Article Results for "Dallas"

Connected City Design Challenge

by: Eurico R. Francisco, AIA

With the Connected City Design Challenge, Dallas is taking steps to link downtown to the Trinity River. Proposals by Ricardo Bofill of Taller de Arquitectura, the Office for Metropolitan Archi¬tecture (OMA), and STOSS + SHoP all rethink the city’s urban ecologies.

ALL RENDERINGS COURTESY DALLAS CONNECTED CITY DESIGN CHALLENGE.
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AIA Dallas Design Awards

The 2013 AIA Dallas Design Awards honored designs that respond to unique cultural, social, environmental, and contextual challenges.

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AIA Dallas 2013 Firm of the Year

Michael Malone Architects has been selected by AIA Dallas as the recipient of its 2013 Firm Award. The firm is being recognized for fostering a culture of commitment to the design community through its practice, publication, and professional involvement.

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Minding the Gap

by: Gregory Ibañez, FAIA

With the opening of the new restaurant pavilion designed by Thomas Phifer, Klyde Warren Park’s success should only increase — its transformation of downtown Dallas is nothing short of astonishing.

PHOTOS BY THOMAS MCCONNELL AND MEI-CHUN JAU. RENDERING BY THE OFFICE OF JAMES BURNETT.
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A Walk in the Park with Willis Winters, FAIA

by: Gerald Moorhead, FAIA

Willis Winters, FAIA, is in the position to have the greatest impact on the quality of life in Dallas of any public official.

Nicole Mlakar
Page 86

Form Follows Fitness 5K

In commemoration of its 10th anniversary, the Nasher Sculpture Center is presenting Nasher XChange, a dynamic public art exhibition consisting of 10 commissioned works by 10 renowned artists at 10 diverse sites throughout the city of Dallas.

PHOTO OF RUNNERS COURTESY DALLAS CENTER FOR ARCHITECTURE.
Page 94

Deck Park Opens as New Dallas Landmark

by: Texas Architect Staff

Klyde Warren Park, the deck park over Dallas’ Woodall Rodgers Freeway, officially opened the last weekend in October, attracting more than 44,000 celebratory visitors.

COURTESY DILLON DIERS PHOTOGRAPY/THE OFFICE OF JAMES BURNETT
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TASA/TASB

by: Texas Architect Staff

The 2012 Exhibit of School Architecture spon¬sored by the Texas Association of School Admin¬istration (TASA) and the Texas Association of School Boards (TASB) Convention awarded the Caudill Award to Lady Bird Johnson Middle School in Irving designed by Corgan Associates.

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Dot's Place

by: Larry Paul Fuller

For Dot Brandt and her architect, Michael Malone, the enthralling pathway to a custom house was very much in sync with the language of the book, The Place of Houses: “You bind the goods and trappings of your life together with your dreams to make a place that is uniquely your own.”

Steven Vaughan
Page 24

Simple Serendipity

by: Eurico R. Francisco, AIA

Carol and Peter York sought out Upchurch Architects — the original designers of their Dallas residence — to compliment their home with deceivingly simple pool house.

Hester + Hardaway Photographers
Page 37

A Triangle and A Tree

by: Catherine Gavin

At 64 Vanguard Way in Dallas, Max Levy has created a simple composition that represents a thoughtful and rigorous response to the challenges of the site. The house combines subtle connections to nature with playful gestures in the art of dwelling that both suit and delight the couple that lives there.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA
Page 40

Place Matters

by: Michael Friebele, Assoc. AIA

With Gurley Place — an affordable senior housing development located across the street from Jubilee Park in Dallas — buildingcommunityWORKSHOP recognized the significance of community engagement as a way of maintaining one of the most intact, early twentieth-century neighborhoods in the city and responding to the dire need for housing.

Nicole Mlaker; Neil Hacker
Page 46

Setting a New Standard

by: Audrey Maxwell, Associate AIA

The Perkins+Will-designed Zan Wesley Holmes Jr. Middle School (ZHMS) is a 202,000-sf progressive school that uses both technology and the building itself to teach and promote environmental stewardship to younger generations.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA
Page 60

Pioneering Shopping Centers

by: J. Brantley Hightower, AIA

Highland Park Village and NorthPark Center in Dallas, and the Galleria in Houston all blazed trails as shopping centers that spurred urban development. And today they continue to be examples of successful retail design, which from their inceptions sought to create a unique sense of place.

OMNIPLAN AND PETER CALVIN
Page 30

A Fresh Patina

by: Gregory Ibañez, FAIA

The Gensler-designed Patina store, a new retail concept offering floor and wall-covering products along with in-house interior design consultation in Dallas, is an ambi¬tious attempt by Acme Brick to fill a void in the marketplace while creating an entirely new shopping model.

Bruce Damonte Photography
Page 46

A Curator and a Critic

by: Ben Koush and Catherine Gavin

Pedro Gadanho, curator of Contemporary Architecture at the Department of Architecture and Design at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, and Mark Lamster, the new architectural critic for the Dallas Morning News, discuss their latest projects.

EXHIBIT PHOTO COURTESY OF THE MUSEUM OF MODERN ART NEW YORK. GIFT OF PATRICIA PHELPS
DE CISNEROS, TAKEO OHBAYASHI PURCHASE FUND, AND SUSAN DE MENIL PURCHASE FUND, IMAGES COURTESY UT ARLINGTON
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Design Conference 2013

by: Thomas Hayne Upchurch, AIA

The Second Annual Texas Architects Design Conference: Collections was held in Dallas, Feb.22–24, 2013. The event was co-chaired by Michael Malone, AIA, and Mark Wellen, AIA, and was based at the Dallas Center for Architecture.

PHOTO BY HOLLY REED
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Fair Park Deco: Art and Architecture of the Texas Centennial Exposition

by: Anna Mod

“Fair Park Deco” is the third book by this author duo on Texas Art Deco. Jim Parsons and David Bush detail the Fair Park (Dallas) collection of Art Deco buildings, murals, sculptures, fountains, and landscape design, which are unrivaled nationally.

photo by Elizabeth Hackler
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Johnson Renewed

by: Gerald Moorhead, FAIA

Bodron+Fruit’s careful rehabilitation and restoration of Philip Johnson’s Beck House in Dallas resulted in a livable home that is true to both its historic character and the lifestyle of the new owners.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA; David McWilliams
Page 54

Made in the Shade

by: Kevin Sloan

Natural light is essential to architecture, but when thinking about the sunlight in Texas, one of its qualities seems to dominate all the others: heat. Shade structures by architects Bud Oglesby, FAIA; O’Neil Ford, FAIA; Max Levy, FAIA; Murray Legge, FAIA; and Foster + Partners provide significant examples of passive designs to beat the heat.

PHOTO COURTESY LZT ARCHITECTS. PHOTOS BY BILL MILLER PHOTOGRAPHY. ELEVATIONS COURTESY MAX LEVY ARCHITECT. PHOTOS COURTESY LZT ARCHITECTS AND FORD, POWELL & CARSON. PHOTO BY CHARLES DAVIS SMITH, AIA.
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School Matters

by: Ron Stelmarski, AIA

A motivated Dallas Independent School District (DISD), in collaboration with the local community and partnering colleges, engaged SHW Group to build the kind of school most only talk about: the Kathlyn Joy Gilliam Collegiate Academy.

Luis Ayala
Page 58

Nature Meets Science

by: Gregory Ibañez, FAIA

Morphosis Architects has claimed possibly the most visible place in the conversation about Dallas’ object buildings with the fractured, vertical form of the Perot Museum of Nature and Science.

Thomas McConnell
Page 66

UT Arlington Students Design West Dallas Homes

Graduate students at The University of Texas at Arlington School of Architecture got a helping of real-world design experience thanks to a partnership with West Dallas Investments (WDI).

RENDERING BY SELINA CINECIO.
Page 89

Design Shop

by: Bang Dang

Dan Shipley’s Design Shop is a subtle statement in the successful layering of materials.

Charles Davis Smith and Joshua Fortuna
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Webb Chapel Park Pavilion

by: Catherine Gavin

With its surprising cantilever and thin slits of blue sky framed in bright yellow, Cooper Joseph Studio’s Webb Chapel Park Pavilion in Dallas is a straightforward, yet playful design.

Eduard Hueber/ArchPhoto
Page 54

Kathlyn Joy Gilliam Collegiate Academy

by: Ron Stelmarski, AIA

SHW Group’s Kathlyn Joy Gilliam Collegiate Academy redefines the public school building typology and looks to a bright the future.

Luis Ayala
Page 70

An Investment Firm Embraces Transparency

Michael Malone Architects designed an office for Highland Capital Management that is founded on the firm’s forward-thinking approach to investing: transparency.

Jud Haggard
Page 90

The Connected City Challenge: Entries Due October 3

The Connected City Design Challenge is an open call for urban design solutions to connect Downtown Dallas and the Trinity River.

IMAGE COURTESY THE CONNECTED CITY.
Page 123

Texas Society of Architects Honor Awards

The Texas Society of Architects announces the recipients of our 2013 Honor Awards.

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Dallas Forum for Architecture Presents Wilfried Wang

The Dallas Forum for Architecture presents Wilfried Wang, one of the founders of Berlin-based Hoidn Wang Partners.

Page 121

Nasher Presents Citywide Public Sculpture Exhibition

In commemoration of its 10th anniversary, the Nasher Sculpture Center is presenting Nasher XChange, a dynamic public art exhibition consisting of 10 commissioned works by 10 renowned artists at 10 diverse sites throughout the city of Dallas.

Page 122

Historic Department Store in Houston Demolished

The Downtown Houston city block bound by Main, Travis, Dallas, and Lamar streets no longer boasts one of Houston’s oldest department stores.

MACY’S PHOTO BY FILO CASTORE, AIA.
Page 123

It’s George, Not Georgian

by: Michael Malone, AIA
Architect: Robert A.M. Stern Architects

The new Bush Presidential Center in Dallas by Robert A. M. Stern Architects reinterprets the traditional materials of the SMU campus into a modern statement.

