Article Results for "design"

Innovation and Design

by: Catherine Gavin

Digital fabrication is turning traditional architectural practice on its head, and as academics press forward into uncharted territories, communication and cross-pollination with practicing architects is increasingly important.

Page 7

Sizing Up Design: Working Big

by: Ron Stelmarski, AIA

Ron Stelmarski, AIA, details the benefits of large firm culture.

Page 15

Sizing Up Design: Diary of a Small Firm

by: Jessica Stewart Lendvay

Small firm culture has many benefits.

Page 15

Plastic Stereotomy

Justin Diles’ “Plastic Stereotomy” is the winner of TEX-FAB’s 2014 international digital design and fabrication competition.

Page 17

Cube Loft

Architects and design professionals have a new place to stay when traveling to Austin: the Charles Moore Foundation’s Cube Loft.

Page 19

AIA Dallas 2014 Design Awards

Texas Architect magazine features the AIA Dallas 2014 Design Awards.

Page 20

Self-Sustaining House

Bercy Chen Studio’s Self-Sustaining House optimizes rainwater retention, solar radiation, and a turbine-driven generator and compressor to satisfy all energy and water needs.

Page 22

Weather Room

Through minimalist multitasking, LOJO’s Weather Room takes portability to a new level.

Page 22

Creek Show: Light Night

Austin’s Creek Show brought thousands of visitors to Waller Creek on a freezing night last fall to see installations by local architects and landscape architects.

Page 28

Why Small?

by: Donna Kacmar, FAIA

Bigger isn’t always better, even in Texas.

Page 31

Guest Nest

by: Jen Wong

Nested House, a guesthouse built around a traditional sauna, supports full-range living and achieves spatial efficiency through thoughtful program placement.

Luis Ayala
Page 36

Cabin Fever

by: Jack Murphy, Assoc. AIA

Urs Peter “Upe” Flueckiger and students of Texas Tech University College of Architecture build a smart and compact Sustainable Cabin in West Texas.

Urs Peter "Upe" Fleuckiger and Denny Mingus
Page 44

Big Ideas

Architect-designed bus stops in San Antonio, Austin, and Dallas are adding a bit of design to street corners.

Dror Baldinger, AIA; Thomas McConnell; Nicholas McWhirter; Charles David Smith, AIA
Page 50

Small is Beautiful

by: Jack Murphy, Assoc. AIA

Candid Rogers Architect’s Marfa 10 x 10 Lightbox peeks over the shrubs to provide sweeping views of the West Texas landscape.

Chris Cooper
Page 56

A Bench Is a Bench

by: Ryan Flener, Assoc. AIA

Rhotenberry Wellen Architects and Shipley Architects team up for the design and construction of the Kidd Spring Park Pavilion in Dallas — the latest addition to the Dallas Park and Recreation Department’s growing Park Pavilion program.

Charles David Smith, AIA
Page 62

Bit by Bit

by: Miriam Sitz

Studio Joseph takes a measured approach to the design of the National Butterfly Center Welcome Pavilion in Mission.

Nathaniel Liberman
Page 66

Keeping It Compact

by: Lawrence Connolly, AIA

Haddon+Cowan Architects Collaborative’s Girls’ School of Austin maximizes its site while providing students with a playful campus.

Bronson Dorsey
Page 72

A Yellow Pop-Up

by: Rachel Adams

Bart Shaw Architect redefines the typical farmers’ market tent.

Chad Davis
Page 80

Bring Your Own Bag

by: Catherine Gavin

DO.GROUP DESIGN is building a business around its Bundle Reusable Bags.

Christopher Ferguson, Assoc. AIA
Page 84

Field Constructs Design Competition Call for Entries

Field Constructs Design Competition call for entries now open.

Page 94

Lake|Flato Architects Recognized by Interior Design Magazine

Interior Design magazine honorees for its 30th annual Hall of Fame Awards include David Lake, FAIA, and Ted Flato, FAIA, of Lake|Flato Architects.

Page 94

Page Expands to the West Coast with Focus on Planning

Page has acquired a well-known San Francisco planning firm, BMS Design Group.

Page 95

Music Box

John Grable Architects designs a tiny pavilion for playing music and practicing yoga.

Page 96

My Middle-Aged City

by: David Heymann, FAIA

The biological paradigm that explains cities as entities remains in vogue, and David Heymann embraces it for his discussion of Austin’s growing pains.

Page 15

B3 Plot Cultural Pavilion

The RTKL Dallas office has committed to performance-driven design and was honored by the 2014 Re-Thinking the Future Sustainability Awards late last year.

Page 15

2014 AIA San Antonio Design Awards

Texas Architect magazine features the 2014 AIA San Antonio Design Awards.

Page 22

Heron Creek Restroom

The Heron Creek Restroom by Mell Lawrence Architects opens up this spring on the Lady Bird Lake Hike and Bike Trail in Austin.

Page 26

Architecture of Space

by: Brantley Hightower, AIA

The story goes that the first word spoken on the surface of another world was the name of a Texas city.

Page 31

Designing for Ageing

by: Ingrid Spencer

While most adults say they would strongly prefer to stay in their homes as they age, many houses and communities in the U.S. are not set up to meet the needs of the elderly and less mobile.

Kimberly Davis
Page 40

New Scenes in America Deserta

by: Jack Murphy, Assoc. AIA

The Texas Tech University College of Architecture’s Land Arts of the American West program offers a wide-eyed, sunburnt trip that explores how we alter the land around us.

Page 48

A Living Building in North Texas

by: Margaret Sledge, AIA

Lake|Flato Architects' Josey Pavilion aspires to be the first Living Building in Texas.

Casey Dunn Photography
Page 56

Raw and Synthetic

by: Bruno Juricic, Gabriel Esquivel, and Stephen Caffey

The Design Research Lab at the Texas A&M University College of Architecture explores resiliency in terms of the raw and synthetic.

Page 62

Curtain Wall Call

by: Jen Wong

Can a 500-ft-tall glass box in Houston possibly be a good idea? The recent expansion of high-rise office buildings says yes.

Peter Aaron/OTTO; Joe Aker; Steelblue;
Page 68

Rehabilitation and Recovery

by: Ben Koush

After the double whammy of Hurricane Ike in 2008 and the great Texas drought of 2011, the unthinkable happened in Houston’s Memorial Park: Half of the trees died.

Page 82

Texas Society of Architects 2015 Design Conference: CRAFT

The Texas Society of Architects 2015 Design Conference: CRAFT occurred on a wintery February weekend.

Page 93

Field Constructs Design Competition Entries Due April

Field Constructs Design Competition deadline is fast approaching with an April 1 submission date.

Page 94

2014 Preservation Texas Honor Awards

Texas Architect magazine features the 2014 Preservation Texas Honor Awards.

Page 19

Red Zone

by: Rachel Adams

Kinneymorrow Architects designed a small gem of a building to help artist Daryl Howard address a range of needs.

 Luis Ayala, AIA
Page 55

Alex Krieger, FAIA, to Speak on Waterfronts

During his visit to Austin as part of the Texas Society of Architects 2015 Design Awards jury, Alex Krieger, FAIA, takes time out of his busy schedule to deliver a lecture, “Principles for Remaking the Urban Waterfront.”

Page 86

Colors in the Garden

The aesthetic qualities of Austin’s first “artist-led community garden,” designed by Thoughtbarn, created considerable buzz — and plenty of participation — among people living nearby.

Page 88

Brad Cloepfil and Rives to Keynote TxA “Stories” Convention Members Only

The Texas Society of Architects 2015 Convention and Design Expo focuses on the theme of “Stories.” Keynotes by architect Brad Cloepfil and poetry slam champion Rives will anchor the convention, which will include some 70 educational sessions, 30 tours, and dozens of events.

Page 21

AIA West Texas Design Awards Members Only

Texas Architect magazine features the AIA West Texas Design Awards.

Page 22

Products Members Only

by: Rita Catinella Orrell

Rita Catinella Orrell reviews five products designed to support better learning environments.

Page 26

Desert Refuge Members Only

by: Jack Murphy, Assoc. AIA

The Texas-trained duo behind the design-build firm DUST garnered national acclaim for their first joint project in the Arizona Desert. Casa Caldera, their latest project, was largely built by hand and is the subject of Jack Murphy's latest piece for TA.

Page 60

White on White

by: Jen Wong

Baldridge Architects’ new office, a study in precision-built minimalism, offers a counterintuitive take on design-build in practice.

Casey Dunn and Elaine Shen
Page 66

Lessons by the Sea

by: Erika Huddleston

Sea Scout Base Galveston, a newly completed maritime educational center by Shipley Architects and Randall-Porterfield Architects, seeks to accomplish two goals: to inspire learners to care about the maritime environment, and to withstand the hurricanes and storms that so often threaten the Texas coast.

Bao Loi and Arlen Kennedy
Page 80

New School Members Only

by: Ryan Flener, Assoc. AIA

New educational approaches demand architectural innovation; Richard J. Lee Elementary, a net-zero building that defies traditional school layouts, stands as one example of best-in-class design.

Greg Folkins  and Luis Ayala, AIA
Page 84

Networks for Resilience Members Only

The National Resilience Initiative, which seeks to establish a network of design studios that focus on developing built environments that are resilient in the face of natural disaster, recently added two new studios to its roster.

Page 94

San Antonio Military Medical Center Recognized for Sustainable Design Members Only

The RTKL-designed San Antonio Military Medical Center was selected as one of the 2015 “Top Ten Green Projects” by the American Institute of Architects Committee on the Environment.

Page 95

The Desert, and All Its Beauty

Chrisine Ten Eyck’s design of 2.5 acres of a West Texas ranch transformed a once-degraded landscape into a getaway that celebrates its desert setting while serving as sanctuary for urbanites in need of respite.

Bill Timmerman
Page 96

Urban Ecologies

by: Catherine Gavin

With its stacked interchanges and sweeping flyovers, Texas has no shortage roadway feats, yet they often represent barriers for connectivity. Urban designers across the state are rethinking these roadways and using green infrastructure to reconnect downtown districts.

Page 9

Connected City Design Challenge

by: Eurico R. Francisco, AIA

With the Connected City Design Challenge, Dallas is taking steps to link downtown to the Trinity River. Proposals by Ricardo Bofill of Taller de Arquitectura, the Office for Metropolitan Archi¬tecture (OMA), and STOSS + SHoP all rethink the city’s urban ecologies.

ALL RENDERINGS COURTESY DALLAS CONNECTED CITY DESIGN CHALLENGE.
Page 15

PageSoutherlandPage Thinks Forward

by: Catherine Gavin

Begin¬ning January 1, 2014, PageSoutherlandPage will be known simply as Page. The rebrand¬ing effort makes it clear that Page is focused on “design that makes lives better.”

courtesy Page
Page 17

AIA Dallas Design Awards

The 2013 AIA Dallas Design Awards honored designs that respond to unique cultural, social, environmental, and contextual challenges.

Page 22

AIA Brazos Design Awards

The 2013 AIA Brazos Design Awards honored designs that respond to unique cultural, social, environmental, and contextual challenges.

Page 23

AIA Dallas 2013 Firm of the Year

Michael Malone Architects has been selected by AIA Dallas as the recipient of its 2013 Firm Award. The firm is being recognized for fostering a culture of commitment to the design community through its practice, publication, and professional involvement.

Page 23

Fosu Marina and Master Plan

by: OTA+

Austin-based OTA+ designed a new master plan and marina for the Fosu Lagoon area of Cape Coast, Ghana. The project proposes Africa’s tallest building.

Page 24

Embracing the Edge

by: Brett Koenig Greig
Architect: Bercy Chen Studio

The Edgeland House in Austin rises from the earth giving little hint to people on the street about what lies below the tall grasses growing on the roof.

Paul Bardagjy
Page 26

New Urban Tapestries

by: Frederick R. Steiner

Architects, landscape architects, and planners must design more interconnected, green infrastructure and should do so with greater cultural sensitivity.

MAP AND POPULATION DATA PROVIDED BY UT AUSTIN TUFLAB. PHOTO OF KLYDE WARREN PARK BY AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHY INC.
RENDERING OF BUFFALO BAYOU PARK COURTESY PAGE, FORMERLY PAGESOUTHERLANDPAGE. PHOTO OF MISSION REACH COURTESY
THE SAN ANTONIO RIVER AUTHORITY. RENDERING OF SOUTH SHORE WATERFRONT COURTESY AIA SDAT. PHOTO OF PASSAIC RIVER PARK BY COLIN COOKE. RENDERING OF SPONGE PARK COURTESY DLANDSTUDIO.
PHOTO OF GEORGE W. BUSH PRESIDENTIAL CENTER BY MICHAEL MALONE, AIA.
Page 36

Mission Reach

by: Tracy Idell Hamilton

On a bright morning, more than 50 years after the San Antonio River south of downtown was turned into a flood control ditch, hundreds of residents turned out to celebrate the completion of what is now the nation’s largest urban river restoration and linear park.

PHOTO COURTESY THE SAN ANTONIO RIVER FOUNDATION. PHOTOS COURTESY THE SAN ANTONIO RIVER FOUNDATION. PHOTO OF RESTORED PRAIRIE BY LEE MARLOWE. MAP COURTESY SAN ANTONIO RIVER AUTHORITY.
Page 43

On the Bayou

by: Guy Hagstette, FAIA

An ambitious agenda for linear green space, compatible urban development, flood control, and multi-modal access along 10 miles of the Buffalo Bayou is transforming Houston.

RENDERING COURTESY THOMPSON DESIGN
GROUP AND BUFFALO BAYOU PARTNERSHIP. RENDERINGS COURTESY LAKE|FLATO AND BNIM. PHOTO COURTESY BNIM. PHOTOS OF HOBBY CENTER
BRIDGE AND SABINE PROMENADE COURTESY SWA GROUP AND BUFFALO BAYOU PARTNERSHIP. RENDERINGS COURTESY SWA GROUP.
Page 48

Austin’s Ecological Affluence

by: Dean J. Almy, AIA

A series of urban design initiatives could establish Austin’s green infrastructure as the preeminent agent of a new compact and connected city.

PHOTO BY DAVID SUCSY. RENDERING OF DEVELOPMENT STUDY BY KEN SMITH LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT AND TEN EYCK LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS. RENDERING OF THE GROVE BY MICHAEL VAN VALKENBURG ASSOCIATES. PHOTO OF THE TUNNEL EXCAVATION BY TODD SPENCER. PHOTO OF THE UT AUSTIN STUDIO BY MURRAY LEGGE, FAIA. PHOTO BY THOMAS MCCONNELL. RENDERING OF PROPOSED URBAN STRUCTURE BY UT AUSTIN TUFLAB. RENDERING OF SOUTH AUSTIN WATERFRONT COURTESY AIA SDAT.
Page 54

Waller Creek Update

by: Ingrid Spencer

Since selecting a winning design by Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates and Thomas Phifer and Partners last fall, Austin’s Waller Creek Conservan¬cy has continued sprinting forward with its plans to transform the 1.5-mile creek corridor from ne¬glected waterway to vibrant downtown destination.

PHOTO OF THE TUNNEL EXCAVATION BY TODD SPENCER. PHOTO OF THE UT AUSTIN STUDIO BY MURRAY LEGGE, FAIA.
Page 57

Minding the Gap

by: Gregory Ibañez, FAIA

With the opening of the new restaurant pavilion designed by Thomas Phifer, Klyde Warren Park’s success should only increase — its transformation of downtown Dallas is nothing short of astonishing.

PHOTOS BY THOMAS MCCONNELL AND MEI-CHUN JAU. RENDERING BY THE OFFICE OF JAMES BURNETT.
Page 60

Block 21

by: Canan Yetmen
Architect: Andersson-Wise Architects (Design Architect) and BOKA Powell (Architect of Record)

Andersson-Wise Architects’ Block 21 is one of the most successful mixed-use developments in downtown Austin.

Andrew Pogue, Art Gray, Jonathan Jackson, Thomas McConnell,
and Tim Hursley
Page 66

Beyond the Box

by: Ingrid Spencer
Architect: Workshop8

Workshop8’s Paisano Green Community is educating residents to be stewards of their environment.

Jesse Ramirez
Page 72

A Walk in the Park with Willis Winters, FAIA

by: Gerald Moorhead, FAIA

Willis Winters, FAIA, is in the position to have the greatest impact on the quality of life in Dallas of any public official.

Nicole Mlakar
Page 86

Submit to Present at 2014 Texas Architects Convention

Call for papers for the 2014 Texas Architects Convention.

OF CRAIG DYKERS BY HOLLY REED.
Page 93

Myriad Botanical Gardens

by: Ben Koush

Downtown Oklahoma City’s Myriad Botani¬cal Gardens received a huge face-lift from The Office of James Burnett in collaboration with David Epstein, AIA, of Gensler’s Austin office.

PHOTO COURTESY THE OFFICE OF JAMES BURNETT.
Page 96

Materials and Sustainability

by: Donna Kacmar, FAIA

The Materials Research Collaborative at the University of Houston is pushing sustainability and providing valuable tools for the students and local design community.

PHOTOS OF MRC BY JULIE PIZZO WOOD
Page 13

Alighted Structures

by: James Warton

Based on morphological studies of avian bone structure, James Warton is exploring thin wall optimization as a possible design model.

Page 82

Re-Flex

Parametric design and digital fabrication create a responsive modular system focused on filtering light.

Page 24

Islamabad High Court

by: Todd Hamilton

Parametric design and digital fabrication create a responsive modular system focused on filtering light.

Page 24

Pollen at Play

by: Jen Wong

African sands fill the polycarbonate panels that clad Pollen Architecture and Design’s studio building in East Austin.

Photography Victoria Samnubaris and Julie Pizzo Wood
Page 56

Material Dance

by: Canan Yetmen

In Real County, traditional agrarian structures inspired the exquisite Dietert Ranch.

Paul Hester, Hester + Hardaway Photographers
Page 62

The Ur Building of Texas

by: Michael Malone, AIA

The world has lost one of the great architectural processional experiences with the replacement of Louis Kahn’s landscape design at the Kimbell Art Museum in Fort Worth.

SKETCHES BY MICHAEL MALONE, AIA
Page 30

Call For Entries: 2014 Brick in Architecture Awards

The call for entries for the 2014 Brick in Architecture Awards was announced.

Page 94

Lower Rio Grande Valley AIA Design Awards

Award winners announced for the Lower Rio Grande Valley AIA’s 2013 Design Awards.

Page 21

AIA San Antonio Design Awards

Award winners announced for AIA San Antonio’s 2013 Design Awards.

Page 21

Preservation Texas Honor Awards

Award winners announced for the 2013 Preservation Texas Honor Awards.

Page 19

Boat Dock

Alterstudio Architecture’s boat dock on Lake Austin embraces the long views of the water and landscape, but screens the immediacy of the speedboats from backyard barbecuers.

Page 25

Playing Up Waller Creek

by: Catherine Gavin

Austin’s Waller Creek Conservancy continues its mission to draw attention to the neglected urban waterway. Waller Wall, a temporary installation designed by UT Austin students and Murray Legge, FAIA, was on display at SXSW.

Photos by Casey Dunn and Patrick Wong
Page 9

Caret 6

by: Catherine Gavin

Caret 6, a dramatic installation by architect Kory Bieg of OTA+ and his Design V Studio at The University of Texas at Austin School of Architecture, is making its way around the state.

Page 17

The Boatmakers’ Craft

by: Ingrid Spencer

Shipley Architects designed a house that only boat-builders could detail so effortlessly.

Michael Burns
Page 46

Invisible Aquatics

by: Jack Murphy, Assoc. AIA

Bercy Chen Studio’s design moves at the Cascading Creek House sleekly conceal extensive mechanics under the hood of a gorgeous space.

Page 52

Subtle Layers

by: Heather McKinney, FAIA

Rammed earth wall, rippling Venetian plaster, and colorful-blocks of the Margo Sawyer designed art walls, Page’s Torcasso residence achieves the sublime.

Robert Reck
Page 60

AIA National Convention

On June 26–28 in Chicago, the American Institute of Architects will host its 2014 National Convention. Themed “Design With Purpose,” the event will feature leaders, luminaries, and legends from within and outside architecture sharing their insights on the opportunities, challenges, and possibilities facing architects and the profession.

Page 86

Water’s Edge

by: Candid Rogers, AIA
Architect: Tobin Smith Architect

The runway terrace at Rockridge Gardens stretches the landscape of the O’Neil Ford designed San Antonio house into the horizon.

Kemp Davis and Mark Menjivar
Page 76

A Coastal Bend Reinvention

by: Ben Koush

Kirksey Architecture restored and rehabilitated Sylvan Beach Pavilion on the Gulf Coast, ensuring that the historic integrity of the building remained while also meeting current hurricane-code standards.

Shau Lin Hon
Page 72

After the Rain

by: Michael E. Allex, AIA

bcWORKSHOP has moved to the Lower Rio Grande Valley and is bringing its public design process to housing developments outside of Harlingen.

Skyler J. Fike
Page 32

AIA Austin Awards

AIA Austin announced the recipients of its 2014 Design and Honor awards competition in May. The jury included Steve Dumez, FAIA, of New Orleans, and Marsha Maytum, FAIA, of San Francisco.

Page 18

“The Architecture of Art Museums: A Decade of Design, 2000–2010”

by: Bruce C. Webb

Ronnie Self’s “The Architecture of Art Museums: A Decade of Design, 2000–2010” is a welcome guide in charting the most formally enigmatic building type of our time.

Page 21

Menil Drawing Institute

by: Johnston Marklee

Los Angeles-based architecture firm Johnston Marklee’s proposed design for the Menil Drawing Institute (MDI) is at once serene and revolutionary.

Page 22

Products

by: Rita Catinella Orrell

Rita Catinella Orrell features a hospitality products roundup.

Page 24

Designing for Density

by: Richard M. Miller, FAIA
Architect: James M. Evans, AIA

Mt. Vernon Townhomes, designed by Houston-based Collaborative Designworks, maximizes Houston’s denser-development possibilities and adds a handsome multifamily project to Montrose.

Benjamin Hill Photography
Page 34

Making Learning Fun

by: Ingrid Spencer

Austin’s new 36,340-sf, LEED Silver-certified children’s museum, the Thinkery, is the product of Koning Eizenberg Architecture’s collaboration with STG Design

Casey Dunn Photography
Page 42

Working Artifacts

by: Miriam Sitz
Architect: Jonathan R. Card, AIA; Kristin Wiese Hefty, AIA

Restaurants by Urbanist Design and Dado Group are causing a stir in San Antonio’s popular Pearl Brewery district.

Scott Martin; Ryann Ford
Page 70

A Japanese Farmhouse

by: Ben Koush
Architect: Michael Hsu, AIA

Michael Hsu Office of Architecture’s Uchi restaurants have distinguished themselves as outstanding examples of current trends in impeccable restaurant design.

Paul Bardagjy
Page 76

TxA 75th Annual Convention and Design Expo: Nov. 6–8 in Houston

The Texas Society of Architects’ 75th Annual Convention and Design Expo, themed “Imagine,” will take place on November 6–8, 2014, in Houston.

Page 86

Excellence in Wood Design Awards

The Texas Forestry Association (TFA) is seeking nominations for its 2014 Excellence in Wood Design Awards.

Page 87

Notes on a Jury

by: Catherine Gavin

The statewide design awards wrapped up, and according to juror Marlon Blackwell, FAIA, there “is not a lot of formal gymnastics, just good, sound building.”

Page 9

Mapping Projects

A collaboration between Austin-based Trophyology, a design and fabrication studio, and Portland, Oregon-based Nested Yellow, a jewelry and object design shop, has grown out of a client’s desire to say thank you to her architect and contractor.

Page 22

AIA Houston Awards

AIA Houston announced the winners of its 2014 Design Awards. The honored projects, selected from among 108 entries, are on display in an exhibition, along with the 2014 Student Biennial, running through September 26.

Page 25

Perforated House

by: Ben Koush
Architect: LOJO Architecture

Houston’s Perforated House is a mash-up of virtuoso formal composition, a multifaceted conceptual program, and some tricked-out detailing that comes together in a compelling mix.

Luis Ayala, AIA
Page 42

(Almost) All-American House

by: Stephen Fox
Architect: Karen Lantz, AIA

With the (Almost) All-American Home, Lantz Full Circle was determined to pursue the project as an exercise in the way architecture ought to be practiced.

Lantz Full Circle, Paul Hester, Jack Thompson Photography
Page 46

Green Lantern

by: Alan G. Brake
Architect: John Grable Architects

John Grable Architects’ Green Lantern is defined by an extensive use of glass and operable walls that transform the house from a series of enclosed rooms to an expansive garden pavilion.

Drod Baldinger, AIA
Page 50

Hog Pen Creek Retreat

by: Fredrick R. Steiner
Architect: Ted Flato

High nature is married to high design in Lake|Flato Architects’ Hog Pen Creek Retreat.

Casey Dunn
Page 54

Ottomers Residence

by: Jack Murphy, Assoc. AIA
Architect: Vicent Snyder, AIA

Clear structural articulation and a folded corrugated metal roof are the major architectural features of the Ottmers Residence, a project designed to be built by a client on a very tight budget.

Vicent Snyder, AIA
Page 58

SK Ranch

by: Catherine Gavin
Architect: Brian Korte, AIA

Long limestone facades with floating roofs above them, Lake|Flato Architects’ SK Ranch is a contemporary take on a Hill Country ranch.

Robert Reck Photography
Page 62

Big Tree Camp

by: Brantley Hightower, AIA
Architect: Tobin Smith, AIA

Big Tree Camp offers its inhabitants protection from the elements, while always maintaining a tactile connection to the outdoors.

Mark Menjivar
Page 66

La Hacienda Casitas

by: Michael E. Allex, AIA
Architect: Brent A. Brown, AIA

Everything about bcWORKSHOP’s La Hacienda Casitas addresses how to keep 96,000 gallons of storm water on the property as long as possible so as not to inundate Harlingen’s storm system.

Skyler J. Fike
Page 70

Pearl Brewery Redevelopment

by: Miriam Sitz
Architect: Lake|Flato Architects

The Pearl Brewery Redevelopment strikes a delicate balance at the intersection of past and present, form and function, and residential and commercial spaces.

Casey Dunn Photography and Lara Swimmer
Page 74

Munday Library

by: Gerald Moorhead, FAIA
Architect: Fiske Crowell, FAIA

The Munday Library makes its place in architectural history by learning from its predecessors, rather than mimicking them, and by finding modern purposes for very old spatial types.

Casey Dunn Photography
Page 78

Temple Dining Hall & Booth Student Center

by: Brett Koenig Greig
Architect: Arthur Andersson, FAIA

Slender pipe columns support a lofty roof while daylight pours into the soaring dining room at Andersson-Wise Architects’ Temple Dining Hall & Booth Student Center.

Andrew Pogue Photography
Page 82

Mestizo City

by: Phil Zimmerman, Assoc. AIA
Architect: Geoffrey S. Edwards, AIA

Multiple bottles of colorful soda are transformed into a glowing cube called Mestizo City by Muñoz & Company.

Chris Gutierrez Muñoz & Company
Page 86

Thinkery

by: Ingrid Spencer
Architect: Julie Eizenberg AIA

Austin’s Thinkery has transformed the children’s museum experience for kids and adults.

Casey Dunn Photography
Page 90

Dallas City Performance Hall

by: Aaron Seward
Architect: Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (Design Architect) and Corgan (Architect of Record)

Transparency to the street is key to the success of the Dallas City Performance Hall.

Hedrich Blessing Photographers
Page 94

Hughes Warehouse Adaptive Reuse

by: Jen Wong

The Hughes Warehouse by Overland Partners has transformed its San Antonio neighborhood.

Drod Baldinger, AIA
Page 98

ZIlliant

by: Canan Yetmen
Architect: John Mapes, AIA

Gensler converts a downtown Austin parking garage into a collaborative workspace.

Casey Dunn Photography
Page 102

Profile: Ron Stelmarski, AIA

by: Audrey Maxwell, AIA

Ron Stelmarski, AIA, is pushing for a cultural change in the Perkins + Will Dallas office — and it is all about design.

Page 121

Texas Society of Architects’ 2014 Design Expo

The Texas Society of Architects’ 2014 Design Expo, taking place at the George R. Brown Convention Center in Houston during the first two days of our 75th Annual Convention, will be our biggest ever.

