Article Results for "Houston"

Kenneth E. Bentsen, FAIA (1926–2013)

by: Stephen Fox

Important Houston architect Kenneth Edward Bentsen, FAIA, died on September 24, 2013.

PHOTO OF KENNETH E. BENTSEN, FAIA, COURTESY HIS FAMILY.
Page 19

Embracing the Edge

by: Brett Koenig Greig
Architect: Bercy Chen Studio

The Edgeland House in Austin rises from the earth giving little hint to people on the street about what lies below the tall grasses growing on the roof.

Paul Bardagjy
Page 26

On the Bayou

by: Guy Hagstette, FAIA

An ambitious agenda for linear green space, compatible urban development, flood control, and multi-modal access along 10 miles of the Buffalo Bayou is transforming Houston.

RENDERING COURTESY THOMPSON DESIGN
GROUP AND BUFFALO BAYOU PARTNERSHIP. RENDERINGS COURTESY LAKE|FLATO AND BNIM. PHOTO COURTESY BNIM. PHOTOS OF HOBBY CENTER
BRIDGE AND SABINE PROMENADE COURTESY SWA GROUP AND BUFFALO BAYOU PARTNERSHIP. RENDERINGS COURTESY SWA GROUP.
Page 48

Submit to Present at 2014 Texas Architects Convention

Call for papers for the 2014 Texas Architects Convention.

OF CRAIG DYKERS BY HOLLY REED.
Page 93

Ziegler Cooper Gets the Gold

Ziegler Cooper Architects’ new office in the Bank of American Center in downtown Houston became the tower’s first tenant to receive LEED Gold certifica¬tion.

PHOTO OF ZIEGLER COOPER OFFICE BY JUD HAGGARD.
Page 95

Materials and Sustainability Members Only

by: Donna Kacmar, FAIA

The Materials Research Collaborative at the University of Houston is pushing sustainability and providing valuable tools for the students and local design community.

PHOTOS OF MRC BY JULIE PIZZO WOOD
Page 13

Learning Through Making Members Only

by: Andrew Vrana

The digital fabrication lab at the University of Houston produces a range of projects, one of which was picked up by the 2014 Venice Biennale, curated by Rem Koolhaas.

PHOTOS OF “NEW HARMONY CAVE OF THE NEW BEING” BY JULIE PIZZO WOOD

PHOTOS OF “THREE CONTINENT STUDIO” BY GEOFFREY BRUNE, FAIA, AND PETER ZWEIG, FAIA
Page 15

Raymond Brochstein, FAIA

by: Nonya Grenader, FAIA

Houston's fearless leader, Raymond Brochstein, FAIA, demonstrates and demands excellence.

Photography by Julie Pizzo Wood
Page 88

2014 Docomomo US National Symposium: Modernism in Texas Members Only

The Docomomo US National Symposium: Modernism in Texas will occur in Houston on March 13–15, 2014.

Page 95

Triniti Restaurant

by: Texas Architect Staff

MC2 Architects renovated a 1936 Houston art-deco building for its client, the owners of Triniti Restaurant. Perforated aluminum panels now clad the restaurant and diffuse the intense Texas sun in the interior space.

Stephen Gutierrez
Page 56

Modesty is a Virtue

by: Ben Koush, AIA

Architect Donna Kacmar has demonstrated how to do rather a lot with not very much in this tiny, 544-sf house. Located in Houston, the home is like a light-hearted Texas garden folly where one is permanently on vacation.

Julie Pizzo Wood; Charlotte Wood; Luis Ayala
Page 30

AIA Houston and IIDA Collaborate on Interior Design Exhibit

“Houston Interior Designers – How Texans Touched the World” opened at the Architecture Center Houston. The exhibit, which features 17 projects by eight firms, is the first time AIA and IIDA have col¬laborated on a showing of member works.

Scott McDonald of Hedrich Blessing
Page 12

Life, Fruits, and Veggies on the Street

by: Andrew Albers, AIA

Since 1994, there has been a 448% increase in the number of farmers markets across the country. Rice University School of Architecture students were given the problem of addressing the spatial needs of the farmers market for the Houston’s not-for-profit Urban Harvest.

Page 76

BBVA Compass Stadium

The core of Houston’s East Downtown Redevelopment Plan and the new home of Major League Soccer team the Houston Dynamo, BBVA Compass Stadium, designed by Populous, sets a unique precedent for American sports stadia and innovative design for the region.

Geoffrey Lyons
Page 71

AIA Fort Worth Design Awards

Recipients of the 2013 AIA Fort Worth Design Awards were announced in January. Six firm projects and five student works were singled out for excellence in design as part of the chap¬ter’s Honors and Awards Program.

Page 17

Menil Receives AIA Twenty-Five Year Award

Renown for its diffusion of natural light, the roof of the Menil Collection comprises 300, 25-mm-thick, ferrocement leaves, which protect the building from the light and heat of the Texas sun. Completed in 1981 by Renzo Piano, the Menil received the 2013 AIA 25-Year Award.

Hester + Hardaway Photography
Page 19

...with Ardis Clinton, AIA

by: Constance Adams, AIA

Ardis Clinton, AIA, is essential to the community at the Perkins+Will Houston office, and when she is not surprising the team with ice cream treats as reprieve from hot summer days or helping young interns with their licensure process, Clinton manages projects like the Galveston National Laboratory biodefense facility and then goes home to twin sons.

Nicole Mlaker
Page 67

Pioneering Shopping Centers

by: J. Brantley Hightower, AIA

Highland Park Village and NorthPark Center in Dallas, and the Galleria in Houston all blazed trails as shopping centers that spurred urban development. And today they continue to be examples of successful retail design, which from their inceptions sought to create a unique sense of place.

OMNIPLAN AND PETER CALVIN
Page 30

William F. Stern, FAIA: 1947-2013

by: Rives Taylor, FAIA

William “Bill” Stern, FAIA, of Houston, who passed away in March of 2013, is remembered as a passionate advocate of urban planning, design, and fine arts. He contributed 36 years of design rigor, public advocacy and engagement, and often passionate leadership to the architecture and design community in Houston.

HEADSHOT COURTESY ERIC HESTER; PORCH IMAGE COURTESY DAVID BUCEK, FAIA
Page 11

Building a Modern Houston

by: Al York, AIA

“Building Modern Houston” by Anna Mod provides an annotated jaunt through the modern movement as it evolved in the optimistic boom, bust and boom-again metropolis of Houston.

photo by Elizabeth Hackler
Page 18

4415 Perry Street

by: Filo Castore, AIA

Designed by Val Glitsch, FAIA, for New Hope Housing — an independent nonprofit organization that offers quality, affordable single-room occupancy (SRO) housing to low-income-earning adults — 4415 Perry Street in Houston is a sustainable solution for an underserved population.

Hiebert Photography & Professional Imaging
Page 24

Preservation In Houston

by: David C. Bucek, FAIA

With its 20 protected historic districts, Houston is a city that is increasingly embracing both old and new.

PHOTOS BY PAUL HESTER AND JULIE PIZZO WOOD
Page 40

Reuse, Recycle, and Reinvent

by: Ben Koush

Studio RED Architects’ rehabilitation of a former warehouse for use as the Houston Permitting Center was centered on rigorously researched sustainability, deference to the industrial character of the old building, and the installation of an intensely local public art program.

Hester + Hardaway Photographers; MN | Photography
Page 48

James Surls Houston Exhibit

The Architecture Center Houston’s (ArCH) will exhibit of works by AIA Houston 2012 Artist of the Year James Surls from June 13– July 19, 2013.

PHOTO COURTESY ARCH
Page 75

AIA Houston Recognizes Student Proposals

by: TA Staff

Texas Architect features a student-led design competition hosted by AIA Houston’s Committee on Architecture for Health (CAH).

Page 15

Down and Up House

by: Stephen Fox

Karen Lantz, AIA, of Lantz Full Circle | Enter Architecture purchased a lot in Houston’s Ranch Estates subdivision and then proceeded to think long and hard about the house she wanted to design there for herself and her husband. The building is an in-depth study in local Texas materials.

Paul Hester and Jack Thompson
Page 24

Weekend with Turrell

by: Nonya Grenader, FAIA

Houston is home to three permanent installations by artist James Turrell: “Skyspace” at Live Oak Friends Meeting House; “The Light inside” at Wilson Tunnel, Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; and “Twilight Epiphany” Skyspace at Rice University. Each yields distinctly different effects, yet they are profoundly connected by the artist’s immersive exploration of light.

PHOTO COURTESY MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, HOUSTON. PHOTOS OF THE LIVE OAK MEETING HOUSE BY PAUL HESTER. PHOTOS OF “THE LIGHT INSIDE” AND “ARCO” COURTESY MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, HOUSTON. PHOTOS BY CASEY DUNN AND JULIE PIZZO WOOD.
Page 34

Multipurpose Training Center

by: TA Staff

Leslie Elkins, AIA, designed the $1.45M LEED Silver-certified Magnificat House W.T. and Louise J. Moran Center as a versatile and efficient space that supports a population in transition by providing them with valuable skills.

Hester + Hardaway and Junko Nonaka
Page 80

Astrodome Update

by: Ben Koush

After much uncertainty, things are starting to look up for Houston’s Astrodome.

PHOTO COURTESY OF CHUCK LEE 713-298-8098
Page 18

AIA Houston 2013 Design Awards

Texas Architect features the AIA Houston’s 2013 Design Awards.

Page 23

An Office for an Interiors Firm

A new office was the chance for the Houston-based architecture and interiors firm PDR to follow its own advice and build some¬thing that would respond to the firm’s culture while remaining flexible.

Scott McDonald for Hedrich Blessing
Page 88

... with TEX-FAB

by: Scott Marble

TEX-FAB led by Brad Bell, Kevin Patrick McClellan, Andrew Vrana, and Kory Bieg, is changing the status quo in terms of digital design and fabrication. Scott Marble details how their new approach to workflows is the way of the future.

Nicole Mlakar and Kory Bieg
Page 95

Campus Public Art Programs

by: Audrey McKee

The University of Texas at Austin’s Landmarks and Rice University’s Public Art Program both feature successful public art installations that offer lessons for architects.

photos by Julie Pizzo Wood.
Page 18

Lines, Numbers, and Colors

by: Matt Fajkus, AIA

The University of Texas at Austin’s Landmarks program recently procured a pair of works by Sol LeWitt and a new “Skyspace” by James Turrell — impressive additions to an already respectable collection of sculptures

“CIRCLE WITH TOWERS” COURTSEY THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN. PHOTO BY MARK MENJIVAR.
DETAILS OF “THE COLOR INSIDE.” COURTSEY THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN. PHOTO BY PAUL
BARDAGJY. WALL DRAWINGS COURTESY OF THE ESTATE OF SOL LEWITT. PHOTOS BY MARK MEJIVAR.
Page 20

Making Light: The Menil Collection Receives 25-Year Award

by: Ben Koush

The Menil Collection, designed by Renzo Piano with Richard Fitzgerald & Associates and inaugurated in 1987, was selected by the Texas Society of Architects for its 25-Year Award.