Peter Aaron/OTTO and Michael Malone, AIA
Page 54

A Quiet, Stately Statement

by: Thomas Hayne Upchurch, AIA
Architect: Robert A.M. Stern Architects

The George H. W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum was designed by HOK to blend into its context at the Texas A&M University campus.

Peter Aaron/OTTO and Michael Malone, AIA
Page 62

Society Unveils New Brand Identity, Redesigns of Website and Magazine

by: Noelle Heinze

On Oct. 28, during the Texas Society of Architects 72nd Annual Convention in Dallas, 2011 President Dan Hart, AIA, PE, formally announced the Society’s redesigned website and “refreshed” brand, which uphold Texas Architects’ mission to be “the voice for Texas architecture, supporting the creation of safe, beautiful, sustainable environments.”

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Award-Winning Rehab Project Saves Formerly ‘Endangered’ Caruth Home

by: Jonathan P. Rollins, AIA

The rehabilitation of the historic Caruth Homeplace – located just west of Central Expressway and south of Northwest Highway – is a landmark achievement for the property’s owner, the Communities Foundation of Texas. By recognizing the project with its 2011 Sense of Place Award, Preservation Dallas has emphasized the significance of this transformation from a derelict building included on its 2007 Most Endangered List to a revitalized architectural treasure.

Photos by Carolyn Brown Courtesy Communities Foundation of Texas
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AIA LRGV 2011 Design Awards

by: Texas Architect Staff

The jury for the Lower Rio Grande Valley AIA chapter’s 2011 Design Awards Jury selected four projects for recognition. Jurors were Thomas Hayne Upchurch, AIA, of Brenham; Rick del Monte, FAIA, of Dallas; Donna Kacmar, FAIA, of Houston.

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Prototype Housing for Modest Means


Architect: Edward M. Baum, FAIA

Edward M. Baum, FAIA, seeks to provide an alternative to traditional single-family homes by clustering four 1,350-sf residential units that share common interior walls and rigorously controlling construction costs.

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UT Dallas Among USGBC’s ‘Best of Green Schools 2011’

The U.S. Green Building Council's Center for Green Schools, working in conjunction with its founding sponsor, United Technologies Corp., released its inaugural Best of Green Schools 2011 in December to recognize school administrators and government leaders in 10 categories for their efforts to create sustainable learning environments.

Page 77

An Ordered Approach

by: Kevin W. Sloan, ASLA

Typical projects use spreadsheets for programming. The program for the new University of Texas at Dallas master plan, however, began with a conversation between Peter Walker, FASLA, and Margaret McDermott, a great patron of Dallas’ cultural milieu and widow of the late Texas Instrument co-founder Eugene McDermott. Walker recalls Mrs. McDermott saying, “Look, this is my husband’s and my life’s work. We want to leave this campus in as first class of an order as we can.”

Aerial Photography; Vince Yaeger; PWP Landscape Architecture
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Clearly Inviting

by: Eurico R. Francisco, AIA

Richland College, a member of the Dallas County Community College District (DCCCD), was dedicated in 1972, and it welcomed its first students that same year. Designed as a collaboration between Perkins & Will of Chicago and the Oglesby Group of Dallas, the campus is located on a suburban setting in north Dallas.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA
Page 60

Tianjin Binhai Art Center

Designing an art center for a client in China required the architects in RTKL’s Dallas office to strike a balance between allowing in natural light while protecting the artwork on exhibit. Their solution calls for an exterior that combines stone and glass, one material representing strength and another of a more delicate nature.

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Living History

by: Gregory Ibanez

Attending the State Fair is a rite of passage for all Texans. Offering more than just another opportunity to indulge one’s fetish for fried food, the annual pilgrimage gives us a chance to celebrate our state’s agrarian roots, its industrial might, and its football prowess.

Carolyn Brown; Dallas Historical Society
Page 50

Margaret Hunt Hill Opens to Traffic

by: Michael Malone, AIA

On March 29 the first cars rolled across the long-awaited Margaret Hunt Hill Bridge in Dallas. Designed by Spanish architect and engineer Santiago Calatrava, the bridge joins Reunion Tower and Pegasus as a standout on the icon-heavy Dallas skyline. It is named for the matriarch of the Hunt family which, through Hunt Petroleum, donated $12 million to the Trinity River Corridor Project in 2005.

Photos courtesy Craig D. Blackmon , FAIA; Michael Lyon
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Live Large, Think Big

by: Michael Friebele, Assoc. AIA

When it comes to the development of marque hotels, no city does it bigger and with more attention than Dallas. Downtown Dallas has a rich history of hotel development, from the Adolphus, built in the early 20th century to respond to Dallas’ booming growth, to the roots of Conrad Hilton, to the mid-century hotel boom that saw the development of the Southland Life Sheraton and the Statler Hilton.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA; Jacob Tindall
Page 54

EPA’s Annual Energy Star Buildings List Includes Three Texas Cities

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has released its annual listing of U.S. metropolitan areas featuring the most Energy Star certified buildings for 2011, and three Texas cities — Dallas, Fort Worth, and Houston — have made the list. Energy use in commercial buildings accounts for nearly 20 percent of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions at a cost of more than $100 billion per year.

Page 77

David Dillon Symposium Inaugurated in Dallas

by: Lawrence Connolly, AIA

A distinguished group of architecture journalists assembled in Dallas at the end of April to inaugurate the David Dillon Symposium at the Dallas Museum of Art and the Nasher Museum. Former New Yorker architecture critic Paul Goldberger headlined the two-day event and established the tone as keynote speaker on the state of architecture journalism.

Photo by Nicholas McWhirter, AIA
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Texas A&M University - Commerce Music Building

Dallas firm Brown Reynolds Watford Architects’ 69,500-sf Music Building for the Department of Music at Texas A&M University – Commerce meets the rapidly growing needs of the music program. Sited at the main entrance of the campus, the Music Building is designed to reflect the aesthetic and materials of musical instruments, while acting as a gateway to the entire campus.

Michael Lyon Photography
Page 66

Fitness Finesse

by: Dan Killebrew, AIA

In a bucolic natural setting of rolling hills, the Northwood Club was established in 1946 by residents of north Dallas to provide golf and recreational activities for young families in an expanding city. The latest addition to the club — the fitness center, completed in 2010 —houses strength training, aerobics, a yoga studio, and child care services, along with food service for pool users and golfers.

 Good Fulton & Farrell Architects
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The Hodge Orr Residence

by: by Michael Malone, AIA
Architect: David W George, FAIA

The Dallas neighborhood of Preston Hollow is home to a number of well-designed and often very significant houses by nationally recognized architects — Frank Lloyd Wright, Richard Meier, Steven Holl, and Edward Larrabee Barnes, to name a few. The neighborhood also has a considerable representation of local talent (including Max Levy, Russell Buchanan, Mark Wellen, Svend Fruit, Frank Welch, and Howard Meyer).

Thomas McConnell
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For Goodness' Sake

by: Larry Paul Fuller

There is good architecture. And then there is good architecture … as in architecture for the public good. This year’s statewide design award winners — 13 projects from Dallas, Houston, San Antonio, and Austin — are a case in point. I was struck, during the awards jury process, by how intent the jurors were on recognizing certain entries, not only for their merit in terms of design (even design merit as broadly defined), but also for their capacity to fulfill client aspirations for the public good.

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Brownwood Park Pavilions

by: Eurico Francisco

The pavilions at Brownwood Park in north Dallas seem deceptively simple. The three structures — conceived by architect Joe McCall, FAIA, as “The Huddle” —appear at first to be a lighthearted concoction of shapes, colors, and textures. Get closer, though, and a clear idea supported by design rigor becomes evident.

Craig D. Blackmon, FAIA; Joe McCall, FAIA
Page 30

Cotillion Park Pavilion

by: Eurico Francisco, AIA

Cotillion Park is located in northeast Dallas, just south of Highway I-635, and is surrounded by single-family homes in a stable middleclass neighborhood. A baseball field and tennis courts occupy the majority of the park, but there is also a small playground and, adjacent to it, a new pavilion – Cotillion Park Pavilion.

Mell Lawrence, FAIA
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Cathedral of Hope Interfaith Peace Chapel

by: Lawrence Connolly, AIA

As the dynamic second phase of an ambitious masterplan, the chapel resembles clumps of milk-white Jello that have been jiggled and huddled together on a bed of lettuce. A derivative of several previous projects, the IPC has three hierarchal components that lean into each other to form a step stool ascending from the vestibule to the chapel and its 40-ft-tall apse.

James Wilson; Michael Palumbo; Cunningham Architects
Page 38

TM Advertising

by: Michael Friebele, Assoc. AIA

Finding the “Beautiful Truth” has long been the focus of TM Advertising in Dallas. It is a central notion that aims to capture the spirit and passion of their clients in a way that translates to the consumer audience. The firm of nearly 50 has been able to do so through a body of personnel that each bring their own sort of passion to the field but seamlessly come together to create a body of work that is immensely expressive and powerful. Recognizing the need for a space to define the future of the company, TM ultimately landed in one of the flanking arms of the Victory Park Plaza adjacent to the American Airlines Center

Bruce Damonte
Page 42

Preservation Texas Announces 2012 Honor Awards

Preservation Texas recently announced its 2012 Honor Awards, which includes 10 awards and a special commendation recognizing the best of preservation in Texas. Individuals and projects in Austin, Dallas, Galveston, Houston, Marshall, San Antonio, and West Texas received awards.

Courtesy of Preservation Texas
Page 117

UT Dallas Building Recognized with Metal Architecture Award

A new entrance to the University of Dallas campus, designed by Page Southerland Page, has received a 2012 Metal Architecture Design Award for “Interiors.” The Visitor Center and University Bookstore was one of 10 projects recognized in various award categories. The awards highlight creativity in the metal construction industry and the use of steel in innovative design.