Page 134

Provocations at the Nasher

The Nasher Sculpture Center’s upcoming exhibition, “Provocations: The Architecture and Design of Heatherwick Studio,” promises a treasure-trove of the London-based firm’s drawings, models, and mock-ups.

Page 136

Elliot’s “Ugly Drawings”

by: Catherine Gavin

Rand Elliot, FAIA, claims he loves his “ugly drawings” for their power, not their grace.

Page 7

Oriented Otherwise

by: Ryan Flener, Assoc. AIA
Architect: Russell Buchanan, FAIA

Among the faux-Parisian, Italianate, and Spanish-style block-busters in Dallas' Highland Park neighborhood, Buchanan Architecture’s Mockingbird Residence stands out.

Troy Carlson, AIA
Page 44

High Art

by: Dr. Kathryn E. O’Rourke

Recently-found drawings of multiple towers designed by the office of Ford, Powell & Carson Architects illustrate the iterative process inherent in design.

Page 52

The Touchstone Sketch

by: Jen Wong
Architect: Arthur W. Andersson, FAIA

Andersson-Wise Architects’ kept going back to a singular watercolor as they developed the design for Austin’s Topfer Theatre.

Andrew Pogue
Page 59

El Paso Knothole

by: Aaron Seward
Architect: Benjamin Ball

Ball-Nogues Studio creates a fence that acts as a window on a ballpark in El Paso.

Marty Snortum
Page 64

Women in Architecture Exhibition at AIA Houston

AIA Houston and Architecture Center Houston feature a new exhibition, “Women in Architecture,” spotlighting contributions women have made to
the profession and offering a current snapshot of women’s changing role in architecture and design.

Page 94

Field Constructs Design Competition Call for Entries

Field Constructs Design Competition call for entries now open.

Page 95

Texas A&M University’s Fall 2014 Lecture Series Wraps Up

A diverse group of leading architectural designers, educators, and artists bring their knowledge and experience to campus during the Texas A&M Department of Architecture’s Fall 2014 lecture series.

Page 94

The Bike Shed

by: Canan Yetmen

In a changing South Austin neighborhood, Minguell-McQuary Architecture+Design’s Bike Shed is a simple building that embodies a much larger design ethos that takes its cues from the past even as it keeps one eye focused on the future.

JOSE MINGUELL
Page 68

hopdoddy

by: Texas Architect Staff

The popular Austin burger spot, hopdoddy reflects recent trends in restaurant design. Located in West Anderson Plaza, which was renovated by Levy Architects, the interior build out was completed by Aubrey Carter Design Office in collaboration with their client Chuck Smith.

Casey Dunn, Matt Lankes
Page 58

TASA/TASB

by: Texas Architect Staff

The 2012 Exhibit of School Architecture spon¬sored by the Texas Association of School Admin¬istration (TASA) and the Texas Association of School Boards (TASB) Convention awarded the Caudill Award to Lady Bird Johnson Middle School in Irving designed by Corgan Associates.

Page 14

AIA San Antonio Design Awards

by: Texas Architect Staff

Recipients of the 2012 AIA San Antonio Design Awards were announced in November 2012. Selecting from 45 entries representing 24 San Antonio firms, the jury recognized three projects — Cross Timbers by Lake|Flato; Raymond Russell Park, Projects 1 & 2 by Diane Hays leading a student team; and Rockridge Gardens by Tobin Wells Smith — with Honor Awards.

Page 16

AIA El Paso Design Awards

by: Texas Architect Staff

Recipients of the 2012 AIA El Paso Design Awards were announced in November 2012. The El Paso County Family Youth and Services Center by Wright & Dalbin Archtiects, Albert Bacon Fall Mansion by ARTchitecture, and E.G. Chayo Community Center by Alvidrez Architecture all received Honor Awards

Page 17

Dot's Place

by: Larry Paul Fuller

For Dot Brandt and her architect, Michael Malone, the enthralling pathway to a custom house was very much in sync with the language of the book, The Place of Houses: “You bind the goods and trappings of your life together with your dreams to make a place that is uniquely your own.”

Steven Vaughan
Page 24

Modesty is a Virtue

by: Ben Koush, AIA

Architect Donna Kacmar has demonstrated how to do rather a lot with not very much in this tiny, 544-sf house. Located in Houston, the home is like a light-hearted Texas garden folly where one is permanently on vacation.

Julie Pizzo Wood; Charlotte Wood; Luis Ayala
Page 30

Simple Serendipity

by: Eurico R. Francisco, AIA

Carol and Peter York sought out Upchurch Architects — the original designers of their Dallas residence — to compliment their home with deceivingly simple pool house.

Hester + Hardaway Photographers
Page 37

A Triangle and A Tree

by: Catherine Gavin

At 64 Vanguard Way in Dallas, Max Levy has created a simple composition that represents a thoughtful and rigorous response to the challenges of the site. The house combines subtle connections to nature with playful gestures in the art of dwelling that both suit and delight the couple that lives there.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA
Page 40

Place Matters

by: Michael Friebele, Assoc. AIA

With Gurley Place — an affordable senior housing development located across the street from Jubilee Park in Dallas — buildingcommunityWORKSHOP recognized the significance of community engagement as a way of maintaining one of the most intact, early twentieth-century neighborhoods in the city and responding to the dire need for housing.

Nicole Mlaker; Neil Hacker
Page 46

Dwelling: To Have or to Be

by: Joe Self, AIA

People looking to build a house, even the financially comfortable and educated, seldom hire an architect because architects haven’t done a good job of communicating their value.

Page 22

AIA STAD Program and Report for Austin’s South Shore Central

by: Texas Architect Staff

AIA Austin was proud to partner with the City of Austin and six other consultants chosen to participate in AIA’s Sustainable Design Assistance Team (SDAT) program.

Page 65

For a Gardener: In Memory of Ruth Carter Johnson Stevenson (1923-2013)

by: W. Mark Gunderson, AIA

In memory of Ruth Carter Stevenson’s many contributions to Fort Worth and the state, Mark Gunderson, AIA, recalls her unique role in and contribution to matters of architecture and design, her friendship with Philip Johnson, and her love of gardening.

Amon Carter Museum
Page 8

“I Have Seen the Future: Norman Bel Geddes Designs America”

“I Have Seen the Future: Norman Bel Geddes Designs America, ” a recent exhibit at the University of Texas Harry Ransom Center (HRC) captured Bel Geddes vision of the future and his fundamental belief in the coexistence of art and architecture.

Edith Lutyens and Norman Bel Geddes Foundation / Harry Ransom Center
Page 12

AIA Houston and IIDA Collaborate on Interior Design Exhibit

“Houston Interior Designers – How Texans Touched the World” opened at the Architecture Center Houston. The exhibit, which features 17 projects by eight firms, is the first time AIA and IIDA have col¬laborated on a showing of member works.

Scott McDonald of Hedrich Blessing
Page 12

Everyday Advocate

by: Melissa C. Brandrup, AIA

Advocating for architecture is easy — as every¬thing relates to back to architecture and how design matters: where one lives, how one gets to work, where one buys groceries, the productivity level in an office, neighborhood sustainability — even overall happiness.

Holly Reed
Page 15

Retail Development and Design

by: Catherine Gavin

Retail design has the potential to go beyond just creating an interesting clean space for product presentation. This issue of Texas Architect looks at how good planning and design create effective community spaces and individual stores with a sense of place.

NorthPark Center and Omniplan
Page 5

BBVA Compass Stadium

The core of Houston’s East Downtown Redevelopment Plan and the new home of Major League Soccer team the Houston Dynamo, BBVA Compass Stadium, designed by Populous, sets a unique precedent for American sports stadia and innovative design for the region.

Geoffrey Lyons
Page 71

Salt River Fields at Talking Stick

The HKS-designed Salt River Fields at Talking Stick is the new spring training home of the Arizona Diamond¬backs and Colorado Rockies. Situated on 144 acres of the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community, it is the first stadium facility to be both LEED Gold-certified and located on tribal land.

Blake Marvin
Page 72

Setting a New Standard

by: Audrey Maxwell, Associate AIA

The Perkins+Will-designed Zan Wesley Holmes Jr. Middle School (ZHMS) is a 202,000-sf progressive school that uses both technology and the building itself to teach and promote environmental stewardship to younger generations.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA
Page 60

AIA Fort Worth Design Awards

Recipients of the 2013 AIA Fort Worth Design Awards were announced in January. Six firm projects and five student works were singled out for excellence in design as part of the chap¬ter’s Honors and Awards Program.

Page 17

McAllen Library Interior Honored by AIA

MS&R created the largest single-story library in the United States by rehabilitating an abandoned Walmart in McAllen. The creative use of forms, materials, patterns, and colors to organize the interior space earned the interior design team a 2013 AIA Honor Award.

Page 19

Pioneering Shopping Centers

by: J. Brantley Hightower, AIA

Highland Park Village and NorthPark Center in Dallas, and the Galleria in Houston all blazed trails as shopping centers that spurred urban development. And today they continue to be examples of successful retail design, which from their inceptions sought to create a unique sense of place.

OMNIPLAN AND PETER CALVIN
Page 30

Standing Up to the Strip Mall

by: Rebecca Roberts

Building code necessitated a blast wall at the Met Retail site in Austin. Studio 8 Architects took the opportunity to customize the building’s aesthetic and break from typical highway architecture.

Andy Mattern; Brian Mihealsick
Page 36

Buy Local

by: Catherine Gavin

In the ever-changing world of retail design, flexibility, simplicity, curb appeal, and storage are fundamental to continued success. Keepers, Eliza Page, and Rogue Running, all local Austin retailers, were pioneers of downtown shopping — and their continued relevance is a prom¬ising sign

Jud Haggard Photography, Casey Woods Photography, Juan Carlos DeLeon
Page 40

A Fresh Patina

by: Gregory Ibañez, FAIA

The Gensler-designed Patina store, a new retail concept offering floor and wall-covering products along with in-house interior design consultation in Dallas, is an ambi¬tious attempt by Acme Brick to fill a void in the marketplace while creating an entirely new shopping model.

Bruce Damonte Photography
Page 46

Re-Tailoring Retail

by: Aaron Seward

Three projects — Rackspace Hosting (an internet company in the old Windsor Park Mall in San Antonio), the McAllen Public Library (in an old Walmart), and Montgomery Plaza (a condominium in former Mont¬gomery Ward facility in Fort Worth) — offer a cross section of some of the design concerns and sociological effects of rehabilitating abandoned shopping malls.

Lars Frazer Photography, Boultinghouse Simpson Gates Architects; Lara Swimmer Photography, Craig Smith Photography; Shands Photographics
Page 50

New Site Provides Easy Access to Research on the Built Environment

The Building Research Information Knowl¬edgebase (BRIK) is a new resource from the AIA and the National Institute of Building Sciences. The website is an interactive portal connecting individuals to professionally reviewed research and case studies on all facets of the built environment, from pre-design through occu¬pancy and re-use.

Page 73

UTSA Summer Career Academy

High school and college students are invited to participate in a two-week Summer Career Academy in Architecture and Interior Design taught by faculty members of the College of Architecture at the University of Texas San Antonio’s downtown campus.

Page 74

Preservation: The Past Meets the Present

by: Catherine Gavin

Courthouse and main street restoration programs are an exciting facet of historic preservation, but they generally represent the more traditional side of the field. This issue explores preservation in the context of rehabilitation, adaptive reuse, and contemporary design, illustrating how these projects can in fact meet prescribed sustainability standards.

Brantley Hightower, AIA
Page 5

William F. Stern, FAIA: 1947-2013

by: Rives Taylor, FAIA

William “Bill” Stern, FAIA, of Houston, who passed away in March of 2013, is remembered as a passionate advocate of urban planning, design, and fine arts. He contributed 36 years of design rigor, public advocacy and engagement, and often passionate leadership to the architecture and design community in Houston.

HEADSHOT COURTESY ERIC HESTER; PORCH IMAGE COURTESY DAVID BUCEK, FAIA
Page 11

A Curator and a Critic

by: Ben Koush and Catherine Gavin

Pedro Gadanho, curator of Contemporary Architecture at the Department of Architecture and Design at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, and Mark Lamster, the new architectural critic for the Dallas Morning News, discuss their latest projects.

EXHIBIT PHOTO COURTESY OF THE MUSEUM OF MODERN ART NEW YORK. GIFT OF PATRICIA PHELPS
DE CISNEROS, TAKEO OHBAYASHI PURCHASE FUND, AND SUSAN DE MENIL PURCHASE FUND, IMAGES COURTESY UT ARLINGTON
Page 12

Design Conference 2013

by: Thomas Hayne Upchurch, AIA

The Second Annual Texas Architects Design Conference: Collections was held in Dallas, Feb.22–24, 2013. The event was co-chaired by Michael Malone, AIA, and Mark Wellen, AIA, and was based at the Dallas Center for Architecture.

PHOTO BY HOLLY REED
Page 14

AIA West Texas Design Awards

Two Midland-based firms, Rhotenberry Wellen Architects and Travis Durham Architects were honored with AIA West Texas Design Awards.

Page 17

Fair Park Deco: Art and Architecture of the Texas Centennial Exposition

by: Anna Mod

“Fair Park Deco” is the third book by this author duo on Texas Art Deco. Jim Parsons and David Bush detail the Fair Park (Dallas) collection of Art Deco buildings, murals, sculptures, fountains, and landscape design, which are unrivaled nationally.

photo by Elizabeth Hackler
Page 19

4415 Perry Street

by: Filo Castore, AIA

Designed by Val Glitsch, FAIA, for New Hope Housing — an independent nonprofit organization that offers quality, affordable single-room occupancy (SRO) housing to low-income-earning adults — 4415 Perry Street in Houston is a sustainable solution for an underserved population.

Hiebert Photography & Professional Imaging
Page 24

Irreconcilable Differences Resolved

by: Lawrence Connolly, AIA

The new United States Federal Courthouse in Austin designed by Mack Sogin Merrill Elam Architects meets a stringent security design paradigm and is flooded with natural light. This unconventional civic structure is perfect for Austin’s sensibilities.

Casey Dunn
Page 32

A Romanesque Rebirth

by: J. Brantley Hightower, AIA

The 1899 Comal County Courthouse in New Braunfels is the latest addition to the list of restored Texas courthouses. Originally designed by James Riely Gordon, Austin-based Volz & Associates fully restored the original design and finishes.

Brian Mihealsick; Brantley Hightower, AIA
Page 42

Reuse, Recycle, and Reinvent

by: Ben Koush

Studio RED Architects’ rehabilitation of a former warehouse for use as the Houston Permitting Center was centered on rigorously researched sustainability, deference to the industrial character of the old building, and the installation of an intensely local public art program.

Hester + Hardaway Photographers; MN | Photography
Page 48

Texas Tech Campus Chapel

Designed to fit into its context on the Texas Tech University campus, the Kent R. Hance Chapel by McKinney York Architects is a 7,000-sf non-denomina¬tional Spanish Renaissance chapel.

Dror Baldinger Architectural Photography
Page 69

Pelli Clarke Pelli-Designed Computing Center Opens at UT Austin

The Pelli Clarke Pelli-designed 232,000-sf state-of-the-art Bill & Melinda Gates Computer Science Complex and Dell Computer Science Hall (GDC), is the new home of the University of Texas at Austin’s Computer Science Department.

GDC PHOTO BY PAUL FINKEL, COURTESY UT COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES
Page 76

Daylight and Design

by: Catherine Gavin

Sketches that bring sunlight and moonlight into spaces in creative, playful ways; otherworldly experiments in color centered on the early morning and evening skies; the construction of shade for people and plants; an oasis of densely planted, colorful cacti in the desert; and the benefits of daylight for work and study — this issue is about natural light and design.

PHOTO BY ISTOCK; SOFTSERVEGIRL
Page 5

Waller Creek’s Creek Show

by: Octavia Hayes

Creek Show proposes to transform Austin’s Waller Creek into an active venue for art, architecture, and landscape architecture. A series of temporary installations will appear along the 1.5-mile site in an attempt to surprise and delight the community.

RENDERINGS COURTSEY DESIGN WORKSHOP, BALDRIDGE ARCHITECTS, LEGGE LEWIS LEGGE, AND THOUGHTBARN
Page 8

AIA Austin Design Awards

by: TA Staff

Texas Architect features AIA Austin’s 2013 Design Awards. The competition recognizes outstanding architectural projects by members and promotes public interest in architectural excellence.

Page 14

AIA Houston Recognizes Student Proposals

by: TA Staff

Texas Architect features a student-led design competition hosted by AIA Houston’s Committee on Architecture for Health (CAH).

Page 15

Down and Up House

by: Stephen Fox

Karen Lantz, AIA, of Lantz Full Circle | Enter Architecture purchased a lot in Houston’s Ranch Estates subdivision and then proceeded to think long and hard about the house she wanted to design there for herself and her husband. The building is an in-depth study in local Texas materials.

Paul Hester and Jack Thompson
Page 24

Made in the Shade

by: Kevin Sloan

Natural light is essential to architecture, but when thinking about the sunlight in Texas, one of its qualities seems to dominate all the others: heat. Shade structures by architects Bud Oglesby, FAIA; O’Neil Ford, FAIA; Max Levy, FAIA; Murray Legge, FAIA; and Foster + Partners provide significant examples of passive designs to beat the heat.

PHOTO COURTESY LZT ARCHITECTS. PHOTOS BY BILL MILLER PHOTOGRAPHY. ELEVATIONS COURTESY MAX LEVY ARCHITECT. PHOTOS COURTESY LZT ARCHITECTS AND FORD, POWELL & CARSON. PHOTO BY CHARLES DAVIS SMITH, AIA.
Page 40

Desert Decadent

by: Aaron Seward

The Office of James Burnett’s new Sunnylands Center & Gardens is a composition of color and texture achieved through a densely layered, yet sustainable, planting design.

Ken Hayden, Sibylle Allgaier, and Dillon Diers
Page 46

A New Lease on Life

by: Ingrid Spencer

Austin-based Miró Rivera Architects designed a sustainable and economical building, full of natural light, for the not-for-profit LifeWorks in East Austin.

Paul Finkel and Michael Hsu
Page 52

Multipurpose Training Center

by: TA Staff

Leslie Elkins, AIA, designed the $1.45M LEED Silver-certified Magnificat House W.T. and Louise J. Moran Center as a versatile and efficient space that supports a population in transition by providing them with valuable skills.

Hester + Hardaway and Junko Nonaka
Page 80

Texas Firm Among Global Sustainability Award Winners

San Antonio’s Lake|Flato Architects was among the five architects from around the world to receive a prestigious 2013 Global Award for Sustainable Architecture. Principal Ted Flato represented the firm at the ceremony and symposium at the Cité de l’architecture & du patrimoine in Paris.

PHOTO OF THE GLOBAL SUSTAINABILITY AWARD WINNERS BY GASTON FRANÇOIS BERGERET, COURTESY LAKE|FLATO ARCHITECTS.
Page 87

UT Arlington Students Design West Dallas Homes

Graduate students at The University of Texas at Arlington School of Architecture got a helping of real-world design experience thanks to a partnership with West Dallas Investments (WDI).

RENDERING BY SELINA CINECIO.
Page 89

Simplicity and Restraint

by: Catherine Gavin, Editor

The 2013 Texas Architects Design Awards jurors: Ann Beha, FAIA, of Ann Beha Architects in Boston; Julie Eizenberg, AIA, of Koning Eizenberg in Santa Monica; and Douglas Stockman, AIA, of el dorado in Kansas City honored a refreshing batch of 11 projects for their design excellence.

PHOTO OF HILLSIDE RESIDENCE BY CASEY DUNN PHOTOGRAPHY. PHOTO OF WEBB CHAPEL PARK
PAVILION BY EDUARD HUEBER/ARCHPHOTO. PHOTO OF FIRE|BEACH HOUSE BY ANDREW POGUE.
Page 11

Public Interest Design

by: Margaret R. Sledge, AIA

Is Sambo Mockbee the Howard Roark of our time? Margaret Sledge argues that his fundamental role in starting the Auburn University Rural Studio program was a catalyst for the growth of public interest design.

PHOTOS BY TIM HURSLEY.
Page 14

Texas Society of Architects 74th Annual Convention

On November 7–9, over 3,000 design and construction professionals from across the Southwest will gather at the Fort Worth Convention Center for Texas Architects 74th Annual Convention and Design Expo, themed “Transformation.”

Page 20

AIA Houston 2013 Design Awards

Texas Architect features the AIA Houston’s 2013 Design Awards.

Page 23

A Desert Drive-In

There will soon be a new reason to head west and visit Marfa. New York-based MOS is designing the Ballroom Marfa Drive-In — an integration of art, architecture, and landscape architecture.

renderings by MOS and OLIN
Page 24

Designing Pan-America: U.S. Architectural Visions for the Western Hemisphere

by: Fernando Lara

“Designing Pan-America: U.S. Architectural Visions for the Western Hemisphere” by Robert González, AIA, makes an important contribution to understanding architecture’s role in constructing cultural identities.

PHOTOS BY ELIZABETH HACKLER.
Page 28

Notes on a Jury

by: Brian William Kuper, AIA

Texas Society of Architects 2013 Design Awards jurors: Ann Beha, FAIA, Ann Beha Architects, Boston; Julie Eizenberg, AIA, Koning Eizenberg in Santa Monica, Calif.; and Douglas Stockman, AIA, el dorado, Kansas City, Mo. awarded 11 designs as this years winners.

PHOTOS BY JULIE PIZZO WOOD.
Page 36

Hillside Residence

by: Canan Yetmen

This renovation and addition to an existing Austin bungalow by Alterstudio Architecture is a strong architectural idea existing easily alongside a distinct lack of pretension.

Casey Dunn Photography
Page 38

Design Shop

by: Bang Dang

Dan Shipley’s Design Shop is a subtle statement in the successful layering of materials.

Charles Davis Smith and Joshua Fortuna
Page 42

Renovation of 714 Main Street

by: Gerald Moorhead, FAIA

Using the original 1930s drawings, Schwarz Hanson Architects reconstructed the entire base 714 Main Street in Fort Worth — and this was just the beginning of the work to bring the building back to life.

Daniel Stober andJohn Roberts, AIA
Page 46

1221 Broadway

by: Jack Murphy

Lake|Flato Architects successfully converted an abandoned apartment complex into a viable and interesting design at 1221 Broadway in San Antonio.

Chris Cooper and Frank Ooms
Page 50

Webb Chapel Park Pavilion

by: Catherine Gavin

With its surprising cantilever and thin slits of blue sky framed in bright yellow, Cooper Joseph Studio’s Webb Chapel Park Pavilion in Dallas is a straightforward, yet playful design.

Eduard Hueber/ArchPhoto
Page 54

Fire|Beach House

by: Aaron Seward

Surrounded by sandburs, the sea breeze, and a wide airstrip, the Fire|Beach House in Galveston is a surprising piece of contemporary architecture.

Andrew Pogue
Page 58

Roy Kelly Terminal and Parking Garage

by: Ben Koush

Powers Brown Architecture created a safe and inviting street presence with the clean lines and bright lights of the Roy Kelley Terminal and Parking Garage in Bryan.

Dror Baldinger, AIA
Page 62

T3 Parking Structure

by: Rebecca Roberts

Parking has never been so pretty; the T3 Parking Structure in Austin, by Danze Blood Architects, uses design to redefine the typically banal experience of parking.

Whit Preston
Page 66

Kathlyn Joy Gilliam Collegiate Academy

by: Ron Stelmarski, AIA

SHW Group’s Kathlyn Joy Gilliam Collegiate Academy redefines the public school building typology and looks to a bright the future.

Luis Ayala
Page 70

Health Services Building, Arizona State University

by: Eurico R. Francisco, AIA

Lake|Flato knows how to make an understated and entirely appropriate addition to the heart of a campus. Their design for the Health Services Building at Arizona State University says a lot about sitting well in one’s context.

Bill Timmerman
Page 74

LifeWorks Sooch Foundation Youth and Family Resource Center

by: Ingrid Spencer

Miró Rivera Architects’ LifeWorks building in East Austin stands out as a powerful example of elegance and sustainability meeting a very tight budget.

Paul Finkel
Page 78

The Buttrey Building’s Transformation for Peddle

Alterstudio Architecture’s design for a young firm embraces both Austin’s late 19th-century Buttrey Building’s age and the client’s creative ethos.

Casey Dunn Photography
Page 86

An Investment Firm Embraces Transparency

Michael Malone Architects designed an office for Highland Capital Management that is founded on the firm’s forward-thinking approach to investing: transparency.

Jud Haggard
Page 90

Attorneys at Law

Gensler designed a new open office for a young Austin law firm, Weisbart Springer Hayes.

Casey Dunn Photography
Page 92

... with TEX-FAB

by: Scott Marble

TEX-FAB led by Brad Bell, Kevin Patrick McClellan, Andrew Vrana, and Kory Bieg, is changing the status quo in terms of digital design and fabrication. Scott Marble details how their new approach to workflows is the way of the future.

Nicole Mlakar and Kory Bieg
Page 95

Convention Sessions to Explore Latest Research in Digital Technology

TxA Interactive will bring experimental research and exploration among academics and practitioners to the Texas Architects 74th Annual Convention and Design Expo.

PHOTO BY KEVIN PATRICK MCCLELLAN.
Page 121

The Connected City Challenge: Entries Due October 3

The Connected City Design Challenge is an open call for urban design solutions to connect Downtown Dallas and the Trinity River.

IMAGE COURTESY THE CONNECTED CITY.
Page 123

Trinity University Looking Forward

by: Catherine Gavin

O’Neil Ford designed Trinity University so that it would grow naturally from its site and set a national precedent for the use of lift-slab construction. As the university looks forward to future development, the question of preserving the integrity of the historic campus comes to bear.

PHOTO AND DRAWING COURTESY FORD, POWELL & CARSON.
Page 11

Obituary: In Memory of Natalie de Blois, FAIA (1921–2013)

by: Emily Little, FAIA

In 1980, when Natalie de Blois, FAIA, hit Austin, she dove into local politics, zoning issues, and Barton Springs Pool with gusto. She also just happened to be a woman who had designed some of the most innovative modern buildings in the United States.

PORTRAIT COURTESY SOM. PHOTO OF THE UNION CARBIDE BUILDING
BY EZRA STOLLER/ESTO. COURTESY SOM. PHOTOS OF SOM BUILDINGS BY EZRA STOLLER/ESTO. COURTESY SOM. PHOTOS
OF GINGERBREAD BUILD-OFF AND BOOK COVER COURTESY AIA HOUSTON.
Page 23

Making Light: The Menil Collection Receives 25-Year Award

by: Ben Koush

The Menil Collection, designed by Renzo Piano with Richard Fitzgerald & Associates and inaugurated in 1987, was selected by the Texas Society of Architects for its 25-Year Award.

Page 27

What Starts Here…

by: Brantley Hightower, AIA

Even an Aggie would have to admit that The University of Texas at Austin has an impressive campus. Three new buildings: Belo Center for New Media, Norman Hackerman Building, and the College of Liberal Arts Building push the envelope and interpret design guidelines in creative ways.

PHOTO BY TOM BONNER. PHOTOS OF THE BELO CENTER BY S.FRANCES. PHOTO OF THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS BY DROR BALDINGER.
UT AUSTIN MASTER PLAN BY SASAKI ASSOCIATES. COURTSEY PAGESOUTHERLANDPAGE.
Page 33

R J Marfa


Architect: Rand Elliott, FAIA, of Elliott + Associates Architects

The minimalist design R J Marfa by Rand Elliott, FAIA, of Elliott + Associates Architects strips out everything unnecessary to become an object in the landscape.

Page 41

Binary House

by: Ben Koush
Architect: Collaborative Designworks

Designed by Jim Evans, AIA, of Collaborative Designworks, the Binary House is bringing stucco back in Houston.

Taggart Sorensen
Page 46

Friends For Life – Don Sanders Adoption Center


Architect: Gensler

It’s not often that design is literally a matter of life or death, but that was the case for the 8,250- sf Friends For Life Don Sanders Adoption Center designed by Gensler.

Aker Imaging
Page 104

Austin Animal Center


Architect: Jackson & Ryan Architects

Jackson & Ryan Architects’ Austin Animal Center has several design features that increase the chances that its dogs, cats, and rabbits will find “forever” homes.

Mark Scheyer
Page 108

Re-imagine the Astrodome

The Architect’s Newspaper’s “Re-imagine the Astrodome” design competition winners will be announced at the Texas Society of Architects 74th Annual Convention and Design Expo.