Page 27

Binary House

by: Ben Koush
Architect: Collaborative Designworks

Designed by Jim Evans, AIA, of Collaborative Designworks, the Binary House is bringing stucco back in Houston.

Taggart Sorensen
Page 46

Friends For Life – Don Sanders Adoption Center


Architect: Gensler

It’s not often that design is literally a matter of life or death, but that was the case for the 8,250- sf Friends For Life Don Sanders Adoption Center designed by Gensler.

Aker Imaging
Page 104

Historic Department Store in Houston Demolished

The Downtown Houston city block bound by Main, Travis, Dallas, and Lamar streets no longer boasts one of Houston’s oldest department stores.

MACY’S PHOTO BY FILO CASTORE, AIA.
Page 123

Re-imagine the Astrodome

The Architect’s Newspaper’s “Re-imagine the Astrodome” design competition winners will be announced at the Texas Society of Architects 74th Annual Convention and Design Expo.

ASTRODOME PHOTO BY ARTHUR
JONES, FAIA. COURTESY BEN KOUSH.
Page 123

The Blaffer Reworked

by: Ronnie Self
Architect: WORK Architecture Company (WORKac) (Design Architect) and Gensler (Architect of Record)

Though the project for the Blaffer Art Museum at the University of Houston was primarily an interior renovation, WORKac’s design is ambitious and less predictable than many university buildings.

Iwan Baan and Thomas McConnell
Page 80

An Alternative Animal Shelter

by: Catherine Gavin

The proposal for the Ann Young Animal Adoption Facility in Houston by English + Associates integrates community amenities in a park-like setting creating broader appeal for the building typology.

Page 124

More SROs for Houston Non-Profit

by: Texas Architect Staff

Just two months after breaking ground on its sixth single-room-occupancy (SRO) residential complex in Houston, New Hope Housing has announced plans to build a seventh. The non-profit organization, recognized for establishing a successful model for SRO properties in Texas, expects to accommodate a total of 964 low-income residents with rent-stabilized apartments by autumn 2013.

Rendering Courtesy Val Glitsch Architect
Page 14

AIA LRGV 2011 Design Awards

by: Texas Architect Staff

The jury for the Lower Rio Grande Valley AIA chapter’s 2011 Design Awards Jury selected four projects for recognition. Jurors were Thomas Hayne Upchurch, AIA, of Brenham; Rick del Monte, FAIA, of Dallas; Donna Kacmar, FAIA, of Houston.

Page 20

Teaching Tool

by: Donna Kacmar, FAIA

As soon as you’ve parked your car (mine was parked in one of the spaces reserved for high-efficiency vehicles) and walk toward Gloria Marshall Elementary School, you realize this is not your average public school building. The covered path leads you past an “eco-garden”—laid out with individual planting beds for each grade and an adjacent pond, both fed by runoff from the roof drains and rainfall captured in an above-ground 5,000-gallon cistern.

Luis Ayala
Page 48

Evans Named AIA Young Architect

by: TA Staff

One Texan – James M. Evans, AIA, of Houston – is among the 13 recipients of the 2012 AIA Young Architects Award. Young Architects are defined by the AIA as professionals who have been licensed 10 years or fewer regardless of their age. The award honors individuals who have shown exceptional leadership and made significant contributions to the profession early in their careers.

Page 12

Delight in Restraint

by: Jeffrey Brown

The announcement in Architectural Record’s January 2005 issue that Yoshio Taniguchi would design his first free-standing building outside of Japan in Houston’s revered Museum District brimmed with expectation. At that time, Taniguchi was considered an emerging “starchitect” whose addition to the Museum of Modern Art had been completed the previous year.

Hester & Hardaway
Page 44

Gragg Building Renovations

by: Noelle Heinze

Harrison Kornberg Architects was commissioned to reinvigorate the 40,755-sf Gragg Building and improve the surrounding park and adjacent maintenance facility.

Michael Stravato
Page 64

Gulf Coast Green 2012

Gulf Coast Green, May 1, in Houston, announces its 2012 keynote speakers, Stan Cox and Mitchell Thomashow.

Page 67

Catalytic Jam

by: Fernando Brave, FAIA

Like the music that inspired Dan Havel and Dean Ruck of Havel Ruck Projects to make Fifth Ward Jam, their latest collaboration is a social experiment. The duo, with help from local resident Sherman Miller, assembled Fifth Ward Jam using materials scavenged from dilapidated buildings in the Houston neighborhood.

Havel Ruck Projects and Fernando Brave
Page 68

AIA Houston Design Awards

AIA Houston’s 2012 design awards competition resulted in recognition for 21 projects in eight categories out of a total of 127 entries. Eligibility was limited to projects completed within the last five years and located within the Houston metropolitan area or designed by an architect working in the Houston metropolitan area.

Houston Ballet photo by Nic Lehoux; Brockman Hall Photo by Peter Aaron /OTTO; Roy Kelly Garage photo By Dror Baldinger , AIA
Page 18

veloCity


Architect: Peter Muessig, Rice School of Architecture

Rice School of Architecture student Peter Muessig has been recognized as a winner in the “Conceptual Projects” category of the 2012 AIA Houston design awards program for his entry entitled “veloCity: Mapping Houston on the Diagonal” (see full awards story on page 18).

Page 24

Form Follows Market

by: Filo Castroe, AIA

More than 20 years after the last major high-rise building was completed in downtown Houston, the Bayou city skyline welcomes BG Group Place at 811 Main Street. Developed by the Hines CalPERS Green Development Fund and designed by Pickard Chilton, the graceful tower, completed in 2011, stands 46 stories tall at the core of the Central Business District (CBD) along the METRO light rail transit line and is strategically connected to the six-mile underground pedestrian tunnel system.

Peter Aaron/OTTO; Aker Imaging; Scott McDonald/Hendrick-
Blessing
Page 48

Clean Line Energy Partners

by: Noelle Heinze

Designed by Kirksey Architecture, Clean Line Energy Partners in downtown Houston is a 6,700-sf space housing an electricity transmission company that develops electrical transmission lines connecting wind farms to urban areas. Several factors guided the design, including a limited budget of $350,000. The client desired a sustainable, historic headquarters building with a design that would reflect the company’s fresh, hip brand.

Aker/Zvonkovic Photography
Page 72

EPA’s Annual Energy Star Buildings List Includes Three Texas Cities

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has released its annual listing of U.S. metropolitan areas featuring the most Energy Star certified buildings for 2011, and three Texas cities — Dallas, Fort Worth, and Houston — have made the list. Energy use in commercial buildings accounts for nearly 20 percent of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions at a cost of more than $100 billion per year.

Page 77

John S. Chase, FAIA (1925-2012)

by: Stephen Fox

John Saunders Chase died in Houston on March 29, 2012, at the age of 87. Chase was the first African American to enroll in and graduate from the architecture program at the University of Texas at Austin (March 1952), the first African American to be registered as an architect in Texas (1954), the first architect of his race in Texas to become a member of the American Institute of Architects (1954), and also the first architect of his race in Texas to be elected to Fellowship in the AIA (1990).

Archival photo courtesy Center for American History; Humanities Building © Gerald Moorhead, FAIA; Portrait by Robert Pandya, courtesy The Alcalde
Page 8

On the Road with Alexis McKinney, AIA, LEED AP

by: Noelle Heinze

For Alexis McKinney, AIA, the “road to registration” has led to the past. And today, her interest in historic preservation has led to downtown Houston, where McKinney and colleague Gerald Moorhead, FAIA, peruse two historic houses (1904 and 1905) that have been “mothballed” and relocated to a dramatic site yards from the city’s 42,000-seat baseball stadium. The project is one of several McKinney is working on.

Julie Pizzo
Page 61

James and Nancy Gaertner Performing Arts Center

The James and Nancy Gaertner Performing Arts Center at Sam Houston State University in Huntsville was designed to have a distinct identity in contrast to many of the simple flat-roofed buildings constructed on campus to accommodate as much program space as possible.

 Aker Imaging
Page 69

Worthy of the Mission

by: Gin Kappler-Peeler, AIA

The story of the Moran Family Health Center is larger than just the account of relocating the San Jose Clinic from its outdated and undersized 50-year-old facility in downtown. Its true telling reveals the comprehensive delivery of a range of services that are interconnected and focused on the overall well-being and soundness of families.

Aker Imaging
Page 44

The Big Picture

by: Val Glitsch, FAIA

In 2008 the YMCA of Greater Houston announced the imminent replacement of Kenneth Franzheim’s Italian Renaissance-inspired ten-story edifice that had provided classrooms, exercise facilities, and 132 single-room residential units since 1941. Aspiring to move in a more “family-friendly” direction, the organization stated the primary goal of the new 115,000-sf facility would be to assume a stronger community presence in downtown Houston.

Aker Imaging, Thomas McConnell
Page 50

For Goodness' Sake

by: Larry Paul Fuller

There is good architecture. And then there is good architecture … as in architecture for the public good. This year’s statewide design award winners — 13 projects from Dallas, Houston, San Antonio, and Austin — are a case in point. I was struck, during the awards jury process, by how intent the jurors were on recognizing certain entries, not only for their merit in terms of design (even design merit as broadly defined), but also for their capacity to fulfill client aspirations for the public good.

Page 7

ArCh Hosts Inaugural Texas Student Biennial Exhibition

by: Texas Architect Staff

The Architecture Center Houston (ArCH) held an opening reception July 26 for its first “Texas Student Biennial Exhibition.” The exhibit features work from the eight accredited schools of architecture in Texas and includes project boards, slide shows, and architectural models.

Courtesy ArCh
Page 12

Houston Food Bank

by: Ardis Clinton, AIA

Hope. Simply stated, it is the message of a new facility, on a mission to ultimately end hunger. Nestled in a warehouse district outside of downtown, the Houston Food Bank (HFB) building gleams with its spirited green color and metal cladding. The new 308,000-sf facility is the nation’s largest Feeding America food bank and source of food for hunger relief charities in 18 southeast Texas counties. Beyond feeding the hungry, the Houston Food Bank provides community services and education programs aimed at promoting good nutrition, assistance with federal and state Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Programs, job training, and employment help — all in an effort to break the cycle of food insecurity.