Courtesy Page Southerland Page
Page 118

Italy/Texas

by: Texas Architect Staff

"At once wistful and thought-provoking, light-hearted and profound.” That is how Dallas architect and contributing editor Max Levy, FAIA, described the set of Italy/Texas photo collages represented here in the following selections. We agree with Max that the images, created by UT School of Architecture student Emily Wiegand, are fascinating and promise to be a source of delight for our readers.

Emily Wiegand
Page 120

Design Conference Set for Dallas February 22-24

The Society’s Design Committee invites all Texas Architects members to attend the Second Annual Texas Architects Design Conference, scheduled to be held at the Dallas Center for Architecture (DCA) February 22-24.

Page 8

Texas Society of Architects 25-Year Award

by: Willis Winters, FAIA

Temple Emanu-El in Dallas, one of the most distinguished works of contemporary architecture in Texas built during the 1950s, has been recognized by a jury to receive the Texas Society of Architects 25-Year Award for 2012.

Craig D. Blackmon, FAIA
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Dallas Arts District – Time for a Remix?

by: Joe Self, AIA

Trendy food trucks have arrived in the heart of the Dallas Arts District at lunchtime to populate an otherwise quiet section of downtown.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA, Justin Terveen
Page 54

A Conversation in Dallas

by: José Mismo

Roy is showing his new friend, Emily, around the city. They pause beneath a tree on Flora Street. It’s August and the shade offers them a bit of relief from the sun.

Page 54

Founders Hall Academic Building

Founders Hall at the University of North Texas at Dallas campus is a multipurpose academic building that addresses current needs for the students, faculty, and staff, while allowing the campus to expand its curriculum and services. Designed by Overland Partners, the first floor of the 108,000-sf building contains public functions such as a library, open reading room, lecture theater, computer lab, large multipurpose spaces, and food service.

Jeffrey Totaro Photography
Page 60

Crow Holdings at Old Parkland

by: Michael Malone, AIA

Forlorn and neglected, a romantic near-ruin, the former Parkland Hospital sat abandoned and unused for decades at the junction of the Dallas North Tollway and Oak Lawn Avenue. Passersby could glimpse the distinguished older structures (dating back to 1913) nestled under their sentinel oaks, and be curious about what the buildings’ fate might be.

 Crow Holdings; Good Fulton & Farrell
Page 48

Gateway Park


Architect: Perkins + Will

Gateway Park, designed by Perkins+Will’s Dallas office for a site outside Jackson, Miss., is conceived as an emerging type of mixed-use development known as an “airport city.” The 4.45 million-sf project is located in Mississippi directly south of Jackson-Evers International Airport on 200 acres of woodland.

Page 25

Rochofskys Named Honorary AIA

by: TA Staff

For their deep involvement in community-based organizations promoting architecture, art, and education, the AIA this year confers honorary membership on Howard and Cindy Rachofsky of Dallas.

Page 10

AIA Honors Lake/Flato, Wyly, DAF

by: TA Staff

Among the recipients of 2011 AIA Institute Honors are two projects with Texas connections and the Dallas Architecture Forum.

Page 14

KRob Highlights Drawing Excellence

by: Julien Meyrat

The results of the 2010 Ken Roberts Memorial Delineation Competition were announced in November at the Dallas Museum of Art. Commonly known as “KRob,” the contest was established 36 years earlier by AIA Dallas to recognize excellence in the art of architectural delineation (originally hand-rendered works but later expanded to include computer-assisted drawings).

Page 16

The Park’s Restaurant and Pavilion


Architect: Thomas Phifer and Partners of New York

The 5.2-acre park currently under construction over Woodall Rodgers Freeway on the north side of downtown Dallas will feature a performance pavilion and an adjacent restaurant, both designed by Thomas Phifer and Partners of New York, along with other public amenities.

Page 20

1810 Bermuda

by: Michael Malone
Architect: Ron Wommack Architect

When Dee Mitchell first contacted Ron Wommack, FAIA, about the possibility of designing his new house, Mitchell said he intended to interview five architects and visit with each of them three times before deciding which one would get the commission. Later, when he called to tell Wommack he had the job, Mitchell offered that he so enjoyed visiting with him that he didn’t want the conversation to end.

Charles David Smith
Page 26

Core Identity

by: Eurico R. Francisco
Architect: Corgan Associates

Richardson, just northeast of Dallas, is representative of the typical American suburban landscape: it is dependent on a nearby metropolis and is connected to it via an expressway; it has decent public schools; it has a generally well educated workforce; it has an adequate supply of mostly single-family residences in attractive, stable neighborhoods. What is missing?

John Davis
Page 46

AIA Dallas’ Latinos in Architecture Takes Volunteer Efforts to the Streets

by: Ellena Fortner Newsom

With the help of a local group of Latino architects, the west Dallas neighborhood known as La Bajada has organized to retain its cultural identity and single-family homes. The efforts are in response to plans by the City of Dallas to explore redevelopment scenarios that would transform an area along the Trinity River near the downtown into a high-density urban village. The area currently includes several small neighborhoods, one being La Bajada.

Georgina Sierra, Fred Pena
Page 18

Parkland Health and Hospital System

The $1.27 billion Parkland Health and Hospital System in Dallas is currently under construction to replace the existing 54-year-old Parkland Memorial Hospital. HDR Architecture partnering with Corgan Associates, both based in Dallas, was selected as the design team for the new 17-story, 862-bed hospital and master-planned campus, which includes expansion zones for future additions.

Page 26

Energy Future Holdings

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: lauckgroup

Wanting to update the look of its offices but remain in the same high-rise building in downtown Dallas, Energy Future Holdings hired lauckgroup to fulfill the vision of the utility company’s new leadership. The renovation project involved reshuffling operations on the seven floors of the existing 143,000-sf office space. The client requested an energy-efficient space that also reflected a “casual elegance.”

Brian Harness
Page 70

Pratt and Box: Brief History of a Firm

by: James Pratt

After the war, following his service with the U.S. Naval Engineers, Hal Box returned to Texas to restart his architecture career. Having shared an apartment while studying architect at the University of Texas, we were reunited in the early 1950s when we worked together for Don Nelson in Dallas.

Box Family, Marsha Miller, UT Austin School of Architecture
Page 12

Belo Garden

Construction began in February on Belo Garden, one of several urban oases planned as part of the City of Dallas’ 2005 Downtown Parks Master Plan. Hargreaves Associates, the landscape design firm that developed the master plan with Carter & Burgess, designed the 1.8-acre Belo Garden that replaces a parking lot on the west side of downtown.

Page 23

Fire Station No. 33

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: Brown Reynolds Watford Architects

The City of Dallas’ new Fire Station No. 33, designed by Brown Reynolds Watford Architects, replaces a previously existing facility on the same site in an established urban neighborhood. The four-bay station houses 15 firefighters, including a lieutenant, captain, and battalion chief.

Michael Lyon
Page 74

25-Year Award for Fountain Place’s Prismatic Tower, Urban Waterscape

by: TA Staff

Since its completion in 1986, Fountain Place in downtown Dallas has been praised for both the geometrical precision of its 60-story tower clad in green glass and the extraordinary six-acre urban space that unfurls at its base.

Photos by Craig Blackmon, FAIA, Blackink Architectural Photography
Page 18

North Texas Showcase on Sustainability

by: Betsy del Monte, FAIA

There were some unusual sightings in Dallas in mid-July—pedestrians, lots of them, in spite of 101-degree heat. The occasion was the North Texas Sustainable Showcase 2011 that was staged at several venues within an easy walk from each other, giving reason for why many of the nearly 300 attendees were strolling along the sidewalks—a welcome site for the newly thriving Uptown neighborhood.

Greensourcedfw.Org
Page 20

Convention Offers ‘Balance’ in Dallas

by: TA Staff

Every year since 1939, the statewide architecture community has gathered for professional development, fellowship, and the opportunity to see the best its host city has to offer. This year’s convention of the Texas Society of Architects builds on that long history.

Page 25

Museum Tower

The latest addition to the evolving Dallas Arts District is under construction on the block between the Nasher Sculpture Center and the Myerson Symphony Center. The 42-story Museum Tower is on track for owners to take occupancy of its 116 units (a total of 370,000 square feet) late next year.

Page 28

Texas Architects Convention Preview: Exhibitors

More than 150 companies listed below are partnering with the Texas Society of Architects to produce a tradeshow experience that is valuable, diverse, and fun! Please join us in Hall C at the Dallas Convention Center October 27-28 to help drive the energy and success of this year’s Design Products & Ideas Expo.

Page 107

AIA Dallas Announces Design Awards

by: Jim Henry, AIA

A total of 13 projects were recently recognized with Design Awards by AIA Dallas. The chapter’s annual awards program celebrates the work of local architects, as well as the efforts of clients and consultants toward achieving design excellence. Three levels of awards – Honor, Merit, and Citation – were presented by two separate juries, one for built projects and a separate panel for unbuilt work, during different events.

Page 25

March Opening for Calatrava Bridge

by: Michael Malone, AIA

Still another few months away from completion, the Margaret Hunt Hill Bridge already stands out from the other iconic profiles
that make up the skyline of Dallas. Designed by Spanish architect and engineer Santiago Calatrava, the bridge is the most conspicuous component of the ongoing improvements to the Trinity River.

Jeremy Dickie
Page 23

AIA Brazos Honors Five Projects

by: Elizabeth Price, AIA

Five projects were recognized in July with AIA Brazos Design Awards from a total of 16 entries. Jurors were Michael Malone, AIA, of Michael Malone Architects in Dallas; Emily Little, FAIA, of Clayton & Little Architects in Austin; and Mark T. Wellen, AIA, of Rhotenberry Wellen Architects in Midland.