ASTRODOME PHOTO BY ARTHUR
JONES, FAIA. COURTESY BEN KOUSH.
Page 123

A Quiet, Stately Statement

by: Thomas Hayne Upchurch, AIA
Architect: Robert A.M. Stern Architects

The George H. W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum was designed by HOK to blend into its context at the Texas A&M University campus.

Peter Aaron/OTTO and Michael Malone, AIA
Page 62

Not A Little Cozy Affair

by: Al York, AIA
Architect: Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (Design Architect, 1966–67) and Overland Partners (Design Architect, 20

In 1966, as Gordon Bunshaft was putting pencil to trace for the design of the new presidential library and museum in Austin, Lyndon Baines Johnson was a giant.

Thomas McConnell
Page 68

Bold Moves

by: Audrey Maxwell, Assoc. AIA
Architect: Polshek Partnership (now Ennead Architects) with Jacobs Engineering Group

Ennead Architects went off the grid for their design approach this business school at the University of North Texas.

Thomas McConnell and Aislinn Weidlele
Page 74

The Blaffer Reworked

by: Ronnie Self
Architect: WORK Architecture Company (WORKac) (Design Architect) and Gensler (Architect of Record)

Though the project for the Blaffer Art Museum at the University of Houston was primarily an interior renovation, WORKac’s design is ambitious and less predictable than many university buildings.

Iwan Baan and Thomas McConnell
Page 80

A New Look

by: Stephen Sharpe, Hon. TSA

No doubt you noticed the makeover of the nameplate on the cover, the most conspicuous of several changes introduced in this edition. The redesigned Texas Architect represents efforts by consultant Dyal and Partners and the magazine’s staff.

Elizabeth Hackler
Page 5

Society Unveils New Brand Identity, Redesigns of Website and Magazine

by: Noelle Heinze

On Oct. 28, during the Texas Society of Architects 72nd Annual Convention in Dallas, 2011 President Dan Hart, AIA, PE, formally announced the Society’s redesigned website and “refreshed” brand, which uphold Texas Architects’ mission to be “the voice for Texas architecture, supporting the creation of safe, beautiful, sustainable environments.”

Page 8

AIA Fort Worth 2011 Design Awards

by: Tom Manganiello, Assoc. AIA

Recipients of the AIA Fort Worth’s 2011 Excellence in Design program were announced on Oct. 18 at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth. Jurors for the annual competition were Julie VandenBerg Snow, FAIA, of Julie Snow Architects in Minneapolis; Chris Carson, FAIA, of Ford Powell & Carson Architects & Planners in San Antonio; and Mark T. Wellen, AIA, of Rhotenberry Wellen Architects in Midland.

Page 18

AIA LRGV 2011 Design Awards

by: Texas Architect Staff

The jury for the Lower Rio Grande Valley AIA chapter’s 2011 Design Awards Jury selected four projects for recognition. Jurors were Thomas Hayne Upchurch, AIA, of Brenham; Rick del Monte, FAIA, of Dallas; Donna Kacmar, FAIA, of Houston.

Page 20

Blanco Public Library


Architect: Brett Wolfe, Assoc. AIA

For a planned expansion of the public library in Blanco, designer Brett Wolfe, Assoc. AIA, drew inspiration from F.E. Ruffini’s 1885 limestone courthouse that looms over the center of town about a half-mile away.

Page 22

Atascocita Springs Elementary School

by: Noelle Heinze

For the design of Atascocita Springs Elementary School in Humble, the architects of PBK integrated elements that support its science and math curricula while also reflecting the town’s rich tradition in energy production. Interactive kiosks allow students to log the school’s consumption of water, natural gas, and electricity—exercises that tie the building’s sustainable design features to grade-level appropriate curriculum.

Jud Haggard Photography
Page 71

Garden Ridge Elementary School

by: Stephen Sharpe, Hon. TSA

SHW Group’s design of Garden Ridge Elementary School places the library at the center of campus, with a planted roof above and tubular skylights that draw daylight into the reading areas. Both elements are used as part of the school’s science curriculum, along with above-ground cisterns that collect rainwater and teach students about conservation of natural resources.

Page 73

UT Dallas Among USGBC’s ‘Best of Green Schools 2011’

The U.S. Green Building Council's Center for Green Schools, working in conjunction with its founding sponsor, United Technologies Corp., released its inaugural Best of Green Schools 2011 in December to recognize school administrators and government leaders in 10 categories for their efforts to create sustainable learning environments.

Page 77

Free Online Resources for ‘Whole Building Design’

A website maintained by the nonprofit National Institute of Building Sciences offers numerous resources at no charge to advance sustainable design, including online continuing education courses approved by the American Institute of Architects. The mission of the Whole Building Design Guide (www.wbdg.org) is to create successful high-performance buildings through an integrated team approach during a project’s planning and programming phases.

Page 78

Raven Lake Ranch

by: Stephen Sharpe, Hon. TSA

Eileen Bennett was leaning toward Arts and Crafts but her architect encouraged her to “come to the dark side.” Modern was a better choice, he insisted, for the splendid acreage she and her husband, local attorney Martin Bennett, had purchased just south of Athens in northeast Texas. Warming to the idea, she asked Michael Malone, AIA, to design a sprawling 2,700-sf house she describes as “modern ranch,” the centerpiece of the couple’s 100-acre Raven Lake Ranch.

Jud Haggard Photography
Page 32

An Ordered Approach

by: Kevin W. Sloan, ASLA

Typical projects use spreadsheets for programming. The program for the new University of Texas at Dallas master plan, however, began with a conversation between Peter Walker, FASLA, and Margaret McDermott, a great patron of Dallas’ cultural milieu and widow of the late Texas Instrument co-founder Eugene McDermott. Walker recalls Mrs. McDermott saying, “Look, this is my husband’s and my life’s work. We want to leave this campus in as first class of an order as we can.”

Aerial Photography; Vince Yaeger; PWP Landscape Architecture
Page 40

Teaching Tool

by: Donna Kacmar, FAIA

As soon as you’ve parked your car (mine was parked in one of the spaces reserved for high-efficiency vehicles) and walk toward Gloria Marshall Elementary School, you realize this is not your average public school building. The covered path leads you past an “eco-garden”—laid out with individual planting beds for each grade and an adjacent pond, both fed by runoff from the roof drains and rainfall captured in an above-ground 5,000-gallon cistern.

Luis Ayala
Page 48

Up From the Ashes

by: Carlos N. Moreno, AIA

On the evening of May 6, 2008, an electrical short lead to an eruption of flames inside the upper levels of Old Main at Our Lady of the Lake University in San Antonio. Fortunately, no one was injured, but the four-alarm blaze destroyed the building’s dormered roof, top floor, and one of its circular four-story twin turrets. Although firefighters heroically extinguished the flames, water damage ultimately ruined most of the historic French Gothic-inspired landmark that dates to the institution’s late-nineteenth-century origins.

Chris Cooper Photography; Mark Menjivar
Page 54

Clearly Inviting

by: Eurico R. Francisco, AIA

Richland College, a member of the Dallas County Community College District (DCCCD), was dedicated in 1972, and it welcomed its first students that same year. Designed as a collaboration between Perkins & Will of Chicago and the Oglesby Group of Dallas, the campus is located on a suburban setting in north Dallas.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA
Page 60

New Accessibility Rules Become Law

by: Stephen Sharpe, Hon. TSA

On March 15, the long-awaited revisions to state accessibility standards become law. That date represents the culmination of efforts to synchronize overlapping federal and state guidelines that respond to the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. As a result, Texas practitioners will no longer be required to cross-check two sets of regulations to ensure that their projects are conforming to the appropriate laws.

Page 9

AIA Honors Rice Design Alliance

by: TA Staff

The Rice Design Alliance is one of two recipients of 2012 Institute Honors for Collaborative Achievement, an award presented annually by the AIA to recognize and encourage distinguished achievements of allied professionals, clients, organizations, architect teams, knowledge communities, and others who have had a beneficial influence on or advanced the architectural profession.

Page 12

AIA San Antonio Design Awards

After carefully evaluating 60 entries from 24 local architectural firms, jurors for AIA San Antonio’s 2011 Design Awards program announced their selections during ceremonies held on Nov. 4 at Pearl Stable. Attendees also celebrated the recipients of the chapter’s Studio Awards, its Twenty-Five Year Award, and its annual Mayor’s Choice Award honoring a publicly funded architectural project.

Page 14

AIA LRGV Studio Awards

by: TA Staff

Two awards were presented by AIA Lower Rio Grande Valley in the chapter’s 2011 Studio Awards program. Carolina Civarolo, AIA, of Boultinghouse Simpson Architects in McAllen, received the Spark Award for Digital Media for the proposed renovation and expansion of the University of Texas–Pan American’s College of Business Administration in Edinburg. Ortiz Architecture & Environment in Weslaco was recognized with a Design Award for an Unbuilt
Project for its Weslaco Family Care Center & Occupational Medicine Clinic.

Page 16

AIA Fort Worth Student Design Awards

by: Tom Manganiello, Assoc. AIA

During AIA Fort Worth’s awards banquet held on Jan. 24, three student projects were recognized for design excellence. The lone Honor Award was presented to Ace Academy by John Paul Rysavy and Daniel Shumaker, both students at the University of Texas at Austin.

Page 18

Tianjin Binhai Art Center

Designing an art center for a client in China required the architects in RTKL’s Dallas office to strike a balance between allowing in natural light while protecting the artwork on exhibit. Their solution calls for an exterior that combines stone and glass, one material representing strength and another of a more delicate nature.

Page 20

Grand Hotel Austin at Waller Creek

Designed by Gensler’s local office to be the city’s tallest structure, the 47-story hotel is planned for a 1.75-acre site located next door to the Austin Convention Center in the southeastern quadrant of downtown. Ground breaking is set for August, with construction tentatively scheduled to be complete in 2015.

Page 20

Delight in Restraint

by: Jeffrey Brown

The announcement in Architectural Record’s January 2005 issue that Yoshio Taniguchi would design his first free-standing building outside of Japan in Houston’s revered Museum District brimmed with expectation. At that time, Taniguchi was considered an emerging “starchitect” whose addition to the Museum of Modern Art had been completed the previous year.

Hester & Hardaway
Page 44

In the Classroom with Susan Appleton, AIA

by: Noelle Heinze

With 48 hours until its debut, the first project of Assistant Professor Susan Appleton’s Spring 2012 Senior Interior Design Studio is taking shape–literally. A luminous string sculpture, the centerpiece for an upcoming Building Sciences Expo dinner in the gallery of the University of Texas at Arlington School of Architecture.

Julie Pizzo
Page 57

Twin Oaks Library

by: Neolle Heinze

Twin Oaks Library, designed by h+uo architects, replaces a former branch library located in leased storefronts in south Austin.

Paul Bardagjy
Page 61

Whatley Agriculture Complex

by: Neolle Heinze

Designed by VLK Architects, Whatley Agriculture Complex on the campus of Northeast Texas Community College in Mount Pleasant is a single-story 8,600-sf steel-framed structure.

Chad Davis, AIA
Page 63

Texas Among Top 10 States for LEED

Texas ranks eighth among states in the U.S. for the per capita amount of commercial and institutional square footage certified by the LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) rating system in 2011, according to figures released in January by the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC).

Page 65

Four Texas Teams Chosen as Semifinalists in Waller Creek Design Competition

Four Texas firms are among a nationwide total of nine that were chosen Jan. 30 as semifinalists for the Waller Creek Conservancy design competition, from a pool of 31 entries. The competition calls for a redesign of a 1.5-mile stretch of city parkland and urban space along Waller Creek in downtown Austin.

Page 66

Design and Full Circles

by: Larry Paul Fuller

First things first. Regular readers of this magazine will notice that the name attached to this column is not the same as the one appearing here for almost 12 years now. Indeed, the tenure of Stephen Sharpe as editor of Texas Architect has come to an end — as even good things must do.

Julie Pizzo
Page 5

Margaret Hunt Hill Opens to Traffic

by: Michael Malone, AIA

On March 29 the first cars rolled across the long-awaited Margaret Hunt Hill Bridge in Dallas. Designed by Spanish architect and engineer Santiago Calatrava, the bridge joins Reunion Tower and Pegasus as a standout on the icon-heavy Dallas skyline. It is named for the matriarch of the Hunt family which, through Hunt Petroleum, donated $12 million to the Trinity River Corridor Project in 2005.

Photos courtesy Craig D. Blackmon , FAIA; Michael Lyon
Page 12

Conference Emphasizes Practice in the Hinterlands

by: Stephen Sharpe, Hon. AIA

For two days in February, a group of designers gathered in Midland to consider the challenges of producing top-flight architecture in a place far removed from the state’s larger urban areas. The event, dubbed “Architecture in the Hinterlands,” included an address by acclaimed Canadian architect Brian MacKay-Lyons that featured his work in remote Nova Scotia.

Thomas McConnell
Page 15

Speakers Announced for Texas Society of Architects’ 73rd Convention

by: Texas Architect Staff

The Texas Society of Architects 2012 Annual Convention and Design Expo, October 18-20, in Austin, presents two distinguished keynote speakers who will examine the role of design in the context of the convention’s theme, “Influence.” One is an activist and innovator who helped create the High Line — a public park built atop an abandoned, elevated rail line in New York; the other is the award-winning host and radio producer of 99% Invisible. Attend the convention to hear the unique perspectives of Robert Hammond and Roman Mars.

Page 16

AIA Houston Design Awards

AIA Houston’s 2012 design awards competition resulted in recognition for 21 projects in eight categories out of a total of 127 entries. Eligibility was limited to projects completed within the last five years and located within the Houston metropolitan area or designed by an architect working in the Houston metropolitan area.

Houston Ballet photo by Nic Lehoux; Brockman Hall Photo by Peter Aaron /OTTO; Roy Kelly Garage photo By Dror Baldinger , AIA
Page 18

2012 Honorary AIA Member Awards

Three Texas residents have been elected to honorary membership in the American Institute of Architects (AIA) — one of the highest honors bestowed by the Institute upon a person outside the profession of architecture. The designation is reserved for those otherwise ineligible for membership but who have rendered distinguished service to the profession of architecture or to the allied arts and sciences.

Page 22

residential architect Award Winner

A Texas house is among 36 winning projects out of nearly 800 entries in the 2012 residential architect Design Awards program. Lake|Flato, of San Antonio, received one of three Merit Awards in the Single-Family Housing category for the Miller Ranch Porch House in Vanderpool.

Page 22

veloCity


Architect: Peter Muessig, Rice School of Architecture

Rice School of Architecture student Peter Muessig has been recognized as a winner in the “Conceptual Projects” category of the 2012 AIA Houston design awards program for his entry entitled “veloCity: Mapping Houston on the Diagonal” (see full awards story on page 18).

Page 24

Water, Bridges, and Dreams

by: Joe Self, AIA

The new Tarrant County College (TCC) campus, situated just northeast of the historic county courthouse, should be on any architect’s Fort Worth visit list. However, some background is required to understand how the placement and form of the buildings were developed and, ultimately, why the project was abbreviated.

Nic Lehoux; Craig Kuhner
Page 40

Form Follows Market

by: Filo Castroe, AIA

More than 20 years after the last major high-rise building was completed in downtown Houston, the Bayou city skyline welcomes BG Group Place at 811 Main Street. Developed by the Hines CalPERS Green Development Fund and designed by Pickard Chilton, the graceful tower, completed in 2011, stands 46 stories tall at the core of the Central Business District (CBD) along the METRO light rail transit line and is strategically connected to the six-mile underground pedestrian tunnel system.

Peter Aaron/OTTO; Aker Imaging; Scott McDonald/Hendrick-
Blessing
Page 48

Live Large, Think Big

by: Michael Friebele, Assoc. AIA

When it comes to the development of marque hotels, no city does it bigger and with more attention than Dallas. Downtown Dallas has a rich history of hotel development, from the Adolphus, built in the early 20th century to respond to Dallas’ booming growth, to the roots of Conrad Hilton, to the mid-century hotel boom that saw the development of the Southland Life Sheraton and the Statler Hilton.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA; Jacob Tindall
Page 54

Bungalow Modern

by: Canan Yetmen

In Austin’s richly diverse and energetic East Side neighborhoods, a rebirth is taking place. The addition of the Heywood Hotel on East Cesar Chavez Street represents the latest addition to a burgeoning and thriving East Side culture. Nestled comfortably among the barbecue joints, tacquerias and local shops that have so far eluded big-box homogenization, the hotel builds respectfully on the neighborhood’s considerable charms.

Casey Dunn
Page 60

In the Light with Charles K. Thompson, FAIA

by: Larry Paul Fuller

It’s a Monday morning at Archillume Lighting Design in Austin. Founder Charles Thompson, FAIA, is just now back from a four-day road trip on his 2009 Harley Davidson Ultra Classic. His time on the open road to Big Bend and back has helped to recharge his energy and clear his mind. So he’s ready for whatever awaits him.

Julie Pizzo
Page 67

Clean Line Energy Partners

by: Noelle Heinze

Designed by Kirksey Architecture, Clean Line Energy Partners in downtown Houston is a 6,700-sf space housing an electricity transmission company that develops electrical transmission lines connecting wind farms to urban areas. Several factors guided the design, including a limited budget of $350,000. The client desired a sustainable, historic headquarters building with a design that would reflect the company’s fresh, hip brand.

Aker/Zvonkovic Photography
Page 72

Propaganda Hair Group

Dick Clark Architecture designed Propaganda Hair Group’s leased, 1,700-sf shell space within the Gables 5th Street Commons building in downtown Austin. The client requested a loft-like space with an open plan, minimal furnishings, and wood and concrete textures. The design focuses on ways to differentiate program areas within a single space, while offering an open atmosphere.

Paul Bardagjy
Page 75

Two Texas Design Firms among Four Waller Creek Competition Finalists

Two Texas design firms are among four design teams that have been chosen as finalists in an international competition to revitalize Austin’s downtown Waller Creek. More than 30 teams entered the competition late last year, and nine semifinalists were chosen in January.

Page 77

Free Mobile App for Design Professionals

McGraw-Hill Construction Sweets has developed and launched a free mobile app that enables design professionals to search and download building product information on iPhones and Android devices.

Page 78

Library is San Antonio’s First City-Owned LEED Gold Project

The Parman Library at Stone Oak in San Antonio, designed by Marmon Mok, is the first city-owned project to be awarded LEED Gold Certification by the U.S. Green Building Council.

Page 78

AIA Convention and Design Expo, May 17-19, Washington, D.C.

The American Institute of Architects’ 2012 Convention Guide and Daily Schedule are now available online.

Page 78

Is Drawing Dead?

by: Bryce A. Weigand, FAIA

To explore the future of drawing in this digital age, the Yale School of Architecture hosted a symposium February 9-11 entitled “Is Drawing Dead?” Approximately 450 architects, students, historians, theorists, neurologists, digital gurus, and professors gathered in Hastings Hall in the Paul Rudolph-designed School of Architecture building to discuss and debate the question — an issue accentuated by the ready availability of digital drawing resources.

Julie Pizzo
Page 80

To Your Good Health

by: Larry Paul Fuller

In this edition about design for healthcare and wellness, we look at good buildings of both types. But the role of architects in public health goes far beyond their work on the hospitals, clinics, and fitness facilities routinely associated with these two categories. The broader purview includes their role in shaping more livable, sustainable, and healthy communities — the premise being that there is a direct correlation between the design of a community and the health of its people.

Photos by Michael Moran
Page 5

AIA Convention Recap

Thousands of architects and design professionals convened in Washington, D.C., for the American Institute of Architects Convention and Design Exposition, May 17-19.

Page 10

Registration Opens Mid July for Texas Architects Convention

by: TA Staff

Online registration opens mid July for the Texas Society of Architects Convention and Design Expo, October 18-20, in Austin. This year, the convention’s theme is “Influence.”

Page 13

2012 AIA Austin Design Awards

AIA Austin’s 2012 Design Awards competition resulted in recognition for 15 projects in three categories out of a total of 112 entries.

Page 16

Health Center, El Cantón, Honduras

by: TA Staff

A small health center for the agrarian village of El Cantón in Honduras is being constructed as the implementation of the winning entry in the “Building Health Challenge” design competition staged in January by Global Architecture Brigades among its university chapters nationwide.

Page 18

everyday

by: Larry Paul Fuller

Like the other two books highlighted here, everyday, by Leonard Volk, will be part of the featured activities (including book-signings by authors) in the AIA-Austin-hosted Reading Room at the Texas Society of Architects Convention and Design Expo in Austin October 18-20.

Page 20

The Architect’s Guide to Residential Design

by: Heather McKinney, FAIA

I am predisposed to like any book described as “A practical guide….” This book did not disappoint. Scrubbed free of architecteze and self-aggrandizement, the book offers simple, solid advice. Aimed at the architect (or future architect) reader, it is a primer that can teach even old dogs new tricks.

Page 20

Independent for Life: Homes and Neighborhoods for an Aging America

by: John V. Nyfeler, FAIA

Architects are faced with the reality that we are an Aging Society.  Among the challenges of this future is the preference of people to “age in place,” living at home, in the same neighborhood. Our suitable homes today will not accommodate our needs as we age.

Page 20

Lila Cockrell Theatre Renovation

Originally designed for HemisFair ’68 as a performing arts center for the world’s fair, the 2400-seat Lila Cockrell Theater is today, an integral part of the city’s convention center. The facility remained untouched by renovation or remodeling for over 40 years.

Chris Cooper
Page 65

Texas A&M University - Commerce Music Building

Dallas firm Brown Reynolds Watford Architects’ 69,500-sf Music Building for the Department of Music at Texas A&M University – Commerce meets the rapidly growing needs of the music program. Sited at the main entrance of the campus, the Music Building is designed to reflect the aesthetic and materials of musical instruments, while acting as a gateway to the entire campus.

Michael Lyon Photography
Page 66

James and Nancy Gaertner Performing Arts Center

The James and Nancy Gaertner Performing Arts Center at Sam Houston State University in Huntsville was designed to have a distinct identity in contrast to many of the simple flat-roofed buildings constructed on campus to accommodate as much program space as possible.

 Aker Imaging
Page 69

Fitness Finesse

by: Dan Killebrew, AIA

In a bucolic natural setting of rolling hills, the Northwood Club was established in 1946 by residents of north Dallas to provide golf and recreational activities for young families in an expanding city. The latest addition to the club — the fitness center, completed in 2010 —houses strength training, aerobics, a yoga studio, and child care services, along with food service for pool users and golfers.

 Good Fulton & Farrell Architects
Page 56

The Hodge Orr Residence

by: by Michael Malone, AIA
Architect: David W George, FAIA

The Dallas neighborhood of Preston Hollow is home to a number of well-designed and often very significant houses by nationally recognized architects — Frank Lloyd Wright, Richard Meier, Steven Holl, and Edward Larrabee Barnes, to name a few. The neighborhood also has a considerable representation of local talent (including Max Levy, Russell Buchanan, Mark Wellen, Svend Fruit, Frank Welch, and Howard Meyer).

Thomas McConnell
Page 30

For Goodness' Sake

by: Larry Paul Fuller

There is good architecture. And then there is good architecture … as in architecture for the public good. This year’s statewide design award winners — 13 projects from Dallas, Houston, San Antonio, and Austin — are a case in point. I was struck, during the awards jury process, by how intent the jurors were on recognizing certain entries, not only for their merit in terms of design (even design merit as broadly defined), but also for their capacity to fulfill client aspirations for the public good.

Page 7

Baylor Stadium

by: Texas Architect Staff

Even as college football fever was beginning to intensify across the state in late July, the Baylor University Board of Regents voted to move forward with the construction of a new $250 million riverfront stadium complex pending a favorable final vote by Waco’s city council (which happened as expected August 7). Designed by Populous, recognized for sports stadium architecture worldwide, the new Baylor Stadium is expected to be ready for the opening of the 2014 season.

Page 17

Rice University's School of Architecture Turns 100

by: Stephen Fox

Architecture schools look to the future. So it’s challenging when a school has to confront a major historical milestone such as its centennial. Rice University’s School of Architecture turned one hundred years old in September, as did the university of which it is a part.

Page 21

Notes on a Jury

by: Brian William Kuper, AIA

Our 2012 Design Awards jury met at the Texas Architects headquarters in Austin on June 7 and 8 to review the 227 entries submitted in this year’s program. As Chair of the 2012-2013 Design Committee, I enjoyed the privilege of being present during the deliberations of three distinguished and insightful jurors: Angie Brooks, AIA, of Brooks + Scarpa in LA; Eddie Jones, AIA, of Jones Studio in Phoenix; and James Timberlake, FAIA, of Kieran Timberlake in Philadelphia.

Page 28

Brownwood Park Pavilions

by: Eurico Francisco

The pavilions at Brownwood Park in north Dallas seem deceptively simple. The three structures — conceived by architect Joe McCall, FAIA, as “The Huddle” —appear at first to be a lighthearted concoction of shapes, colors, and textures. Get closer, though, and a clear idea supported by design rigor becomes evident.

Craig D. Blackmon, FAIA; Joe McCall, FAIA
Page 30

Cotillion Park Pavilion

by: Eurico Francisco, AIA

Cotillion Park is located in northeast Dallas, just south of Highway I-635, and is surrounded by single-family homes in a stable middleclass neighborhood. A baseball field and tennis courts occupy the majority of the park, but there is also a small playground and, adjacent to it, a new pavilion – Cotillion Park Pavilion.

Mell Lawrence, FAIA
Page 34

Cathedral of Hope Interfaith Peace Chapel

by: Lawrence Connolly, AIA

As the dynamic second phase of an ambitious masterplan, the chapel resembles clumps of milk-white Jello that have been jiggled and huddled together on a bed of lettuce. A derivative of several previous projects, the IPC has three hierarchal components that lean into each other to form a step stool ascending from the vestibule to the chapel and its 40-ft-tall apse.

James Wilson; Michael Palumbo; Cunningham Architects
Page 38

TM Advertising

by: Michael Friebele, Assoc. AIA

Finding the “Beautiful Truth” has long been the focus of TM Advertising in Dallas. It is a central notion that aims to capture the spirit and passion of their clients in a way that translates to the consumer audience. The firm of nearly 50 has been able to do so through a body of personnel that each bring their own sort of passion to the field but seamlessly come together to create a body of work that is immensely expressive and powerful. Recognizing the need for a space to define the future of the company, TM ultimately landed in one of the flanking arms of the Victory Park Plaza adjacent to the American Airlines Center

Bruce Damonte
Page 42

McGarrah Jessee Building

by: Adapted from “Midcentury Update,” by Stephen Sharpe, Hon. AIA Texas Architect, March/April, 2011

McGarrah Jessee’s relocation to larger quarters in downtown Austin neatly coincided with the home-grown creative agency’s bursting out of its regional sphere of influence. Affectionately known as McJ, the company has steadily ratcheted up its staffing level as its roster of clients has expanded and its recognition has gone national. Now, after having outgrown its former offices in a converted warehouse, McJ has re-established its base of operations in the Starr Building, a modernist landmark completed in 1954 and designed by local firm Kuehne, Brooks and Barr for the offices of American National Bank. The project achieved widespread acclaim at the time for its distinctively crisp interiors by Florence Knoll and a monumental mural created in situ by Seymour Fogel.

Thomas McConnell
Page 46

I-35 Makeover

by: Canan Yetmen

Downtown Austin’s east-west streets are sliced in half by the northsouth artery of IH-35. To the west, downtown rises, its sparkling towers radiating progress. To the east, the city of days past lingers, its
neighborhoods of humble homes and local businesses resolute. The freeway, elevated at the heart of the city, creates a physical and spiritual divide that has plagued Austin for decades.

Mike Osborne; Jett Butler; Thomas McConnell
Page 50

Kimber Modern B&B

by: Aaron Seward

As urban infill lots go, the roughly 12,000-sf triangular site that is now home to the Kimber Modern Bed & Breakfast presented Baldridge Architects with more than its fair share of challenges. For one, the rather
small plot rose 25 feet in elevation from the curb to the back lot line, a precipitous pitch. Furthermore, neighboring establishments created conditions that most would find undesirable for a boutique design hotel.