Slyworks Photography
Page 62

BioScience Research Collaborative at Rice University

by: Jason T. Chan, AIA

At the intersection of Rice University’s historic and growth axes is the BioScience Research Collaborative, a ten-story 477,000-sf translational research facility designed to facilitate multi-institutional research collaboration between Rice and various institutes from Texas Medical Center. This interdisciplinary facility embraces a wide range of disciplines, from chemistry to bioengineering, from organizations supporting startup research companies to the National Space Biomedical Research Institute — all with emphasis on improving human wellness through research.

Cesar Rubio Photography
Page 66

Tellepsen Family Downtown YMCA

by: Adapted from “The Big Picture,” by Val Glitsch, FAIA Texas Architect, July/August, 2012

In 2008 the YMCA of Greater Houston announced the imminent replacement of Kenneth Franzheim’s Italian Renaissance-inspired ten-story edifice that had provided classrooms, exercise facilities, and 132 single-room residential units since 1941. Aspiring to move in a more “family-friendly” direction, the organization stated the primary goal of the new 115,000-sf facility would be to assume a stronger community presence in downtown Houston.

Aker Imaging, Thomas McConnell
Page 70

Military Hospital Addition

by: J. Brantley Hightower, AIA

Fort Sam Houston in San Antonio has served the medical needs of men and women in uniform since the 1870s. During that time, the complex grew incrementally until 1995 when a new facility was built to consolidate the Fort’s hospital operations. Containing over a million square feet of space, the massive Brooke Army Medical Center (BAMC – pronounced “Bam-See”) was clad in heavy masonry that gave it a somewhat institutional quality. While BAMC was functional, the needs of contemporary combat medical practice are constantly evolving and when the decision was made to absorb most of the operations of a nearby Air Force medical facility into the complex, a significant expansion became necessary to create what would eventually be known as the San Antonio Military Medical Center.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA
Page 74

University Branch Library

by: Texas Architect Staff

University Branch Library, designed by Bailey Architects, is a two-story, 40,000-sf building on approximately 4.2 acres of the University of Houston Sugar Land campus. The library — for both university and public use — includes a variety of children and young adult services, reference resources, meeting and study areas, and staff work spaces.

Aker Imaging
Page 86

Julia Ideson Building

by: Texas Architect Staff

The Julia Ideson Building — recently updated by Gensler and originally designed by Boston architects Cram & Ferguson (with associates Watkin and Glover) — opened its doors as Houston’s main library in 1926. However, Cram & Ferguson’s vision for the Ideson was not fully realized. A south wing and reading garden were eliminated due to budget constraints. In 2006, the Julia Ideson Library Preservation Partners raised $32 million to build a new archival wing for Houston Metropolitan Research Center and restore the Julia Ideson Building. The new wing opened in 2009 and follows Cram’s original plan, with some modification.

Courtesy of Gensler
Page 90

Preservation Texas Announces 2012 Honor Awards

Preservation Texas recently announced its 2012 Honor Awards, which includes 10 awards and a special commendation recognizing the best of preservation in Texas. Individuals and projects in Austin, Dallas, Galveston, Houston, Marshall, San Antonio, and West Texas received awards.

Courtesy of Preservation Texas
Page 117

ArCH Hosts Deans’ Roundtable

by: Ardis Clinton, AIA

The Architecture Center Houston (ArCH) hosted a Deans’ Roundtable Discussion in September. Moderated by Larry Speck, FAIA, he opened the discussion with a national statistic that only 35% of architecture faculty are registered architects.

ArCH
Page 10

VeloCity: Mapping Houston on the Diagonal


Architect: Peter Muessig

This bold idea for elevating the bicycle culture of Houston was one of five winners from the 2012 Texas Architects Studio Awards program, which annually recognizes excellence in unbuilt, often strictly conceptual, architectural design.

Page 23

Honored Heritage

by: Anna Mod
Architect: Smith & Company Architects

The African American Library at the Gregory School is located in a former elementary school building in Houston’s Fourth Ward neighborhood immediately west of downtown. The two-story concrete-frame, brick-veneer Classical Revival-style building is a designated State of Texas Landmark, City of Houston Protected Landmark, and is located within the Freedmen’s Town National Register Historic District.

Gary Zvonkovic
Page 57

Extending the Brand

by: Dan Searight
Architect: Powers Brown Architecture

“Be Brilliant Together” proclaims Logica, a leading business and technology service company employing 39,000 personnel worldwide. “This is not a slogan,” explains Mike Lewsley, chief operating officer of its Houston office. “It is a call to action for our clients and employees alike.” Logica’s newly completed office responds to the corporate tagline with an energetic and expressive design.

Dror Baldinger
Page 40

Houston Announces Design Awards

by: Theodora Batchvarova

A diverse jury with a broad spectrum of interests and experience met at the Architecture Center Houston on Feb. 25 to evaluate a wide variety of submittals in this year’s AIA Houston Design Awards competition. Eligibility was limited to projects completed within the last five years and located in the Houston metropolitan area or designed by an architect working in the Houston metropolitan area.

Page 20

Prism Cloud


Architect: Logan/Johnson

Houston firm Logan/Johnson conceived Prism Cloud as an energy-generating landscape pavilion near Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates. The pavilion will appear to hover over the desert terrain, alternately casting shadows and light on the surface of the sand. Five concrete piers anchor the pavilion to the ground, with a steel cable net – embedded with thin-film photovoltaic panels and glass prisms – that stretches between the piers.

Page 26

Recap: Gulf Coast Green 2011

by: Filo Castore

More than 200 people gathered at the United Way of Houston on May 25 for the sixth annual Gulf Coast Green Symposium and Professional Expo. Attendees – including architects, engineers, contractors, developers, students, educators, and government officials – met to learn, share, and network at the event hosted by AIA Houston‘s Committee on the Environment.

Slyworks Photography
Page 21

Placemaking in Corpus Christi

by: Laura N. Bennett

Last December during a meeting of the City Council, representatives of a local grassroots organization presented their concept for developing a six-block stretch of Corpus Christi’s downtown bayfront into a vibrant, multi-purpose destination. They envision an expansive public place along the lines of Discovery Green in downtown Houston.

Page 24

Manner of Approach

by: Gerald Moorhead
Architect: leslie elkins architecture; Kendall/Heaton Associates

Until last year, it was always a little tricky to find Bayou Bend, the former home of Miss Ima Hogg that now serves as the American decorative arts branch of the Museum of Fine Arts Houston. Its hard-to-find entrance off the busy intersection of Memorial and Westcott in Houston’s West End was a narrow drive leading down to a parking lot alongside Buffalo Bayou. The recently completed Lora Jean Kilroy Visitor and Education Center eliminates this wayfinding problem, providing greatly enhanced public visibility and a number of much-needed facilities to expand the museum’s curatorial and educational programs.

Joe Aker
Page 58

Oak Forest Library

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: Natalye Appel + Associates Architects; Architect Works; James Ray Architects

Completed in January, the makeover of the City of Houston’s Oak Forest Library includes a 4,500-sf addition and a complete renovation of the original 7,500-sf structure. The project was a collaboration among three local firms—James Ray Architects, Natalye Appel + Associates Architects, and Architect Works.

Page 71

Tour Spotlights Mid-Century Beaumont

by: Stephen Fox

A recent t our sponsored by Houston Mod, a design advocacy group, highlighted the residential architecture of Beaumont’s leading mid-century modernists. The day trip was the culmination of a series of events highlighting April as Modern Month, in which affiliates of the international DoCo-MoMo (Documentation and Conservation of Buildings, Sites and Neighborhoods of the Modern Movement) celebrated modern heritage locally and regionally.

Top Photo Courtesy Houston Mod; Bottom Photo by Gerald Moorhead, FAIA
Page 22

fibrocity

The idea behind Perkins + Will’s entry in this year’s Living City Design Competition is the need for a sustainable model for Houston’s continued rapid growth.

Page 28

Brockman Hall for Physics

by: Donna Kacmar
Architect: KieranTimberlake

Kieran Timberlake has synthesized difficult technical requirements, environmental responsibility, and architectural craft in the new 110,000-sf Brockman Hall for Physics on the Rice University campus.

Peter Aaron/ESTO; Paul Hester; R. Kevin Butts
Page 52

Sam Houston Tollway Northeast Toll Plazas

by: Jesse Hager
Architect: RdlR Architects

Bridges are a cherished design problem. The clear span represents a common exercise for architecture students exploring essential concepts of structure, tension, and compression. Regrettably, architects are seldom commissioned to design a bridge project.

Chad McGhee; Mark Gaynor
Page 76

Methodist Hospital Research Institute

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: WHR Architects with KPF and CO Architects

Completed in October 2010, the Methodist Hospital Research Institute (TMHRI) is a 440,000-sf facility dedicated to translational research and nano-medicine located within the Texas Medical Center in Houston.

Joe Aker
Page 94

After Sloughing Off Gray, Houston Courts Building Is Pink Once Again

by: Anna Mod

Following a $65 million restoration, the 1910 Harris County Civil Courts Building in downtown Houston was rededicated on Aug. 23. The 29-month project, partially funded by a grant through the Texas Historic Courthouse Preservation Program, returned the architectural luster to a building that had sustained significant deterioration over several decades due to deferred maintenance, overcrowding, and unsympathetic alterations.

Nash Baker/Vaughn Construction
Page 20

St. Emanuel House

by: Ben Koush, AIA

It has been quite some time since a modern house in Houston has received so much attention. In fact, it’s been more than 50 years since Bolton & Barnstone’s flat-topped, cool as a cucumber Gordon House (1955) was published as many times in the local, national, and international press.

Hester + Hardaway Photographers
Page 40

Inspired Inquiry

by: Stephen Sharpe, Hon. TSA

The best architecture combines the rigor of scientific inquiry with the inspired explorations of art. Equal amounts of science and art produced the four projects profiled on the following pages—two designed for scientific research and two related to the arts.

Page 47

Dance Partner

by: Geoffrey Brune, FAIA

What makes a building an icon? One characteristic is distinct contrast with its context, in form and/or exterior material, that draws attention to the building and away from its surroundings.

Nic Lehoux
Page 60

Notre Dame Catholic Church

by: Noelle Heinze

The Notre Dame Catholic Church in Houston, designed by Turner Duran Architects, replaces existing facilities with a 1,100-seat sanctuary and expanded parking on the existing 20-acre campus.