Page 29

KRob Recognizes Drawing Excellence

by: Julien Meyrat

The results of the 35th Annual Ken Roberts Memorial Delineation Competition were announced on Nov. 19. Commonly known as “KRob,” the events was established by AIA Dallas in 1974 to recognize excellence in the art of architectural delineation (originally hand-rendered works but later expanded to include computer-assisted drawings).

Page 23

Perot Museum of Nature and Science

Construction began in November on the Perot Museum of Nature and Science on a 4.7-acre site in the Victory development just north of downtown Dallas. Thom Mayne, FAIA, of Morphosis, designed the $185 million project as a mammoth cube that appears to float over a landscaped plinth.

Page 26

An Urban ‘Setting for People’

by: Kevin Sloan

With the opening of the spectacular AT &T Performing Arts Center still ringing in the air, the City of Dallas dedicated an urban park in November that is equally bold for different reasons. Known as the Main Street Garden, the 1.7-acre park did not emanate from a Pritzker Prize-winning architect, nor does it flaunt any enthusiasms for Pritzker Prize-like experimentation. Designed by Thomas Balsley and Associates of New York City, the park is intended to be a richly active urban space for downtown residents—a “setting for people,” in the words of its landscape architect.

Willis Winters, Thomas Balsley and Associates
Page 28

Outside the Box

by: Val Glitsch
Architect: Shipley Architects

For over 23 years , Oak Hill Academy in Dallas has helped students with learning differences achieve success not commonly seen in ordinary schools. Oak Hill’s unique approach to education integrates multidisciplinary studies with individualized multi-sensory teaching, permitting children to experience lessons in a meaningful way.

Charles David Smith
Page 44

Dallas Arts District: Past and Future

by: Stephen Sharpe

The reinvigorated Dallas Arts District provides a timely opportunity to feature performance venues around the state while highlighting the Winspear Opera House and the Wyly Theatre. Both are stunning additions to the downtown cultural enclave that has evolved over three decades through the roller coaster ride of the boom-bust economic cycle.

Craig Blackmon, FAIA
Page 5

Designs of Trolley Stops Chosen For Dallas’ Bustling West Village

by: Paul Pascarelli

In the heart of the lively neighborhood called Uptown Dallas, the M-Line of the McKinney Avenue Transit Authority covers a 3.5-mile circuit with a fleet of preserved historic trolley cars. The vintage trolleys are an important link in an urban mass-transit system that connects Uptown Dallas with the downtown to the south, shuttling local residents and visitors to popular restaurants, shops, and night spots. At the upper reaches of Uptown is the live/work/play enclave known as West Village, located at the intersection of McKinney and Lemmon.

Page 20

The Importance of Public Space

by: Kevin Sloan

In premodern cities, the architecture of the public domain – the temples, cathedrals, monuments and the deliberately shaped spaces around them – conferred status to citizens and communicated authority to the outside world. Central Park and Bryant Park in New York City; Golden Gate Park, Market Street and the Embarcadero in San Francisco; and the venerated Emerald Necklace in Boston are public spaces in more recent cities. In the best examples of all worlds, cities are continuous networks of humanized space.

Julien Meyrat, Kevin Sloan
Page 34

Drama Machine

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: REX/OMA architect of record Kendall/Heaton Associates

Rem Koolhaas (Pritzker honoree in 2000) and Joshua Prince-Ramus, enabled by enlightened patrons, designed the Wyly to function like no other traditional theater—vertically, with its main performance space at ground level and almost all support facilities placed at the building’s upper tiers. This daring experiment in the logistics of stagecraft exemplifies Koolhaas’s intellectual approach to re-interpreting an established building type from the ground up.

Iwan Baan, Tim Hursley
Page 36

A Generously Open House

by: Michael Malone
Architect: Foster and Partners architect of record Kendall/Heaton Associates

This refreshing urbanistic quality was introduced to the Dallas Arts District in 1989 by I.M. Pei with his Meyerson Symphony Center, followed in 2003 by Renzo Piano with the Nasher Sculpture Center. More recently, two additions to the Arts District – the Margot and Bill Winspear Opera House and the Dee and Charles Wyly Theater – both have gone a step further by making it concrete and tangible.

Iwan Baan, Craig Blackmon, Tim Hursley
Page 44

Watermark Community Church

by: Susan Butler
Architect: Omniplan

In the fall of 2007, Watermark Community Church in Dallas completed phase two of a three-phase project that created an 11.5-acre campus master-planned and designed by Omniplan. First came the renovation of an eight-story office building to provide facilities for the church’s growing congregation, including spaces for adult education and children’s classes.

Peter Calvin
Page 66

Healing with Architecture

by: Stephen Sharpe

By broadening the theme for this edition to encompass wellness, TA’s staff expanded the range of feature projects beyond medical facilities. That allowed us to include The Bridge, a new homeless assistance center on the southern edge of downtown Dallas that addresses the well being of that community’s neediest residents. The Bridge, recognized for design excellence by the AIA and other national organizations, is a collaborative effort between CamargoCopeland Architects in Dallas and Overland Partners Architects in San Antonio.

Perkins + Will
Page 5

AIA Houston Awards 13 Projects

by: TA Staff

Thirteen projects were selected for 2010 AIA Houston Design Awards. The jury – Brian Johnsen of Johnsen Schmaling Architects in Milwaukee, Wis.; Juan Miró, AIA, of Miró Rivera Architects in Austin; and Amanda Kolson Hurley, executive editor of Washington, D.C.-based Architect magazine – met Feb. 26 at the Architecture Center Houston to review 132 entries from 59 local firms. Awards were presented March 25 at the Rice Hotel in Houston.

Page 19

Gail Thomas Named Honorary AIA

by: TA Staff

The American Institute of Architects (AIA) has awarded honorary membership to Gail Thomas, Ph.D., president and CEO of the Trinity Trust Foundation. Honorary membership is one of the highest honors the AIA can bestow on any person outside the profession of architecture. Thomas, a Dallas resident, was recognized for her efforts to improve cities and for her support of the arts and architecture.

Page 20

Resolute Landmark

by: Eurico R. Francisco
Architect: CamargoCopeland Architects and Overland Partners

Also dotting the landscape are landmarks from a grander but almost forgotten earlier era—including the Masonic Temple (1941; Flint & Broad), the Weisfeld Center (1912; Hubbell & Greene; originally the First Church of Christ, Scientist), and the Scottish Rite Cathedral (1913; Hubbell & Greene). Dallas City Hall, designed in 1977 by I.M. Pei with the mission of awakening Dallas from its post- JFK assassination slump, mediates between this neglected corner of downtown and the inner city’s robust commercial district. There is hope, however, for this neighborhood’s renewal since the opening in 2008 of The Bridge, a homeless assistance center funded by the City of Dallas.

Charles David Smith
Page 42

Refit for Fitness

by: Brian McLaren
Architect: Good Fulton & Farrell Architects

As designed by Good Fulton & Farrell, the new Dallas facility reflects the idea of working out as if it were fashion and lifestyle more than losing weight and staying fit. Despite the people exercising everywhere and the array of equipment, this is much more about creating a retreat than it is about pumping iron.

Mark Knight Photography; GFF Media
Page 48

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: 4240 Architecture

The 56,700-sf Department of Homeland Security U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS ) building in Dallas replaces two separate USCIS offices. Completed in 2008 and designed by 4240 Architecture of Chicago, the two-story building includes a waiting room, information counters, a processing office, and a ceremony room on the first floor.

Perzel Photography Group; Mark Olsen; BlackInk Architectural Photography by Craig Blackmon FAIA
Page 65

AIA/HUD Award for Dallas Initiative

by: TA Staff

Congo Street Green Initiative in Dallas by Building Community Workshop recently received a 2010 American Institute of Architects/U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Secretary’s Award in the category of community-informed design.

’Before’ Photo Courtesy Building Community Workshop; ‘After’ photo courtesy Noe Medrano
Page 11

Casa Verde

Casa Verde, a conceptual project by Houston’s Morris Architects, was one of three projects awarded an Honorable Mention in the 2009 Dallas Urban Re:Vision international design competition that challenged participants to transform a 2.5-acre downtown parking lot into an entirely self-sustaining mixed-use, mixed-income development.

Page 20

Cotillion Pavilion

Designed by Mell Lawrence Architects of Austin, the Cotillion Pavilion replaces an existing shade structure at Cotillion Park in northeast Dallas. Scheduled for completion later this year, the project is part of the City of Dallas Park and Recreation Department’s long-range strategic plan to restore or replace aging picnic pavilions throughout the city.

Page 20

Intentional Grounding

by: Stephen Sharpe

Texas St adium collapsed on April 11 in a well-executed implosion detonated at 7:08 a.m. that ended a storied 37-year career as the home of the Dallas Cowboys. In less than 30 seconds and before more than 20,000 witnesses, a spectacular series of blasts from 2,715 lbs. of explosives reduced the 65,675-seat arena to rubble.

The City of Irving
Page 68

Texas’ Influence Rises at AIA

by: Stephen Sharpe

Two recent events have raised the national stature of the AIA’s Texas component, the state with the third-largest membership in the American Institute of Architects. In June, during the AIA convention in Miami, delegates elected Jeff Potter, FAIA, of Dallas as the 2011 first vice president/president-elect, which will evolve into the 2012 AIA presidency.

Page 23

The Collector

The Collector, a conceptual project by Brendan O’Grady, AIA, of RTKL Associates in Dallas, is a mixed-use development imagined for construction in Shanghai. Planned to encompass more than 2.7 million square feet, the project is “designed to harness the energy of business, culture, and nature.”