Casey Dunn
Page 54

UT Austin Visual Arts Center

by: Thomas Hayne Upchurch, AIA

In the past there has been a sense of aloofness characterizing the Art Building on the UT Austin campus. Located on the northeast corner of San Jacinto and 23rd Street, across from Royal–Memorial Stadium, the two-story building has stood at a distance from the public. Although its main entry on the west side was connected to street level by a prominent exterior stair, the building’s solid volumes revealed little about its interior activities. Yet the south elevation of this mid-century modern building expressed a slight undulation in the soft orange brick veneer, rising to a cap of contrasting white concrete barrel vaults. These details created a bit of visual interest and a hint of greater possibilities within.

Frank Ooms
Page 58

Houston Food Bank

by: Ardis Clinton, AIA

Hope. Simply stated, it is the message of a new facility, on a mission to ultimately end hunger. Nestled in a warehouse district outside of downtown, the Houston Food Bank (HFB) building gleams with its spirited green color and metal cladding. The new 308,000-sf facility is the nation’s largest Feeding America food bank and source of food for hunger relief charities in 18 southeast Texas counties. Beyond feeding the hungry, the Houston Food Bank provides community services and education programs aimed at promoting good nutrition, assistance with federal and state Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Programs, job training, and employment help — all in an effort to break the cycle of food insecurity.

Slyworks Photography
Page 62

BioScience Research Collaborative at Rice University

by: Jason T. Chan, AIA

At the intersection of Rice University’s historic and growth axes is the BioScience Research Collaborative, a ten-story 477,000-sf translational research facility designed to facilitate multi-institutional research collaboration between Rice and various institutes from Texas Medical Center. This interdisciplinary facility embraces a wide range of disciplines, from chemistry to bioengineering, from organizations supporting startup research companies to the National Space Biomedical Research Institute — all with emphasis on improving human wellness through research.

Cesar Rubio Photography
Page 66

Tellepsen Family Downtown YMCA

by: Adapted from “The Big Picture,” by Val Glitsch, FAIA Texas Architect, July/August, 2012

In 2008 the YMCA of Greater Houston announced the imminent replacement of Kenneth Franzheim’s Italian Renaissance-inspired ten-story edifice that had provided classrooms, exercise facilities, and 132 single-room residential units since 1941. Aspiring to move in a more “family-friendly” direction, the organization stated the primary goal of the new 115,000-sf facility would be to assume a stronger community presence in downtown Houston.

Aker Imaging, Thomas McConnell
Page 70

Military Hospital Addition

by: J. Brantley Hightower, AIA

Fort Sam Houston in San Antonio has served the medical needs of men and women in uniform since the 1870s. During that time, the complex grew incrementally until 1995 when a new facility was built to consolidate the Fort’s hospital operations. Containing over a million square feet of space, the massive Brooke Army Medical Center (BAMC – pronounced “Bam-See”) was clad in heavy masonry that gave it a somewhat institutional quality. While BAMC was functional, the needs of contemporary combat medical practice are constantly evolving and when the decision was made to absorb most of the operations of a nearby Air Force medical facility into the complex, a significant expansion became necessary to create what would eventually be known as the San Antonio Military Medical Center.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA
Page 74

Haven for Hope

by: Dror Baldinger, AIA

Haven for Hope Homeless Transformational Center is a groundbreaking project aimed at ameliorating homelessness in San Antonio. It emerged from the shared vision of two philanthropists: business leader Bill Greehey, and Phil Hardberger, Mayor of San Antonio from 2005-2009. Since its first-phase completion in 2008, Haven for Hope’s operational model has inspired other American cities to reassess their approaches to addressing homelessness.

Hester + Hardaway, Scott Adams Photography
Page 78

University Branch Library

by: Texas Architect Staff

University Branch Library, designed by Bailey Architects, is a two-story, 40,000-sf building on approximately 4.2 acres of the University of Houston Sugar Land campus. The library — for both university and public use — includes a variety of children and young adult services, reference resources, meeting and study areas, and staff work spaces.

Aker Imaging
Page 86

Parman Branch Library at Stone Oak

by: Texas Architect Staff

The 17,000-sf Parman Branch Library at Stone Oak, designed by Marmon Mok, is located in a rapidly growing and previously underserved section of San Antonio. Nestled within a natural clearing centered on a grove of existing live oaks, the crescent-shaped building includes a community meeting room, quiet study/meeting spaces, public-access computers, and sections for children and teenagers. The ten-acre site features a walking trail, outdoor amphitheatre, and a Rotary-funded playground.

Ryann Ford; Dror Baldinger, AIA
Page 88

Julia Ideson Building

by: Texas Architect Staff

The Julia Ideson Building — recently updated by Gensler and originally designed by Boston architects Cram & Ferguson (with associates Watkin and Glover) — opened its doors as Houston’s main library in 1926. However, Cram & Ferguson’s vision for the Ideson was not fully realized. A south wing and reading garden were eliminated due to budget constraints. In 2006, the Julia Ideson Library Preservation Partners raised $32 million to build a new archival wing for Houston Metropolitan Research Center and restore the Julia Ideson Building. The new wing opened in 2009 and follows Cram’s original plan, with some modification.

Courtesy of Gensler
Page 90

UT Dallas Building Recognized with Metal Architecture Award

A new entrance to the University of Dallas campus, designed by Page Southerland Page, has received a 2012 Metal Architecture Design Award for “Interiors.” The Visitor Center and University Bookstore was one of 10 projects recognized in various award categories. The awards highlight creativity in the metal construction industry and the use of steel in innovative design.

Courtesy Page Southerland Page
Page 118

Texas Architects Convention Offers ARE Study Classes

The Texas Society of Architects and AIA Austin are offering three specialized study classes on the Architect Registration Examination (ARE) during the Texas Architects 73rd Annual Convention and Design Expo, Oct. 18-20, in Austin. The classes are “Tips and Tricks for using the NCARB Practice Software”; “Archibowl - Come on Down!”; and “NCARB and You: IDP, ARE, and Certification.”

Page 119

Design Conference Set for Dallas February 22-24

The Society’s Design Committee invites all Texas Architects members to attend the Second Annual Texas Architects Design Conference, scheduled to be held at the Dallas Center for Architecture (DCA) February 22-24.

Page 8

FED_Scraper

This fantastical concept emerged from the premise that government transforms the way we occupy and inhabit space. It was honored at the 2012 Texas Architects Studio Awards program, which annually recognizes excellence in unbuilt architectural design.

Page 21

Fire/Beach House

Conceived as a primary fire and rescue support for Galveston Island, this Fire and Rescue Station was honored at the 2012 Texas Architects Studio Awards program, which annually recognizes excellence in unbuilt architectural design.

Page 22

Itinerant Oil Worker Housing (I.o.W.H.)

I.o.W.H. proposes a quick, low-cost, sustainable, multifamily housing option for a better quality of living for oil-field workers in Encinal, Texas. This project was honored at the 2012 Texas Architects Studio Awards program, which annually recognizes excellence in unbuilt, often strictly conceptual, architectural design.

Page 22

VeloCity: Mapping Houston on the Diagonal


Architect: Peter Muessig

This bold idea for elevating the bicycle culture of Houston was one of five winners from the 2012 Texas Architects Studio Awards program, which annually recognizes excellence in unbuilt, often strictly conceptual, architectural design.

Page 23

Gdansk Museum of the Second World War

World Ward II began in the city of Gdansk, Poland on September 1, 1939, this concept for the museum commemorates the event. The proposal was one of the five winners of the 2012 Texas Architects Studio Awards program, which annually recognizes excellence in unbuilt, often strictly conceptual, architectural design.

Page 24

The Greater Texas Foundation

The Greater Texas Foundation (GTF) building is a collaboration among architecture firm Furman + Keil and an integrated project team that began before the design was initiated and continued throughout the design and construction process.

Casey Dunn Photography
Page 59

Founders Hall Academic Building

Founders Hall at the University of North Texas at Dallas campus is a multipurpose academic building that addresses current needs for the students, faculty, and staff, while allowing the campus to expand its curriculum and services. Designed by Overland Partners, the first floor of the 108,000-sf building contains public functions such as a library, open reading room, lecture theater, computer lab, large multipurpose spaces, and food service.

Jeffrey Totaro Photography
Page 60

Sustainable Cabin


Architect: Urs Peter “Upe” Flueckiger

Sustainable Cabin is a 400-sf prefabricated, design-build collaboration sited in Crowell, Texas, by students at Texas Tech University College of Architecture, led by Architecture Professor Upe Flueckiger, Dipl. Arch. SIA.

Urs Peter “Upe” Flueckiger
Page 61

Team Selected for Linear Park in Downtown Austin

As the culmination of an international competition to revitalize Austin’s downtown Waller Creek, a team led by Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates (MVVA) and Thomas Phifer and Partners has been selected to design a 1.5-mile-long linear park. The announcement was made October 18.

Waller Creek Conservancy
Page 71

Balcones House

by: Al York, AIA

The Austin firm Pollen Architecture and Design has created a home that ties itself tightly to a dramatic landscape of densely-packed small hills and steep valleys.

Patrick Wong; Whit Preston; Casey Dunn; Lars Frazer; Bill Salens
Page 26

The Happening on the South Plains

by: J. Brantley Hightower, AIA

While Lubbock is not typically mentioned alongside Marfa and Santa Fe when describing small communities that are defined by their cultural offerings, the city is nevertheless experiencing a remarkable transformation on account of its thriving art scene.

Tonja Hagy, Urs Peter “Upe” Flueckiger, J. Brantley Hightower, AIA, Denny Mingus, and Tom Kessler Photography
Page 34

San Antonio Announces Design Awards

by: TA Staff

After jurors evaluated 48 entries from 17 local architectural firms, the AIA’s San Antonio chapter announced the recipients of its 2010 Design Awards during a dinner and ceremony at the Pearl Stable on Oct. 27.

Page 16

Four Awards from Fort Worth Jury

by: Tom Manganiello

Four projects were recognized for excellence in design at the AIA Fort Worth’s 2010 Design Award Program held Oct. 5 at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth.

Page 19

AIA El Paso Presents Awards

by: Robert Garland, III

This year’s AIA El Paso Design Awards program was juried by eight steemed architectural educators from Universidad Autonoma de Ciudad Juarez, located just across the international border. The jury met for two days and reviewed a total of 34 entries, ultimately recognizing five projects with awards for design excellence in four categories.

Page 23

Discovery Science Place


Architect: Butler Architectural Group

Discovery Science Place in Tyler, designed by Butler Architectural Group, is a hands-on museum for children of all ages. The museum has been located in the same early-1900s building for the past 15 years and recently acquired an adjacent structure.

Page 25

Gateway Park


Architect: Perkins + Will

Gateway Park, designed by Perkins+Will’s Dallas office for a site outside Jackson, Miss., is conceived as an emerging type of mixed-use development known as an “airport city.” The 4.45 million-sf project is located in Mississippi directly south of Jackson-Evers International Airport on 200 acres of woodland.

Page 25

Numinous Space


Architect: William Helm

Architectural designer William Helm conceived Numinous Space as a design experiment, on an undisturbed 10-acre tract in a Chihuahuan desert basin between El Paso and Las Cruces. Inspired by James Turrell’s Roden Crater, Helm proposes to construct four elevated observation posts that frame views out to the surroundings from spaces designed to alter one’s perception of objective reality through optical phenomena.

Page 25

Enfield Residence

by: Thomas Hayne Upchurch
Architect: Frank Welch & Associates

Being the architect on the house for his daughter, Liz Tirrell, and her family, was “like a surgeon operating on his own daughter,” says Frank Welch, FAIA. While he admits to being “very nervous” about the project, she recalls the experience as “fun” and one that offered fresh insights into her father’s extraordinary design skills.

Charles David Smith
Page 33

Informal Learning

Today’s architects are fully engaged with educators to design facilities for informal learning where students of all ages can benefit from nontraditional approaches to the pursuit of knowledge. In this annual “Design for Education” edition, Texas Architect looks at four very different types of academic projects that share a common thread in being uniquely created to accomplish the client’s specialized mission.

Page 39

Lakefront Learning

by: Dror Baldinger
Architect: Alamo Architects

Alamo Architects designed the first structures built under the 2005 master plan—Juniper Hall, a three-story building with 76,000 square feet of classrooms and faculty offices, and Redbud Learning Center, a 41,000-sf library. On the ground level, facing the lake, Redbud also includes a cyber café and an outdoor seating area. In between Juniper Hall and Redbud, one finds a well proportioned outdoor space. The space is the campus’ first attempt at considering the connectivity of program functions across an outdoor space. Forming and overlooking the modest plaza are the library and its writing lab, two of the most frequently visited spaces on campus.

Chris Cooper
Page 41

Lakefront Learning

by: Dror Baldinger
Architect: Sprinkle & Co

Sprinkle and Co. designed the Cypress Campus Center on the eastern edge of the lake. The building contains seminar rooms, dining hall, the campus’ bookstore, administation offices, and student advisors’ offices. In an organizational method similar to that used by Alamo Architects, Sprinkle and Co. also divided the building’s program into two blocks, which allowed the designers to respect the campus grid with one block, and adapt the new, rotated grid with the second building block. The resulting geometry created a fluid and spatially dynamic connecting lobby. A study of the building’s plans; the program elements and their compositional assembly, reveals rigor and elegance.

Chris Cooper
Page 41

Principled Gestured

by: Gerald Moorhead
Architect: Michael Graves & Associates

Since the implementation of the 2004 Master Plan (by Barnes Gromatzky Kosarek Architects with Michael Dennis & Associates) at the College Station campus of Texas A&M University, new facilities must respond to mandates affecting a wide range of architectural issues. They include energy-efficient design principles, connections to the surrounding community, facade articulation, and the use of materials consistent with those at the historic core of the campus.

Richard Payne
Page 51

Honored Heritage

by: Anna Mod
Architect: Smith & Company Architects

The African American Library at the Gregory School is located in a former elementary school building in Houston’s Fourth Ward neighborhood immediately west of downtown. The two-story concrete-frame, brick-veneer Classical Revival-style building is a designated State of Texas Landmark, City of Houston Protected Landmark, and is located within the Freedmen’s Town National Register Historic District.

Gary Zvonkovic
Page 57

Child’s Play

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: Legorreta + Legorreta; Gideon Toal

There is a child -like playfulness to the work of Ricardo Legorreta. When experiencing his projects, one intuits the architect’s delight in applying vivid colors and his fascination with simple geometric forms as if he had been handed a box of paints and a set of gigantic building blocks. Throughout his long career, Legorreta has perfected a rigorous approach to modernism infused with Latino vitality.

Juergen Nogai
Page 62

Selecting the Best of Public Schools

by: Bill T. Wilson

As a juror for the 2010 Exhibit of School Architecture sponsored by the Texas Association of School Administrators and the Texas Association of School Boards (with support from the Texas Society of Architects), I spent the better part of a week in July studying the latest work of some of my fellow Texas architects. The experience renewed my appreciation of the range of educational design being built across our state and the lasting impact that educators, administrators, policymakers, and, of course, architects can have in shaping the spaces and places where we educate our children.

Page 68

Selecting the Best of Public Schools

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: SHW Group

Designed by SH W Group, the 102,835-sf Evelyn Turlington Elementary School in Hockley was completed in 2009. The architects worked with Waller IS D to create a firm connection between the facility and its 20-acre rural site. Two pre-existing features influenced the design—a century-old live oak and a pond situated along the western boundary. The school’s placement, form, and footprint were planned to preserve these natural features.

Luis Ayala
Page 69

Selecting the Best of Public Schools

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: Corgan Associates

John A. Dubiski Career High School, designed by Corgan Associates, is a 2,000-student career and technology school located in Grand Prairie. The school’s curriculum seeks to reduce the dropout rate and prepare graduates to enter college or the workforce. The four-story, 250,000-sf structure is designed to accommodate unique programmatic needs, including specific careertrack diploma programs.

Charles David Smith
Page 71

Selecting the Best of Public Schools

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: SHW Group

Giddings Independent School District hired SH W Group to design a technology-rich learning environment for its high school and middle school students, while optimizing space and resources. The proposed solution renovated and re-purposed the existing, but outdated high school into a middle school. The renovated building was joined to a new high school building, creating a single facility for the district’s 1,400 students in grades 6-12.

Paul Bardagiy; Brian Mihealsick
Page 73

Selecting the Best of Public Schools

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: Parkhill Smith & Cooper

El Paso Community College’s Culinary Arts Program, designed by Parkhill Smith & Cooper, is a $5 million, 22,226-sf renovation located in the Administrative Services Center, Building B. The renovated facility was designed to accommodate students on a waiting list for the culinary program. T he architects held meetings with students, chefs, and staff to meet the client’s needs and the American Culinary Federation program requirements.

Geof Harral
Page 74

Selecting the Best of Public Schools

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: SHW Group

Designed by SHW Group, Ennis Independent School District’s newly constructed junior high is a 195,000-sf facility on a 50-acre site. The design incorporates a contemporary feel and function. Classrooms are configured to be flexible to support interactive teaching through integrated technology. Large-group instruction spaces and a closed-circuit television studio are two significant features.

Mark McWilliams
Page 75

IT Infrastructure

by: John Jankowski

There was a time, not terribly long ago, when the telecommunications industry spoke of “convergence.” Voice and data would soon be one, and the complexity that goes with building and maintaining separate systems would evaporate. That time is upon us; actually, it has been for years. Why, then, is building the corporate information technology infrastructure still so complicated?

Page 78

Award-Winning Workplace

by: Stephen Sharpe

About a year ago, when the staff of Texas Architect decided that this edition would focus on workplace design, no one could have foreseen the coincidence that the Texas Society of Architects/AIA itself would be relocating offices as the issue went to press. In another remarkable concurrence, the move takes TSA to the former home of fd2s, which was featured on the cover of the July/August 2002 edition. That issue was also dedicated to the subject of workplace design.

Page 5

Ebb and Flow

The concept by two UT Arlington School of Architecture graduate students – Sarah Kuehn and Nakjune Seong – shared first place in an international urban design context to explore “live, work and play” opportunities in the heart of Fargo, N.D.

Page 20

Tobin Center for the Performing Arts


Architect: LMN Architects, Marmon Mok Architects

The renovation of San Antonio’s Municipal Auditorium will retain the historic entrance and front facade of the 1926 Spanish Colonial Revival landmark originally designed by Atlee B. Ayers and Associates. The new design by LMN Architects of Seattle (in association with local firm Marmon Mok Architects) removes previous alterations and adds a multi-purpose performance hall to seat an audience of 1,750 for symphony, ballet, and opera productions.

Page 20

The Park’s Restaurant and Pavilion


Architect: Thomas Phifer and Partners of New York

The 5.2-acre park currently under construction over Woodall Rodgers Freeway on the north side of downtown Dallas will feature a performance pavilion and an adjacent restaurant, both designed by Thomas Phifer and Partners of New York, along with other public amenities.

Page 20

1810 Bermuda

by: Michael Malone
Architect: Ron Wommack Architect

When Dee Mitchell first contacted Ron Wommack, FAIA, about the possibility of designing his new house, Mitchell said he intended to interview five architects and visit with each of them three times before deciding which one would get the commission. Later, when he called to tell Wommack he had the job, Mitchell offered that he so enjoyed visiting with him that he didn’t want the conversation to end.

Charles David Smith
Page 26

In Working Order

by: Stephen Sharpe

The design of a workplace conveys a sense of that organization’s corporate culture. In this edition, Texas Architect profiles four different approaches that translate each client’s operations into physical space. The projects on the following pages are the result of close partnerships between architect and client to design an office where work flows as efficiently and effectively as possible.

McConnell Photography
Page 33

Extending the Brand

by: Dan Searight
Architect: Powers Brown Architecture

“Be Brilliant Together” proclaims Logica, a leading business and technology service company employing 39,000 personnel worldwide. “This is not a slogan,” explains Mike Lewsley, chief operating officer of its Houston office. “It is a call to action for our clients and employees alike.” Logica’s newly completed office responds to the corporate tagline with an energetic and expressive design.

Dror Baldinger
Page 40

Green Acres Conference Center

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: Fitzpatrick Architects

The New Conference Center and Performance Hall at Green Acres Baptist Church in Tyler by Fitzpatrick Architects was completed in 2010. The facility, equipped with advanced acoustics, is designed to seat 2,200 people and includes full dining services for 1,450. The main hall footprint is a 150-ft square with a stage sized for a 50-piece orchestra.

Craig Blackmon, FAIA
Page 59

Sullivan Performing Arts Center

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: SHW Group

Designed by SHW Group and located adjacent to Texas High School in the Texarkana Independent School District, Sullivan Performing Arts Center is a 38,000-sf facility that houses the 1,000-seat John Thomas Theatre. The design is intended to serve as a catalyst for the local arts community.

Paul Bardagjy
Page 60

Arts Center at Texas Southmost College

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: Studio Red Architects

Designed by Studio Red Architects, the 54,000-sf Arts Center at Texas Southmost College on the grounds of the University of Texas at Brownsville is carefully sited to fit within the campus master plan. The building shares a connection with the campus through the incorporation of design elements – such as arches, arcades, and brick patterns – used on historic Fort Brown. A unique nautilus floor plan was developed to add multiple entrances.

Greg Phelps; Keith Talley
Page 62

AIA Dallas’ Latinos in Architecture Takes Volunteer Efforts to the Streets

by: Ellena Fortner Newsom

With the help of a local group of Latino architects, the west Dallas neighborhood known as La Bajada has organized to retain its cultural identity and single-family homes. The efforts are in response to plans by the City of Dallas to explore redevelopment scenarios that would transform an area along the Trinity River near the downtown into a high-density urban village. The area currently includes several small neighborhoods, one being La Bajada.

Georgina Sierra, Fred Pena
Page 18

Houston Announces Design Awards

by: Theodora Batchvarova

A diverse jury with a broad spectrum of interests and experience met at the Architecture Center Houston on Feb. 25 to evaluate a wide variety of submittals in this year’s AIA Houston Design Awards competition. Eligibility was limited to projects completed within the last five years and located in the Houston metropolitan area or designed by an architect working in the Houston metropolitan area.

Page 20

West 7th Street Bridge

With next year’s scheduled completion of a new West 7 th Street Bridge, the Trinity River in Fort Worth will be spanned by the world’s first precast concrete network arch. The bridge has been developed by a team at the Texas Department of Transportation’s Bridge Division led by senior design engineer Dean Van Landuyt, PE. It will replace a significantly deteriorated 100-year-old bridge that has sidewalks too narrow to accommodate a growing number of pedestrians walking from downtown to the city’s Cultural District.

Page 26

Parkland Health and Hospital System

The $1.27 billion Parkland Health and Hospital System in Dallas is currently under construction to replace the existing 54-year-old Parkland Memorial Hospital. HDR Architecture partnering with Corgan Associates, both based in Dallas, was selected as the design team for the new 17-story, 862-bed hospital and master-planned campus, which includes expansion zones for future additions.

Page 26

Sisters’ Retreat

by: Matt Fajkus
Architect: Mell Lawrence Architects

“Light, space and order—these are the things that humans need just as much as they need bread or a place to sleep.” Le Corbusier’s observation of these three essential elements comes to mind when visiting the Sisters Retreat pool house and pavilion by Mell Lawrence Architects. Though the project possesses the typical attributes one might associate with a small recreational program, the unique quality of the design is manifest both in the overall layout as well as in its materiality and detailing, all of which embrace light in nuanced ways.

Mell Lawrence, JH Jackson Photography
Page 34

Graceful Synthesis

by: Stephen Sharpe

This edition’s featured projects strike a balance between a building’s unique program and the desire for synthesis with its surroundings. The design of the U.S. Courthouse in El Paso directly relates to the region’s geography and history, while adhering to stringent security standards; the restoration of Ancient Oaks near Bastrop recaptures a once-lost sense of place through sensitivity to existing conditions; the Museum of the Pacific War in Fredericksburg demonstrates how to tell a heroic story through architecture without overwhelming a small town’s historic fabric; and Singing Bell Ranch quietly nestles in its rural grassland setting to offer its city-dwelling owners a getaway of “ranch pragmatism” and prevailing breezes.

Alexander Vertikoff, Rick Patrick, J. Griffis Smith, Charles Davis Smith
Page 41

Excellence Overruled

by: Ed Soltero
Architect: Antoine Predock Architect, WHPacific

The face of federal architecture was certainly revamped under the auspices of the General Services Administration’s Design Excellence Program inaugurated in 1994 under the leadership of Ed Feiner, FAIA. Without question, the GSA’s revised protocol for the design of federal facilities represented a radical departure from the concrete bunkers and sterile buildings developed during Lyndon B. Johnson’s Great Society domestic programs era.

Alexander Vertikoff
Page 62

Sweet Leaf Tea Headquarters

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: Wiese Hefty Design Build

Designed by San Antonio firm Wiese Hefty Design Build, the Austin headquarters of Sweet Leaf Tea highlights the company’s brand while also displaying its eclectic office culture. The architects used building information modeling (BIM) software to design the almost 8,000-sf space, which is an adaptive reuse of a 1918 building in the Penn Field office complex.

Philip Thomas
Page 69

Energy Future Holdings

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: lauckgroup

Wanting to update the look of its offices but remain in the same high-rise building in downtown Dallas, Energy Future Holdings hired lauckgroup to fulfill the vision of the utility company’s new leadership. The renovation project involved reshuffling operations on the seven floors of the existing 143,000-sf office space. The client requested an energy-efficient space that also reflected a “casual elegance.”

Brian Harness
Page 70

Pratt and Box: Brief History of a Firm

by: James Pratt

After the war, following his service with the U.S. Naval Engineers, Hal Box returned to Texas to restart his architecture career. Having shared an apartment while studying architect at the University of Texas, we were reunited in the early 1950s when we worked together for Don Nelson in Dallas.

Box Family, Marsha Miller, UT Austin School of Architecture
Page 12

Livestrong HQ in COTE Top Ten

by: TA Staff

The American Institute of Architects’ Committee on the Environment has included Lake/Flato Architect’s Livestrong Foundation’s headquarters among its 2011 Top Ten Green Projects, a national program that celebrates sustainable design excellence. Livestrong, located in Austin, was this year’s sole Texas honoree.

Paul Hester
Page 14

KAUST Receives AIA/ALA Library Award

by: TA Staff

The American Institute of Architects and the American Library Association (ALA) recently bestowed the ALA Library Building Award to the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) in Thuwal, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Sam Fentress
Page 14

AIA Honors Overland’s Haven for Hope

by: TA Staff

Haven for Hope, a San Antonio homeless assistance center designed by Overland Partners, was recognized with two AIA Honor Awards during the AIA national convention in New Orleans. The project, completed last year, was the only one in Texas to receive either an AIA Housing Award or an AIA/HUD Secretary’s Award.

Page 16

KIDS Program in S.A. Schools Opens Young Minds to Design

by: Kimberley Drennan

Think you’re a better designer than a third grader? Think again, suggests Michael Imbimbo, AIA, of San Antonio. Having recently spent a semester working with a class at San Antonio ISD’s Hawthorne Elementary, Imbimbo came away from the experience with renewed respect for a child’s unbridled eagerness for exploration. “As creative as we architects think we are,” Imbimbo says, “we’re no match for a bright, happy, and enthusiastic third-grader.”

Southwest School of Art
Page 16

AIA Austin Presents Design Awards

by: Tamara L. Toon

AIA Austin honored 10 projects in its 2011 Design Awards Celebration. From a total of 77 submittals, the distinguished jury of architects selected three for Honor Awards, six for Citations of Honor, and one unbuilt project for a Studio Award.

Page 18

Mopac Trailhead

The design initiative by Miró Rivera Architects proposes a series of activity zones for a segment along the Lady Bird Lake Hike and Bike Trail in Austin where the trail extends underneath heavily trafficked Mopac Expressway (Loop 1).

Page 23

Thin Living

The problem posed by visiting assistant professor Jeffrey S. Nesbit in his third-year design studio at Texas Tech called for a slender mixed-use tower to be built on a 450-sf lot in downtown Philadelphia immediately adjacent to an abandoned movie theater.

Page 23

Belo Garden

Construction began in February on Belo Garden, one of several urban oases planned as part of the City of Dallas’ 2005 Downtown Parks Master Plan. Hargreaves Associates, the landscape design firm that developed the master plan with Carter & Burgess, designed the 1.8-acre Belo Garden that replaces a parking lot on the west side of downtown.

Page 23

Placemaking in Corpus Christi

by: Laura N. Bennett

Last December during a meeting of the City Council, representatives of a local grassroots organization presented their concept for developing a six-block stretch of Corpus Christi’s downtown bayfront into a vibrant, multi-purpose destination. They envision an expansive public place along the lines of Discovery Green in downtown Houston.