Geoff Lyon
Page 74

UTEP’s Green Roof Thrives in Desert; Modular System Monitored for Data

by: Lauren Woodward Stanley, Lars Stanley

As green roofs are increasingly explored and utilized, the range of their application is following suit. No longer only perceived as a technological option for regions with abundant rainfall (the Pacific Northwest, for example), they are making headway in hotter and drier climes, albeit with some tentativeness. Now, with a recent installation at the University of Texas at El Paso, the Lone Star State can claim significant green-roof forays on the institutional level from its east end (near Houston) to its westernmost point.

Javier Greigo, UTEP
Page 15

AIA LRGV Announces Design Awards

by: James Rodriguez

During its annual award banquet on Dec. 12, AIA Lower Rio Grande Valley announced the results of its 2009 Design Awards program. The selections were made by a jury that met in Houston during the TSA convention in October.

Page 16

Oliver Named UH Architecture Dean

by: TA Staff

Patricia Belton Oliver, FAIA, who served from 2001-2008 as senior vice president of educational planning and architecture at the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, Calif., has been named dean of the Gerald D. Hines College of Architecture at the University of Houston. Oliver succeeds Joe Mashburn, AIA, who held the post for the last 11 years.

Page 23

Sakowitz Apartments

With its mission to build and operate high-quality affordable housing for more than 1,000 adults in Houston, the not-for-profit developer New Hope Housing will move closer to its goal late next year with completion of the Sakowitz Apartments.

Page 26

Seamless Expansion

by: Fernando Brave
Architect: Hopkins Architects with Hanbury Evans Wright Vlattas + Company

While other prominent universities in the U.S. comprise a fusion of signature stylistic expressions, Rice University has focused on architecture that reinforces the well synchronized, harmonious feel of its campus. Aside from some unique buildings – such as Thomas Pfeiffer’s Brochstein Pavilion and the school’s off-site Data Center and the Library Service Center by Carlos Jimenez – that provide interesting drama to the otherwise prevailing architectural uniformity,

Robert Benson Photography
Page 38

Vertical Challenge

by: Edward Richardson

My four-year-old niece, Jocelyn, compares them to “those pads that frogs jump on” and likes to imagine herself as some sort of energized amphibian as she climbs, leaps, and hops her way to the top. Her description is in reference to the new climbing installation or “climber” at the Children’s Museum of Houston’s recently completed expansion (by Jackson & Ryan Architects). The climber, designed and constructed by Spencer Luckey, frames an almost constant ingress of squealing, gleeful adventurers as they navigate the varied vertical pathways rising from the basement level of the addition. Boasting more than 70,000 linear feet of cable, 120,000 ring connectors, and 130 levels, the intricate assemblage plays a central role in the new exhibition space at the museum.

Paul Finkel/Piston Design
Page 76

AIA Recognizes Brochstein Pavilion

One Texas project – the Brochstein Pavilion at Rice University by Thomas Phifer and Partners – is among 14 projects recognized with 2010 Institute Honor Awards for Architecture.

Page 11

Malarkey Named ‘Young Architect’

Brian Malarkey, AIA, of Kirksey in Houston is among nine honorees in this year’s list of AIA “Young Architects.” The Young Architects Award is given to individuals who have shown exceptional leadership and made significant contributions to the profession in an early stage of their architectural career.

Page 12

Cynthia Woods Mitchell (1922-2009)

by: Barrie Scardino

Cynthia Woods Mitchell – like Ima Hogg, Dominique de Menil, and Jane Blaffer Owen – was an influential and discerning woman who changed the cultural and architectural landscape of the Houston area. Also like the others, Cynthia Mitchell had an eye for aesthetic perfection and a passion for beauty.

Mitchell Family
Page 15

Wright-Influenced NASA Landmark Redone as Offices for Houston Parks

by: Gerald Moorhead

One of Houston’s landmarks of modern architecture has been rededicated after a $16 million renovation. The historic Farnsworth & Chambers Co. building, designed by MacKie & Kamrath and completed in 1957, has been the home of Houston’s Parks and Recreation Department since 1977. Known as the Gragg Building after the donor of adjacent parkland, it is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and is a Registered Texas Historic Landmark and a City of Houston Landmark.

Houston Parks and Recreation, NASA
Page 16

Reprise of a Classic

by: Anna Mod
Architect: Stern and Bucek Architects

Schulenburg, situated about 100 miles west of Houston along Interstate 10, was founded in 1873 after Louis Schulenburg donated land surrounding the planned Galveston, Harrisburg and San Antonio Railway. Typical of late-nineteenth-century railroad towns, Schulenburg developed a wide commercial street lined with several blocks of one- and two-story masonry buildings facing the tracks. Architecturally, the downtown is still intact today although only a few businesses remain open due to the routine exodus for the nearby highway.

Hest + Hardaway
Page 60

Big Art

by: Mark Lam

Amongst its many fountains, gardens, and playgrounds, Houston’s Hermann Park is playing host to 15 newly installed monumental sculptures that have transformed the grounds into a landscape of exploration. Made possible by the Texan-French Alliance for the Arts, the works by French sculptor Bernar Venet will remain on display until October. (Three Indeterminate Lines is shown at top; the inset shows Random Combination of Indeterminate Lines.)

Nash Baker, McClain Gallery
Page 80

As Military Consolidates Operations, San Antonio Sees $3 Billion in Work

by: Raina Tilden

A total of $3 billion in new construction and renovation at San Antonio’s largest military installations – Fort Sam Houston, Lackland Air Force Base, and Randolph Air Force Base – is currently underway, funded mostly by a federal program that consolidates military facilities that are being closed in other parts of the country.

RTKL, Joint Program Management Office, Fort Sam Houston
Page 10

AIA Houston Awards 13 Projects

by: TA Staff

Thirteen projects were selected for 2010 AIA Houston Design Awards. The jury – Brian Johnsen of Johnsen Schmaling Architects in Milwaukee, Wis.; Juan Miró, AIA, of Miró Rivera Architects in Austin; and Amanda Kolson Hurley, executive editor of Washington, D.C.-based Architect magazine – met Feb. 26 at the Architecture Center Houston to review 132 entries from 59 local firms. Awards were presented March 25 at the Rice Hotel in Houston.

Page 19

Beacon of Hope

by: Kurt Neubek
Architect: FKP Architects

In late 2006 the hospital announced its Vision 2010, a $1.5 billion investment in four facilities—“the largest investment and program expansion ever by a single pediatric organization,” according to Texas Children’s Hospital. The first completed of the four projects is the $120 million, eight-story vertical expansion of the Feigin Center, designed by FKP Architects and encompassing 206,000 square feet. The building is named for the late Dr. Ralph Feigin (pronounced FI gin, with a long “i” and a hard “g”), the hospital’s influential and well respected physician-in-chief, the position he held until his death in 2008.

Aker/Zvonkovic Photography
Page 36

Morris Frank Library

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: m ARCHITECTS

The Morris Frank Library, designed by m Architects of Houston and completed in 2009, represents a new direction in services for the Houston Public Library System. Relocated from its original building, the library now resides on the ground floor of an existing atrium building in a revitalized low-income area of Houston.

G. Lyon Photography
Page 67

Legacy of Care

by: Stephen Sharpe

Renowned internationally for his breakthroughs in medical techniques, legendary heart surgeon Michael E. DeBakey, M.D., spent 60 years on the staff of Methodist Hospital and the faculty of Baylor College of Medicine at the Texas Medical Center in Houston. It is fitting that a new museum dedicated to his innovations and achievements sits at the heart of the medical center.

Gerald Moorhead
Page 80

New Expansion of Ideson Library Follows Cram’s Original Scheme

by: Gerald Moorhead

The Julia Ideson Building, Houston’s historic downtown library, has received an addition that finally completes its original 1926 scheme. Designed by Gensler’s Houston office, the four-story south extension replicates a wing that was omitted from the Boston firm Cram and Ferguson’s plan for the library, the only facility completed of the projected five-building Civic Center focused around Hermann Square, a block donated to the city in 1914 by philanthropist George H. Hermann.

Gerald Moorhead, FAIA
Page 12

Recap: Gulf Coast Green 2010

by: Filo Castore

Held in mid-April at the University of Houston, the fifth annual Gulf Coast Green Symposium and Professional Expo brought together a diverse group – architects, engineers, contractors, developers, students, educators, and government officials – to share information and network across disciplines.

Page 15

Casa Verde

Casa Verde, a conceptual project by Houston’s Morris Architects, was one of three projects awarded an Honorable Mention in the 2009 Dallas Urban Re:Vision international design competition that challenged participants to transform a 2.5-acre downtown parking lot into an entirely self-sustaining mixed-use, mixed-income development.

Page 20

H2Ouston

by: Maryalice Torres-MacDonald

In 1836, shortly after Texas won its independence from Mexico, two New York real estate developers, John and Augustus Allen, claimed just over 6,600 acres as the site of Houston. The site, located at the confluence of the Buffalo and White Oak bayous, is where Houston’s first port, known as Allen’s Landing, opened for business in 1841.

Texas Tech College of Architecture
Page 23

Cool, Composed, and Highly Secure

by: Jesse Hager
Architect: Leo A Daly/LAN + PageSoutherlandPage, A Joint Venture

From its beginning in 1994, the General Services Administration’s Design Excellence Program upset the status quo in how the federal government commissioned architectural services. The innovative program advocated high-quality design and architectural expression, two concepts not often associated with federal projects built in the latter half of the twentieth century.

Tim Hursley
Page 42

Fort Sam Rescues Its Heritage

by: Raina Tilden

Designated a National Historic Landmark in 1975, Fort Sam Houston has over 900 structures deemed historic (built before 1960), more than any other active military installation in the U.S.

Photo courtesy Joint Program Management Office, Fort Sa m Houston
Page 20

(Shell)ter for Home

(Shell)ter for Home, designed by Jeffrey Brown, AIA, of Powers Brown Architecture in Houston, is a 1,400-sf affordable housing solution based on Quonset hut construction (prefabricated, arched steel buildings introduced during WWII for their easy transport and assembly). Brown’s plan places the building on an east/west axis to respond to solar orientation and create public/private exterior space, along with “curb appeal.”

Page 25

GSA Regional Field Office

by: Filo Castore
Architect: Leo A Daly/LAN + PageSoutherlandPage; A Joint Venture

Rising above congested freeways, oversized houses, and drab strip malls, a new architectural landmark has been added to Houston’s horizon. A product of the General Service Administration’s Design Excellence Program, the austere and impressive governmental GSA Regional Field Office emerges from the nondescript suburban landscape with its simple form and emerald skin.

Tim Hursley
Page 72

Brays Crossing

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: Glassman Shoemake Maldonado Architects

Brays Crossing, designed by Glassman Shoemake Maldonado Architects, is a joint venture between New Hope Housing and the City of Houston to remodel a 1960s-era apartment complex adjacent to a major freeway in a crime-ridden neighborhood.