Page 25

Grauwyler Park Branch Library

by: Gregory Ibanez
Architect: Oglesby Greene

In a famous Letter to the Editor in Architectural Record, architect Andres Duany labeled the four types of architectural consumers—patrons, clients, customers, and martyrs. Although he was writing in reference to housing, let’s (with apologies to Mr. Duany) apply the same categories to municipal architecture.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA; Kristin Winters, AIA
Page 40

Buzz Lofts

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: t. howard + associates/Parmadesign

Buzz Lofts, a live/work residential building designed by t. howard + associates, is sited on an urban block near downtown Dallas. Sustainable, modern, and artistic describe the design concept for the three-story building that rests above ground-floor parking.

Jay Brousseau
Page 83

AIA Dallas Selects Award Winners

by: Brian William Kuper, AIA

Two juries – one judging the built projects and another the unbuilt – for AIA Dallas’ 2010 Design Awards program presented 16 awards following deliberations in late September at the Dallas Center for Architecture. A total of 117 submittals, 74 built and 43 unbuilt, were entered by members of the local chapter.

Page 23

A Work in Progress

by: Kevin Sloan
Architect: Gromatzky Dupree & Associates

Park Lane is not your typical New Urbanist enclave. There is no tinge of nostalgia to the buildings, no sense of a walk down memory lane, nor the feel of a backdrop to a 1920s movie. Instead, crisp lines, angular building shapes, and modernist glass cubes are gathered along the familiar form of a street. Taken together, it is a project that manifests an interest in distinguishing urban design concepts from building style.

Steve Hinds Photography
Page 54

A Work in Progress

by: Kevin Sloan
Architect: Good Fulton & Farrell Architects

Park Lane is not your typical New Urbanist enclave. There is no tinge of nostalgia to the buildings, no sense of a walk down memory lane, nor the feel of a backdrop to a 1920s movie. Instead, crisp lines, angular building shapes, and modernist glass cubes are gathered along the familiar form of a street. Taken together, it is a project that manifests an interest in distinguishing urban design concepts from building style.

Craig D. Blackmon, FAIA
Page 54

Studio Awards 2010


Architect: Max Levy, FAIA

Color Clock House was conceived as a speculative house for a developer of an enclave of sustainable homes in Dallas.

Page 29

Clyde Porter Receives AIA Young Award

by: Stephen Sharpe

For his efforts to encourage minority, under-served, and low-income students to pursue careers as architects, the American Institute of Architects’ Board of Directors has selected Clyde Porter, FAIA, as the 2009 recipient of the Whitney M. Young Jr. Award.

Page 10

Accessibility Exercise in Dallas Opens Eyes to New Perspective

by: Walter Kilroy, AIA

Have you ever wondered what it feels like to ask people in a restaurant to move from their seats so you can get to the handicapped seating area? Ever thought what a ramp looks like to a person in a wheelchair?

top and bottom right by Will Rutledge; bottom right photo courtesy F&S Partners
Page 14

A Resonant Ensemble

by: Willis Winters, FAIA
Architect: Allied Works Architecture; Booziotis & Company Architects

It is early afternoon at the new arts magnet school in downtown Dallas. Classes are in session and there is considerable activity in the building’s loft-like corridors. Students can be found working on class projects, but these are not the kinds of activities and assignments typically encountered in a high school curriculum.

Helene Binet; Jeremy Bittermann; Willis Winters, FAIA
Page 40

Building Careers

by: Tom Cox

The architecture CLUSTER at Skyline High School began in 1972 as one of the magnet career programs offered by the Dallas Independent School District to help prepare students for a variety of professions. From the outset, the objective was to provide students with the essential concepts of the practice of architecture.

Tom Cox
Page 96

Halprin’s Heritage Plaza in Fort Worth Among ‘Endangered’ Places for 2009

by: Michal g. Tincup, ASLA

Texas is gifted with many celebrated public landscapes from the modern era, including Philip Johnson’s Fort Worth Water Gardens (1974) and Thanks-Giving Square (1974); Daniel Kiley’s Fountain Place (1986) and Dallas Museum of Art (1983); and Peter Walker’s Nasher Sculpture Center Garden (2005).

Page 12

Trammell Crow (1914-2009)

by: Gregory Ibanez

The noted Dallas developer Trammell Crow passed away at his East Texas farm on Jan. 14. He was 94 years old and had apparently been in failing health for some time. While Crow’s reach in the commercial real estate world was international in scope, he left an inescapable legacy in his hometown of Dallas.

Page 16

Renewal of a Jewel

by: Duncan T. Fulton, AIA
Architect: ARCHITEXAS

he 16-story Dallas National Bank was a significant addition to Dallas’ burgeoning skyline in 1927. Its opening made headlines and its grandeur conveyed the prosperity and ambitions of both the young bank and the city around it. By the end of the century, however, its decrepit state and the indignities it had suffered also spoke volumes—not only about the building, but also about the state of Dallas’ urban core. Since then the fortunes of both have taken a happy turn for the better as exemplified in the building’s reincarnation as the Joule Hotel.

Eric Laignel, ARCHITEXAS
Page 46

Suburban Revival

by: Eurico R. Francisco
Architect: Omniplan

“Dallas is a place where the future looks better than the past,” states Ed Baum, the former dean of the University of Texas at Arlington’s School of Architecture and longtime Dallas resident. His description succinctly sums up both the regret of missed opportunities and the promise of better things to come. At the same time both sad and optimistic, his quip also captures the essence of the American city over the last 100 years or so—a place always expanding outward and leaving behind what came before, not just its downtown, but also its history. In short, the American city is forever searching for “a better future.” Dallas is a good example.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA
Page 64

EPA Extols Houston, D/FW for Efficiency

Houston and the Dallas-Fort Worth metropolitan area are among the top five cities in the nation with the most buildings enrolled in the Energy Star program administered by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The federal program promotes energy conservation and reduction of greenhouse gases by designing buildings to be more energy efficient.

Page 10

Vision 2030: West Dallas Gateway

Recognized with a 2009 Great Places Award, co-sponsored by the Environmental Design Research Association and Metropolis magazine, the West Dallas Gateway suggests redevelopment strategies for a blighted, post-industrial area of the city.

Page 22

Dallas Convention Center Hotel

In March, demolition and soil remediation began on the future site of the Dallas Convention Center Hotel, designed by Dallas architectural firm 5Gstudio_collaborative with BOKA Powell as the architect of record.

Page 22

Designs on Volunteering

by: Margine Biswas

The opportunity to offer one’s knowledge and skills to young people can be an exceptionally rewarding experience. When such an opportunity arose recently, I joined several members of AIA Dallas’ Women in Architecture in preparing a presentation for middle school-aged girls to help them realize their potential for professional careers. Our presentation was part of the national “Expanding Your Horizons” program sponsored by the American Association of University Women.

Photo by Penny
Page 25

Forwarding Dallas

Designed by Portugal firms Atelier Data and MOOV, Forwarding Dallas is one of three winning projects in Urban Revision’s Re:Vision Dallas competition to design a fully sustainable 2.5-acre block in downtown Dallas.

Page 21

Suburban Revolution

by: Gregory Ibanez

During our now-passed housing boom, it certainly felt as though the appreciation of Modern residential design gained wider acceptance, as evidenced by the emergence of Dwell magazine and the resurgence of classic mid-century furniture. It has long been the architect’s lament that if consumers really had a choice, many would prefer contemporary, architect-designed homes instead of those ubiquitous builder McMansions. Two ambitious and important developments in Dallas, Kessler Woods and Urban Reserve, set out to prove this point.

Photo at left by Jason Franzen, ©2008 Buchanan Architecture; photo at right by James F. Wilson courtesy Talley Associates
Page 26

Neighbors

by: Stephen Fox

Architectural historian Virginia McAlester; architect and historian Willis Winters, FAIA; journalist Prudence Mackintosh; and photographer Steve Clicque have produced an extraordinary work on the history and architecture of Dallas’ two best-known twentieth-century residential communities, Highland Park and University Park.

Page 31

Urban Complex

by: Brian McLaren
Architect: JHP Architecture/Urban Design

Cityville Southwest Medical Center embodies the pioneer spirit. When opened in 2007, the mixed-use development shared the neighborhood with industrial brownfields, rusting steel warehouses, and a red-light district.

Steve Hinds; Stan Wolenski Photography
Page 46

Baylor University Medical Center at Dallas – New Family Center

by: Susan Butler
Architect: HDR Architecture

Located on the seventh floor of Baylor University Medical Center’s Truett Tower in Dallas, the New Family Center is a 22,000-sf renovation specializing in postpartum healthcare services.

Mark Trew Photography
Page 69

New Opera House and Theater Opens; Dallas Arts District Nears Completion

by: Willis Winters, FAIA

October 12 marks the long-awaited grand opening of the Dallas Center for the Performing Arts (DCPA), a multiple-venue complex located in the Dallas Arts District that includes a new opera house and outdoor performance park designed by Foster + Partners, a multiform theater designed by REX/OMA (Kendall/Heaton was the associate architect for both projects), and a 10-acre public park designed by the French landscape architect Michel Desvigne.

Photos by Willis Winters, FAIA
Page 22

Foster + Partners Exhibit at Nasher

by: Gregory Ibanez

The Nasher Sculpture Center in Dallas has shown a significant interest in architecture during its relatively brief history.

Page 25

San Antonio Military Medical Center

Construction of the 1.1 million-sf San Antonio Military Medical Center at Fort Sam Houston, designed by RTKL’s Dallas office, began in December. Scheduled for completion in July 2011, the $556 million integrated design-bid-build contract is a result of the 2005 Defense Base Closure and Realignment Commission’s recommendations.

Page 28

Illustrious Memorial

by: Julien Meyrat

According to Jack Craycroft, AIA, the idea for an architectural delineation competition and exhibit was partly inspired by the numerous architectural renderings that his firm, Craycroft-Lacy & Partners, produced as a means of selling projects to clients and financial lenders.

