas Association of School Administrators/Texas Association of School Boards.

Aker-Zvonkovic photography
Page 65

One Hundred Years of Studio

by: Stephen Sharpe

This June marks the centennial of the first graduating class from any school in Texas that taught architecture as a degree program. The degrees in architectural engineering were awarded to three young men at the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas, now known as Texas A&M University.

courtesy of TAMU College of Architecture
Page 80

Kraus Among AIA’s 2006 ‘Young Architects’

Shannon Kraus, AIA, of Dallas is among the six recipients of the 2006 AIA Young Architects Award, the annual recognition of professionals who have been licensed 10 years or fewer regardless of their age. This award honors individuals who have shown exceptional leadership and made significant contributions to the profession early in their careers.

Page 14

Corpus Christi Awards Five Projects

AIA Corpus Christi awarded five projects during the chapter’s 2005 Design Awards ceremony held on Dec. 8 at the American Bank Center, one of the projects honored with an award. The jury – John DeSalvo, AIA, of Booth Hansen Architects; Frank Key, AIA, of Frank P. Key and Associates; and Jana McCann, AIA, of ROMA Design Group – selected the projects from 25 submittals entered by 10 local firms.

Page 15

AIA Lubbock Design Awards Announced

Two projects received Honor Awards in AIA Lubbock’s 2005 Design Awards ceremony held on Dec. 5. The jury – David E. Lewis, AIA, of David E. Lewis, Architect; MJ Neal, AIA, of MJ Neal Architects; and Al York, AIA, of McKinney Architects – selected the award recipients among the entries.

Page 12

AIA Austin Awards Eleven Projects

AIA Austin honored 11 projects during the chapter’s 2006 Awards and Honors Gala held on Feb.25 at the Seaholm Power Plant. The projects were selected from a pool of 69 entries submitted by local firms.

Page 14

Institute for Jazz Studies

Jeffrey Olgin, an architecture student at Texas Tech University, recently received the 2005 form•Z University Joint Study Award of Distinction in Architecture for his conceptual design for the Institute for Jazz Studies. Designed for a site at historic Fort Adams Park in Rhode Island where the Newport Jazz Festival takes place each year, the project consists of two distinct buildings that house the campus and museum, along with a bridging element that connects them to performance spaces.

Page 16

AIA Houston Presents Design Awards

AIA Houston recognized 15 projects in the chapter’s 2006 Design Awards. The jury – Margaret Helfand of Helfand Architecture; Steve Cassell of Architecture Research Office; Zack McKown of Tsao & McKown Architects; and Rob Rogers of Rogers Marvel Architects – selected the winners from 113 submittals.

Page 14

AIA West Texas Awards Five Projects

Five projects received awards in AIA West Texas’s 2006 Design Awards. The projects were reviewed by a panel three jurors—Ray Bailey, FAIA, of Bailey Architects; Rick Archer, FAIA, of Overland Partners; and Dan Shipley, FAIA, of Shipley Architects.

Page 15

Regional Inflections

by: Stephen Sharpe

This year’s Design Awards jury offered a study in regional vernacular, but not the architectural kind. It was their voices that fixed them to identifiable places on the map and hinted at the experiences that frame their sensibilities.

Paul Finkel
Page 5

TSA Announces 2006 Honor Awards

by: TA Staff

The Texas Society of Architects has announced its annual Honor Awards to recognize significant contributions to the architectural profession and the quality of the built environment. The Honor Awards will be presented during the TSA annual convention scheduled Nov. 2-4 in Dallas.

Page 10

Rehab of Historic ‘Rock Ranch’ Recognized by Preservationists

by: J. Brantley Hightower

In his essay “The Necessity for Ruins,” J.B. Jackson writes of the importance of an “interval of neglect” in the history of a built object or landscape. “Ruins,” he notes, “provide the incentive for restoration, and for a return to origins.” While the old adage – we only miss things once they are gone – may very well be true, Jackson proposes that we also can appreciate things while they are here and take action before those things are lost forever.

Photos courtesy Steph en B. Cha mbers, AIA
Page 12

Design Awards 2006

by: Michael Malone

Architects rarely have the opportunity to view the best work of their peers from around the state, so the TS A Design Awards’ jury review offers a unique vantage point. The event is much like a window from which to see the diversity of scope, scale, and issues our fellow professionals are working with. Sitting in while the jury meets is exciting. It also can be a humbling experience and, at moments, distressing when projects you believe have merit are summarily rejected.

staff photos
Page 30

2006 Design Awards Jury

by: Michael Malone

This year’s jury was exceptional in a number of ways—particularly for its regional diversity (Boston, New York City, and Baton Rouge) and the sheer number of awards its three jurors have amassed for design (more than 150 among them). Also notable to anyone observing the jurors working together was their commitment to rewarding excellence through careful review and consensus. Shown from left to right, the jurors were:

Page 31

Addison Pavilion


Architect: Cunningham Architects

The Pavilion defines the entry point of the Addison Arts and Events District. The Pavilion’s steel frame supports a flat roof deck of natural pine.