Page 24

Stone-Face

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: Holzman Moss Bottino Architecture with ArchiTexas

Stone has long held the fascination of Malcolm Holzman, FAIA. Since the late 1970s, he has designed buildings around the U.S. that feature stone from local quarries in increasingly conspicuous ways. His experimentations with native limestone over the past two decades have yielded noteworthy public buildings in several places across Texas. The New York-based architect even wrote a book, Stonework, in which he paid homage to the ubiquitous natural material that provided ancient civilizations the world over with the means to erect monuments and structures that have stood for millennia.

Craig Blackmon, FAIA
Page 38

Fire Station No. 33

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: Brown Reynolds Watford Architects

The City of Dallas’ new Fire Station No. 33, designed by Brown Reynolds Watford Architects, replaces a previously existing facility on the same site in an established urban neighborhood. The four-bay station houses 15 firefighters, including a lieutenant, captain, and battalion chief.

Michael Lyon
Page 74

University of the Incarnate Word Parking Garage

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: Marmon Mok Architecture + McChessney/Blanco Architects

Designed by Marmon Mok, the 290,000-sf parking garage on the University of the Incarnate Word campus in San Antonio is located on a highly visible yet constrained site. The garage features 800 spaces for cars on nine tiers.

Dror Baldinger
Page 76

Firm Philosophy

by: Stephen Sharpe, Hon. TSA

Lake/Flato Architects is well known for exemplary design. Every year the firm’s commitment to producing the highest quality work is rewarded by design juries. In this edition you’ll find features on five Lake/Flato projects selected for 2011 Design Awards out of a total of 12 winners in the Texas Society of Architects annual competition.

Photos Courtesy Lake/Flato  Architects
Page 10

Tour Spotlights Mid-Century Beaumont

by: Stephen Fox

A recent t our sponsored by Houston Mod, a design advocacy group, highlighted the residential architecture of Beaumont’s leading mid-century modernists. The day trip was the culmination of a series of events highlighting April as Modern Month, in which affiliates of the international DoCo-MoMo (Documentation and Conservation of Buildings, Sites and Neighborhoods of the Modern Movement) celebrated modern heritage locally and regionally.

Top Photo Courtesy Houston Mod; Bottom Photo by Gerald Moorhead, FAIA
Page 22

fibrocity

The idea behind Perkins + Will’s entry in this year’s Living City Design Competition is the need for a sustainable model for Houston’s continued rapid growth.

Page 28

Nature and Human Nature

by: Max Levy, FAIA

Our nineteenth-century Texas forebears lived more closely with nature than we do, but of course they had little choice in the matter. Though we sometimes romanticize that close relationship, most early Texans probably would have traded the romance for a window unit air conditioner. Nevertheless, they made the most of their situation and there remains much that we can learn from them about the intersection of daily lives, architecture, and nature.

All Photos By Max Levy, Faia, With Exception Of Next Page Top Left Photo Courtesy Fort Worth Public Library And Amon Carter Museum; Next Page Top Right Photo Courtesy Fort Worth Museum Of Science And History
Page 34

Notes on the Jury

by: Michael Malone, AIA

On May 20, the 2011 design awards jury met to review the 257 entries submitted in this year’s program. The distinguished jury consisted of three exceptional professionals with diverse practice and professional experiences, along with a considerable love of architecture and design.

Photos By Julie Pizzo
Page 38

Armstrong Oil & Gas

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: Lake|Flato Architects (design); Bothwell Davis George Architects (architect of record)

In adapting a century-old machine shop for use as commercial offices, Lake/Flato Architects has preserved the essence of the building’s brawny, tradesman-like character. Yes, the interior has been reconfigured as elegantly austere workspaces, but everywhere are relics of its industrial past.

Frank Ooms
Page 40

Arthouse at the Jones Center

by: J. Brantley Hightower
Architect: LTL Architects

While it is not unusual for a renovation project to transform an individual building, it is noteworthy when such a project begins to change how people relate to the city around them.

Michael Moran
Page 44

ASU Polytechnic Campus

by: Christine Noble
Architect: Lake|Flato Architects (design); RSP Architects (architect of record)

When building in the desert, landscape and climate dominate the discussion. This is the case for Lake/Flato Architects’ Arizona State University Polytechnic Campus where weathered steel screens, trellises covered with climbing vines, and a progression of courtyards create visual and experiential layers that respond to and reflect the colors and textures of its unique environment.

Bill Timmerman
Page 48

Brockman Hall for Physics

by: Donna Kacmar
Architect: KieranTimberlake

Kieran Timberlake has synthesized difficult technical requirements, environmental responsibility, and architectural craft in the new 110,000-sf Brockman Hall for Physics on the Rice University campus.

Peter Aaron/ESTO; Paul Hester; R. Kevin Butts
Page 52

Brown Residence

by: Mark T. Wellen
Architect: Lake|Flato Architects

The Phoenix area is rich in the tradition of masterful architects weaving eloquent designs into the powerful desert landscape. Wright, Soleri, and others have produced spirited designs, engaging their buildings in a dialogue with their austere settings.

Bill Timmerman
Page 56

Cabin on Flathead Lake

by: Thomas Hayne Upchurch
Architect: Andersson-Wise Architects

Projecting into the southern end of Flathead Lake in northwestern Montana is a small peninsula of scattered ponderosa pines, towering over a terrain of steep cliff, ridges, and ravines, sloping down to the water’s edge.

Art Gray
Page 60

Cutting Horse Ranch

by: Bart Shaw
Architect: Lake|Flato Architects

Cutting Horse Ranch, located on 175 acres in rural Parker county near Fort Worth, is dedicated to the breeding and training of competition cutting horses.

Frank Ooms
Page 64

Full Goods Warehouse and Il Sogno

by: Vincent Canizaro, PhD
Architect: Lake|Flato Architects (design); Durand-Hollis Rupe Architects (architect of record)

A visit to the Pearl development just North of downtown San Antonio underscores the promise of thoughtful, incremental urban placemaking. The 22-acre site was the home of Pearl Brewery until beer production ceased in 2001.

Casey Dunn
Page 68

Rainwater Court

by: Andrea Exter
Architect: Dick Clark Architecture in association with Architecture for Humanity

A game-changer in more ways than one, Rainwater Court inspires hope and creates new opportunities for more than 600 children and other residents of Mahiga, a rural Kenyan community.

Turk Pipkin; Greg Elsner; Christy Pipkin; Christina Tapper
Page 72

Sam Houston Tollway Northeast Toll Plazas

by: Jesse Hager
Architect: RdlR Architects

Bridges are a cherished design problem. The clear span represents a common exercise for architecture students exploring essential concepts of structure, tension, and compression. Regrettably, architects are seldom commissioned to design a bridge project.

Chad McGhee; Mark Gaynor
Page 76

Singing Bell Ranch

by: Bart Shaw
Architect: Max Levy Architect

The term Max Levy, FAIA, uses to describe the weekend house he designed for Singing Bell Ranch is “ranch pragmatism.” The clients asked for a design that was functional and simple, which Levy provided in the form of an elongated rectangle oriented on an east-west axis to catch the prevailing breezes.“

Charles Smith
Page 80

Sisters’ Retreat

by: Matt Fajkus
Architect: Mell Lawrence Architects

Located on a semi-urban 7.5-acre lot more than a few miles West of Austin, Sisters’ Retreat encompasses a shared pool house and play area for the families of two siblings, set amongst their small compound of homes. The site, surrounded by tall grass and within walking distance of Lake Austin, is reached by a short meander from the residences.

Hester+Hardaway Photographers, JH Jackson Photography
Page 84

Texas Center for Infectious Disease Hospital

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: O’Connell Robertson

The new Texas Center for Infectious Disease (TCID) hospital is the first free-standing infectious disease hospital constructed in the U.S. in more than 50 years and one of only six in the nation. Designed by O’Connell Robertson for the care and treatment of patients with tuberculosis, the 60,000-sf hospital replaces aging facilities on the Texas Department of State Health Services campus near Brooks City-Base in San Antonio.

Thomas McConnell
Page 91

UNT Health Science Center MET

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: Jacobs and Ennead Architects

Completed in June 2010, the University of North Texas Health Science Center’s Medical Education & Training (MET) building is located in Fort Worth’s Cultural District, only blocks from the Kimbell and Amon Carter museums. The project was designed by Ennead Architects (formerly the Polshek Partnership) with Jacobs serving as architect and engineer of record.

Thomas McConnell
Page 93

Texas Architects Convention Preview: Exhibitors

More than 150 companies listed below are partnering with the Texas Society of Architects to produce a tradeshow experience that is valuable, diverse, and fun! Please join us in Hall C at the Dallas Convention Center October 27-28 to help drive the energy and success of this year’s Design Products & Ideas Expo.

Page 107

Overwhelmed

by: Stephen Sharpe, Hon. TSA

Art and science – the theme of this edition – converge in the work of James Turrell, particularly in the meticulous design of his bedazzling “skyspaces.” Site specific, they are fine-tuned by the artist to such a degree that changes in external conditions can erode the science and efface the art.

Thomas Brown
Page 5

Pitts Medal Goes to Cowan For Lifetime Achievement

by: Andrea Exter

Described as a “legend” by his peers, Tommy N. Cowan, FAIA, is a dedicated and lifelong leader. His interest in design and architecture began in the fifth grade when a teacher invited him to compete in Austin’s Wellesley Junior Art Show. Two of Cowan’s architectural drawings were submitted and both won top honors.

Page 14

Student-Designed Go-Green Pavilion Showcases Energy-Efficient Systems

by: Laura Bennett, AIA

Thanks to efforts by local architectural students, residents of Brownsville and surrounding communities are learning about affordable green building strategies. The students designed and built the Go-Green Pavilion, a portable showcase for alternative types of construction materials and systems, earlier this year.

UTB /TSC
Page 18

AIA Dallas Announces Design Awards

by: Jim Henry, AIA

A total of 13 projects were recently recognized with Design Awards by AIA Dallas. The chapter’s annual awards program celebrates the work of local architects, as well as the efforts of clients and consultants toward achieving design excellence. Three levels of awards – Honor, Merit, and Citation – were presented by two separate juries, one for built projects and a separate panel for unbuilt work, during different events.

Page 25

March Opening for Calatrava Bridge

by: Michael Malone, AIA

Still another few months away from completion, the Margaret Hunt Hill Bridge already stands out from the other iconic profiles
that make up the skyline of Dallas. Designed by Spanish architect and engineer Santiago Calatrava, the bridge is the most conspicuous component of the ongoing improvements to the Trinity River.

Jeremy Dickie
Page 23

AIA Brazos Honors Five Projects

by: Elizabeth Price, AIA

Five projects were recognized in July with AIA Brazos Design Awards from a total of 16 entries. Jurors were Michael Malone, AIA, of Michael Malone Architects in Dallas; Emily Little, FAIA, of Clayton & Little Architects in Austin; and Mark T. Wellen, AIA, of Rhotenberry Wellen Architects in Midland.

Page 29

King of Courts

by: J. Brantley Hightower, AIA

James Riely Gordon (1863–1937) is best known to most Texans for the ornate county courthouses he designed in the closing decade of the nineteenth century. His grand Romanesque piles for Ellis County in Waxahachie and Bexar County in San Antonio are among the state’s bestloved public buildings.

Texas Tech University Press
Page 31

Inspired Inquiry

by: Stephen Sharpe, Hon. TSA

The best architecture combines the rigor of scientific inquiry with the inspired explorations of art. Equal amounts of science and art produced the four projects profiled on the following pages—two designed for scientific research and two related to the arts.

Page 47

All Saints Chapel

by: Noelle Heinze

The Texas Military Institute’s All Saints Chapel, designed by Ford Powell and Carson Architects and Planners, is the school’s first landmark building on its new Hill Country campus.

Chris Cooper
Page 73

Notre Dame Catholic Church

by: Noelle Heinze

The Notre Dame Catholic Church in Houston, designed by Turner Duran Architects, replaces existing facilities with a 1,100-seat sanctuary and expanded parking on the existing 20-acre campus.

Geoff Lyon
Page 74

The Hobbit House

by: Alan Harmon, AIA, and Lauren Cortinaz, Assoc. AIA

When the South Central Texas Chapter of the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society asked Marmon Mok to donate its services to design and build a playhouse, we were intrigued and accepted. Then we each unleashed our “inner child” to design with full vengeance!

Alan Harmon, AIA
Page 80

Texas Tech’s Green Future

by: Stephen Sharpe

This edition covers a broad sweep of variations on the “Design for Education” theme, from new facilities for private and public schools to an award-winning architecture course at UT Arlington that is now improving the everyday experiences of Arlington residents. There’s also a news article about a green roof on the campus of UT El Paso, an unlikely – but so far successful – attempt at sustainable design in a desert climate.

Brian Rex
Page 5

Rice’s Solar Decathlon Zerow House Advances Affordable Sustainability

by: Zach Mortice

The 20 solar-powered houses that lined the National Mall in October during the fourth Solar Decathlon made it clear that the sustainable design movement is becoming more self-assured and sophisticated. The projects, each designed and built by a team of students, used a wide variety of materials (stone, wood, steel, and plastic composite) and spatial organizations not seen in past decathlons.

Eric Hester
Page 11

AIA El Paso Awards 7 Projects

by: Frederic Dalbin

On Oct. 30, AIA El Paso recognized seven projects at its 2009 Design Award Banquet held at the historic Camino Real Hotel in downtown El Paso. Four projects received a Design Award and two projects received an Honorable Mention.

Page 16

AIA LRGV Announces Design Awards

by: James Rodriguez

During its annual award banquet on Dec. 12, AIA Lower Rio Grande Valley announced the results of its 2009 Design Awards program. The selections were made by a jury that met in Houston during the TSA convention in October.

Page 16

Ten Projects Honored in San Antonio

by: TA Staff

AIA San Antonio announced the results of its 2009 Design Awards at a ceremony at Pearl Stable on Nov. 4. Eight projects from 49 entries were selected for Design Awards in three categories: Honor, Merit, and Citation. The Mayor’s Choice Award and the 25-Year Award were also announced at the event.

Page 19

Nine Awards Presented by AIA FW

by: Bart Shaw

On Oct. 6, the jury for AIA Fort Worth’s 2009 Design Awards program convened at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth. They viewed 40 projects submitted by local architects before deciding on the nine they selected for distinction.

Page 20

Oliver Named UH Architecture Dean

by: TA Staff

Patricia Belton Oliver, FAIA, who served from 2001-2008 as senior vice president of educational planning and architecture at the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, Calif., has been named dean of the Gerald D. Hines College of Architecture at the University of Houston. Oliver succeeds Joe Mashburn, AIA, who held the post for the last 11 years.

Page 23

Post-Rita ‘Grow Homes’ Completed

by: TA Staff

Two years after a statewide design competition yielded affordable housing prototypes to benefit victims of Hurricane Rita, two have been built and a third is under construction. The two completed projects were unveiled in November, slightly four years after Rita devastated Gulf Coast communities at the Texas-Louisiana border.

Rick Gardner Photography
Page 25

Perot Museum of Nature and Science

Construction began in November on the Perot Museum of Nature and Science on a 4.7-acre site in the Victory development just north of downtown Dallas. Thom Mayne, FAIA, of Morphosis, designed the $185 million project as a mammoth cube that appears to float over a landscaped plinth.

Page 26

An Urban ‘Setting for People’

by: Kevin Sloan

With the opening of the spectacular AT &T Performing Arts Center still ringing in the air, the City of Dallas dedicated an urban park in November that is equally bold for different reasons. Known as the Main Street Garden, the 1.7-acre park did not emanate from a Pritzker Prize-winning architect, nor does it flaunt any enthusiasms for Pritzker Prize-like experimentation. Designed by Thomas Balsley and Associates of New York City, the park is intended to be a richly active urban space for downtown residents—a “setting for people,” in the words of its landscape architect.

Willis Winters, Thomas Balsley and Associates
Page 28

Changing Course

by: Scott Wilson
Architect: SHW Group

At first sight , approaching the school from around a stand of mature trees, all preserved through careful planning, visitors immediately feel a dynamic presence. The mosaic of juxtaposed masonry, concrete, and cantilevered metal and glass elements hints at a complex collaboration lying within the two-story Career and Technical Education (CTE) Center in Frisco. In only its second academic year and under the continued, enthusiastic leadership of Dr. Wes Cunningham, the CTE Center appears to be setting the bar higher for the design of public schools.

Hester + Hardaway Photographers; Terry Wier Architectural Photography; Paul Bardagjy
Page 54

Boerne-Samuel V. Champion High School

by: Susan Butler
Architect: Pfluger Associates Architects; OCO Architects

Built to inform and inspire the students and the local community about conservation, Boerne-Samuel V. Champion High School in Boerne ISD is designed with a focus on the intelligent use of natural resources and protection of the natural environment.

Chris Cooper Photography
Page 63

Dr. Clotilde P. Garcia Library

by: Susan Butler
Architect: WKMC Architects

Designed by WKMC Architects in Corpus Christi, the Dr. Clotilde P. Garcia Library was built through a partnership between Corpus Christi ISD and the City of Corpus Christi to engage both students and the general public. The main concepts behind the design are conservation of the natural environment and education about ecosystems in the Gulf of Mexico.

Jud Haggard Photography
Page 65

Vertical Challenge

by: Edward Richardson

My four-year-old niece, Jocelyn, compares them to “those pads that frogs jump on” and likes to imagine herself as some sort of energized amphibian as she climbs, leaps, and hops her way to the top. Her description is in reference to the new climbing installation or “climber” at the Children’s Museum of Houston’s recently completed expansion (by Jackson & Ryan Architects). The climber, designed and constructed by Spencer Luckey, frames an almost constant ingress of squealing, gleeful adventurers as they navigate the varied vertical pathways rising from the basement level of the addition. Boasting more than 70,000 linear feet of cable, 120,000 ring connectors, and 130 levels, the intricate assemblage plays a central role in the new exhibition space at the museum.

Paul Finkel/Piston Design
Page 76

AIA Honor for Texas Architect

by: Stephen Sharpe

For 60 years, the members of TSA have financially supported Texas Architect through their dues while also contributing in various ways toward making the magazine one of the best AIA component publications. That long-term collective effort is being recognized this year by the AIA with an Institute Honor for Collaborative Achievement bestowed as part of the 2010 AIA Honor Awards program.

Page 11

AIA Corpus Christi Awards Three Projects

The Corpus Christi chapter of the AIA announced its 2009 Design Award winners on Dec. 15. Nineteen entries were received with work completed between 2005 and 2009, and the submittals were judged by a distinguished jury of architectural peers from outside the area. Richter Architects was awarded all three honors.

Page 12

Wright-Influenced NASA Landmark Redone as Offices for Houston Parks

by: Gerald Moorhead

One of Houston’s landmarks of modern architecture has been rededicated after a $16 million renovation. The historic Farnsworth & Chambers Co. building, designed by MacKie & Kamrath and completed in 1957, has been the home of Houston’s Parks and Recreation Department since 1977. Known as the Gragg Building after the donor of adjacent parkland, it is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and is a Registered Texas Historic Landmark and a City of Houston Landmark.

Houston Parks and Recreation, NASA
Page 16

Designs of Trolley Stops Chosen For Dallas’ Bustling West Village

by: Paul Pascarelli

In the heart of the lively neighborhood called Uptown Dallas, the M-Line of the McKinney Avenue Transit Authority covers a 3.5-mile circuit with a fleet of preserved historic trolley cars. The vintage trolleys are an important link in an urban mass-transit system that connects Uptown Dallas with the downtown to the south, shuttling local residents and visitors to popular restaurants, shops, and night spots. At the upper reaches of Uptown is the live/work/play enclave known as West Village, located at the intersection of McKinney and Lemmon.

Page 20

SMU Unveils Bush Library Design

by: TA Staff

In November, officials of Southern Methodist University unveiled the design by Robert A.M. Stern Architects for the George W. Bush Presidential Center. Groundbreaking is scheduled to take place later this year on the project envisioned by Stern as a modernist complement to SMU’s red-brick Georgian character. Set on a 23.11-acre site, the complex – containing an archive, a museum, and a policy institute – is expected to cost $250 million to construct.

Page 23

Belo Center for New Media

Following a competition among 15 firms, a new 120,000-sf Belo Center for New Media is being designed by Lawrence Group Architects for the University of Texas at Austin. Serving as a northwest gateway to the campus, the building will expand facilities for the College of Communication.

Page 24

Drama Machine

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: REX/OMA architect of record Kendall/Heaton Associates

Rem Koolhaas (Pritzker honoree in 2000) and Joshua Prince-Ramus, enabled by enlightened patrons, designed the Wyly to function like no other traditional theater—vertically, with its main performance space at ground level and almost all support facilities placed at the building’s upper tiers. This daring experiment in the logistics of stagecraft exemplifies Koolhaas’s intellectual approach to re-interpreting an established building type from the ground up.

Iwan Baan, Tim Hursley
Page 36

Watermark Community Church

by: Susan Butler
Architect: Omniplan

In the fall of 2007, Watermark Community Church in Dallas completed phase two of a three-phase project that created an 11.5-acre campus master-planned and designed by Omniplan. First came the renovation of an eight-story office building to provide facilities for the church’s growing congregation, including spaces for adult education and children’s classes.

Peter Calvin
Page 66

St. Stephen Deacon + Martyr

by: Susan Butler
Architect: Alvidrez Architecture

Built last year, the St. Stephen Deacon + Martyr Sanctuary of the Catholic Diocese of El Paso represents the final phase of a project designed by Alvidrez Architecture. Comprising a total 42,000 sf on 7.5 acres, the project took 10 years to complete. The 25,745-sf sanctuary, its design inspired by the themes of light and journey, accommodates a capacity of 1,000 people and was completed on a $3.6m budget.

Fred Golden Photography
Page 69

Combine and Conquer

by: J. Michael Leinback

Inside every design firm, there exists a constant struggle to find a balance between the current workload and its staff’s capacity to produce work. Rarely is there equilibrium between the two. We’ve all heard and lived the phrase, “feast or famine”. This is especially true of small firms that must often forego marketing efforts while the sole principal and the staff (if there is any) work feverishly to meet a project deadline.

iStock, Julie Pizzo
Page 70

Healing with Architecture

by: Stephen Sharpe

By broadening the theme for this edition to encompass wellness, TA’s staff expanded the range of feature projects beyond medical facilities. That allowed us to include The Bridge, a new homeless assistance center on the southern edge of downtown Dallas that addresses the well being of that community’s neediest residents. The Bridge, recognized for design excellence by the AIA and other national organizations, is a collaborative effort between CamargoCopeland Architects in Dallas and Overland Partners Architects in San Antonio.

Perkins + Will
Page 5

TEX-FAB Advances Digital Fabrication

by: Brad Bell

With advancements in parametric design technology and digital fabrication reshaping the way designers think and create, a group of educators from Texas architectural schools have organized to sponsor activities for local professionals and the academic community.

Andrew Vrana
Page 16

AIA Houston Awards 13 Projects

by: TA Staff

Thirteen projects were selected for 2010 AIA Houston Design Awards. The jury – Brian Johnsen of Johnsen Schmaling Architects in Milwaukee, Wis.; Juan Miró, AIA, of Miró Rivera Architects in Austin; and Amanda Kolson Hurley, executive editor of Washington, D.C.-based Architect magazine – met Feb. 26 at the Architecture Center Houston to review 132 entries from 59 local firms. Awards were presented March 25 at the Rice Hotel in Houston.

Page 19

Jury Selected for Design Awards

by: TA Staff

With the deadline having passed on April 23 for the 2010 TSA Design Awards, three jurors have been selected to review this year’s entries on May 21 at the TSA offices. The jurors are Adèle Naudé Santos, FAIA, dean of MIT’s School of Architecture and Planning and a principal of Santos Prescott and Associates in San Francisco; Tom Phifer, FAIA, of Thomas Phifer and Partners in New York; and Edward Bosley, director of the Gamble House in Pasadena, Calif., and an art historian on the faculty of the USC’s School of Architecture. They were chosen by the TSA Design Awards Committee, chaired by Michael Malone, AIA.

Page 23

‘Looking into the Distance’

The conceptual project by UT Austin architecture students Brian Bedrosian and William Huie received first-place recognition in the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture International Student Design Competition.

Page 25

Autism Treatment Center

The San Antonio Autism Treatment Center’s new outpatient clinic is designed by SHW Group as a learning tool for understanding the complex developmental disorder. Containing six therapy rooms and a sensory lab, the 6,000-sf project encourages sensory and social interaction skills through active group and one-on-one therapy. Working with autism specialists, the architects used six principles – acoustics; spatial sequencing; natural light; color, texture, and pattern; therapeutic horticulture; and rhythms – that help clients identify the spaces and anticipate a functional change.

Page 25

Making a Case for Research

by: Jesse Hager

In their recent book, Evidence-Based Design for Multiple Building Types, David Watkins, FAIA, and Kirk Hamilton, FAIA, offer case studies involving several built projects that illustrate the importance of empirical research for the benefit of architects and owners. Though often associated with healthcare design, the authors state that evidence-based design is a methodology that can be used in any sort of architectural practice.

Page 34

Beacon of Hope

by: Kurt Neubek
Architect: FKP Architects

In late 2006 the hospital announced its Vision 2010, a $1.5 billion investment in four facilities—“the largest investment and program expansion ever by a single pediatric organization,” according to Texas Children’s Hospital. The first completed of the four projects is the $120 million, eight-story vertical expansion of the Feigin Center, designed by FKP Architects and encompassing 206,000 square feet. The building is named for the late Dr. Ralph Feigin (pronounced FI gin, with a long “i” and a hard “g”), the hospital’s influential and well respected physician-in-chief, the position he held until his death in 2008.

Aker/Zvonkovic Photography
Page 36

Resolute Landmark

by: Eurico R. Francisco
Architect: CamargoCopeland Architects and Overland Partners

Also dotting the landscape are landmarks from a grander but almost forgotten earlier era—including the Masonic Temple (1941; Flint & Broad), the Weisfeld Center (1912; Hubbell & Greene; originally the First Church of Christ, Scientist), and the Scottish Rite Cathedral (1913; Hubbell & Greene). Dallas City Hall, designed in 1977 by I.M. Pei with the mission of awakening Dallas from its post- JFK assassination slump, mediates between this neglected corner of downtown and the inner city’s robust commercial district. There is hope, however, for this neighborhood’s renewal since the opening in 2008 of The Bridge, a homeless assistance center funded by the City of Dallas.

Charles David Smith
Page 42

Refit for Fitness

by: Brian McLaren
Architect: Good Fulton & Farrell Architects

As designed by Good Fulton & Farrell, the new Dallas facility reflects the idea of working out as if it were fashion and lifestyle more than losing weight and staying fit. Despite the people exercising everywhere and the array of equipment, this is much more about creating a retreat than it is about pumping iron.

Mark Knight Photography; GFF Media
Page 48

Improved Model

by: Nestor Ifanzon
Architect: 5G Studio Collaborative

The earnest attempt by city officials to codify the characteristics of the built environment proved challenging for the architects at 5G Studio Collaborative as they began designing an urgent care and emergency clinic called Legacy ER. Their concept did not fit within the typical stick-and-brick suburban aesthetic as outlined in the city’s development code, which called for commercial buildings to look not unlike Frisco’s pitched-roof residences. But the client, a group of young physicians, was pleased. According to one of them, Dr. Jay R. Woody, they didn’t want their clinic to be “your average care space, your average office, and most definitely not an everyday Frisco building.” Still, lengthy negotiations with city officials ensued to win them over to the idea.

Charles Davis Smith Architectural Photography; Michael Hemme Photography; Callahan Photography
Page 52

Powerful Homage

by: Michael E. Allex
Architect: SmithGroup and F&S

Yet over several decades, the University of Texas–Pan American has developed a vernacular that directly flows from his genius. With its most recent addition, Kahn’s design principles are explored and allowed to mature in UTPA’s Wellness and Recreation Sports Complex designed by Smith Group/F&S (formerly F&S Partners).

BlackInk Architectural Photography by Craig Blackmon FAIA
Page 60

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: 4240 Architecture

The 56,700-sf Department of Homeland Security U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS ) building in Dallas replaces two separate USCIS offices. Completed in 2008 and designed by 4240 Architecture of Chicago, the two-story building includes a waiting room, information counters, a processing office, and a ceremony room on the first floor.

