Article Results for "Marfa"

A Desert Drive-In

There will soon be a new reason to head west and visit Marfa. New York-based MOS is designing the Ballroom Marfa Drive-In — an integration of art, architecture, and landscape architecture.

renderings by MOS and OLIN
Page 24

R J Marfa


Architect: Rand Elliott, FAIA, of Elliott + Associates Architects

The minimalist design R J Marfa by Rand Elliott, FAIA, of Elliott + Associates Architects strips out everything unnecessary to become an object in the landscape.

Page 41

The Happening on the South Plains

by: J. Brantley Hightower, AIA

While Lubbock is not typically mentioned alongside Marfa and Santa Fe when describing small communities that are defined by their cultural offerings, the city is nevertheless experiencing a remarkable transformation on account of its thriving art scene.

Tonja Hagy, Urs Peter “Upe” Flueckiger, J. Brantley Hightower, AIA, Denny Mingus, and Tom Kessler Photography
Page 34

Frontier Renaissance

by: Dan Searight

Long-time friends and former business partners Randy Bacon and Jim Stuart were both looking for a small town where they might live at a slower pace. They were attracted to Marfa and Fort Davis, but those locales were too remote. They considered several small towns within a few hours’ drive of Fort Worth, hoping to find one with a historic courthouse and a downtown square. Stuart wanted a quiet place to pursue his ambitions as a writer, while Bacon required an artist studio near the West Texas subject matter he paints.

Rick Wintersole
Page 88

Studio Awards 2010


Architect: C. Graham Beach , J . Brantley Hightower, aia, and Jennifer Young

The concept for edgeHouse explores the architectural potential of a house that fully exploits the unique social and environmental dualities of Marfa.

Page 31

Judd’s Legacy in Print

by: Lawrence Connolly

In his foreword of Urs Peter Flückiger’s Donald Judd: Architecture in Marfa, Texas, the eminent architectural historian Richard Guy Wilson describes Judd’s Marfa work as overwhelming both in scale and quality. For Wilson, it speaks volumes about the nature of art that one would findJudd’s enigmatic pieces in such an isolated place.

Photography by Florian Holzherr courtesy the Judd Foundation; drawings by Urs Peter Flückiger and students of Texas Tech University, College of Architecture
Page 29

The Judd Effect

by: J. Brantley Hightower

When she was young, Valda Livingston learned to accept that no one had ever heard of her hometown. There was no particular reason anyone should have heard of Marfa since it was located in the proverbial middle of nowhere between San Antonio and El Paso. That is why she was suspicious years later when a man from New York told her he was “going to put Marfa on the map of the art world.”

Illustration by Michael A. Hill for Texas Architect; PHOTO COURTESY FORD, POWELL & CARSON
Page 33

Chinati Gallery

by: Mark T. Wellen
Architect: Ford Powell & Carson Architects and Planners

Andy Mattern
Page 36

Wesley Gallery


Architect: Ford Powell & Carson Architects and Planners

An abandoned stable of crumbling adobe and concrete was converted to a permanent gallery.

Andy Mattern, Artimbo
Page 74
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