James F. Wilson; Craig Kuhner
Page 32

Austin City Lofts


Architect: Page Southerland Page

This 82-unit, 14-story tower provides an anchor and landmark for a new mixed-use district in the southwest quadrant of downtown. A three-story, horizontal, stone volume houses the entry lobby, deep stacked porches, and a modest retail strip off a shady arcade. Parking for 164 vehicles is tucked behind and below.

Tim Griffith Photography
Page 34

Bonfire Memorial


Architect: Overland Partners Architects

On Nov. 18, 1999, the 55-foot-tall stack under construction for the annual Bonfire collapsed, killing 12 Texas A&M students and injuring 27 others. The memorial is intended to open outside eyes to a deep, strong spirit and tradition that has united thousands of Aggies.

Frank White Photography
Page 36

Commerce Street Townhomes


Architect: Ron Wommack, FAIA

The eight-unit, inner-city townhouse project is located on a long-abandoned site in a former manufacturing area east of downtown Dallas. Two industrial structures across the street had been renovated into residential dwellings, and this project forms another street wall to bring scale and intimacy to this neighborhood.

Charles Smith
Page 38

Corinth Civil War Center


Architect: Overland Partners Architects

A joint project between the National Park Service and the Corinth Siege and Battle Commission, the Corinth Civil War Interpretive Center commemorates Corinth’s critical role in the Civil War.

Osborne Photography
Page 40

Cup City


Architect: Legge Lewis Legge

Cup City, a temporary interactive lounge sponsored by Starbucks, was constructed over the course of the three-day Austin City Limits Music Festival using 41 (6 x 15-foot) fence panels, zip ties, and approximately 25,000 pieces of garbage.

Legge Lewis Legge
Page 42

The Envelope


Architect: Buchanan Architecture

Rather than accepting the most general issues of zoning compliance, this project offers a very detailed response to the zoning constraints and its exceptions. The design solution should be considered, in part, as a product of thorough zoning research.

Jason Franzen
Page 44

The 505


Architect: Collaborative Designworks

The 505, a four-unit townhouse development, sits near Houston’s rejuvenated downtown. The architect spearheaded the project as an experimental design exercise that works within the economic and market constraints of a speculative housing development. The 505 sought to be financially successful and to make responsible use of land, incorporate sustainable design principles, enhance community sensibilities, and possess an architectural identity.

Aker/Zvoncovik Photography; G. Lyon Photography
Page 46

Floating Box House


Architect: Peter L Gluck and Partners, Architects

Surrounded by a grove of more than 200 live oaks, the house is located just outside Austin and stands between the city’s new urban skyline and its rural past.

Paul Warchol
Page 48

Footbridge


Architect: Miró Rivera Architects

With a design inspired in the reeds that line the edges of the lake, this pedestrian bridge is a light structure integrated with its setting. The bars/reeds intertwine at the abutments and “grow” over the bridge, camouflaging and turning it into a symbiotic, almost invisible link.

Paul Finkel
Page 50

Government Canyon


Architect: Lake/Flato Architects

The Visitor Center floats in a field of native grasses and restored oaks at the mouth of the canyon, forming a gateway to the 8,600-acre Government Canyon State Natural Area. The canyon’s rich ranching history is expressed in the exposed pipe structure.

Chris Cooper
Page 52

Guerra Branch Library


Architect: Sprinkle Robey Architects

The Guerra Branch Library is located in a working class, military neighborhood in San Antonio. Inspired by the soaring hangars at the adjacent Air Force Base, the building is organized in three volumes that are oriented to define an existing green space to the north and east, while limiting the harsh sunlight from the south and west.

Paul Hester
Page 54

Health & Science Building


Architect: Hellmuth, Obata + Kassabaum

The program is for a new Health and Science Building. The facility houses the chemistry, geology, biology, and physics/astronomy departments within the Natural Sciences Program, and the nursing, respiratory, occupational therapy, and dental hygiene departments within the Health Program.

Aker/Zvonkovic Photography
Page 56

Lake Tahoe Residence


Architect: Lake/Flato Architects

The historic mines of the region, with their simple shed forms on the sloping land, were the inspiration for the project. Use of exposed concrete, eathered wood, and rusted steel create a palette of low-maintenance materials. The crisp exterior materials give way to warm, natural woods on the interiors.

Jeff Dow Photography
Page 58

McKinney Farm House


Architect: Ron Wommack, FAIA

The project comprises a new barn and house built on a 150-acre farm just northeast of McKinney. A screened porch connects the 3,500-sq. ft. house to a carport and utility structure. The house is constructed of concrete block, cypress siding, glass, and galvanized metal.

Charles Smith
Page 60

Methodist Healthcare Ministries


Architect: Kell Muñoz Architects, Inc.

The architect’s commission for a new building to house the largest charitable religious foundation in South Texas was based upon the designers’ ability to represent the visionary culture of Methodist “works.” The client asked for a headquarters that would represent the purity and simplicity of the foundation’s calling to help the poor with healthcare while quietly asserting its importance to the region.