Perzel Photography Group; Mark Olsen; BlackInk Architectural Photography by Craig Blackmon FAIA
Page 65

Morris Frank Library

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: m ARCHITECTS

The Morris Frank Library, designed by m Architects of Houston and completed in 2009, represents a new direction in services for the Houston Public Library System. Relocated from its original building, the library now resides on the ground floor of an existing atrium building in a revitalized low-income area of Houston.

G. Lyon Photography
Page 67

The Perils of Substitution

by: Jim Atkins, Grant A. Simpson

Substitutions of products and systems different from the architect’s original design are an ongoing reality in the construction industry today. In fact, it is rare when alternate products and building systems are not proposed by the owner, the contractor, or other parties.

Page 70

A Voice Silenced

by: Stephen Sharpe

The idea of extremes, of designing the tallest or most outlandish work of architecture, seems appropriate in a state as celebrated as ours for audacious gesture. Unfortunately, we also live in a place where the art of architecture criticism has left the building. Currently, no daily newspaper in the state employs a critic solely dedicated to assessing architectural design and reporting his or her reflections, and the continued demise of architecture criticism bodes ill for our entire society.

Dallas Morning News
Page 5

AIA/HUD Award for Dallas Initiative

by: TA Staff

Congo Street Green Initiative in Dallas by Building Community Workshop recently received a 2010 American Institute of Architects/U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Secretary’s Award in the category of community-informed design.

’Before’ Photo Courtesy Building Community Workshop; ‘After’ photo courtesy Noe Medrano
Page 11

New Expansion of Ideson Library Follows Cram’s Original Scheme

by: Gerald Moorhead

The Julia Ideson Building, Houston’s historic downtown library, has received an addition that finally completes its original 1926 scheme. Designed by Gensler’s Houston office, the four-story south extension replicates a wing that was omitted from the Boston firm Cram and Ferguson’s plan for the library, the only facility completed of the projected five-building Civic Center focused around Hermann Square, a block donated to the city in 1914 by philanthropist George H. Hermann.

Gerald Moorhead, FAIA
Page 12

AIA Austin Awards 15 Projects

by: Rick Price

Fifteen projects were selected for the 2010 AIA Austin Design Awards in April. The jury was comprised of Merrill Elam, AIA, of Mack Scogin Merrill Elam Architects in Atlanta, Ga.; Marlon Blackwell, FAIA, of Marlon Blackwell Architect in Fayetteville, Ark.; and Michael Imber, FAIA, of Michael G. Imber Architects in San Antonio. The three jurors reviewed over 100 submittals at the AIA Austin Center for Architecture.

Page 16

Jury Chosen for TSA Studio Awards

by: TA Staff

This year’s TSA Studio Awards will be judged by three Arizona architects, each respected for design work and commitment to sustainable architecture. Comprising the jury is Wendell Burnette, FAIA, of Wendell Burnette Architects in Phoenix; John Kane, FAIA, a founding principal of Architekton in Tempe: and Philip Weddle, AIA, of Weddle Gilmore Black Rock Studio in Scottsdale.

Page 19

Waller Creek Master Plan

“Tailor the District,” a concept for reinvigorating a downtrodden corner of downtown Austin, uses Waller Creek as the central seam around which patches of social fabric (i.e., places of local commerce, open space, and entertainment venues) are stitched together by a unified circulation network.

Page 20

Casa Verde

Casa Verde, a conceptual project by Houston’s Morris Architects, was one of three projects awarded an Honorable Mention in the 2009 Dallas Urban Re:Vision international design competition that challenged participants to transform a 2.5-acre downtown parking lot into an entirely self-sustaining mixed-use, mixed-income development.

Page 20

Cotillion Pavilion

Designed by Mell Lawrence Architects of Austin, the Cotillion Pavilion replaces an existing shade structure at Cotillion Park in northeast Dallas. Scheduled for completion later this year, the project is part of the City of Dallas Park and Recreation Department’s long-range strategic plan to restore or replace aging picnic pavilions throughout the city.

Page 20

H2Ouston

by: Maryalice Torres-MacDonald

In 1836, shortly after Texas won its independence from Mexico, two New York real estate developers, John and Augustus Allen, claimed just over 6,600 acres as the site of Houston. The site, located at the confluence of the Buffalo and White Oak bayous, is where Houston’s first port, known as Allen’s Landing, opened for business in 1841.

Texas Tech College of Architecture
Page 23

Defense Redesigned

by: Steven Land Tillotson

British historian Arnold J. Toynbee observed that the border of an enlightened and ascendant civilization is a fluid zone of contact. But, he cautioned, when its power of self-determination and its creative influence upon neighbors wane so does the mutual cooperation and communication shared with those neighbors until hostility transforms the border into a rigid military line.

Page 26

Environmental Impact

David Heymann concedes that the house is indeed very large, yet he is quick to point out the designs sustainable attributes. “It’s not smart growth, but its smarter to have one very big house than a dozen big houses,” he says. “Such houses are inevitable, and ignoring them for scalar impropriety does not resolve their environmental consequence.”

Page 41

Cool, Composed, and Highly Secure

by: Jesse Hager
Architect: Leo A Daly/LAN + PageSoutherlandPage, A Joint Venture

From its beginning in 1994, the General Services Administration’s Design Excellence Program upset the status quo in how the federal government commissioned architectural services. The innovative program advocated high-quality design and architectural expression, two concepts not often associated with federal projects built in the latter half of the twentieth century.

Tim Hursley
Page 42

Silo

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: Sprinkle & Co. Architects (formerly Sprinkle Robey Architects)

Designed by Sprinkle & Co. Architects and completed in 2008, Silo’s second San Antonio location occupies 8,900 square feet and two floors within a suburban retail development. The owners requested that the architects preserve but also refresh the restaurant’s identity.

Chris Cooper; Paul Hester
Page 58

August E’s

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: Mustard Design

August E’s was an established restaurant in need of a new location. In 2008, the business moved to an existing building one block off historic Main Street in Fredericksburg. Designed by Andrew E. Bray of Mustard Design, the project injected new life into a 4,900-sf structure that previously housed a 1950s automotive repair shop and later a furniture warehouse.

Green Dog Pictures
Page 60

Reading Into the Numbers

by: Stephen Sharpe

The annual TSA Design Awards program provides an intriguing snapshot of the state of architectural design in Texas. While nowhere near comprehensive in depicting a multifaceted profession, each year’s collection of winners nonetheless offers a survey of contemporary trends and the occasional flash of creative brilliance. Beyond its beauty-contest aspects, the program may also reveal insights into current economic conditions through the level of participation.

istockphoto, nikada
Page 7

Fort Sam Rescues Its Heritage

by: Raina Tilden

Designated a National Historic Landmark in 1975, Fort Sam Houston has over 900 structures deemed historic (built before 1960), more than any other active military installation in the U.S.

Photo courtesy Joint Program Management Office, Fort Sa m Houston
Page 20

(Shell)ter for Home

(Shell)ter for Home, designed by Jeffrey Brown, AIA, of Powers Brown Architecture in Houston, is a 1,400-sf affordable housing solution based on Quonset hut construction (prefabricated, arched steel buildings introduced during WWII for their easy transport and assembly). Brown’s plan places the building on an east/west axis to respond to solar orientation and create public/private exterior space, along with “curb appeal.”

Page 25

Hutto City Hall Complex

Austin-based architecture and planning firm Antenora Architects recently completed the schematic design phase for a new Hutto City Hall, with an adjacent multi-purpose building and municipal park.

Page 25

The Collector

The Collector, a conceptual project by Brendan O’Grady, AIA, of RTKL Associates in Dallas, is a mixed-use development imagined for construction in Shanghai. Planned to encompass more than 2.7 million square feet, the project is “designed to harness the energy of business, culture, and nature.”

Page 25

Design Awards 2010

by: Lawrence Connolly

After seven hours of uninterrupted work on May 21, this year’s TSA Design Awards jury finalized its selections. The jury began with 200 entries, keeping 61 from that total in the first round, and finished a second round with 21 before ultimately choosing the 11 projects featured on the following pages.

Illustration BY Betsy Cooper
Page 35

Cinco Camp

by: Ed Soltero
Architect: Rhotenberry Wellen Architects

When Malcolm McLean devised the now-ubiquitous metal shipping container in the 1950s, his idea transformed the cargo transport business. The movement of goods on a global scale was greatly facilitated by what became known as inter-modal steel building units.

Hester + Hardaway
Page 36

Grauwyler Park Branch Library

by: Gregory Ibanez
Architect: Oglesby Greene

In a famous Letter to the Editor in Architectural Record, architect Andres Duany labeled the four types of architectural consumers—patrons, clients, customers, and martyrs. Although he was writing in reference to housing, let’s (with apologies to Mr. Duany) apply the same categories to municipal architecture.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA; Kristin Winters, AIA
Page 40

The Lance Armstrong Foundation Headquarters

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: Lake/Flato Architects in collaboration with the Bommarito Group

Entering the Lance Armstrong Foundation (Livestrong) headquarters is an exercise in transition—from busy streetscape through serene garden to an open, sunlit interior. Transition also characterizes the conversion of the 1950s-era warehouse into the Livestrong offices, considering that a wide variety of the project’s materials were salvaged from the original structure.

Casey Dunn; Paul Hester
Page 44

La Lomita Chapel Restoration

by: Michael E. Allex
Architect: Kell Muñoz

Upon hi s death in 1861, a French merchant from Reynosa named Rene Guyard, bequeathed a tract of land along the Rio Grande near present-day Mission to two Catholic priests “for the propagation of the faith among the barbarians.” Thus began the 150-year history of La Lomita Chapel as a rendezvous point for Oblate missionaries in their travels through the wild borderlands.

Rebecca Rivera; MPC Studios; Nicki Martinez
Page 48

Mod Cott: Guest House

by: Murray Legge, AIA
Architect: Mell Lawrence Architects

A view of the limitless horizon can have a transforming effect. Watching the landscape stretch out across miles can cast a spell over even the most world-weary, especially from a high point where one is transfixed by the subtly shifting light over a wide space, cloud shadows cast across the land, a wild storm approaching from afar.

Mell Lawrence, FAIA; Jacob Termansen
Page 52

PSU Overlook Pavilion

by: Sean Burkholder
Architect: Overland Partners Architects

Integrating architecture into any given context while maintaining design integrity is a fine art. Architects must constantly walk the line between over- or under-contextualizing a building to support its strength as a unique entity within its environment. Somewhere between total disregard to surroundings and cliché facsimiles of geologic or biologic imagery, a good architect can find a project’s meaning without being overt. Such sought-after balance has been gracefully achieved by Overland Partners with the firm’s new Overlook Pavilion at Penn State University.

Jeffrey Totaro
Page 56

Pearl Stable

by: Douglas Lipscomb, AIA
Architect: Ford, Powell & Carson Architects and Planners

Upon seeing the renovated Pearl Stable one can fully appreciate how past generations respected even the most prosaic of structures. The stable building was originally constructed in 1894 to house the horses that pulled the beer wagons of the Pearl Brewing Company. The elegance of the original two-story, elliptical structure derives from the simplicity of its plan – with horse stalls arranged on the ground floor around its perimeter and its core – and the richness of the corbelled and patterned brick on the exterior. The second floor served as the hay loft from which feed could be dropped through the chutes to the horses below. At the center of the roof was a handsome cupola that provided ventilation to the stables.

Paul Bardagjy
Page 60

Sid W. Richardson Visual Arts Center

by: Rebecca Boles
Architect: Gideon Toal

Fort Worth Country Day ha s the cache t of bei ng one of the premier college preparatory programs in North Texas. In existence since 1963, Fort Worth Country Day offers K-12 instruction on its campus in southwest Fort Worth. Students become accustomed to the feel of a college campus as they change classes and circulate among separate academic buildings throughout the school day. Covered walkways, an abundance of trees, and landscaping with mature plantings are evidence that the school’s leadership sees the importance of an appropriate setting in creating an environment for learning.

Craig Kuhner
Page 64

Stone Creek Camp

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: Andersson-Wise Architects

“Beauty alone doesn’t hold your interest for very long. You want things to be a little… scary. But the kind of awe that derives from nature is extraordinarily tranquil.” So muses Arthur Andersson, AIA, in the recently published Natural Houses that features several projects designed by Andersson-Wise Architects, the Austin firm led by him and Chris Wise, AIA. Prominently showcased in the book is Stone Creek Camp, a backwoods hideaway built on a ridge overlooking Flathead Lake in rural northwestern Montana. The elegantly rusticated encampment comprises eight small buildings strategically arrayed across the steeply sloping site, each positioned to foster an individual and collective sense of refuge.

Art Gray
Page 68

GSA Regional Field Office

by: Filo Castore
Architect: Leo A Daly/LAN + PageSoutherlandPage; A Joint Venture

Rising above congested freeways, oversized houses, and drab strip malls, a new architectural landmark has been added to Houston’s horizon. A product of the General Service Administration’s Design Excellence Program, the austere and impressive governmental GSA Regional Field Office emerges from the nondescript suburban landscape with its simple form and emerald skin.

Tim Hursley
Page 72

East Windsor Residence

by: Ingrid Spencer
Architect: alterstudio architects

According to Kevin Alter, the 4,200-sf, three -story East Windsor Residence is essentially a one-bedroom loft because the top floor “has all the pleasures and attributes of a penthouse and then it expands down to give you all this other stuff.” The project was designed by Alter, along with alterstudio architects co-principal Ernesto Cragnolino, AIA, with a focus on the third level, which boasts 270-degree views and contains the master suite, kitchen, and main living area. But the “other stuff” found on the remaining two levels completes this finely crafted house in dynamic and dramatic ways.

Paul Finkel; Jonathan Jackson
Page 76

Brays Crossing

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: Glassman Shoemake Maldonado Architects

Brays Crossing, designed by Glassman Shoemake Maldonado Architects, is a joint venture between New Hope Housing and the City of Houston to remodel a 1960s-era apartment complex adjacent to a major freeway in a crime-ridden neighborhood.

Eric Hester
Page 81

Buzz Lofts

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: t. howard + associates/Parmadesign

Buzz Lofts, a live/work residential building designed by t. howard + associates, is sited on an urban block near downtown Dallas. Sustainable, modern, and artistic describe the design concept for the three-story building that rests above ground-floor parking.

Jay Brousseau
Page 83

Barton Place

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: BOKA Powell Architects

Designed by BOKA Powell Architects, Barton Place is a six-story, multi-building condominium complex located south of downtown Austin. Six buildings and an elevated plaza landscaped with native plants rest above a twolevel underground parking garage.

Patrick Wong
Page 85

Firm Award Goes to Overland Partners

by: TA Staff

In recognition of its distinguished architecture and significant contributions to the architectural profession and the community, Overland Partners Architects of San Antonio was presented with the 2010 TSA Architecture Firm Award on Oct. 15 during the Texas Society of Architects/AIA convention.

Page 15

Eco Topics at El Paso Conference

by: Frederic Dalbin

The third annual Eco El Paso conference held Sept. 30 attracted more than 170 attendees to learn about environmentally responsible building design and construction in the hot and arid climate of the Chihuahuan desert region.

Page 16

AIA Dallas Selects Award Winners

by: Brian William Kuper, AIA

Two juries – one judging the built projects and another the unbuilt – for AIA Dallas’ 2010 Design Awards program presented 16 awards following deliberations in late September at the Dallas Center for Architecture. A total of 117 submittals, 74 built and 43 unbuilt, were entered by members of the local chapter.

Page 23

NE Texas Awards Six Projects

by: TA Staff

Six projects by members of AIA Northeast Texas were recognized in the chapter’s 2010 Design Awards program. Jurors viewed a total of 15 entries before making their selections on Oct. 14 at the Center for Architecture in San Antonio.

Page 25

A Work in Progress

by: Kevin Sloan
Architect: Gromatzky Dupree & Associates

Park Lane is not your typical New Urbanist enclave. There is no tinge of nostalgia to the buildings, no sense of a walk down memory lane, nor the feel of a backdrop to a 1920s movie. Instead, crisp lines, angular building shapes, and modernist glass cubes are gathered along the familiar form of a street. Taken together, it is a project that manifests an interest in distinguishing urban design concepts from building style.

Steve Hinds Photography
Page 54

A Work in Progress

by: Kevin Sloan
Architect: Good Fulton & Farrell Architects

Park Lane is not your typical New Urbanist enclave. There is no tinge of nostalgia to the buildings, no sense of a walk down memory lane, nor the feel of a backdrop to a 1920s movie. Instead, crisp lines, angular building shapes, and modernist glass cubes are gathered along the familiar form of a street. Taken together, it is a project that manifests an interest in distinguishing urban design concepts from building style.

Craig D. Blackmon, FAIA
Page 54

Montgomery ISD Aquatic Center

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: RWS Architects

Designed by Houston firm RWS Architects, the Montgomery Independent School District Aquatic Center is a 29,600-sf facility that hosts the district’s swim practice, competitions, and community programs for all age groups. The center’s glass lobby with clerestory is located at the entrance of the Montgomery IS D Athletic Complex and faces the main drive.

Susan Hernandez Photography
Page 62

Texas State Student Recreation Center

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: Marmon Mok Architecture

The renovation and expansion of San Marcos’ Texas State University Student Recreation Center, designed by San Antonio firm Marmon Mok, is the first campus project to adhere to new guidelines that call for Spanish Colonial architecture and a specific material palette.

Chris Cooper Photography
Page 63

The Public is Invited

by: Don Gatzke, AIA

AIA Fort Worth has joined the ranks of progressive chapters in establishing a new home and a venue for public outreach on issues of architecture and design. Located one block from the Cultural District, the new Center for Architecture is a neighbor to several world-famous destinations for art and architecture.

Brandon Burns courtesy of FIRM817
Page 72

Kimbell Unveils Piano’s Expansion, Future Building Sited on West Lawn

by: Gregory Ibanez

On Nov. 18, the Kimbell Art Museum unveiled the eagerly anticipated preliminary design for its expansion, designed by Renzo Piano Building Workshop. The design confirmed speculation that the new addition would occupy the west lawn of the museum grounds.

Page 10

AIA El Paso Awards 7 Projects

by: Fred Perez, AIA

The jury in AIA El Paso’s 2008 awards program recognized seven projects for design excellence. From more than 25 entries submitted in four categories – commercial, interiors, residential, and future projects – the jury presented two Honor Awards, four Merit Awards, and one Honorable Mention.

Page 16

AIA San Antonio Presents Design Awards

by: AIA San Antonio Staff

After jurors carefully evaluated 53 entries from 20 local architectural firms and one individual AIA member, the AIA San Antonio chapter announced the winners of its 2008 Design Awards. A total of 13 projects were recognized with awards in early November. Kell Muñoz topped the list with five awards.

Page 18

AIA Fort Worth Awards Nine Projects

by: Bart Shaw

The jury for AIA Fort Worth’s 2008 Design Awards convened Oct. 14 at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth where they sifted through 40 projects before selecting nine for distinction.

Page 20

5 Design Awards for AIA Northeast Texas

by: Brett Patrick, AIA

The Northeast Texas chapter of the AIA presented five design awards at its annual Christmas party and chapter meeting on Dec. 2. The winning projects for this biannual event were selected from a field of 18 entries representing seven firms.

Page 22

Prefabricated Bathroom Pods

Two new dormitories at Rice University will feature prefabricated bathroom pods when construction is completed later this year. The pods were designed by London-based Hopkins Architects, the lead firm for the McMurtry and Duncan residential colleges.

Page 26

National Museum of the Pacific War

The 40,000-sf addition and renovation to the George H.W. Bush Gallery of the National Museum of the Pacific War (formerly known as the Admiral Nimitz Museum) is designed with direct reference to Fredericksburg’s historic fabric and metaphorical reference to the Pacific theater of World War II.

Page 26

The Blanton That Could Have Been

by: J. Brantley Hightower

While studying at UT Austin in the spring of 1998, my classmates and I had the opportunity to attend a series of public lectures given by the seven short-listed architects for the Jack S. Blanton Museum of Art. The list was impressive and when Herzog & de Meuron was ultimately chosen we were thrilled by the prospect of what the Swiss firm would design. The insertion of a thoughtful work within the Spanish Mediterranean-style campus was certainly something to be eagerly anticipated.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA ; Illustration by Richard Carman, courtesy Herzog & de Meuron and UT Austin
Page 27

Homework Yields High Marks

by: Chris Schultz, AIA
Architect: Pfluger Associates Architects; Chumney & Associates

The North East Independent School District set several lofty learning objectives for the designers of its new prototypical middle school, José M. Lopez Middle School, in the fast-growing Stone Oak area of far-north San Antonio.

Chris Cooper Photography
Page 58

Educating the Educators

by: James Kirkpatrick AIA

Who knew that homework was still being assigned so many years after completing school? In preparation to sit on the jury for the 2008 TASA/TASB Exhibit of School Architecture, I spent about 30 hours studying the 96 entries prior to the meeting in Austin. I combed through all of them at least four times, all the while keeping in mind the criteria—design, educational appropriateness, innovation, process of planning, sustainability, and value

Page 68

Andy Dekaney High School

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: SHW Group

Andy Dekaney High School recently received the 2008 Caudill Award, the highest honor given in the TASA /TASB Exhibit of School Architecture. Based on findings that students perform better in small groups, “Instruction Should Drive Construction” was the guiding philosophy for SH W Group’s design of the 486,000-square-foothigh school sited on 80.7 acres in Houston’s Spring Independent School District.

Richard Payne, FAIA
Page 69

Robert R. Bruno (1945 – 2008)

by: Rick Price

Robert R. Bruno, known for his idiosyncratic Steel House that evolved over three decades of design and construction, died Dec. 9 at the age of 63 from complications of cancer. A member of the faculty of Texas Tech University’s College of Architecture in the late 1970s, Bruno later taught courses there periodically.

Kelly Ludwig, www.detourart.com , www.robertbruno.com
Page 16

Pulse

Designed by Helen Pierce of PierceWorkshop in San Antonio, Pulse recently won the $8,000 DawnTown 2008 Award sponsored by the Miami Downtown Development Authority.

Page 22

Shanghai Tower

Designed by Marshall Strabala, AIA, in Gensler’s Houston office, the Shanghai Tower Construction and Development Corporation’s 2,074-foot tall Shanghai Tower broke ground in November. The 128-story building, set for completion in 2014, is expected to be the tallest building in China.

Page 22

Cibolo Town Center

The Cibolo Town Center Master Plan, designed by Archimedia, was developed over several months in a series of stakeholder charrettes and city leadership meetings. Located just four miles off I-35 northeast of San Antonio, Cibolo must adapt to rapid growth.

Page 22

Houston Historicist

by: Mark Oberholzer, AIA

Many modernists have been trained to look down their noses at the output of twentieth-century architects who designed within eclectic or historicist vocabularies. The work of architect John Staub and his contemporaries was often dismissed by subsequent generations of architects who refused to accept the disjunction between the historical references of this work and the essentially modern character of its program and use.

Texas A&M Press, Richard Ch eek; Texas A&M University Press
Page 37

AT&T Conference Center

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: HKS Architects (architect of record) and Lake|Flato Architects (design architect)

The AT &T Executive Education and Conference Center opened in 2008 on the University of Texas campus in Austin. Designed by Lake/Flato Architects, in collaboration with HKS, the conference center “…adheres to goals of the campus master plan by borrowing very specifically from the materials of the campus as well as the massing and the fenestration of the original 40 acres,” said principal design architect David Lake, FAIA .

Blake Martin, HKS
Page 70

The State of BIM

by: David Baldacchino

Change is the word of the moment. For the design and construction industry, change has been slowly brewing for the past several years. That change is by no means an easy and painless process, but our profession will come out stronger at the end.

Parkview Regional medical center rendering courtesy of hks architects; Woodsedge rendering courtesy morris architects
Page 74

Survey: Texas Slow to Adopt BIM

by: Andy MacPhillimy, AIA

The software capabilities that are the foundation for Building Information Modeling, or BIM, have been under development for more than 20 years, and in the last few years awareness and interest in BIM by the AEC industry have grown remarkably. However, a recent survey indicates that the AEC industry in Texas has been slow to adopt BIM. Those few in Texas who are now using BIM, survey respondents state that adoption of the new technology has resulted in wide-ranging changes in the way they design and deliver projects.

Page 74

Adapt, Transform, Forget…

by: Fernando Brave

The modernist dictum that “form follows function” does not appear a viable equation in adaptive re-use where function must follow form. Take, for example, the re-purposing of the ubiquitous and increasingly unappealing big box. Texas Architect asked a group of artists and designers to do just that, to consider the fate of a vacant Circuit City building. Their responses are diverse, and can be grouped into three distinct categories—adapted, transformed, and forgotten.

Page 84

McNay’s French Connection

by: Stephen Sharpe

In his native France, Jean Paul Viguier is known for his modernist rigor in designing projects for clients ranging from cultural institutions to multinational corporations. However, Viguier was almost unknown in the U.S. when the McNay Art Museum commissioned him to design a much-needed expansion.

rendering courtesy Jean-Paul Viguier s.a. d’archit ecture; Photo by ESTO, Jeff Goldberg
Page 5

EPA Extols Houston, D/FW for Efficiency

Houston and the Dallas-Fort Worth metropolitan area are among the top five cities in the nation with the most buildings enrolled in the Energy Star program administered by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The federal program promotes energy conservation and reduction of greenhouse gases by designing buildings to be more energy efficient.

Page 10

AIA Awards Texas Housing Projects

Two projects by Texas firms are among the 17 residential buildings recognized in the 2009 AIA Housing Awards. The awards program, now in its ninth year, was established to recognize the best in housing design and promote the importance of good housing as a necessity of life, a sanctuary for the human spirit, and a valuable national resource.

Photos by (left) Hester & Hardaway and (right) Charles Davis Smith, AIA
Page 12

Lake/Flato’s Shangri La in Top Ten Green

Lake/Flato Architects’ Shangri La Botanical Gardens and Nature Center in Orange is among the Top Ten Green Projects for 2009 as recognized by the AIA’s Committee on the Environment (COTE). Each year the national award celebrates excellence in sustainable architecture and design solutions that protect and enhance the natural environment.

Photo by Hester + Hardaway
Page 12

SAC Program Celebrates Milestone

by: Julie Cooper

In 1958, architect Vernon Helmke inaugurated a program at San Antonio College to prepare students for careers in architecture. Since offering those first classes in design, graphics, freehand drawing, and construction, SAC’s architectural curriculum has grown in size and reputation.

Photos courtesy San Antonio College
Page 14

TSA Design Awards Jury Selected

by: TA Staff

Three highly respected designers will judge the entries in the 2009 TSA Design Awards program. The jurors will be Philip Freelon, FAIA, president of the Freelon Group in Raleigh-Durham, N.C.; Mary Margaret Jones, FASLA, president of San Francisco-based landscape architecture firm Hargreaves Associates; and Rick Joy, AIA, of Rick Joy Architects in Tucson. The jury is set to meet May 15 in Austin.

Page 17

Hariri to Lead Studio Awards Jury

Gisue Hariri of Hariri & Hariri Architecture in New York City, has been selected to lead the 2009 Texas Society of Architects Studio Awards jury. This year’s TSA Studio Awards will be judged separately from the Design Awards, and the deadline for entries has been set later in the year to encourage more students to participate in the competition.

Page 17

AIA Houston Recognizes 12 Projects

by: Christian Sheridan

AIA Houston honored 12 projects at its 53rd annual Design Awards Dinner held on March 26 at the Rice Hotel’s Crystal Ballroom. Winners were selected from 115 entries in six categories: architecture, residential architecture, interior architecture, renovation/restoration, urban design, and on the boards.

Page 18

Vision 2030: West Dallas Gateway

Recognized with a 2009 Great Places Award, co-sponsored by the Environmental Design Research Association and Metropolis magazine, the West Dallas Gateway suggests redevelopment strategies for a blighted, post-industrial area of the city.

Page 22

The Tolerance Bridge

The Tolerance Bridge is among several public projects planned by the City of Houston to enhance the green space surrounding Buffalo Bayou. The German arts collaborative Elmgreen & Dragset, selected for the project through an international competition, will work in partnership with Houston-based architects SWA Group. Sited just east of Montrose Boulevard, the 850-foot-long pedestrian bridge is designed to connect the bayou’s north and south banks, as well as existing hike-and-bike trails.

Page 22

Dallas Convention Center Hotel

In March, demolition and soil remediation began on the future site of the Dallas Convention Center Hotel, designed by Dallas architectural firm 5Gstudio_collaborative with BOKA Powell as the architect of record.