Eric Hester
Page 81

Stylized Urbanism

by: Jeffrey Brown, AIA
Architect: HOK with Laguarda Low Architects

At first blush, Houston Pavilions seems the type of urban in-fill project that provokes architectural deliberation due in part to its formulaic response to current market conditions—a major mixed-use complex in the central business district. Conventional wisdom (supported by favorable coverage in popular media) tells us that almost any large project in nearly any CBD must be a good thing.

Aker/Zvonkovic
Page 48

Montgomery ISD Aquatic Center

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: RWS Architects

Designed by Houston firm RWS Architects, the Montgomery Independent School District Aquatic Center is a 29,600-sf facility that hosts the district’s swim practice, competitions, and community programs for all age groups. The center’s glass lobby with clerestory is located at the entrance of the Montgomery IS D Athletic Complex and faces the main drive.

Susan Hernandez Photography
Page 62

Recovery Efforts On Coast Continue Four Months After Ike’s Devastation

by: Noelle Heinze

Page 12

Tech’s Students Consider Future Use Of the ‘Eighth Wonder of the World’

by: Maryalice Torres-MacDonald

Reconsidering the Houston Astrodome was the primary focus for the Practicum + Studio at Texas Tech University this past fall. Graduate students of the College of Architecture gain professional experience with local firms while engaging in a studio project that responds to identified community needs.

Page 12

UH Architecture Dean Plans Departure

by: TA Staff

After 11 years as architecture dean of the University of Houston, Joe Mashburn, AIA, has announced that he will step down prior to the start of the Fall 2009 semester.

Page 24

A Well-Centered Campus

by: Thomas M. Colbert, A IA
Architect: Thomas Phifer and Partners

Located near the geographic center of Houston’s frenetic urbanism, just below the crosshairs of its freeway system, the Rice University campus harbors an almost monastic quiet and tranquility. Rice, with a lot more land per student than at most urban universities, affords quite a bit of distance between students as they wander between the staid allees of shade trees and colonnaded brick buildings.

Scott Francis
Page 46

Andy Dekaney High School

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: SHW Group

Andy Dekaney High School recently received the 2008 Caudill Award, the highest honor given in the TASA /TASB Exhibit of School Architecture. Based on findings that students perform better in small groups, “Instruction Should Drive Construction” was the guiding philosophy for SH W Group’s design of the 486,000-square-foothigh school sited on 80.7 acres in Houston’s Spring Independent School District.

Richard Payne, FAIA
Page 69

Walnut Bend Elementary School

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: VLK Architects, Inc.

Walnut Bend Elementary School in the Houston Independent School District received the 2008 TASA /TASB Exhibit of School Architecture’s “Special Recognition for Outstanding Primary School” commendation.

G. Lyon Photography
Page 71

Noble Simplicity

by: Filo Castore
Architect: Ziegler Cooper Architects

How do you draw together more than 18,000 tons of masonry into a timeless cathedral in the crux of a kaleidoscopic metropolis? Start with a team effort that transcends cultural and ethnic distinctions, and creates an ageless, unadorned, and solemn house of worship for the whole community, a space of spartan simplicity that is at once soothing and inspiring.

Aker/Zvonkovic Photography
Page 80

Parra Named 2009 AIA Young Architect

by: TA Staff

Camilo Parra, AIA, of Houston is among eight recipients of the 2009 AIA Young Architects Award. The national honor is presented to professionals who have been licensed 10 years or less regardless of their age.

Page 10

Chipperfield Chosen for Master Site Plan As Menil Reconsiders Montrose Campus

by: Wendy Price Todd

A generation ago, the Menil Collection revealed an architecturally significant museum housing an extraordinary private art collection in an unspectacular Houston enclave.

the Menil Collection
Page 18

Shanghai Tower

Designed by Marshall Strabala, AIA, in Gensler’s Houston office, the Shanghai Tower Construction and Development Corporation’s 2,074-foot tall Shanghai Tower broke ground in November. The 128-story building, set for completion in 2014, is expected to be the tallest building in China.

Page 22

Houston Historicist

by: Mark Oberholzer, AIA

Many modernists have been trained to look down their noses at the output of twentieth-century architects who designed within eclectic or historicist vocabularies. The work of architect John Staub and his contemporaries was often dismissed by subsequent generations of architects who refused to accept the disjunction between the historical references of this work and the essentially modern character of its program and use.

Texas A&M Press, Richard Ch eek; Texas A&M University Press
Page 37

Campus Conversion

by: Kurt Neubek, FAIA and John Clegg, AIA
Architect: HarrisonKornberg Architects

The Houston Community College (HCC) System is one of the nation’s largest, with 23 locations across the metropolitan area. Since its creation in 1971, the system has acquired a diverse range of facilities and adapted them for educational purposes.

Michael Stravato
Page 52

EPA Extols Houston, D/FW for Efficiency

Houston and the Dallas-Fort Worth metropolitan area are among the top five cities in the nation with the most buildings enrolled in the Energy Star program administered by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The federal program promotes energy conservation and reduction of greenhouse gases by designing buildings to be more energy efficient.

Page 10

AIA Houston Recognizes 12 Projects

by: Christian Sheridan

AIA Houston honored 12 projects at its 53rd annual Design Awards Dinner held on March 26 at the Rice Hotel’s Crystal Ballroom. Winners were selected from 115 entries in six categories: architecture, residential architecture, interior architecture, renovation/restoration, urban design, and on the boards.

Page 18

The Tolerance Bridge

The Tolerance Bridge is among several public projects planned by the City of Houston to enhance the green space surrounding Buffalo Bayou. The German arts collaborative Elmgreen & Dragset, selected for the project through an international competition, will work in partnership with Houston-based architects SWA Group. Sited just east of Montrose Boulevard, the 850-foot-long pedestrian bridge is designed to connect the bayou’s north and south banks, as well as existing hike-and-bike trails.

Page 22

Art in the Park

by: PageSoutherlandPage
Architect: PageSoutherlandPage

In early 2004, a group of prominent local philanthropists negotiated a landmark deal with Houston Mayor Bill White. As outlined in the pact, the City of Houston contributed several downtown parcels in front of the George R. Brown Convention Center and the philanthropists agreed to fund the design and maintenance of a world-class park that promised to breathe new life into the urban core. Named through a public competition, the non-profit Discovery Green Conservancy opened the $122 million park in April 2008 to widespread acclaim. The 11.8-acre urban amenity is located near the southeast edge of downtown, between the Toyota Center basketball arena and Minute Maid Park baseball stadium.

Eric Laignel Photography; Chris Cooper Photography; Julie Pizzo
Page 44

As Two Deans Depart, Two Others Arrive

by: TA Staff

Lars Lerup stepped down as dean of the Rice University School of Architecture on July 1, a move that leaves two of Texas’ eight accredited schools of architecture searching for replacements. Earlier this year Joe Mashburn, AIA, announced that he would depart the dean’s office at the University of Houston’s Gerald D. Hines College of Architecture.

Page 19

Building in ‘Enough’

by: Val Glitsch
Architect: Nonya Grenader, FAIA

The site for the house Nonya Grenader, FAIA, designed for her family in Houston was selected for the beauty of the existing trees and shade and its ideal proximity as a construction site. Intimately acquainted with the amenities of the Southampton neighborhood, a deed-restricted subdivision near Rice, the Grenaders had lived next door for 11 years before their elderly neighbor offered to sell them her house in 1997. The 55x130-foot lot presented an opportunity to create a new environment tailored to their long-established live/work lifestyle.

Nash Baker Photographer
Page 34

A Clear Vision

by: Donna Kacmar
Architect: Kirksey

The new Cullen Eye Institute in the Medical Building of Baylor College of Medicine in the Texas Medical Center combines multiple adult ophthalmology subspecialties under one roof. Dr. Dan B. Jones, chair of the Ophthalmology Department at Baylor, recognized the need to consolidate the existing adult ophthalmology practice into a single building on the new McNair Campus.

Aker/Zvonkovic
Page 72

Brown Seeks Mayor’s Office in Houston Stressing Wide Architectural Experience

by: Barrie Scardino

Peter H. Brown, FAIA, announced his candidacy for mayor of Houston in February. With more than 30 years’ experience practicing in Houston, the architect also has served on the City Council since winning election in 2005 and re-election in 2007. He recently sat down with AIA Houston Executive Director Barrie Scardino to outline his objectives should he be elected when voters go to the polls on Nov. 3.

Page 21

San Antonio Military Medical Center

Construction of the 1.1 million-sf San Antonio Military Medical Center at Fort Sam Houston, designed by RTKL’s Dallas office, began in December. Scheduled for completion in July 2011, the $556 million integrated design-bid-build contract is a result of the 2005 Defense Base Closure and Realignment Commission’s recommendations.

Page 28

Solar LED Fascia

University of Houston students Daniel De La Garza, Jared Wilson Thorn, Alfonso Villafuerte, and Chukwunoso Ofili have developed a concept for an eco-friendly, multi-purpose lighting system that could serve nightly as neighborhood and home security lighting and as solar-powered emergency lighting during power shortages.

Page 28

Concrete Poetry

by: Jeffrey Brown, AIA
Architect: Elliott + Associates Architects

This word painting by Rand Elliott, FAIA, explains how he wants people to understand his latest award-winning project, ImageNet of Houston. Employing poetry or manifestoes to describe one’s work is not uncommon these days. Indeed, such material appears to be a prerequisite of the current media culture that promotes “starchitects,” “signature architects,” and one-hit wonders. Supportive text is, we are led to believe, required reading. If a building appears mundane, baffling, or otherwise underwhelming, just refer to the narrative. Within the architect’s words, we are told, lies the true meaning which will assure in our prosaic times that, yes, this is Architecture.

Scott McDonald, Hedrich Blessing; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 56

Folia Fictus

by: Jenny Kiel
Architect: Dillon Kyle Architecture

Once the site of an identical apartment building as the building the gallery now inhabits, is where the designers Dillon Kyle and Cedar Baldridge imagined a parking lot built for the artists of the gallery. The parking lot is actually used more by the guests and owners of the gallery but it makes a nod to the artwork inside. It is a unique integration of art, landscape, and function.

Casey Dunn Photography; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 68

TSA Convention Preview: Exhibitors

The Texas Society of Architects welcomes these companies participating in the 2009 Expo in Houston (current as of August 4). Expo dates are October 23-24 at the George R. Brown Convention Center. Make plans now to visit their booths, pick up new product information, ask a question, or just see a friend. Keep and use this handy guide with booth numbers and contact information as a reference tool.