Illustration courtesy Ken Roberts Memorial Delineation Competition
Page 37

Terminal Clarity

by: Gregory Ibanez
Architect: Corgan with HKS and HNTB

Discussing Dallas Fort Worth International Airport Terminal D and its selection for a 2009 TSA Design Award, juror Philip Freelon, FAIA, said, “We thought that the project was a very good example of a public building, very prominent, but it still was handled with quite some sensitivity. We all have been in airports, probably more than we’d like, and this is one where you actually feel a sense of light and airy space, which is relaxing. Natural light was well used, and the high volume of the space gives it an open and comfortable feeling. We thought it was well worthy of an award.”

Craig Blackmon, FAIA; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 44

A Sonnet to Dwell In

by: Eurico R. Francisco
Architect: Buchanan Architecture

The area just north of downtown Dallas known as Oak Lawn is rich and diverse in demographics, land use, and building types. Having matured over time, Oak Lawn has evolved into a neighborhood of restaurants, churches, hotels, offices, and a varied assemblage of residential buildings.

Jason Franzen; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 48

Garden Spot

by: Michael Malone
Architect: Cunningham Architects

From the street Cunningham Architects’ House in the Garden is a beautifully conceived and executed object, partially shielded behind an iconic wall constructed of stainless-steel wire grid and filled with fragments of slag glass. This idealized garden villa – really a giant porch – provides a delightful way to both view and inhabit a highly personalized landscape. It’s a thoughtful and well organized bit of place making; surprisingly its greatest success is as a foil and extension of an outdoor space that was originally part of the adjacent house.

James F. Wilson, Gisela Borghi; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 52

Haven for Art

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: Laguarda Low Architects

Once just another nondescript, single-story building indistinguishable from its neighbors that together comprise a light-industrial district wedged between downtown Dallas and the Trinity River, the Light & Sie Art Gallery now stands out. The reconfigured entry, framed by a box of aluminum panels, asserts a refined presence that quietly commands attention amid the clutter of storefronts along Leslie Street on the city’s near-west side. The 13,000-sf project is one of the latest examples in a transformative trend for the area where a few of the shopworn buildings have been repurposed as showrooms for the design trade and retail galleries for contemporary art.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 60

Catalyst for Creativity

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: HKS

The comprehensive renovation of a circa-1970 Brutalist office building has yielded a comfortable and award-winning home for the innovate research being conducted by the University of Texas at Dallas Center for BrainHealth. Designed by HKS, with Kyley Harvey leading the effort, the 63,000-sf project was completed in late 2006.

Blake Marvin/HKS; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 80

Light Show

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: Booziotis & Company, Thomas Phifer & Partners, nodesign

Craig Blackmon, FAIA
Page 96

AIA Dallas Celebrates Design Excellence

The Dallas chapter of the American Institute of Architects announced the 2007 design award winners during its annual Design Awards Announcement and Celebration Party in the AT&T Victory Plaza on Sept. 19, 2007.

Page 20

Interloop’s E-X-I-T Enters MoMA

On Nov. 7, 2007, the Museum of Modern Art in New York inducted into its permanent collection Interloop Architecture’s E-X-I-T sign custom designed for the Nasher Sculpture Center in Dallas. Fabricated with acrylic letters and illuminated by LED, the Houston firm’s creation joins other works in the MoMA Architecture and Design collection suchas Vignelli’s New York subway signage and the Flight Departure Panel from Solari di Udine.

Page 24

Trinity River Corridor Approved (Again)

by: Duncan T Fulton, FAIA

On Nov. 6, Dallas voters endorsed development of the Trinity River Corridor in general, and local government’s specific vision in particular. This was the second time in 10 years the electorate had been called to the polls on the issue. The first occurred in 1998 when the voters approved a $246 million bond issue for development of the corridor. The second election was a referendum challenging specific aspects of how the plan had developed since 1998.

Page 24

Jubilee Community Center

Planned in conjunction with a community resource center, the Jubilee Community Center is designed by brownarchitects of Dallas in collaboration with the Detroit Collaborative Design Center, a nonprofit that helped organize meetings with nearby residents.

Page 26

Anfield Stadium

When the Liverpool Football Club decided to expand its Anfield Stadium in Stanley Park, the British soccer club hired Dallas-based architect HKS to design the 60,000-seat sports arena.

Page 26

A Beauty with Brains

by: Nestor Ifanzon
Architect: Page Southerland Page, LLP

The new Natural Science and Engineering Research Laboratory at the University of Texas at Dallas creates an innovative scientific environment while simultaneously possessing an astonishing architectural presence. The design and construction of the four-story, 192,000-squarefoot research facility responds to UT Dallas’ strategic plan to establish a top-flight research institution that will serve as a catalyst for interdisciplinary research. University officials expect to fill the facility with high-level faculty and scientists from such disparate fields as electrical engineering, materials science and engineering, chemistry, biology, and behavioral and brain sciences.

Robert Canfield
Page 32

LaGrone Advanced Technology Complex

by: Megan Braley
Architect: PBK Architects

The 120,792-square-foot LaGrone Advanced Technology Complex, located in the Denton Independent School District, includes 16 academies that provide students with trade-specific technical skills. PBK Architects of Dallas has uniquely designed each academy to reflect a specific professional working environment that facilitates increased learning through experience.

Jud Haggard
Page 65

All Aboard!

by: Stephen Sharpe

Commuter rail is returning to Austin, bringing with it several transit oriented developments (TOD) that will drive the creation of new live/work/play neighborhoods centered around at least eight train stations. Perhaps as early as this fall, Austin will join Dallas and Houston in reviving urban rail travel as a means to reduce traffic congestion and as a catalyst for thoughtful intracity planning. That means more people in and around Austin will have the option of leaving their cars at home.

map courtesy City of Austin Neighborhood Planning & Zoning Department; rendering courtesy MWM Design Group
Page 5

Winner Selected for Dallas Center for Architecture Competition

by: W. Mark Gunderson, AIA

AIA Dallas, following examples from across the country (New York City and Houston considered obvious prologue) has taken the first steps towards the construction of a new 7,500-square foot venue intended to house its own activities as well as those of multiple organizations aligned with the architectural mission of the chapter including the Dallas Architectural Foundation and the Dallas Architecture Forum.

Rendering courtesy Peter Doncaster, AIA
Page 14

Bygone Big D

by: James Pratt

Mark Rice is as fascinated with downtown Dallas history as I am. As a boy of four, I first saw big downtown buildings when I was brought across the Houston Street bridge, then Highway 80, from Fort Worth. A couple of years later, I saw the new winged red horse installed on the top of the Magnolia Petroleum Company headquarters.

Page 22

A City’s Vision Becomes Reality

by: Stephen Sharpe

As reported on the following pages, One Arts Plaza represents the first major commercial venture to open for some time in the Dallas Arts District. Construction continues to swirl around the new project, designed by Morrison Seifert Murphy, as crews work on several significant buildings immediately adjacent to its site. One Arts Plaza, shown at the far left in the rendering provided by the Dallas Center for the Performing Arts, is set at the northeast end of Flora Street that bisects the Arts District. At the street’s other terminus is the Dallas Museum of Art, which, since the Edward Larrabee Barnes-designed complex opened in 1984, has been joined by neighboring cultural venues designed by other highly renowned architects.

Winspear Opera House and Annette Strauss Artist Square Renderings courtesy Foster + Partners; Wyly Theatre And Performance Park Renderings Courtesy Luxigon; Dallas Arts District Rendering Courtesy Dallas Center for the Performing Arts
Page 24

Homage to the Square

by: Michael Malone
Architect: Morrison Seifert Murphy; Corgan Associates

Anchoring the eastern edge of downtown Dallas , One Arts Plaza is a defining presence as the tallest building in the expanding Dallas Arts District. As difficult as it is for any single building to define an edge, this outwardly restrained building could be seen as a textbook lesson on how a tall building, handled skillfully, can contribute to the urban fabric. At this moment, while construction just now begins on significant cultural landmarks but before those adjacent projects grab all the attention within the Arts District, the 24-story One Arts Plaza cannot be missed.

Charles Smith, AIA
Page 26

Justice Served

by: Jonathan P. Rollins, AIA
Architect: Rees Associates, Inc.

The addition to and renovation of the George Allen Sr. courthouse consolidates all 45 of the Dallas County civil courts, formerly located in three buildings, into one central location. Providing 210,000 square feet of new space, the addition stacks its program with the highest traffic family court spaces on the bottom, served by escalators.

Craig Blackmon, FAIA
Page 66

‘Horizons’ Program Introduces Girls To Future Professional Opportunities

by: Margine Biswas

For the past eight years, AIA Dallas’ Women in Architecture has reached out to girls in elementary and middle-school grades through a national program called Expanding Your Horizons. The program encourages girls to continue their studies in math and science by introducing them to interesting career options in technical subjects.

photo by Penny Ball
Page 14

Four by 4

Nocturnal: Design Lab of Dallas describes its Four by 4 as a suburban tree house. It was selected by Lauritzen Gardens, Omaha’s Botanical Center, as a winner in the 2008 KidStructure Competition. Four by 4 is intended to inspire creative play among the young and the young-at-heart. The exterior is composed of a series of 4x4-inch pressure-treated timbers of various lengths.

Page 23

First Step to a New Campus

by: Ann Christensen
Architect: FKP Architects in association with John Lee, FAIA

People come to healthcare facilities to be healed , so it is reasonable for them to expect treatment based on the latest research and technology that will aid their recovery. Patients also might expect that facility to be an environment designed not only to prevent ill health but to promote a healthy lifestyle.

Aker/Zvonkovic Photography
Page 46

Statler Hilton Listed as ‘Endangered’

When first opened in 1956, the sheer size and bold form made the Statler Hilton one of downtown Dallas’ crown jewels. Fifty-two years later, the former icon of mid-century design sits vacant and threatened by encroaching development. However, with its recent inclusion on the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s 2008 list of 11 Most Endangered Places, the old hotel may survive the increasing pressure for its destruction.