Page 22

Designs on Volunteering

by: Margine Biswas

The opportunity to offer one’s knowledge and skills to young people can be an exceptionally rewarding experience. When such an opportunity arose recently, I joined several members of AIA Dallas’ Women in Architecture in preparing a presentation for middle school-aged girls to help them realize their potential for professional careers. Our presentation was part of the national “Expanding Your Horizons” program sponsored by the American Association of University Women.

Photo by Penny
Page 25

Solar Control

by: J. Brantley Hightower

Jean-Paul Viguier’s Jane and Arthur Stieren Center for Exhibitions at the McNay Art Museum in San Antonio represents the latest example of what has become a growing typology in the state—the art museum with a glass ceiling. This development might seem odd in a state known for its blisteringly hot summers and intense sunlight, but the concept of lighting works of art from above is not a particularly new development.

Page 34

Innovative Insertion

by: Ronnie Self
Architect: Jean-Paul Viguier s.a. d’architecture in association with Ford Powell & Carson

The new Jane and Arthur Stieren Center for Exhibitions at the McNay Art Museum by the French architect Jean-Paul Viguier is a modern building. It is not nostalgic, a fact worth noting because the Stieren Center is the latest extension of a 1920s-era Spanish Colonial Revival mansion designed by Ayers and Ayers.

ESTO, Jeff Goldberg
Page 38

Art in the Park

by: PageSoutherlandPage
Architect: PageSoutherlandPage

In early 2004, a group of prominent local philanthropists negotiated a landmark deal with Houston Mayor Bill White. As outlined in the pact, the City of Houston contributed several downtown parcels in front of the George R. Brown Convention Center and the philanthropists agreed to fund the design and maintenance of a world-class park that promised to breathe new life into the urban core. Named through a public competition, the non-profit Discovery Green Conservancy opened the $122 million park in April 2008 to widespread acclaim. The 11.8-acre urban amenity is located near the southeast edge of downtown, between the Toyota Center basketball arena and Minute Maid Park baseball stadium.

Eric Laignel Photography; Chris Cooper Photography; Julie Pizzo
Page 44

Art at Discovery Green

The designers of Discovery Green incorporated art installations throughout the park, including interactive pieces that invite visitors to have a little fun. Great care was taken to ensure the installations would be visually prominent yet nestled within the park’s environs. Many of the works are by well-known artists, including Doug Hollis, whose Mist Tree (shown at left) is the latest of his water-jet sculptures designed for outdoor spaces around the U.S. His large interactive Gateway Fountain (at right) entices children to cool down from the heat.

Page 48

Enlightened Conversion

by: Geof Edwards
Architect: Poteet Architects

When Jim Poteet , AIA, of Poteet Architects converted a derelict 1940s-era auto paint shop into an art studio for noted San Antonio arts patron Linda Pace, he had no way of knowing he would be redesigning that same space just a few months later. Sadly, Pace passed away from breast cancer in 2007, only six months after her new studio was completed. Three months after her death, Poteet was asked to redesign the space as offices for the Pace Foundation, a nonprofit established by Pace prior to her death. The Foundation is dedicated to the display and loan of her renowned contemporary art collection; facilitating the artist-in-residence program at Artpace; and maintaining CHRISpark, the adjacent urban park.

Chris Cooper Photography
Page 50

The Park on Barton Creek

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: Merriman Associates/Architects

The Park on Barton Creek combines corporate office functionality with the natural setting of the South Austin greenbelt. Designed by Merriman Associates/Architects, the project features two five-story, 100,000-squarefoot buildings set along the western edge of the site to minimize impact to the heavily wooded Barton Creek.

Squire Haskins Photography
Page 62

Acme Brick Headquarters

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: Gideon Toal

Acme Brick established two goals with the design of their new headquarters—to respond to the wooded site, setting a standard for future development in the area, and to demonstrate the variety of design alternatives that can be achieved with brick veneer.

Craig D. Blackmon, FAIA; Steven Vaughan
Photography, Dallas
Page 64

Survival in Challenging Times

by: Jim Atkins, FAIA and Grant A. Simpson, FAIA

Here we go again; another recession. And since the work of the design professional is directly related to the economy, our livelihood thrives or suffers accordingly. Those good times that seemed as though they would never end seem to have ended, at least for the present. Projects have gone on hold, or away, friends have been laid off, and many employees are now wanting for something meaningful to do.

Photo illustrations by Julie Pizzo; sketch courtesy merr iman associates/architects
Page 68

Inside-Out Studio

by: Brian Dougan

During the Spring 2007 semester, behind an anonymous tract house on a culdesac in suburban College Station, I designed and built an inside-out studio where I produce utilitarian and often highly decorated earthenware.

images courtesy brian dougan
Page 76

AIA Austin Awards 15 Projects

by: Rick Price

On April 18, AIA Austin recognized 15 projects at its 2009 Design Awards Gala held at the historic Browning Hangar on the redeveloped grounds of former Mueller Municipal Airport. Of the 115 submitted projects, 14 received Design Awards and one received a Studio Award.

Page 17

Forwarding Dallas

Designed by Portugal firms Atelier Data and MOOV, Forwarding Dallas is one of three winning projects in Urban Revision’s Re:Vision Dallas competition to design a fully sustainable 2.5-acre block in downtown Dallas.

Page 21

Stone Oak Branch Library

Designed by Marmon Mok Architecture, the 15,000-sf Stone Oak Branch Library will serve San Antonio’s growing population on the far northwestern edge of the city. The crescent-shaped building will be sited in a clearing among existing live oaks and will provide views of the Hill Country prairie’s native grasses, prickly pears, and elms, as well as neighboring limestone escarpments and a dry creek bed.

Page 21

Archives of the Episcopal Church

The Archives of the Episcopal Church, designed by Studio 8 Architects of Austin, is a five-story, 70,000-sf building that will be the new home for the church’s national archives, which are currently housed in a late-1950s campus as part of the Southwest Episcopal Seminary

Page 21

So You Want To Do Houses?

by: Michael Malone

A casual survey of why people become architects will inevitably lead to an early interest in or passion for the design of houses. It is therefore surprising to many people that not all architects design houses. Single-family residential design is something most architects feel they have the skills and knowledge to do effectively, but the reality is few of us makes an ongoing practice of it and even fewer can earn a meaningful living doing it. I know, I try to do it every day and it is tough.

Renderings courtesy the author.
Page 22

Suburban Revolution

by: Gregory Ibanez

During our now-passed housing boom, it certainly felt as though the appreciation of Modern residential design gained wider acceptance, as evidenced by the emergence of Dwell magazine and the resurgence of classic mid-century furniture. It has long been the architect’s lament that if consumers really had a choice, many would prefer contemporary, architect-designed homes instead of those ubiquitous builder McMansions. Two ambitious and important developments in Dallas, Kessler Woods and Urban Reserve, set out to prove this point.

Photo at left by Jason Franzen, ©2008 Buchanan Architecture; photo at right by James F. Wilson courtesy Talley Associates
Page 26

Austin’s Upscale Downtown

by: Stephen Sharpe

On June 25 construction on the Austonian residential tower reached the height of 51 floors, making it the tallest building in Austin. The project, designed by Ziegler Cooper Architects, will ultimately top out later this year at 56 floors (683 feet with glass crown) above Congress Avenue.

Images courtesy Ziegler Cooper Architects
Page 32

Building in ‘Enough’

by: Val Glitsch
Architect: Nonya Grenader, FAIA

The site for the house Nonya Grenader, FAIA, designed for her family in Houston was selected for the beauty of the existing trees and shade and its ideal proximity as a construction site. Intimately acquainted with the amenities of the Southampton neighborhood, a deed-restricted subdivision near Rice, the Grenaders had lived next door for 11 years before their elderly neighbor offered to sell them her house in 1997. The 55x130-foot lot presented an opportunity to create a new environment tailored to their long-established live/work lifestyle.

Nash Baker Photographer
Page 34

Solid Classicist

by: Jon Thompson
Architect: RVK Architects ; Michael G. Imber, Architect; B&A Architects

The 14-story Vistana is the first major apartment project built in downtown San Antonio in the last decade. Texas Architect asked Jon Thompson to interview Ed Cross of Cross & Co., the developer of the project, and Michael Imber, FAIA, the designer of the building’s exterior.

Kathy Castanon, RVK Architects
Page 40

Center for the Intrepid

by: Susan Butler
Architect: SmithGroup

The 65,000-sf Center for the Intrepid, designed by SmithGroup is equipped with the most sophisticated amputee rehabilitation technology available—virtual reality, robotics, and simulators.

Timothy Hursley
Page 67

Living Laboratory

by: Urs Peter Flueckiger

As our planet’s reserves of water and energy sources become increasingly limited, architects must develop forms of architecture that incorporate – even celebrate – sustainability design practices. Toward that end, my students at Texas Tech University are engaged in an ongoing project that focuses on a variety of solutions. The result is a living laboratory designed for the harsh microclimate of Foard County about 45 miles west of Wichita Falls.

Images by Urs Peter Flueckiger
Page 84

Fierce Competition

by: Stephen Sharpe

The effects of the economic downturn are now clearly apparent across the state. The evidence is rendered in less-than-optimistic forecasts as firms cautiously plan for 2010. The recession is brought into sharper relief when compared with the robust business climate enjoyed by design professionals for a decade prior to last year’s fourth quarter.

Photo courtesy University Health Syst em
Page 7

TSA 25-Year Award Recognizes Parker Chapel on Trinity Campus

by: Stephen Sharpe

The Margarite B. Parker Chapel is essentially unchanged since completed in 1966, a pink-brick Romanesque duomo at the spiritual center of O’Neil Ford’s idealized hill-town campus of Trinity University.

left Photo by W. Eu gene George, FAIA ; right photo courtesy ford powell & carson
Page 15

Bexar County Selects Design Teams qFor $899M in Hospital Improvements

by: Stephen Sharpe

In May, the Bexar County Hospital District announced commissions – totaling $899 million – for two large medical facilities following a competition involving highly detailed presentations by seven design teams.

Rendering at top courtesy Perkins + Will; rendering below courtesy Overland Partners
Page 17

New Opera House and Theater Opens; Dallas Arts District Nears Completion

by: Willis Winters, FAIA

October 12 marks the long-awaited grand opening of the Dallas Center for the Performing Arts (DCPA), a multiple-venue complex located in the Dallas Arts District that includes a new opera house and outdoor performance park designed by Foster + Partners, a multiform theater designed by REX/OMA (Kendall/Heaton was the associate architect for both projects), and a 10-acre public park designed by the French landscape architect Michel Desvigne.

Photos by Willis Winters, FAIA
Page 22

AIA Brazos Awards 3 Projects

by: J.P. Grom, AIA

AIA Brazos held a jury on Aug. 6 for the chapter’s biannual design awards program. Jurors included Dror Baldinger, AIA, of Marmon Mok Architects, Brantley Hightower, AIA, of Lake/Flato Architects and Stephen Sharpe, the editor of Texas Architect. From a total of nine projects submitted, the jury selected three for recognition.

Page 27

Constructed Ecologies

Rice University graduate students Zhan Chen and Brantley Highfill (with faculty sponsor Douglas Oliver) recently received second place for their design Constructed Ecologies in the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture “Concrete Thinking for a Sustainable World” International Student Design Competition.

Page 28

San Antonio Military Medical Center

Construction of the 1.1 million-sf San Antonio Military Medical Center at Fort Sam Houston, designed by RTKL’s Dallas office, began in December. Scheduled for completion in July 2011, the $556 million integrated design-bid-build contract is a result of the 2005 Defense Base Closure and Realignment Commission’s recommendations.

Page 28

Architecture Criticism and the Public

by: David Dillon

I’ve just returned from a trip to Amsterdam and Paris, and one of the things that surprised me – besides $20 chicken salad sandwiches washed down with $15 glasses of vin ordinaire – was the number of architecture and design magazines for sale in airports, train stations, bookstores and sidewalk newsstands.

Photos by Lawrence Lander
Page 32

Design Awards 2009

The 2009 TSA Design Awards jury met in Austin on May 15 to view 261 submittals of built work. The jurors were Mary Margaret Jones, FASLA, of Hargreaves Associates (San Francisco, Cambridge, and New York); Rick Joy, AIA, of Rick Joy Architects (Tucson); and Philip Freelon, FAIA, of the Freelon Group (Durham, N.C.)

Illustrations by Bryce Weigand
Page 39

Eclectic Ensemble

by: Lawrence Connolly
Architect: Dick Clark Architecture with Michael Hsu Design Office

When Antoine Predock, FAIA, was in midst of conceiving the new Austin City Hall, he commented that the city was “terminally democratic.” He made the remark after his design survived a protracted review process that included more than a dozen town meetings and hearings before the City Council. A similar sort of public scrutiny – albeit on a smaller, neighborhood scale – resulted when Dick Clark Architecture added a zoning non-compliant residential building to its 1400 South Congress mixed-use project.

Paul Bardagjy; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 40

Terminal Clarity

by: Gregory Ibanez
Architect: Corgan with HKS and HNTB

Discussing Dallas Fort Worth International Airport Terminal D and its selection for a 2009 TSA Design Award, juror Philip Freelon, FAIA, said, “We thought that the project was a very good example of a public building, very prominent, but it still was handled with quite some sensitivity. We all have been in airports, probably more than we’d like, and this is one where you actually feel a sense of light and airy space, which is relaxing. Natural light was well used, and the high volume of the space gives it an open and comfortable feeling. We thought it was well worthy of an award.”

Craig Blackmon, FAIA; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 44

A Sonnet to Dwell In

by: Eurico R. Francisco
Architect: Buchanan Architecture

The area just north of downtown Dallas known as Oak Lawn is rich and diverse in demographics, land use, and building types. Having matured over time, Oak Lawn has evolved into a neighborhood of restaurants, churches, hotels, offices, and a varied assemblage of residential buildings.

Jason Franzen; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 48

Garden Spot

by: Michael Malone
Architect: Cunningham Architects

From the street Cunningham Architects’ House in the Garden is a beautifully conceived and executed object, partially shielded behind an iconic wall constructed of stainless-steel wire grid and filled with fragments of slag glass. This idealized garden villa – really a giant porch – provides a delightful way to both view and inhabit a highly personalized landscape. It’s a thoughtful and well organized bit of place making; surprisingly its greatest success is as a foil and extension of an outdoor space that was originally part of the adjacent house.

James F. Wilson, Gisela Borghi; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 52

Concrete Poetry

by: Jeffrey Brown, AIA
Architect: Elliott + Associates Architects

This word painting by Rand Elliott, FAIA, explains how he wants people to understand his latest award-winning project, ImageNet of Houston. Employing poetry or manifestoes to describe one’s work is not uncommon these days. Indeed, such material appears to be a prerequisite of the current media culture that promotes “starchitects,” “signature architects,” and one-hit wonders. Supportive text is, we are led to believe, required reading. If a building appears mundane, baffling, or otherwise underwhelming, just refer to the narrative. Within the architect’s words, we are told, lies the true meaning which will assure in our prosaic times that, yes, this is Architecture.

Scott McDonald, Hedrich Blessing; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 56

Haven for Art

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: Laguarda Low Architects

Once just another nondescript, single-story building indistinguishable from its neighbors that together comprise a light-industrial district wedged between downtown Dallas and the Trinity River, the Light & Sie Art Gallery now stands out. The reconfigured entry, framed by a box of aluminum panels, asserts a refined presence that quietly commands attention amid the clutter of storefronts along Leslie Street on the city’s near-west side. The 13,000-sf project is one of the latest examples in a transformative trend for the area where a few of the shopworn buildings have been repurposed as showrooms for the design trade and retail galleries for contemporary art.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 60

Elegant Tribute

by: Geof Edwards
Architect: Poteet Architects

Approaching the Linda Pace Foundation from the east, visitors are confronted with a strikingly graphic text piece on the building’s canvas-like facade, a short poem by Daniel Edgar Martinez: “beauty…it rubs against one’s tongue, it hangs there, hurting one, insisting on its own existence, finally it gets so one cannot stand the pain, then one must have beauty extracted.” It’s an “in your face” message that transcends its purpose as a public art piece and could describe the transformation of a derelict 1940sera auto paint shop into what is now the subtle and powerful beauty of the Linda Pace Foundation.

Chris Cooper Photography; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 64

Folia Fictus

by: Jenny Kiel
Architect: Dillon Kyle Architecture

Once the site of an identical apartment building as the building the gallery now inhabits, is where the designers Dillon Kyle and Cedar Baldridge imagined a parking lot built for the artists of the gallery. The parking lot is actually used more by the guests and owners of the gallery but it makes a nod to the artwork inside. It is a unique integration of art, landscape, and function.

Casey Dunn Photography; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 68

Cross-Cultural Delight

by: Rick Lewis
Architect: Jackson & Ryan Architects

Although San Antonio’s iconic settings are significant especially when weighed for their economic benefits to Texas’ third largest city, the broader story of her heritage, traditions and, most importantly, her people is to be found in quarters beyond the shadows of high-rise downtown hotels.

Mark Scheyer/Houston; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 72

Inspired Display

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: Overland Partners

Aglow at night like a gigantic Chinese paper lantern, the Lenora and Walter F. Brown Asian Art Wing, designed by Overland Partners of San Antonio, inserts a luminous minimalism into the crenellated, century-old former Lone Star Brewery that houses the San Antonio Museum of Art. The architects have maintained the subtle rhythms of the circa-1900 brewery while deftly introducing a sleek, modern horizontal complement to the venerable, vertical brick structure.

Paul Bardagjy Photography, Terry Manning Photography; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 76

Catalyst for Creativity

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: HKS

The comprehensive renovation of a circa-1970 Brutalist office building has yielded a comfortable and award-winning home for the innovate research being conducted by the University of Texas at Dallas Center for BrainHealth. Designed by HKS, with Kyley Harvey leading the effort, the 63,000-sf project was completed in late 2006.

Blake Marvin/HKS; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 80

Enlightened Living

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: MJ Neal Architects

Wolfe Den, by MJ Neal, AIA, represents the Austin architect’s fifth TSA Design Award. The 2,300-sf residence, designed for a young professional couple, is a study in layers, light, and logic, and stands out in subtle contrast to Neal’s previous award-winning work, which includes Twin Peaks (2003), Ramp House (2004), Anthony Nak (2005), and Farley Studio (2007). “This is a much more subtle work than Ramp House and Twin Peaks. The division of space is central to this project,” says Neal, when asked to define the difference between this home and the three others (Twin Peaks comprises two side-by-side dwellings) on the same south Austin street. Sited in an eclectic neighborhood populated by mostly 1930s-era homes interspersed with hip makeovers, Wolfe Den is bordered on the east by a one-story bungalow and on the west by the strikingly modernist Ramp House. Further down the block are Twin Peaks.

Viviane Vives
Page 84

Ella Wooten Park Pool House

by: Susan Butler
Architect: Studio 8 Architects

The Ella Wooten Park Pool House, designed by Studio 8 Architects, is located within the redevelopment of Austin’s former Mueller Airport. The park serves as a public gathering place that embodies the city in both its locally derived design and emphasis on green technology.

Andy Mattern
Page 89

Shedding Light on Lighting

by: Charles Thompson, AIA

Many architects remember a time when incandescent and T12 fluorescent lamps occupied a large part of our light fixture schedules. It was not really all that long ago. But now, there is a new game in town. Well, actually, lots of new games.

top left photo by Chris Cooper; bottom right photo by Charles Thompson, AIA
Page 94

Light Show

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: Booziotis & Company, Thomas Phifer & Partners, nodesign

Craig Blackmon, FAIA
Page 96

Stamp of Approval

by: Gerald Moorhead

First lit in 1852, the lighthouse on Matagorda Island is one of five included in a new set of commemorative stamps issued by the U.S. Postal Service. “Gulf Coast Lighthouses, ” which went on sale in July, also includes the historic lighthouses at Sabine Pass, La.; Biloxi, Miss.; Sand Island, Ala.; and Fort Jefferson, Fla. The fourth in an ongoing series, the new set is preceded by Pacific Lighthouses (2007), Southeastern Lighthouses (2003), and Great Lakes Lighthouses (1995), all designed by Howard E. Paine and illustrated with paintings by Howard Koslow.

(c)2008 USPS
Page 124

RDA Civic Forum’s Post-Ike Forecast Calls for Improved Coastal Safeguards

by: Thomas M. Colbert, A IA

While Hurricane Ike may have roared through Texas over a year ago, public interest remains high in planning efforts to protect the Houston-Galveston region against such violent storms. In response to that interest, the Rice Design Alliance sponsored a three-part civic forum during the summer.

Page 19

New Cowboys Stadium Opens (and Shuts)

by: Lawrence Connolly

The latest in sports arena one-upmanship was formally unveiled when the $1.2 billion Cowboys Stadium, designed by HKS Sports & Entertainment Group, hosted a concert on June 6 by headliners George Strait and Reba McEntire.

photos courtesy Blake Marvin/HKS
Page 23

Studio Awards 2009

Since 2004, the Texas Society of Architects has sponsored the TSA Studio Awards to recognize the best in unbuilt work by architectural students and faculty, as well as by architects practicing in the state. Prior to this year, submittals were reviewed by the same jurors who judged the TSA Design Awards.

Page 30

Studio Awards 2009


Architect: Morris Architects

Bird watching presents untapped potential for the hospitality industry. With as many as 47.8 million American’s calling themselves “birders,” a niche market for hotel design has been previously overlooked. Morris Architects designed an approach that can make this great pastime a sensory, exciting experience for anybody—professional naturalists, hobbyists, or those in search of a luxurious retreat experience.

Page 32

Studio Awards 2009


Architect: Nicholas Richardson

Simulation helps designers see virtual space as more than just a mirror of reality, allowing the user to test the potential realities – site conditions, material properties, lighting, and the laws of physics – of a design before constructing it at full scale.

Page 33

Studio Awards 2009


Architect: Hernan Molina

The project proposes to redevelop Valencia’s old harbor in Spain that represents the commitment of the city with a modern spirit, rich in options and aspirations. This project of renovation and master planning intends to recover the harbor in a sustainable manner. The project proposes: 1) to create a waterfront where none currently exists; 2) to integrate the port into the city; 3) to suitably separate the port and non-port uses; 4) to order traffic circulation along the seafront; 5) to resolve the area in which the dry river bed joins the sea; 6) to conserve and recover the heritage of the area; 7) to propose a suitable combination of public and private uses; and 8) to consider pre-existing uses for their integration into a sustainable environment.

Page 34

Place-Making in Progress

by: Vincent Canizaro, PhD
Architect: Lake/Flato Architects (design); Durand-Hollis Rupe Architects (architect of record)

A visit to the Pearl Development today is one of promise and potential. Still less than 50 percent complete, it is already contributing to life in San Antonio and has become a destination for an increasing and devoted following. How it has done so is based in a rare instance in which the interests of its developers, the local design community, and the public have coincided. Why this has occurred is due in large part to the unique makeup of the members of the project team, their shared goal to create a “transformational” and “authentic” place, and the cost-effective, socially engaging, and incremental process they have followed.

Casey Dunn, Greg Harrison
Page 46

Local Legacy

by: Ken Slavin
Architect: Marmon Mok with AIA San Antonio Building Committee (J. Douglas Lipscomb, AIA; Chris Schultz, AIA; G

Hosting a convention for 19,000 architects might sound like a daunting task. For AIA San Antonio, as the local chapter for the 2007 AIA national conference, planning the annual gathering was just one item of its agenda. At the same time, the chapter’s leaders were also designing a new Center for Architecture, a “legacy project” to fulfill requirements from the national headquarters for a tangible, local initiative that would live long beyond the four-day convention.

Giles & Pearlstone Photography
Page 52

Natural Adaptation

by: Mark Oberholzer, AIA
Architect: GS&C

When Graeber Simmons & Cowan began the design of Advanced Micro Device’s (AMD) new campus in southwest Austin, it was with an appreciation of the environmentally sensitive nature of the site, consisting of 59 acres with varying topography and ecology. GS&C has set a new standard for the region’s corporate campuses in his attempt not just to satisfy environmental criteria but to incorporate them for the benefit of AMD’s culture and the buildings’ users.

Greg Hursley; Patrick Wong; Benedict Kim
Page 62

Citibank Offices

by: Susan Butler
Architect: Marmon Mok

The 17,500-sf Citibank, built on an in-fill site at 5th and Rio Grande streets in downtown Austin, includes a street-level retail banking lobby, four drive-through lanes, and two upper floors for offices of commercial banking. Marmon Mok designed the $5 million project.

Dror Baldinger, AIA; Lawrence Lander
Page 74

Texas Rangers Retail Shop

by: Susan Butler
Architect: FIRM817

The newly completed Texas Rangers Retail Shop at Sundance Square in Fort Worth, designed by FIR M817, was not just intended to be a place to grab a Rangers shirt or tickets to the next game. The design of the 757-sf space was intended to let customers experience the feel of baseball through multiple sensory expressions.

Brandon Burns
Page 76

Design from the Inside Out

by: Jacqui Dodson, AIA

With businesses and project owners interest in keeping costs down and flexibility high, furniture planning takes a significant role in the overall development of a project. Whether it is an enclosed or open office, lobby, library, or classroom, planning for the location and quantity of furniture can help the architect to make the most of the square footage, configuration of a room, spacial relationships, and overall building design.

Page 78

The Direction of Furniture Design

Some recent trends in workplace cultures have led furniture companies to develop lines of product that are more flexible.

Page 79

TA Staff Changes

As reflected on the masthead opposite this page, considerable changes have taken place in the last few months in regards to the staff of Texas Architect. First, as keen observers of TA have already noticed, a new art director is steering the magazine’s graphic design and the evidence is most noticeable in the feature section. Julie Pizzo started in June while her predecessor, Ashley St. Clair, designed and produced the pages of the July/August edition, her last as TA’s art director. Ashley’s colleagues at TSA and Texas Architect wish her the very best.

Page 5

Child’s Play

by: Stephen Sharpe

The best architects practicing today are essentially grown-up children, says Max Levy, FAIA, without a hint of disparagement. Drawing by hand releases a child-like sense of wonder, he explains. Unfortunately, by the time they reach adulthood, most designers have forgotten that feeling of creative release.

drawing by max levy, faia
Page 5

Houston Firm’s Low-Cost Home Design Pledged to Help Ravaged New Orleans

by: Stephen Sharpe

Announced to fanfare surrounding actor Brad Pitt’s personal involvement with bringing affordable housing to this beleaguered city’s poorest residents, the Make It Right program unveiled designs in December for houses by some of the world’s cutting-edge architects. A total of 13 international, national, and regional firms were invited to create home designs for the Crescent City’s Lower Ninth Ward, one of the neighborhoods hardest hit by flooding in the wake of Hurricane Katrina in September 2005.

Rendering by Patrick Lopez, Courtesy BNIM Architect s
Page 13

A Half-Century of Best Works by Hines On View at Architecture Center Houston

by: Barrie Scardino

Starting with a project for a small office and warehouse in 1957, Gerald D. Hines began developing real estate in Houston with a keen eye for adding value to his projects with architectural excellence. A half-century later, having developed hundreds of buildings around the world, Hines has remained committed to raising the standards of commercial design by engaging the best practitioners.

Photos courtesy Hines
Page 14

AIA San Antonio Announces Awards

From the 58 projects entered in the 2007 AIA San Antonio Design Awards, jurors selected two for Honor Awards, three for Merit Awards, and five for Citation Awards. In addition, the jury recognized two of the award-winning projects for sustainable design. During ceremonies held Oct. 24 at the recently renovated Pearl Stable, two other awards were announced—the Mayor’s Choice Award honoring a publicly funded architectural project and the chapter’s 25-Year Design Award for a project `that has stood the test of time.

Page 16

AIA Fort Worth Awards 5 Projects

by: Ivonne Levin, AIA

The local chapter of the AIA recognized four projects in the General Design category and one project in the Mayor’s Award category in ceremonies that took place at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth. The members of the 2007 jury were Julie Eizenberg, AIA, of Koning Eizenberg Architecture in Los Angeles; Errol Barron, FAIA, of Errol Barron/Michael Toups in New Orleans; and Kevin Alter, Assoc. AIA, of Alterstudio Architects in Austin.

Page 18

AIA Dallas Celebrates Design Excellence

The Dallas chapter of the American Institute of Architects announced the 2007 design award winners during its annual Design Awards Announcement and Celebration Party in the AT&T Victory Plaza on Sept. 19, 2007.