Page 103

RDA Civic Forum’s Post-Ike Forecast Calls for Improved Coastal Safeguards

by: Thomas M. Colbert, A IA

While Hurricane Ike may have roared through Texas over a year ago, public interest remains high in planning efforts to protect the Houston-Galveston region against such violent storms. In response to that interest, the Rice Design Alliance sponsored a three-part civic forum during the summer.

Page 19

Houston Set to Expand Ideson Library Based on Cram’s Original Intentions

by: Gerald Moorhead

Eighty-four years after opening as Houston’s Central Library, the Julia Ideson Building will finally be completed according to the plans of its original architect, Ralph Adams Cram. Dedicated in 1926 and named for the city librarian who pressured for a new facility to replace the Carnegie Library of 1904, the Ideson Building is about to undergo restoration by Gensler’s Houston office.

(top) Courtesy Gensler; (bott om) Courtesy Houston Metropolitan Research Center, Houston Public Library
Page 9

Houston Firm’s Low-Cost Home Design Pledged to Help Ravaged New Orleans

by: Stephen Sharpe

Announced to fanfare surrounding actor Brad Pitt’s personal involvement with bringing affordable housing to this beleaguered city’s poorest residents, the Make It Right program unveiled designs in December for houses by some of the world’s cutting-edge architects. A total of 13 international, national, and regional firms were invited to create home designs for the Crescent City’s Lower Ninth Ward, one of the neighborhoods hardest hit by flooding in the wake of Hurricane Katrina in September 2005.

Rendering by Patrick Lopez, Courtesy BNIM Architect s
Page 13

A Half-Century of Best Works by Hines On View at Architecture Center Houston

by: Barrie Scardino

Starting with a project for a small office and warehouse in 1957, Gerald D. Hines began developing real estate in Houston with a keen eye for adding value to his projects with architectural excellence. A half-century later, having developed hundreds of buildings around the world, Hines has remained committed to raising the standards of commercial design by engaging the best practitioners.

Photos courtesy Hines
Page 14

AIA Honors McKittrick with Kemper Award

Thomas McKittrick, FAIA, of Houston is the 2008 recipient of the Edward C. Kemper Award for his contributions to the profession through service to the American Institute of Architects. In 1991, he was honored with TSA’s Llewellyn W. Pitts Award (now called the Lifetime Achievement Medal), the Society’s highest recognition for an architect member.

Page 22

Interloop’s E-X-I-T Enters MoMA

On Nov. 7, 2007, the Museum of Modern Art in New York inducted into its permanent collection Interloop Architecture’s E-X-I-T sign custom designed for the Nasher Sculpture Center in Dallas. Fabricated with acrylic letters and illuminated by LED, the Houston firm’s creation joins other works in the MoMA Architecture and Design collection suchas Vignelli’s New York subway signage and the Flight Departure Panel from Solari di Udine.

Page 24

Careful Intervention

by: Tom Diehl
Architect: Kirksey

Architects at Kirksey faced two major challenges with the design of a nearly quarter millionsquare-foot building for Texas Woman’s University at the Texas Medical Center in Houston. First, the site comprised two 65-foot-wide perpendicular slivers of land at a prominent intersection in the burgeoning medical complex. Second, feasibility studies (conducted in a compressed timeframe) intended intended to confirm the validity of a land exchange ultimately represented a normative site analysis—one generating the organizational armature for subsequent decisions.

Aker/Zvonkovic Photography
Page 50

Carl Wunsche Sr. High School

by: Megan Braley
Architect: SHW Group

Carl Wunsche Sr. High School is a career academy located in the Spring Independent School District of Houston. SH W Group oriented the 273,178-square-foot school around three academic towers that each focuses on a specialized area of study.

Richard Payne, FAIA
Page 63

All Aboard!

by: Stephen Sharpe

Commuter rail is returning to Austin, bringing with it several transit oriented developments (TOD) that will drive the creation of new live/work/play neighborhoods centered around at least eight train stations. Perhaps as early as this fall, Austin will join Dallas and Houston in reviving urban rail travel as a means to reduce traffic congestion and as a catalyst for thoughtful intracity planning. That means more people in and around Austin will have the option of leaving their cars at home.

map courtesy City of Austin Neighborhood Planning & Zoning Department; rendering courtesy MWM Design Group
Page 5

Gulf Coast Green Symposium in Houston To Work on Regional Problems, Solutions

Co-sponsored by AIA Houston, the Gulf Coast Green 2008 symposium and expo is scheduled April 3-6 at Reliant Park in Houston. The event will address timely issues of rising energy costs and global climate concerns. Tours of Houston will be given on April 4, and will feature folk art, green roof, Houston downtown, and sustainable engineering.

Page 13

Winner Selected for Dallas Center for Architecture Competition

by: W. Mark Gunderson, AIA

AIA Dallas, following examples from across the country (New York City and Houston considered obvious prologue) has taken the first steps towards the construction of a new 7,500-square foot venue intended to house its own activities as well as those of multiple organizations aligned with the architectural mission of the chapter including the Dallas Architectural Foundation and the Dallas Architecture Forum.

Rendering courtesy Peter Doncaster, AIA
Page 14

Brochstein Pavilion

Construction is underway at Rice University in Houston on the 6,042-square-foot Brochstein Pavilion, a new gathering place planned for students, faculty, and staff. Composed primarily of glass, the pavilion will include a coffee house and a 10,728-square-foot landscaped, wrap-around plaza where 70 new trees will be added to the campus.

Page 20

Bygone Big D

by: James Pratt

Mark Rice is as fascinated with downtown Dallas history as I am. As a boy of four, I first saw big downtown buildings when I was brought across the Houston Street bridge, then Highway 80, from Fort Worth. A couple of years later, I saw the new winged red horse installed on the top of the Magnolia Petroleum Company headquarters.

Page 22

Reborn on the Bayou

by: Stephen Jovicich, AIA
Architect: Powers Brown Architecture

Geoffery Lyon
Page 44

AIA Houston Awards 16 Projects

by: Kimberley Hickson, AIA

AIA Houston honored 16 projects during the chapter’s fifty-second annual Design Awards Dinner held on March 27 at the Rice Hotel. Winners were selected from 117 entries.

Page 16

One Park Place

Overlooking downtown Houston’s new urban park, the 37-story One Park Place will offer 346 units with a total net rentable space of 498,000 square feet. Designed by Jackson & Ryan Architects for the Finger Companies, the residential tower will provide residents an escape from the chaos of city life.

Page 23

The Designer’s ‘Hand’

by: Garrett Finney

In this high-tech age of ours, designers are discovering new and better ways to work with their heads. And they use their feet to march inexorably forward, constructing buildings and cities that transform the landscape. However, an exhibition now on display at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, reminds us that designers have lost their “hand.”

Page 24

Living in Balance

by: Mark Schatz, AIA
Architect: Intexure Architects

Sometimes the best sense of well -being comes from being in tune with one’s environment in the sense that the environment is a carefully constructed mirror reflecting back views of our better personal qualities. When handled architecturally these expressions of our philosophy, values, and intentions can find their way into daily routines that then become a pattern for living, which constantly reinforces and reinvigorates.

Rame Hruska, AIA
Page 40

Museum Hopes Third Time a Charm For New Home in Downtown Austin

by: Wendy Price Todd

The Austin Museum of Art’s announcement in February of a joint venture with Hines of Houston marks the third time since the 1980s that hopes have been raised for a new downtown AMOA home.

Page 14

CORE: A Compact Highly Adaptable Home

The design submittal from Hybrid/ORA of Seattle is the winner of the “99K House Competition” sponsored by the Rice Design Alliance and AIA Houston. The competition challenged architects to design a sustainable, single-family prototype that could be built for around $99,000 in Houston and replicated throughout the Gulf region.

Page 22

New Harmony Grotto

Inspired by nature, University of Houston Gerald D. Hines College of Architecture fifth-year students re-imagined Frederick Kiesler’s Grotto for Meditation, originally commissioned in 1963 by Jane Blaffer Owen as a quiet and relaxing environment in the arts community of New Harmony, Ind.

Page 22

Light and Flexible

by: Geoffry Brune, AIA
Architect: Lord, Aeck & Sargent

The Margaret M. Alkek Building for Biomedical Research, designed by Lord, Aeck, & Sargent’s Architecture for Science Studio, is a signature facility on the Baylor College of Medicine campus. Completed in July 2007, the eight-story tower contains research facilities for interdisciplinary programs in cardiovascular sciences, cancer, pharmacogenomics, genomics, and proteomics. The building’s open plans, with extensive use of interior glazing, enhance flexibility and collaboration while also adding a sense of transparency.

Jonathan Hillyer
Page 76

TSA Architecture Firm Award

Founded in 1953 by Harvey V. Marmon Jr. and Edward Mok, Marmon Mok is now led by Stephen R. Souter, FAIA, who has served as managing partner since 1988; William Reeves, AIA; Greg Houston, AIA; Dror Baldinger, AIA; Carlos Moreno, AIA; Mary Bartlett, AIA; Braint Harkiewicz, AIA; and Montgomery Howard, AIA.

Page 16

Design Exploration Center

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: GBA Architecture

Faced wit h the imminent demolition of a World War II-vintage structure adjacent to the University of Houston’s College of Architecture, school officials devised a metamorphosis that not only honors the original building’s utilitarian design but also enhances scholarship on the urban campus.

Hester + Hardaway Photographers
Page 50

Near Northside Study

by: TA Staff
Architect: William Truitt, AIA

The purpose of Near Northside Study conducted by William Truitt, AIA, of the University of Houston, is three-fold: to illuminate existing problems of large open-space neighborhoods that are often overlooked in inner-city studies; to highlight the potential for such neighborhoods to positively impact the larger urban area; and to propose new adjacencies that allow for growth in targeted areas over the next 30 years.

Page 106

High Expectations

by: Joyce Chandran

When architects from Leo A Daly’s Dallas office and engineers from its sister company, Lockwood, Andrews & Newnam in Houston, were tasked with designing a transportation facility for the Houston Independent School District, all parties concluded that it was an opportunity to set a new standard in industrial building design.

Page 144

Sicardi Gallery

The new 5,200-sq. ft. Sicardi Gallery, near the Menil Collection and the Houston Center for Photography, will house a second venue to fulfill its mission to facilitate a cultural dialogue between Latin America, the U.S., and Europe through art.