Hilton Photo Copyright John Rogers Photography, courtesy Kate Singleton
Page 12

Cloepfil Addresses Dallas Forum On Booker T. Washington School

by: Michael Malone

As part of the events celebrating the opening of the Booker T. Washington High School for the Performing and Visual Arts, the Dallas Architectural Foundation invited Brad Cloepfil to speak about his firm’s project located in the Dallas Arts District. Cloepil, principal of Allied Works in Portland, Ore., presented the lecture on June 6 at the Dallas Museum of Art.

Photos by Jeremy Bittermann, courtesy Allied Works Architecture
Page 16

TSA Medal for Lifetime Achievement

Velpeau (Vel) E. Hawes Jr., FAIA, graduated in 1958 with a bachelor of architecture degree from Texas A&M University in College Station. After four years of service as an infantry officer, he began a 38-year career as a licensed architect and licensed interior designer with several architectural firms in Dallas, including Omniplan, HOK, and PGAL.

Page 14

DMA Exhibits Work by UTA Studios

by: Susan Appleton, Brad Bell

Planes of sewing thread, a panel of drinking straws, pillows of concrete, and 3-D tiles of laser cut paper – materials used out of context to challenge ordinary associations – form the basis of two walls created by students at UT Arlington’s School of Architecture for the inaugural exhibition in the Center for Creative Connections at the Dallas Museum of Art.

Top left photo by Marta Sw aff er; all others courtesy Dallas Museum of Art
Page 22

West 7th Street District

Centered in the heart of Fort Worth’s Museum and Cultural District, an exciting new urban redevelopment has been designed by Good Fulton & Farrell Architects of Dallas. Spanning five city blocks, 900,000 square feet, and conveniently situated across University Drive from The Modern Art Museum, the mixed-use complex is projected to re-establish the West 7th Street area as a thriving entertainment and shopping district.

Page 29

Helix Pedestrian Bridge

The globally acclaimed architectural firm RTKL Associates, of Dallas has designed a pedestrian bridge in Macao, China, called The Helix. Inspired by the cultural intersections of technology and nature, the 161 meter curvilinear footbridge stands 11 meters over a developing tropical garden and water park, connecting two shopping malls within a large mixed-use entertainment superstructure.

Page 29

George Allen Sr. Courthouse

by: Jonathan P. Rollins, AIA
Architect: Rees Associates

The addition to and renovation of the George Allen Sr. Courthouse building consolidates all 45 of the Dallas County civil courts, formerly located in three buildings, into one central location. Providing 210,000 square feet of new pace, the addition stacks its program with the highest traffic family court spaces on the bottom, served by escalators.

Craig Blackmon, FAIA
Page 62

Oak Court

by: Michael Malone
Architect: Buchanan Architecture

Few architects’ legacies have been more controversial than that of mid-century modernist Edward Durrell Stone. As his buildings age, they don’t engender the passion for restoration often associated with the work of his peers. Buchanan Architecture’s recent restoration and remodel of Oak Court – a palatial Stone design in Dallas from 1956 – offers a clear signal that, despite any prejudices, there is value in Stone’s buildings.

James F. Wilson
Page 82

The Shore

by: Emma Janzen
Architect: WDG Architecture Dallas

Located adjacent to Lady Bird Lake in Austin’s developing 27-acre Waterfront District, The Shore is a 22-story residential complex combining the luxury of lakeside living with the convenience of downtown accessibility. Designed for High Street Residential, a subsidiary of Dallas-based Trammell Crow Company, the complex sits within walking distance of the public hike and bike trail, Sixth Street’s nightlife, and the central business district.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA
Page 111

High Expectations

by: Joyce Chandran

When architects from Leo A Daly’s Dallas office and engineers from its sister company, Lockwood, Andrews & Newnam in Houston, were tasked with designing a transportation facility for the Houston Independent School District, all parties concluded that it was an opportunity to set a new standard in industrial building design.

Page 144

AIA Dallas Presents Design Awards

by: AIA Dallas Staff

Ten local architectural firms, plus a student design studio from the University of Texas at Arlington, earned top honors Sept. 18 at AIA Dallas’ 2008 Design Awards presented in an open-air ceremony on AT&T Plaza at Victory Park.

Page 16

Open Window to History

by: Jonathan Moore

Almost 20 years ago, an infamous building in downtown Dallas reopened as a museum dedicated to the history of events surrounding the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. The Sixth Floor Museum at Dealey Plaza replicates the time and place where a sniper took aim at half-past noon on Nov. 22, 1963. Through the combined efforts of architects, civic leaders, preservation historians, and many volunteers, the museum allows 325,000 visitors annually to experience the building as it existed when JFK’s motorcade passed by 45 years ago.

Depository photo by Bret St. Clair, courtesy The Sixth Floor Museum at Dealey Plaza;
Motorcad e photo by Walt Sisco, courtesy The Dallas Morning News
Page 22

Audubon Takes Flight

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: BRW Architects in association with Antoine Predock Architect

Just eight miles southeast of downtown Dallas, another world exists far removed from the city’s shimmering high-rises and labyrinthine expressways. This world is known as the Great Trinity Forest, the largest urban bottomland hardwood forest in North America. Its 6,000 acres support a widely diverse community of plants and animals that thrives in this unique ecosystem where three distinct biomes – timberland, wetlands, and prairie – converge.

Michael Lyon
Page 34

International on Turtle Creek

by: Emma Janzen
Architect: Good Fulton & Farrell Architects

The 250,000-square-foot International Harvester parts warehouse, located in the Old Trinity Industrial District near downtown Dallas, was originally constructed in 1948 and recently redesigned by local architecture firm Good Fulton & Farrell. Focused on contributing to the growth of Dallas’ Design District, the firm divided the warehouse into smaller units ranging from 1,549 square feet to 39,637 square feet, intended to house an assortment of furniture and interior design showrooms. The architects transformed the site by carving out an open-air corridor through the middle of the building.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA
Page 64

Dallas Cowboys’ Stadium

The concept for the 2.3 million-sf sports venue in Arlington features a monumental pair of boxed arches that will support the largest retractable roof of its kind in the world. The stadium, designed by HKS Architects, is scheduled to open in 2009.

Page 19

New Dallas Schools

by: Willis Winters, FAIA

The Texas schoolhouse is evolving into something new and different at the beginning of the twenty-first century as the state’s burgeoning growth has fueled an intense building campaign.

Page 24

Shared Resources

by: Michael Malone
Architect: VAI Architects

Within the re-emergent Oak Cliff neighborhood on Dallas’ south side, the new Arcadia Park Elementary School and Branch Library demonstrates how civic buildings can focus the life of a community around an institution. Designed by Dallas-based VAI Architects and located in a stunning site with elevated views towards downtown Dallas, the complex spreads out along a continuous linear spine that provides circulation between classroom wings and shared common amenities.

Miguel Casanova
Page 26

Walker Creek Elementary

by: Andi Beierman
Architect: HKS Architects

Located in the North Richland Hills area of Dallas, Walker Creek Elementary embraces a new school design concept that integrates surrounding residential and urban environments. Built on 10.5 acres bordered by Parker, Simmons, and Bridge streets, the school serves 680 students in pre-kindergarten through fifth grade.

Blake Marvin
Page 53

Northeast Texas 2006 Design Awards

by: Brett Patrick, AIA

Seven projects were recognized at the Northeast Texas AIA annual Christmas party and chapter meeting. The jury panel consisted of Kenneth Apel, AIA, of HKS in Dallas; Gary Kirchoff, AIA, of HH Architects in Dallas; and Andrew Vernooy, AIA, dean of the Texas Tech School of Architecture

Page 15

Homeless Assistance Center

Sanctuary, light, and sustainability are the key themes of the design for the City of Dallas’ Homeless Assistance Center to be located on a three-acre downtown site. CamargoCopeland and Overland Partners are working together as the architects.

Page 21

Metal Takes Flight

by: Toy Henson
Architect: GRW Willis, Inc.

WITH traffic at Love Field and Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport at all-time highs, Dallas’ business air travelers are finding an alternative to long lines and delays in the form of a renovated and expanded Dallas Executive Airport, formerly known as Redbird Airport.

Scott Womack
Page 58

Raymond D. Nasher (1921–2007)

by: Frank D. Welch, FAIA

Raymond D. Nasher of Dallas died March 16 at the age of 85. He was an entrepreneurial and arts patron giant who left an extraordinary legacy of a life imbued with an enthusiasm for modern art, particularly in the public realm.

top photo by stewart cohen, bottom left photo by tim hursley; courtesy of the Raymond and
Patsy Nasher Collection. Bottom Right photo by Hester + Hardaway.
Page 14

Victory Park

by: David Richter, FAIA

If you have flown into Dallas Love Field at night recently you might have noticed a striking new feature in the urban landscape. It has been likened to Times Square, but from a dark-sky snapshot it seems to harken more to the scale and energy of the Ginza. Either way, this is not the typical Dallas we have come to expect.

illustrations courtesy Hillwood development; photo by jermey woodhouse | pixelchrome.com
Page 22

Sumptuous Icon

by: Gregory Ibanez
Architect: HKS Architects

DALLAS has long had an “edifice complex,” a skyline fixation that certainly isn’t unique among American cities. Given the aggressive business spirit of the city and its constant insecurity about being perceived as “international,” Dallas always has measured itself by the health and style of the downtown’s silhouette.

Blake Marvin
Page 24

Market Driven

by: W. D. Collins II, AIA
Architect: Good Fulton & Farrell

Park Place Motorcars, having previously worked with Good Fulton & Farrell on several other automobile dealerships, asked the architects to provide a contemporary design for the sales and service areas of its new Mercedes-Benz dealership on Lemmon Avenue in Dallas. The owner wanted the new facility to reflect the shift in marketing strategy that Mercedes-Benz was undertaking to appeal to a broader market, particularly younger consumers of luxury automobiles. According to the architects, their primary objective was to express the lifestyle that Mercedes-Benz owners enjoy rather than design a place to sell cars.