R. Greg Hursley; Chris Cooper; Paul Hester
Page 62

Rocking F Ranch


Architect: Mell Lawrence Architects

Farmhouse vernacular inspired this family retreat in rural Central Texas. The compound consists of three buildings that define the perimeter of a central yard skirting an oak grove—the main building with living areas and kitchen on the ground floor and guest rooms upstairs, a bedroom wing with the master suite in a tower adjacent to the children’s bedroom, and a carport.

Hester + Hardaway
Page 64

Sarofim Research Building


Architect: BNIM Architects

The Fayez S. Sarofim Research Building houses core research laboratories, administrative offices, and a glass auditorium. Located in the Texas Medical Center, the parti consists of a central atrium flanked by two wings—the southern containing administrative offices and the northern containing labs. The openness of the adjoining atrium gardens invites public passage through the building, giving the program a sense of transparency.

Richard Payne, FAIA
Page 66

School of Nursing


Architect: BNIM Architects with Lake/Flato Architects

The School of Nursing enhances human health and productivity while having as little impact on the environment as possible. It is itself a healthy building that was built with 50-percent recycled materials and designed to reduce energy use by 40 percent and water use by 60 percent. The project, submitted for a LEE D Gold rating, was selected by the AIA Committee on the Environment as a 2006 Top Ten Green Project.

Hester + Hardaway
Page 68

Stonehedge Residence


Architect: Miró Rivera Architects

The challenge of this project was to work on a house (built in the 1980s) that the clients had recently renovated, but that they felt still needed further adjustments to improve the connection of the house’s interior spaces with the existing swimming pool and garden and to improve the quality of the public spaces of the house.

Paul Finkel of Piston Design
Page 70

Texas Hillel


Architect: Alterstudio Architects with Black + Vernooy Architecture and Urban Design

The design focused on two principal goals—to orchestrate an inviting building that would encourage students to venture within and to create a place where spirituality would be part of everyday life, not something removed to a sacred sphere.

Paul Bardagjy
Page 72

Wesley Gallery


Architect: Ford Powell & Carson Architects and Planners

An abandoned stable of crumbling adobe and concrete was converted to a permanent gallery.

Andy Mattern, Artimbo
Page 74

World Birding Center


Architect: Lake/Flato Architects

The design approach was to do more with less. The architecture learned from the regional vernacular, responded to the harsh climate, and minimized disturbance of existing habitat. The building creates a gateway between disturbed agricultural land and a 1,700-acre native habitat preserve.

Paul Hester
Page 76

TSA studio Awards

by: Stephen Sharpe

The review of Studio Award entries followed the jury’s finalizing its selections for Design Awards. From the 48 submittals, the jury kept 14 for a second round before deciding to award seven projects. Three of them in particular garnered praise from the jurors—Square of Circles by Jay Smith, AIA, of Dallas; Houston Skyscraper by Michael Kross, an architecture student at Rice University; and Design>Build>Texas by architecture students at UT Austin.

Page 78

CUBE


Architect: RTKL Associates

The concept is to create a single powerful iconic statement for the new focus of the Penn Plaza District. The idea is to make a singular architectural statement that has multiple identities, andmultiple reads.

Page 78

Unity Plaza Station


Architect: RTKL Associates

Like the vestibules and livings rooms of a residence, a city’s plazas are spaces of civic and cultural significance that articulate the urban structure.

Page 79

Design>Build>Texas


Architect: UT Austin School of Architecture

The architecture school recently initiated and completed Design>Build>Texas, a design/build studio for upper-level architecture students. This course was developed as an educational prototype as well as a prototype for the design and construction of an environmentally responsible house

Page 79

Square of Circles


Architect: Jay Smith, AIA

This design was a winning entry in the 2006 Ultimate Tree House design competition held by the Dallas Arboretum (see p. 120). The program required that the tree house be interactive, meet state accessibility requirements, and not attach to the tree.

Page 80

Hector Garcia Middle School


Architect: Perkins + Will

The architectural design for a new 175,000-sq. ft. school for 1,200 students reflects the programmed social organization planned around three teams of students per grade level, and includes a diverse range of academic spaces to support traditional, interdisciplinary, and project-based instructional models.

Page 80

MICA


Architect: RTKL Associates

A new 121,500-sq. ft. student housing for the Maryland Institute College of Art will serve as a gateway to the campus. The building includes living modules, art studios, a gallery, a blackbox theater, and a career development center.

Page 81

Houston Skyscraper


Architect: Michael Kross, student at Rice University

Increased mobility in communications and transportation has seen the traditional central business district lose favor to peripheral centers. Nowhere is this trend more salient than in Houston, where at least one of the motivations for building tall no longer applies.

Page 81

AIA Dallas Awards 13 Projects

by: Scott Marek

AIA Dallas recognized eight built projects and five unbuilt projects in the chapter’s 2006 Design Awards. Winners were chosen from a total of 72 built and 59 unbuilt entries.

Page 16

Shotgun Chameleon

Designed by University of Houston architecture student Zui Ng (working with professors Rafael Longoria and Fernando Brave, AIA), Shotgun Chameleon was one of two entries by Texas designers to receive an Honor Award in the New Orleans Prototype Housing Competition co-sponsored by Architectural Record and Tulane University’s School of Architecture.

Page 18
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