Page 20

Tastefully Prepared

by: Geoffry Brune, AIA
Architect: HOK (design architect), Kendall/Heaton (architect of record), Kirksey (interiors architect)

Sysco Corporations’ new headquarters campus is located on Enclave Parkway, a suburban office street that winds through the gated residential communities of far west Houston. The complex includes a conference center, a 12-story office tower with 318,000 square feet, an eight-story office tower with 214,000 square feet, and parking garages that accommodate 1,832 automobiles. A Sysco data center, located in an existing building on the site, is also incorporated into the project.

Aker/Zvonkovic
Page 40

Interconnected

by: David Jefferis
Architect: Gensler

More and more architecture and engineering firms are rethinking the creative process, trading traditional concepts of rigid hierarchical structure for a new model intended to foster spontaneous, informal interaction. Open office environments are the most conspicuous factor, although elements of corporate branding are also being subtly integrated into the workplace. For Walter P Moore’s new national headquarters, Gensler pursued a holistic approach that seamlessly blends public image and creative performance.

Chas McGrath
Page 52

Work Begins on ‘Discovery Green’ at Prime Downtown Houston Site

by: Andrea Exter

Downtown Houston will soon have a new 11.78-acre park stretching across three blocks directly in front of the George R. Brown Convention Center. Currently under construction, the park takes the place of two underused parking lots and a block of green space sandwiched in between. Designed as a multi-functional outdoor space and expected to cost $93 million to build, the new park promises to be an unexpected retreat within walking distance of the convention center, nearby hotels, and adjacent venues for professional sports.

Page 8

TAMU Interdisciplinary Life Sciences Building

The 228,000-sq. ft. Interdisciplinary Life Sciences Building, designed by Perkins & Will’s Houston office, is the largest single construction project in the 130-year history of Texas A&M University. The $95 million, three story building is sited prominently across from the historic Simpson Drill Field and will serve as both a physical and conceptual link between the main campus life sciences corridor and the west campus research facilities.

Page 19

Fluid Transition

by: Mark Lam
Architect: Hellmuth, Obata + Kassabaum

When the University of Houston commissioned HOK Architects to design a new student services building, the campus lacked a clearly defined organizational concept and was more of a loose conglomeration of disparate buildings without a clear master plan. The architects’ solution attempts to establish an order by continuing the use of the form, materials, and rhythm of the neighboring Miesian-style Bayou Building while also introducing a fresher, more visually appealing character. By this approach, the design concept became one of juxtaposition and transition.

Aker/Zvonkovic; Drew Donovan
Page 38

Mark Twain Elementary

by: Andi Beierman
Architect: Courtney Harper + Partners

Built as a replacement for the original school, the new 86,150-sf Mark Twain Elementary School continues to support its long-established philosophy toward education: focus on each child’s experience while celebrating all aspects of learning

Hester + Hardaway
Page 47

Building a Better Wall

by: Alex Lahti

What happens when you give sophomore architecture students bricks and mortar? Heroic cantilevers go out of style, and formal innovation follows from structural know-how. On Sept. 19 during the annual Brick Day, students at the University of Houston’s Gerald D. Hines College of Architecture had a chance to put to use the theory they learn in lecturer Robert Morris’ structures class.

Photo by Thomas Shea Courtesy University of Houston; Photo by Thomas Shea Courtesy University of Houston; Photo by Thomas Shea Courtesy University of Houston
Page 69

Taniguchi Unveils Asia House Design

Japanese architect Yoshio Taniguchi unveiled his schematic design (shown at right) in December for Asia House, Asia Society Texas Center’s 38,000-sf facility in Houston’s museum district.

photo of model by Toshiharu Kitajima
Page 17

Hoogeboom Selected as AIA Young Architect

Lonnie D. Hoogeboom, AIA, a partner in the Houston firm of Natalye Appel + Associates LLC, is one of six recipients of the 2007 AIA Young Architect Award. Hoogeboom was previously honored with TSA’s Award for Young Professional Achievement in 2006.

Page 19

East Biloxi Model Home

MC2 Architects of Houston was among 12 firms selected by Architecture for Humanity to design residential prototypes for its Model Home program. The goal of the program is to provide design services and financial assistance for the construction of new homes for families in East Biloxi, Miss., whose houses were destroyed in 2005 by Hurricane Katrina.

Page 21

Canal Street Catalyst

by: Donna Kacmar
Architect: Val Glitsch, FAIA

While the need is great, new low-income apartments aren’t easy to come by in Houston’s inner city. The new Canal Street Apartments in Houston’s Second Ward respond to that need with a welldesigned complex of 133 single-room occupancy (SRO) rental units. The project was commissioned by New Hope Housing, Inc., a nonprofit corporation founded in 1993 to provide SRO apartments for low-income adults who choose to live alone.

Miro Dvorscak; Val Glitsch, FAIA
Page 28

Rescue in the Park

by: Gerald Moorhead
Architect: Page Southerland Page

Abused, neglected, and arrested kids in Harris County now take the first steps to a more normal life in a multi-service facility set in a public park. Protection, shelter, food, health care, and schooling are provided at the centralized location of the new Harris County Youth Services Center, housing a number of county agencies, designed by the Houston office of Page Southerland Page.

Hester + Hardaway; Gerald Moorhead, FAIA
Page 44

METRO Administration Building

by: Courtnay Loch
Architect: PGAL

Designed by PGAL, the Lee P. Brown METRO Administration Building combines administrative services and public operations for the Metropolitan Transit Authority of Harris County (METR O) into a single 400,000-sf location.

Dana Hoff
Page 49

AIA Houston Awards 19 Projects

by: Geoffry Brune, AIA

AIA Houston honored 19 projects during the chapter’s 2007 Design Awards Dinner held on April 5 at the Majestic Metro Theater. The projects were selected from 136 entries submitted by local firms.

Page 19

Regent Square

The largest of nine similar high-density, mixed-use projects planned for Houston, GID Urban Development Group’s Regent Square will transform 24 acres south of Allen Parkway into a four-block community connected by pedestrian walkways.

Page 23

United Way Center

by: Jeanette Wiemers
Architect: Gensler

In contrast to its previous ‘anonymous’ office building, United Way’s new campus near downtown Houston establishes a highly visible presence for the nonprofit organization that is also an asset to the surrounding community. Composed of two brick-and-glass buildings, a parking garage, and gardens, the 90,000-sf complex designed by Gensler was completed in March 2005.

Joe Aker, Aker/Zvonkovic
Page 57

Morris Architects

by: Jeanette Wiemers
Architect: Morris Architects

In designing its new corporate headquarters, Morris Architects created a space that reflects the 70-year-old firm’s sophisticated background as well as its contemporary vision for the future. Completed in January 2006, the 27,000-sf facility showcases materials, furniture, and staff talent integral to the company’s core services of design and creativity.

Joe Aker, Aker/Zvonkovic
Page 59

Menil Collection Celebrates 20 Years

by: Wendy Price Todd

On April 21 the Menil Collection commemorated its twentieth anniversary with a rare public lecture by its renowned architect Renzo Piano. From the lawn of the acclaimed museum, the architect addressed an audience of more than 1,000 who came to learn about the project that Piano described as a “portrait of a person”—Dominique deMenil. An extraordinary patron, she also is credited for giving his firm, Renzo Piano Building Workshop (RPBW), of Genoa and Paris its first American commission.

george hixson, Hickey-robertson;
Page 9

Clearly Welcoming

by: Donna Kacmar
Architect: PGAL

THE International Arrivals Building (IAB) by PGAL Architects at the George Bush Intercontinental Airport welcomes travelers and unites the federal Immigration and Customs functions within one large day-lit volume.

Richard Payne, FAIA
Page 58

‘Adventures’ on the Bayou

by: Barrie Scardino

In the six months since Architecture Center Houston opened, ArCH has welcomed more than 2,500 people to a wide range of activities – from workshops and exhibitions to architecture walking tours and even a small concert – but we are most excited about an event coming up this summer.

photographs by joe aker | a-z photography
Page 64

In Mississippi, Houston Design Firms Assist Post-Katrina Housing Recovery

by: Kari Smith

Two years after Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast, the residents of this once-close-knit Mississippi community are still trying to recover from unprecedented devastation. In some areas of East Biloxi, nearly 80 percent of housing is estimated to have been lost or made uninhabitable from the hurricane.

Top photo courtesy MC 2; bottom photo by Brett Zamore
Page 15

Houston Legacy: Hugo V. Neuhaus, Jr.

by: Val Glitsch

On Aug. 2, more than 400 guests attended an opening preview of Houston Mod’s third architectural exhibition, Hugo V. Neuhaus, Jr., Residential Architecture, 1948-1966, at Architecture Center Houston. Neuhaus was the premier gentleman architect for Houston’s elite society in the 1950s.

Page 29

Christ Church

by: Donna Kacmar
Architect: Leo A Daly/LAN + PageSoutherlandPage, A Joint Venture

Timothy Hursley
Page 40

Frame/Harper House

by: Ben Koush
Architect: Stern and Bucek Architects

Genius sometimes strikes quickly. According to one of those quintessential Texas stories, architect Harwood Taylor designed his residential masterpiece for childhood friend David Frame and his wife Gloria during a flight from Midland to Houston in Frame’s private plane in 1958.

Hester + Hardaway
Page 48

Menil House

by: Bruce Webb
Architect: Stern and Bucek Architects

The house Philip Johnson designed for John and Dominique de Menil in the Briarwood subdivision introduced the International Style to Houston’s opulent and architecturally conservative River Oaks neighborhood.

Hester + Hardaway
Page 56

Royal Bank of Scotland

by: William Rios, AIA
Architect: DMJM Rottet

Royal Bank of Scotland (RBS), an international financial institution offering diverse banking service to retail and corporate clients, appropriately maintains offices in downtown Houston.

Benny Chan
Page 72

Satterfield & Pontikes

by: Chris Koon, AIA
Architect: Kirksey

The new corporate headquarters in Houston for Satterfield & Pontikes Construction represents a rare building type where both the contractor and the client are one and the same.

Jud Haggard
Page 76

Memorial Hermann Medical Plaza

by: Megan Braley
Architect: Kirksey

The new 31-story addition to the Texas Medical Center (TMC) offers 500,000-sf of retail, ambulatory surgery, and professional office space to an area that previously lacked adequate lease space for physicians.

Aker/Zvonkovic Photography
Page 87

Solar House

Scheduled for completion next fall, the 5,000-square-foot residence is designed by Adams Architects as the first fully sustainable residential building in Houston. The project employs an intricate steel structure that props 150 photovoltaic panels 12 inches above the roof.