Mark Knight
Page 42

Lancaster High School Auditorium

by: Jeanette Wiemers
Architect: Corgan Associates Inc.

In fall 2006, students in Lancaster IS D south of Dallas moved into the newly-designed Lancaster High School, a 408,000-sf facility designed to accommodate 2200 students.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA
Page 49

Transmod

As designed by Nocturnal Design Lab of Dallas for Metro Transit, Oklahoma City’s only mass transit system, the bus stop has been transformed from a purely functional element into a self-referential icon.

Page 24

Abu Dhabi Hospital and Clinic

Located in Abu Dhabi, the capital of the United Arab Emirates, the new hospital and clinic will represent a new age for Arabian healthcare. The Dallas office of Perkins+Will has designed this iconic 2.2 million-square foot building.

Page 24

The Crossroads

Texas Stadium has seen the Dallas Cowboys bring home five Super Bowl trophies, but now as the team moves to Arlington, the site offers an opportunity for 486 acres of expansive urban development.

Page 24

NorthPark Center

by: Jonathan P. Rollins, AIA
Architect: Omniplan

As a second generation project for both owner and architect, the expansion of NorthPark Center both completes and refines the original design.

Craig Blackmon, FAIA
Page 60

Simmons Ambulatory Surgery Center

by: Megan Braley
Architect: Perkins+Will

Part of the Parkland Health and Hospital System, the 62,000-sf, freestanding building sits near a busy intersection across from Parkland Hospital. The Dallas office of Perkins+Will has designed a stunning image of glass juxtaposed against stone.

Mark Trew Photography
Page 89

Faithful Addition

by: Duncan T Fulton, FAIA
Architect: ARCHITEXAS

In the mid-1990s, the Roman Catholic Diocese of Dallas settled on a simple, but audacious goal: To commemorate the 100th anniversary of its cathedral by finally completing the building as originally designed by one of Texas’ most significant architects. The result is testament to both the power of the original work and the talent of those responsible for the remarkable addition that ensued.

Carolyn Brown
Page 28

Starting Point

by: Nestor Ifanzon, FAIA
Architect: Gromatzky Dupree & Associates

The journey that began centuries ago finds a rest stop within the urban fabric of North Dallas with the new Akiba Yavneh Academy, a private pre-K-12 school that caters to the city’s Modern Orthodox Jewish community. Built as the legacy of the Schultz and Rosenberg families, the academy’s 8.5-acre campus is envisioned as a metaphorical bridge connecting “that which is sacred” and “that which belongs to everyday life.”

Charles Kendrick & Co.
Page 32

Mansfield Medical Center

Christopher Lamb and Daniel Romo’s design for a 269,000-sf medical center was among 14 concepts presented in December by teams of Texas A&M University architecture students working in collaboration with architects at Dallas-based HKS. The proposed site covers 40 acres in Mansfield, just south of Fort Worth.

Page 22

Smart Growth

by: Val Glitsch
Architect: Good Fulton & Farrell Architects in collaboration with Overland Partners Architects

From its beginnings in 1913, the Hockaday School in Dallas has honed a reputation for providing “girls of strong potential” with an education of academic excellence and social responsibility founded on Miss Ela Hockaday’s original Four Cornerstones—character, courtesy, scholarship, and athletics. That she selected an architectural metaphor to classify essential strengths is meaningful in light of recent major additions and refinements to the school.

Blackink Architectural Photography
Page 38

Kraus Among AIA’s 2006 ‘Young Architects’

Shannon Kraus, AIA, of Dallas is among the six recipients of the 2006 AIA Young Architects Award, the annual recognition of professionals who have been licensed 10 years or fewer regardless of their age. This award honors individuals who have shown exceptional leadership and made significant contributions to the profession early in their careers.

Page 14

Will’s Plaza

In 2003 voters passed a City of Dallas bond program that included funds to construct 24 pavilions at municipal parks. Last year another pavilion was added to the program as a memorial to Will Winters, who died suddenly and unexpectedly last March.

Page 16

Elegance Anew

by: Jonathan P. Rollins, AIA
Architect: Selzer Associates, Inc.

After a meticulous restoration, the gleaming terra cotta facade of the Thompson Building in downtown Dallas looks today much as it did when it was newly built in 1915. Constructed by Chicago- based Thompson Restaurants at 1520 Main Street, the two-story building featured two of the cafeteria chain’s signature architectural motifs—a large storefront window emblazoned with the name “Thompson’s” in oversize script, and a glossy white terra cotta facade meant to suggest cleanliness and elegance.

Steven Vaughan Photography, Dallas; Courtesy of Selzer Associates
Page 36

Renaissance for Dallas Parks

by: Willis Winters, FAIA

The “evil” to which Jackson referred in his 1979 essay concerns the changing public perception of municipal parks. Jackson, our era’s eminent observer of the American landscape, was lamenting the fact that city parks were no longer viewed as neighborhood assets. As he observed in his essay, the nation’s city parks attained their ultimate prominence in the early twentieth century as attributes of a community’s economic health and vitality. However, less than a hundred years later, public perception had fallen to the point where they were seen as unsightly liabilities to neighborhood security.

Page 24

Woodall Rodgers Park Planned as Literal Bridge for Urban Dallas

by: Duncan T Fulton, FAIA

Fueled by a vision that is as compelling as it is bold, Woodall Rodgers Park has quickly emerged as one of the most significant – and popular – initiatives in Dallas’ urban core.

Illustrations by Jim Arp for The Office of James Burnett
Page 12

Of Note: Calatrava Bridges

Among the defining elements of Dallas’ Trinity River Plan, none have received more attention than Santiago Calatrava’s three proposed signature bridges. In early June, this attention turned to scrutiny when city officials announced that the low bid for the first bridge was $113 million—almost twice its $57 million budget.

Page 12

Graphic Design

by: Donna Kacmar
Architect: Michael Graves & Associates with PGAL

The new Houston Branch of the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas is hard to miss: its imposing form and graphic detailing rise above the trees along Allen Parkway just west of downtown. While its exterior appears heavy-handed from a distance, one must experience the inner workings to fully appreciate the facility’s design.

Richard Payne, FAIA
Page 28

NorthPark Center Expansion

by: Jennifer Lee
Architect: Omniplan Inc.

The recent expansion of NorthPark Center in Dallas by Omniplan represents the second major alteration of the innovative 1964 shopping mall. Originally developed by Raymond D. Nasher in an L-shaped plan, NorthPark has been reconfigured as a closed square with double the amount of retail space.

James F. Wilson
Page 45

TSA Announces 2006 Honor Awards

by: TA Staff

The Texas Society of Architects has announced its annual Honor Awards to recognize significant contributions to the architectural profession and the quality of the built environment. The Honor Awards will be presented during the TSA annual convention scheduled Nov. 2-4 in Dallas.

Page 10

Commerce Street Townhomes


Architect: Ron Wommack, FAIA

The eight-unit, inner-city townhouse project is located on a long-abandoned site in a former manufacturing area east of downtown Dallas. Two industrial structures across the street had been renovated into residential dwellings, and this project forms another street wall to bring scale and intimacy to this neighborhood.

Charles Smith
Page 38

The Envelope


Architect: Buchanan Architecture

Rather than accepting the most general issues of zoning compliance, this project offers a very detailed response to the zoning constraints and its exceptions. The design solution should be considered, in part, as a product of thorough zoning research.

Jason Franzen
Page 44

TSA studio Awards

by: Stephen Sharpe

The review of Studio Award entries followed the jury’s finalizing its selections for Design Awards. From the 48 submittals, the jury kept 14 for a second round before deciding to award seven projects. Three of them in particular garnered praise from the jurors—Square of Circles by Jay Smith, AIA, of Dallas; Houston Skyscraper by Michael Kross, an architecture student at Rice University; and Design>Build>Texas by architecture students at UT Austin.

Page 78

Square of Circles


Architect: Jay Smith, AIA

This design was a winning entry in the 2006 Ultimate Tree House design competition held by the Dallas Arboretum (see p. 120). The program required that the tree house be interactive, meet state accessibility requirements, and not attach to the tree.

Page 80

Children’s Medical Center

by: Andi Beierman
Architect: HKS, Inc.

To complete a unique and challenging expansion for the Children’s Medical Center of Dallas, HKS and Centex worked together to design and build a six-story addition atop an existing six-story building.

Ed LaCasse
Page 85

Texas Architects Convention Preview: Exhibitors

The Texas Society of Architects is pleased to announce the list of companies participating in the 2006 Design Products & Ideas Expo in Dallas (current as of August 5). Expo dates are November 2-4 at the Dallas Convention Center. Make your plans to visit their booths to pick up new product information, ask a question, or just see a friend. Keep and use this handy guide as a future reference tool. With over 200 companies listed, you will find products to fulfill all of your architectural needs.

Page 99

Tree House Wonderland

by: Andi Beierman

Tree houses have always been structures that beckon the imagination and invite the curious inside to create grand tales and adventures. Now, the Dallas Arboretum invites the world to explore its Ultimate Tree Houses, a juried exhibit featuring innovative designs and modern architectural feats.

Page 120

AIA Dallas Awards 13 Projects

by: Scott Marek

AIA Dallas recognized eight built projects and five unbuilt projects in the chapter’s 2006 Design Awards. Winners were chosen from a total of 72 built and 59 unbuilt entries.

Page 16

Park Planned for Dallas Arts District

A new 10-acre park has been announced as the latest component to the Dallas Arts District. Landscape architect Michel Desvigne of Paris was commissioned by the Dallas Center for the Performing Arts to design Performance Park.

Courtesy JJR-Smith Group
Page 16

The Mondrian

by: Andi Beierman
Architect: RTKL

Implementing a unique multi-rise design, The Mondrian in the area of Dallas known as Cityplace features a 20-story tower with 146 units and an adjoining four-story structure with 72 urban-style lofts.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA
Page 45
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