Page 16

Low-Income Housing Brings ‘New Hope’ to Residents of Houston’s Second Ward

by: Ashley St. Clair

During a Nov. 17 dedication ceremony, Houston non-profit New Hope Housing announced the opening of Canal Street Apartments, the city’s first single room occupancy apartment complex built in a neighborhood district. Located at 2821 Canal Street in Houston’s Second Ward, the 133-unit complex is the third SRO developed by New Hope Housing in the past 12 years. The organization developed Houston’s first SRO in 1995.

Photo by miro dvorak; Photo by Val Glitsch, FAIA
Page 13

School of the Woods–High School

Scheduled to open its doors in August, the School of the Woods-High School in Houston strives to enable experiential learning through its environment. Natalye Appel + Associates Architects with Architectsworks are set to complete the $10 million project.

Page 22

The Brick Wanted to Dance

by: Anna Mod
Architect: RoTo Architects with HKS

“The brick said it wanted to dance,” exclaims Michael Rotondi, FAIA, when asked about the veneer on the new Art and Architecture Building at Prairie View A&M University. Designed by Rotondi’s firm, RoTo Architects in Los Angeles, the 105,000-sf complex adds a dramatic presence to this rural campus located 50 miles west of Houston.

Assassi Productions
Page 32

AIA Houston Design Collection at the MFAH

AIA Houston, in conjunction with the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, has created a special collection to spotlight significant works of twentieth-century modern furniture and other household objects. By featuring classic examples from the period, the local chapter hopes to inform the public about the important roles of architects.

Page 12

Art League Houston School

The Art League Houston is raising $1 million to build a new Art League Houston School, designed by Irving Phillips, as well as to make improvements to the site and an existing gallery building. Located on Montrose Boulevard in Houston, the new school (its western elevation is shown here), will encompass 6,000 square feet. Site improvements are to include courtyard expansion, more suitable lighting, landscaping, and seating.

Page 16

New USGBC Chapter Totals 3 for Texas

Last summer the U.S. Green Building Council incorporated its third and newest chapter in Texas. The Central Texas-Balcones Chapter joined two others – the North Texas and Greater Houston Area chapters – to represent the state on the USGBC’ board of directors.

Page 12

Cultural Reflection

by: Mark Oberholzer, AIA
Architect: MC2 Architects

More than any other aspect of nature, water has forced its way into the collective consciousness of Gulf Coast cities with the threat of frequent floods and heavy rains during each hurricane season. While most designers think of water as something to be shed as quickly as possible from a building and its site, brothers Chung Nguyen, AIA, and Chuong Nguyen of MC_ Architects have conceived a remarkable double residence in Houston whose central feature is a pavilion surrounded by a manmade rainwater pond.

Richard Payne, FAIA
Page 44

Taniguchi Set to Unveil Revised Design this Summer for Asia House Houston

by: Ronnie Self

Yoshio Taniguchi, best known in the U.S. for his recent expansion of the Museum of Modern Art in New York City, will unveil his latest schematic design for Houston’s Asia House later this summer. The client, Asia Society Texas, has acquired two facing parcels totaling 78,000 square feet along one block of Southmore Boulevard between Caroline and Austin streets in the city’s Museum District. The 35,000-sq. ft. facility is expected to open in summer 2009 and will serve as a venue for cultural, artistic, educational, and business exchange.

courtesy asia society texas
Page 10

AIA Houston Presents Design Awards

AIA Houston recognized 15 projects in the chapter’s 2006 Design Awards. The jury – Margaret Helfand of Helfand Architecture; Steve Cassell of Architecture Research Office; Zack McKown of Tsao & McKown Architects; and Rob Rogers of Rogers Marvel Architects – selected the winners from 113 submittals.

Page 14

Rural Fabric

by: Liz Axford

When asked about sources of inspiration for The Quilts of Gee’s Bend, which debuted at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston in the fall of 2002, the quiltmakers often cited their surroundings. In the current exhibit, Gee’s Bend: The Architecture of the Quilt, debuting once again at the MFAH, the curators have worked to make this connection more apparent.

Illustrations courtesy MFAH
Page 20

Graphic Design

by: Donna Kacmar
Architect: Michael Graves & Associates with PGAL

The new Houston Branch of the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas is hard to miss: its imposing form and graphic detailing rise above the trees along Allen Parkway just west of downtown. While its exterior appears heavy-handed from a distance, one must experience the inner workings to fully appreciate the facility’s design.

Richard Payne, FAIA
Page 28

Martel College at Rice University

by: Donna Kacmar

Michael Graves’ signature style also appears in another building recently completed in Houston. Martel College at Rice University (shown at left) exhibits similarities with the Federal Reserve, particularly in the treatment of Martel’s exterior where St. Joe brick is set in a “jumbo running-bond pattern” with precast concrete units used to mimic mortar. As with the Federal Reserve where he again played with the sense of scale on the facade, Graves was teamed with PGAL on the Rice project.

Richard Payne , FAIA
Page 31

Playing It Up

by: Val Glitsch
Architect: Upchurch Architects

The recently completed Day School for Christ Lutheran Church in Brenham puts a new face on school design for this small city Northwest of Houston. Previously occupying a small house and shared weekday use of a rather bleak set of Sunday School rooms, 125 children (with their 24 teachers) now occupy a building Upchurch Architects has designed just for them.

Hester + Hardaway
Page 32

Houstonians Rally to Preserve Theaters

by: Gerald Moorhead

When the Greater Houston Preservation Alliance (GHPA) added two Art Deco theaters to its “most endangered” list in July, there was an unprecedented outcry to save the buildings from being razed. The response has been unique for Houston, where land value is king and buildings, the bearers of history and identity-of-place, are expendable. Within 10 days, more than 20,000 people had signed an online petition in support of GHPA’s actions to preserve the theaters.

Photos by gerald moorhead, fAIA
Page 15

S.I. Morris (1914-2006)

by: Stephen Fox

The dean of Houston’s architecture community, Seth Irwin Morris Jr., died Aug. 1 at the age of 91.

courtesy morris architects
Page 17

The 505


Architect: Collaborative Designworks

The 505, a four-unit townhouse development, sits near Houston’s rejuvenated downtown. The architect spearheaded the project as an experimental design exercise that works within the economic and market constraints of a speculative housing development. The 505 sought to be financially successful and to make responsible use of land, incorporate sustainable design principles, enhance community sensibilities, and possess an architectural identity.

Aker/Zvoncovik Photography; G. Lyon Photography
Page 46

Sarofim Research Building


Architect: BNIM Architects

The Fayez S. Sarofim Research Building houses core research laboratories, administrative offices, and a glass auditorium. Located in the Texas Medical Center, the parti consists of a central atrium flanked by two wings—the southern containing administrative offices and the northern containing labs. The openness of the adjoining atrium gardens invites public passage through the building, giving the program a sense of transparency.

Richard Payne, FAIA
Page 66

School of Nursing


Architect: BNIM Architects with Lake/Flato Architects

The School of Nursing enhances human health and productivity while having as little impact on the environment as possible. It is itself a healthy building that was built with 50-percent recycled materials and designed to reduce energy use by 40 percent and water use by 60 percent. The project, submitted for a LEE D Gold rating, was selected by the AIA Committee on the Environment as a 2006 Top Ten Green Project.

Hester + Hardaway
Page 68

TSA studio Awards

by: Stephen Sharpe

The review of Studio Award entries followed the jury’s finalizing its selections for Design Awards. From the 48 submittals, the jury kept 14 for a second round before deciding to award seven projects. Three of them in particular garnered praise from the jurors—Square of Circles by Jay Smith, AIA, of Dallas; Houston Skyscraper by Michael Kross, an architecture student at Rice University; and Design>Build>Texas by architecture students at UT Austin.

Page 78

Houston Skyscraper


Architect: Michael Kross, student at Rice University

Increased mobility in communications and transportation has seen the traditional central business district lose favor to peripheral centers. Nowhere is this trend more salient than in Houston, where at least one of the motivations for building tall no longer applies.

Page 81

Update: Threatened Houston Theaters

by: Gerald Moorhead

Since the last report on Houston’s endangered River Oaks and Alabama theaters (Sept/Oct 2006 TA, p. 15), the owner of the historic Art Deco movie houses, Weingarten Realty Investors, has made public its intentions. Both sites are planned for high-rise development, with the curved north section of the original River Oaks Shopping Center doomed to make way for a multi-story building.

Photo by Jim Parsons
Page 14

Shotgun Chameleon

Designed by University of Houston architecture student Zui Ng (working with professors Rafael Longoria and Fernando Brave, AIA), Shotgun Chameleon was one of two entries by Texas designers to receive an Honor Award in the New Orleans Prototype Housing Competition co-sponsored by Architectural Record and Tulane University’s School of Architecture.

Page 18

Lofts On Post Oak

by: Andi Beierman
Architect: Wallace Garcia Wilson Architects, Inc.; Jackson & Ryan Arcitects

Situated among the upscale shopping centers in Houston’s Galleria, Lofts on Post Oak provides a much-needed residential center to complement the vibrant commercial streetscape along Post Oak Boulevard. T he complex, with a total of 351 residential units, includes an eight-story tower that houses 66 units offering contemporary living environments opposite buildings designed by I.M. Pei, Cesar Pelli, and Philip Johnson.

Architectural Photography
Page 47

Energy-Efficient Envelopes

by: Mark Oberholzer, AIA

Located at the edge of Houston’s Texas Medical Center, the Fayez S. Sarofim Research Building occupies a tight site between a transit center and Braeswood Bayou. The building design by BNIM Architects adopts a variety of high-performance wall system technologies that enhance the building’s energy efficiency while creating a subtle yet intriguing urban presence.

photo by Richard Payne, FAIA
Page 49

Energy-Efficient Envelopes

by: Mark Oberholzer, AIA
Architect: BNI M Architects

Located at the edge of Houston’s Texas Medical Center, the Fayez S. Sarofim Research Building occupies a tight site between a transit center and Braeswood Bayou. The building design by BNIM Architects adopts a variety of high-performance wall system technologies that enhance the building’s energy efficiency while creating a subtle yet intriguing urban presence.

photo by Richard Payne, FAIA
Page 49

Energy-Efficient Envelopes

by: Mark Oberholzer, AIA
Architect: Thompson, Ventulett, Stainback & Associates, Inc.; Arquitectonica International (Arena); Gignac & As

Located at the edge of Houston’s Texas Medical Center, the Fayez S. Sarofim Research Building occupies a tight site between a transit center and Braeswood Bayou. The building design by BNIM Architects adopts a variety of high-performance wall system technologies that enhance the building’s energy efficiency while creating a subtle yet intriguing urban presence.

photo by Richard Payne, FAIA; Courtesy Thompson Ventulett Stainback & Associates
Page 49
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