Page 20

AIA LRGV Presents 3 Awards

The Lower Rio Grande Valley chapter of the AIA honored local architectural projects during its 2007 Holiday and Design Awards Celebration held in McAllen.

Page 22

Interloop’s E-X-I-T Enters MoMA

On Nov. 7, 2007, the Museum of Modern Art in New York inducted into its permanent collection Interloop Architecture’s E-X-I-T sign custom designed for the Nasher Sculpture Center in Dallas. Fabricated with acrylic letters and illuminated by LED, the Houston firm’s creation joins other works in the MoMA Architecture and Design collection suchas Vignelli’s New York subway signage and the Flight Departure Panel from Solari di Udine.

Page 24

Jubilee Community Center

Planned in conjunction with a community resource center, the Jubilee Community Center is designed by brownarchitects of Dallas in collaboration with the Detroit Collaborative Design Center, a nonprofit that helped organize meetings with nearby residents.

Page 26

Anfield Stadium

When the Liverpool Football Club decided to expand its Anfield Stadium in Stanley Park, the British soccer club hired Dallas-based architect HKS to design the 60,000-seat sports arena.

Page 26

Creole Influence Along the Border

by: Stephen Fox

The Lower Río Grande Valley chapter of the American Institute of Architects kicked off its fifteenth annual conference on Sept. 27 with a day-long tour of nineteenth-century architecture in the border cities of Brownsville and Matamoros, Tamaulipas. Called “A Tale of Two Cities,” the tour was led by Gregory Free, principal of an Austin design firm specializing in historical restoration.

Courtesy Wayne Bell, FAIA
Page 27

A Beauty with Brains

by: Nestor Ifanzon
Architect: Page Southerland Page, LLP

The new Natural Science and Engineering Research Laboratory at the University of Texas at Dallas creates an innovative scientific environment while simultaneously possessing an astonishing architectural presence. The design and construction of the four-story, 192,000-squarefoot research facility responds to UT Dallas’ strategic plan to establish a top-flight research institution that will serve as a catalyst for interdisciplinary research. University officials expect to fill the facility with high-level faculty and scientists from such disparate fields as electrical engineering, materials science and engineering, chemistry, biology, and behavioral and brain sciences.

Robert Canfield
Page 32

Good Neighbor

by: Maryalice Torres-MacDonald
Architect: CO Architects

Locat ed within the science complex of the Texas Tech University campus, the new Experimental Sciences Building has become home to a state-of-the-art research facility designed by CO Architects of Los Angeles to reflect the continuity of the university’s design guidelines while displaying subtle moments of contemporary expression.

Robert Canfield Photography
Page 38

Careful Intervention

by: Tom Diehl
Architect: Kirksey

Architects at Kirksey faced two major challenges with the design of a nearly quarter millionsquare-foot building for Texas Woman’s University at the Texas Medical Center in Houston. First, the site comprised two 65-foot-wide perpendicular slivers of land at a prominent intersection in the burgeoning medical complex. Second, feasibility studies (conducted in a compressed timeframe) intended intended to confirm the validity of a land exchange ultimately represented a normative site analysis—one generating the organizational armature for subsequent decisions.

Aker/Zvonkovic Photography
Page 50

LaGrone Advanced Technology Complex

by: Megan Braley
Architect: PBK Architects

The 120,792-square-foot LaGrone Advanced Technology Complex, located in the Denton Independent School District, includes 16 academies that provide students with trade-specific technical skills. PBK Architects of Dallas has uniquely designed each academy to reflect a specific professional working environment that facilitates increased learning through experience.

Jud Haggard
Page 65

Sky Harbour Elementary

by: Megan Braley
Architect: Pfluger Associates Architects

The 98,620-square-foot Sky Harbour Elementary School, located in the Southwest Independent School District of San Antonio, has been transformed from a solid concrete, windowless building into a series of welcoming, light-filled spaces. Pfluger Associates of San Antonio created a two-story classroom addition with a new administrative area.

Clem Spalding; Michelle Dudley, AIA
Page 67

West Brazos Junior High

by: Megan Braley
Architect: SHW Group

West Brazos Junior High School, located in the Columbia- Brazoria Independent School District of Brazoria, is the first LEE D certified public school in Texas. SH W Group designed the 91,500-square-foot building to fit into its natural surroundings.

Richard Payne, FAIA
Page 68

SUSTAINABLE DESIGN WITH BRICK

(This article was adapted from “Sustainability & Green Building Design with Brick Masonry,” an article that originally appeared in the October 2007 edition of Brick in Architecture published by the Brick Industry Association.) Many of the objectives of sustainab le design do not impact building material selection, but instead focus on building systems such as plumbing, lighting, air conditioning, etc. However, the versatility and durability of brick facilitate the use of brick masonry as part of many elements of sustainable design.

Photo by Mark Trew ; Courtesy HDR
Page 69

Studies Abroad

by: Nancy Egan

Last spring, 21 designers from WHR Architects embarked on a nine-day tour of Japan. The firm’s principals intended the experience to be more than just a trip to look at buildings. They wanted to create a shared frame of reference, encourage collaboration, and broaden design consciousness among their staff.

Photos by David Watkins, FAIA
Page 88

AIA Honors Austin Firm’s Work

Anthony Nak Flagship Store, a high-end jewelry boutique designed by MJ Neal Architects of Austin, has been recognized with a 2008 AIA Honor Award for Interior Architecture. Located in downtown Austin, Anthony Nak represents the only project with a Texas connection among this year’s slate of winners.

Page 11

CNU Set to Convene in Booming Austin To See Changes, Honor Local Urbanist

by: Stephen Sharpe

When hundreds of architects and urban planners convene here in March for the Congress of the New Urbanism’s CNU XVI, one of their main topics of conversation will be: Can Austin be a truly great city?

Page 11

SE Texas Survivors of Hurricane Rita To Benefit from Grow Home Contest

In one of the largest statewide architectural design competitions in Texas history, more than 80 teams of Texas architects competed to design an affordable, modular house for survivors of Hurricane Rita in 2005 who lost their homes in Southeast Texas.

Page 13

Hill Country Montessori School

Designed by SHW Group, the Hill Country Montessori School in Boerne will demonstrate to its young occupants the importance of creating sustainable built environments by using architecture to promote education. The design of the buildings promotes both environmental and social awareness through transparency and access.

Page 20

A City’s Vision Becomes Reality

by: Stephen Sharpe

As reported on the following pages, One Arts Plaza represents the first major commercial venture to open for some time in the Dallas Arts District. Construction continues to swirl around the new project, designed by Morrison Seifert Murphy, as crews work on several significant buildings immediately adjacent to its site. One Arts Plaza, shown at the far left in the rendering provided by the Dallas Center for the Performing Arts, is set at the northeast end of Flora Street that bisects the Arts District. At the street’s other terminus is the Dallas Museum of Art, which, since the Edward Larrabee Barnes-designed complex opened in 1984, has been joined by neighboring cultural venues designed by other highly renowned architects.

Winspear Opera House and Annette Strauss Artist Square Renderings courtesy Foster + Partners; Wyly Theatre And Performance Park Renderings Courtesy Luxigon; Dallas Arts District Rendering Courtesy Dallas Center for the Performing Arts
Page 24

Lewisville Public Library

by: Megan Braley
Architect: F&S Partners Inc.

F&S Partners designed the new 55,000-square-foot addition to the existing 24,000-square-foot Lewisville Public Library. Clerestory windows form the exterior of the two-story concourse that connects the two building components. Natural light enters the building and creates a calm, welcoming atmosphere.

Craig Blackmon, FAIA
Page 56

Georgetown Public Library

by: Megan Braley
Architect: PBS&J Architects

The new 49,000-square-foot Georgetown Public Library offers residents a community space that reflects the historic nature of the city. PBS&J Architects closely followed the requirements of the City of Georgetown’s historic architectural review committee when designing the library.

Jud Haggard; Leigh Christian
Page 58

Healing Environments

by: Stephen Sharpe

The studio exercise called for students to design an addition for an assisted living facility for senior citizens in La Porte. The assignment was their first for the Spring 2008 design studio in the master’s program at Texas A&M University’s Department of Architecture.

Page 5

McNay Expansion Opens in June

by: Stephen Sharpe

Marion Koogler McNay, being the consummate modernist connoisseur of her time, surely would have been intrigued. Her elegant 1929 Spanish Colonial Revivalstyle mansion is being upstaged by a crisply modern addition, the Jane and Arthur Stieren Center for Exhibitions. Designed by French architect Jean-Paul Viguier, the 45,000-sf glass pavilion is set to open June 7 with a week-long schedule of public events celebrating the latest expansion of the McNay Art Museum.

Site plan courtesy Ford Powell & Carson; elevation courtesy Jean-Paul Viguier
Page 9

Two Texas Communities Picked for SDAT

by: Jeff Potter, AIA

Two Texas communities are among 10 selected across the U.S. for study this year by an AIA Sustainable Design Assistance Team (SDAT) to help develop strategies for improving environmental conditions and preserving a sense of place while faced with suburban sprawl.

Page 14

AIA Houston Awards 16 Projects

by: Kimberley Hickson, AIA

AIA Houston honored 16 projects during the chapter’s fifty-second annual Design Awards Dinner held on March 27 at the Rice Hotel. Winners were selected from 117 entries.

Page 16

Jury Selected for 2008 Design Awards

The jury for the 2008 TSA Design Awards will be arts writer Judith Dupré and architects Steven Ehrlich, FAIA, and Billie Tsien, AIA. The three are scheduled to meet June 27 in Austin to review entries and make their selections. The deadline for entries is May 30.

Page 22

Lake/Flato Receives AIA Housing Award

Lake/Flato Architect’s Lake Tahoe Residence is among 19 projects recognized in the 2008 AIA Housing Awards. The competition, now in its eighth year, was established to spotlight the best in housing design and promote the importance of good housing as a necessity of life, a sanctuary for the human spirit, and a valuable national resource.

Page 22

Four by 4

Nocturnal: Design Lab of Dallas describes its Four by 4 as a suburban tree house. It was selected by Lauritzen Gardens, Omaha’s Botanical Center, as a winner in the 2008 KidStructure Competition. Four by 4 is intended to inspire creative play among the young and the young-at-heart. The exterior is composed of a series of 4x4-inch pressure-treated timbers of various lengths.

Page 23

One Park Place

Overlooking downtown Houston’s new urban park, the 37-story One Park Place will offer 346 units with a total net rentable space of 498,000 square feet. Designed by Jackson & Ryan Architects for the Finger Companies, the residential tower will provide residents an escape from the chaos of city life.

Page 23

Beachtown

The new coastal development was designed by the planning and architectural firm of Duany Plater-Zyberk, noted master-planner of Florida’s Seaside and Rosemary Beach communities. Beachtown, conceived along similar New Urbanist ideals, is a 260-acre Traditional Neighborhood Development on the east end of Galveston Island.

Page 23

The Designer’s ‘Hand’

by: Garrett Finney

In this high-tech age of ours, designers are discovering new and better ways to work with their heads. And they use their feet to march inexorably forward, constructing buildings and cities that transform the landscape. However, an exhibition now on display at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, reminds us that designers have lost their “hand.”

Page 24

Mosque Design

by: Akel Ismail Kahera, PhD

Over the last five decades more than 100 mosques have been established in Texas to serve the estimated 150,000 Muslims living mostly in its largest cities. The urban mosque, also known as an Islamic center, represents the heart of the Muslim community and provides the most visual expression of Muslim religious identity. The mosque (masjid in Arabic) is where the faithful gather to engage in communal worship, spiritual retreat, matrimony, education, and social activities.

Image courtesy the author
Page 28

Sustainable Healthcare Design

by: Stephen Sharpe

Gail Vittori is co-author of Sustainable Healthcare Architecture (Wiley Press, 2008) with Robin Guenther, FAIA. As co-director of the Center for Maximum Potential Building Systems, Vittori also helped develop the Green Guide for Health Care (www.gghc.org) and chairs the U.S. Green Building Council’s LEED for Healthcare Committee. TA Editor Stephen Sharpe recently nterviewed Vittori about her book and her purpose in writing it.

Page 32

A World of Small Wonders

by: Thomas Hayne Upchurch
Architect: Karlsberger

Healthcare architecture has made significant strides over the past 20 years to provide environments that are more sensitive to the needs of patients, families, physicians, and staff. There is a greater understanding that wellness and healing are supported not only by advances in medicine and technologies in diagnostics and treatment, but also by the quality of the building’s environment. Designed for the Seton Healthcare Network by Karlsberger of Columbus, Ohio, the Dell Children’s Medical Center of Central Texas in Austin builds on these improvements to the healthcare environment and takes its design to an even higher level while also achieving ambitious goals for environmental stewardship.

John Durant; Thomas McConnell
Page 34

First Step to a New Campus

by: Ann Christensen
Architect: FKP Architects in association with John Lee, FAIA

People come to healthcare facilities to be healed , so it is reasonable for them to expect treatment based on the latest research and technology that will aid their recovery. Patients also might expect that facility to be an environment designed not only to prevent ill health but to promote a healthy lifestyle.

Aker/Zvonkovic Photography
Page 46

Reimagined Introvert

by: Todd Hamilton
Architect: Page Southerland Page in association with Hughes Group Architects

The new Maverick Activities Center at The University of Texas at Arlington is among several new buildings erected on campus after a construction hiatus of many years. Last year the administration completed a revised master plan for the twenty-first century. The master plan, designed by Carter & Burgess of Fort Worth with Ayers Saint Gross of Washington, D.C.,guides the development patterns of future buildings, pedestrian circulation, and the landscape spaces in between. For much of its history as an urban university, UTA students lived elsewhere and commuted to campus for classes.

Craig D. Blackmon, FAIA
Page 56

McAllen Convention Center

by: Megan Braley
Architect: Gignac Architects (architect of record); Thompson, Ventulett, Stainback & Associates (design archite

Brian Gassel, TVS
Page 62

Leander Park and Ride

by: Megan Braley
Architect: McKinney Architects

The newly designed Leander Park and Ride facility provides bus service to the community and will function as the terminus to the new Capital Metro commuter rail line.

R. Greg Hursley Photography
Page 65

Statler Hilton Listed as ‘Endangered’

When first opened in 1956, the sheer size and bold form made the Statler Hilton one of downtown Dallas’ crown jewels. Fifty-two years later, the former icon of mid-century design sits vacant and threatened by encroaching development. However, with its recent inclusion on the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s 2008 list of 11 Most Endangered Places, the old hotel may survive the increasing pressure for its destruction.

Hilton Photo Copyright John Rogers Photography, courtesy Kate Singleton
Page 12

AIA Austin Awards Seven Projects

by: Brian Carlson

AIA Austin honored seven projects during the chapter’s 2008 Awards and Honors Gala held on April 19 at the Mexican American Cultural Center. The projects were selected from a pool of 65 entries submitted by local firms.

Page 18

AIA Lubbock Recognizes 12 Projects

by: Laura N. Bennett

In November, AIA Lubbock presented its 2007 Design Awards at the Merket Alumni Center on the Texas Tech University campus. The competition is held every other year to spotlight the talents of architects from the Lubbock area.

Page 20

CORE: A Compact Highly Adaptable Home

The design submittal from Hybrid/ORA of Seattle is the winner of the “99K House Competition” sponsored by the Rice Design Alliance and AIA Houston. The competition challenged architects to design a sustainable, single-family prototype that could be built for around $99,000 in Houston and replicated throughout the Gulf region.

Page 22

‘Home on the Range’

by: James Kirkpatrick AIA
Architect: Hahnfeld Hoffer Stanford

Weatherford, the county seat of Parker County, is the headwaters of the West. When you imagine cowboys driving cattle through a small townin the “Old West,” Weatherford could easily be that town.

Chad David
Page 48

An Identifiable Heart

by: Mario L. Sanchez, PhD
Architect: Richter Architects in association with WHR Architects

Appearing more like a scattered outpost than an organized assemblage of buildings, Del Mar College’s West Campus in Corpus Christi lacked a “distinct architectural and academic identity,” says Dr. Lee Sloan, dean of the college’s division of business, professional, and technology education. To convey visual energy and instill a sense of community, Del Mar’s leadership charged Richter Architects in association with WHR Architects to design the Del Mar Health Sciences and Emerging Technologies Complex.

Aker/Zvonkovic Photography, Larry Rose
Page 58

A Celebration of Light

by: Ed Soltero
Architect: NINE DEGREES architecture + design, Inc.

The Mansfield residence in El Paso was conceived from a fascination with the experiential qualities of light. Early in the design phase the couple expressed their interest in the genesis and propagation of light. Their personal appreciation of such is manifested through their extensive yet different collections of artifacts. An exquisite collection of menorahs defined hers, while his was embodied in a fascinating collection of cameras. The local firm 9 Degrees Architecture was first and foremost tasked with creating a place of living with the unique purpose of celebrating life each and every day.

Fred Golden Photography
Page 64

Steel Recycling = LEED Points

The use of steel building products enables designers to earn LEED-NC points under Materials and Resources Credit 2.1 and 2.2: Construction Waste Management and Reduction. The recycled content value of the steel produced in facilities that use basic oxygen furnace (BOF) technology exceeds the five percent and 10 percent goals in LEED.

Page 73

Light and Flexible

by: Geoffry Brune, AIA
Architect: Lord, Aeck & Sargent

The Margaret M. Alkek Building for Biomedical Research, designed by Lord, Aeck, & Sargent’s Architecture for Science Studio, is a signature facility on the Baylor College of Medicine campus. Completed in July 2007, the eight-story tower contains research facilities for interdisciplinary programs in cardiovascular sciences, cancer, pharmacogenomics, genomics, and proteomics. The building’s open plans, with extensive use of interior glazing, enhance flexibility and collaboration while also adding a sense of transparency.

Jonathan Hillyer
Page 76

Regional and Beyond

by: Pliny Fisk, III

Since its inception in 2002, the U.S. Department of Energy’s Solar Decathlon has attracted more and more interest in each biannual competition to design and build a 800-square-foot, off-the-grid, solar-powered house. The 2005 and 2007 Decathlons included university teams from Puerto Rico, Spain, and Germany, along with those from several U.S. schools.

Photo by Prakash Patel courtesy Texas A&M University College of Architecture
Page 88

Water Gardens Picked for 25-Year Award

by: Stephen Sharpe

Having enthralled visitors since its opening in 1974, yet despite the grim fact that six people have died there in two harrowing accidents, Philip Johnson’s idyllic Fort Worth Water Gardens is recognized this year with the Texas Society of Architects’ 25-Year Award. The project notably instills the agitated urban landscape with a refreshing serenity at the south edge of downtown, on a formerly blighted site adjacent to the municipal convention center.

Photo by Darin Norman, AIA
Page 12

TSA Medal for Lifetime Achievement

Velpeau (Vel) E. Hawes Jr., FAIA, graduated in 1958 with a bachelor of architecture degree from Texas A&M University in College Station. After four years of service as an infantry officer, he began a 38-year career as a licensed architect and licensed interior designer with several architectural firms in Dallas, including Omniplan, HOK, and PGAL.

Page 14

RUDAT Outlines Boerne’s Options As Growing Town Charts its Future

by: Ben Adam, AIA

A five-day charrette in June led by an AIA Regional & Urban Design Assistance Team (RUDAT) highlighted the challenges facing this Hill Country town 25 minutes north of San Antonio. RUDAT personnel drew upon the knowledge and aspirations of a wide range of local citizens to formulate its assessment that is being produced as a report for the City of Boerne. As one observer remarked, “The city was alive and united for the week of RUDAT. So now we hope to keep that excitement up throughout implementation.

Page 20

DMA Exhibits Work by UTA Studios

by: Susan Appleton, Brad Bell

Planes of sewing thread, a panel of drinking straws, pillows of concrete, and 3-D tiles of laser cut paper – materials used out of context to challenge ordinary associations – form the basis of two walls created by students at UT Arlington’s School of Architecture for the inaugural exhibition in the Center for Creative Connections at the Dallas Museum of Art.

Top left photo by Marta Sw aff er; all others courtesy Dallas Museum of Art
Page 22

Lubbock Recognizes 12 Design Projects

by: Laura N. Bennett

[Editor’s note: Due to an editing error, a news story in the July/August edition about AIA Lubbock’s Design Awards inadvertently omitted the projects’ architecture firms. The complete list follows.] AIA Lubbock presented its 2007 Design Awards on Nov. 29, 2007.

Page 24

Planned TCC Campus a Bridge Too Far

by: Gregory Ibanez

In an about-face that came as a surprise to many, officials of Tarrant County College (TCC) have abandoned plans to build a new and eagerly anticipated downtown campus on both sides of the Trinity River. Instead, TCC announced on June 25 that it had purchased the recently completed downtown headquarters of Radio Shack for a retrofit.

Photo Courtesy HKS, Inc.
Page 26

Asia Society’s Texas Center

Designed to reflect the harmony and elegance of modern Asian architecture, the Asia Society’s Texas Center project was led by internationally celebrated Yoshio Taniguchi, the architect responsible for the 2004 expansion of New York’s Museum of Modern Art.

Page 29

West 7th Street District

Centered in the heart of Fort Worth’s Museum and Cultural District, an exciting new urban redevelopment has been designed by Good Fulton & Farrell Architects of Dallas. Spanning five city blocks, 900,000 square feet, and conveniently situated across University Drive from The Modern Art Museum, the mixed-use complex is projected to re-establish the West 7th Street area as a thriving entertainment and shopping district.

Page 29

Helix Pedestrian Bridge

The globally acclaimed architectural firm RTKL Associates, of Dallas has designed a pedestrian bridge in Macao, China, called The Helix. Inspired by the cultural intersections of technology and nature, the 161 meter curvilinear footbridge stands 11 meters over a developing tropical garden and water park, connecting two shopping malls within a large mixed-use entertainment superstructure.

Page 29

Lessons from Rome

by: Taeg Nishimoto

“Lessons from Rome” explores the enduring impact of the ancient metropolis on Robert Venturi, Tod Williams, Thomas Phifer, and Paul Lewis. The four architects are Fellows of the American Academy in Rome (AAR) whose experiences there continue to inform their design work. Curated and produced by Smilja Milovanovic-Bertram, an assistant professor at the UT Austin School of Architecture, the exhibition juxtaposes photographs of Rome with images of the architects’ subsequent work. The exhibition, funded through grants from the Graham Foundation for Advanced Visual Studies and UT Austin, opens on Oct. 20 at Texas A&M University’s College of Architecture.

Pantheon photo by Smilja Milovanovic-Bertram; Cranbrook School Natatorium photo by Michael
Page 35

Jury Duty

by: Michael Rey, AIA

This year’s jury event comprised an 11-hour marathon that resulted in the selection of 15 Design Awards and four Studio Awards. Meeting on June 27 in the TSA conference room, the three jurors began their work at 8:30 a.m.

Page 40

2008 Design Awards Jury

Last February TSA’s Design Awards Committee, with representatives from almost all of the 17 AIA chapters across Texas, gathered in Austin to elect a jury for this year’s program. Texas has been privileged to host a variety of astounding critics throughout the Design Award’s 57-year history. This year was no exception. Billie Tsien, AIA; Steven Ehrlich, FAIA; and Judith Dupré accepted the challenge of reviewing 267 Design Award entries and 87 Studio Award entries. The ensuing deliberations showcased each juror’s individual perspective and approach to their work.

Page 41

AMLI II

by: Wendy Price Todd
Architect: PageSoutherlandPage

Located in downtown Austin ’s fledgling 2nd Street District, the new 18-story AMLI II integrates 35,000 square feet of ground-level retail space, four and one-half levels of above-ground parking, an activity deck on the fifth level above the garage, and 231 rental apartments on 17 floors.

Casey Dunn
Page 42

Concrete Studio

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: Mell Lawrence Architects

Mell Lawrence, FAIA
Page 46

Design Exploration Center

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: GBA Architecture

Faced wit h the imminent demolition of a World War II-vintage structure adjacent to the University of Houston’s College of Architecture, school officials devised a metamorphosis that not only honors the original building’s utilitarian design but also enhances scholarship on the urban campus.

Hester + Hardaway Photographers
Page 50

Edcouch Fine Arts Center

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: Kell Muñoz

The tallest building in the delta region of the Lower Rio Grande Valley is also the first important civic building to be erected in more than 30 years to serve the small towns of Edcouch and Elsa. Sharing resources in a combined public school district, the towns are located halfway between Harlingen and Edinburg.

Chris Cooper Photography
Page 54

Friends Meetinghouse

by: Jon Thompson
Architect: Lake|Flato Architects

Lake /Flat o Architects ’ recent addition to the San Antonio Friends Meetinghouse represents the firm’s second phase for the local community of the Religious Society of Friends. Both phases of the Friends Meetinghouse create a concrete expression of the inner centering that is fundamental to the Quaker faith.

Chris Cooper Photography
Page 58

George Allen Sr. Courthouse

by: Jonathan P. Rollins, AIA
Architect: Rees Associates

The addition to and renovation of the George Allen Sr. Courthouse building consolidates all 45 of the Dallas County civil courts, formerly located in three buildings, into one central location. Providing 210,000 square feet of new pace, the addition stacks its program with the highest traffic family court spaces on the bottom, served by escalators.

Craig Blackmon, FAIA
Page 62

Indian Bean Guesthouse

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: FARO STUDIO

About an hour outside of Louisville, Kentucky, on 250 acres of rolling fields, a former tobacco farm plays host for a family’s weekend retreats—and now for their friends, too.

Jason Schmidt; Frank Doring
Page 66

Karbach Residence

by: Lawrence Connolly
Architect: Tim Cuppett, AIA

Located just two blocks from the State Capitol, the three-story 20 x 150-foot sliver at 811 Congress represents one of the few remaining historic buildings in downtown Austin. The structure, originally built in 1874 and used over the years to house a series of retail establishments, had been ravaged by fire and abandoned when Dennis Karbach bought the property to turn it into a residence. He hired Tim Cuppett, AIA, to help him realize the potential for the 9,000-sq. ft. shell hidden beneath an outmoded 1950s-era perforated-metal brise soleil.

Paul Bardagjy; Woody Welch; Tim Cuppett
Page 70

Lake Austin Residence

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: Lake|Flato Architects

Designed as a “village by a canal ,” this waterside residence integrates a series of small-scale, gable-roofed buildings with a narrow site along an inlet of Lake Austin. The architects of Lake/Flato once again have exhibited their adroit touch with materials and adeptness for capturing abundant outdoor views. Clustered like a rustic encampment, the individual buildings are designed to seamlessly blend their interiors with the exterior environment.

Patrick Y. Wong; Paul Hester
Page 74

Lost Pines Chapel

by: Lawrence Connolly
Architect: LZT Architects

Set adjacent to the east shore of Lake Bastrop, the new non-denominational openair chapel at the 400-acre Lost Pines Boy Scout Camp provides a memorable meditative experience, especially at dusk when the rustic structure frames a vista of the sun setting over the lake.

Murray Legge, AIA
Page 78

Oak Court

by: Michael Malone
Architect: Buchanan Architecture

Few architects’ legacies have been more controversial than that of mid-century modernist Edward Durrell Stone. As his buildings age, they don’t engender the passion for restoration often associated with the work of his peers. Buchanan Architecture’s recent restoration and remodel of Oak Court – a palatial Stone design in Dallas from 1956 – offers a clear signal that, despite any prejudices, there is value in Stone’s buildings.

James F. Wilson
Page 82

Residence 1414 Renovation

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: Miró Rivera Architects

As one of two Miró Rivera projects selected for Design Awards this year, the renovation of this 1940s house required a fine balance between modern updates and traditional aspects of the original design.

Paul Finkel – piston design
Page 86

Seton Medical Center

by: Emma Janzen
Architect: PageSoutherlandPage

Seton Medical Center, the largest medical and surgical acute care center in Austin, was in desperate need of a facelift. In 2005, Seton commissioned PageSoutherlandPage to expand and renovate its 1970s-era brick building. The scope of the expansion included 110,000 square feet of new facilities, including a day surgery center, a chapel with adjacent garden, a main entranceway, and a “front door image” for the hospital. When the work was completed, both the physical identity of the building and its capacity were improved.

Tim Griffith Photographer
Page 90

Trail Restroom

by: Dror Baldinger
Architect: Miró Rivera Architects

An assemblage of 49 Corten steel plates arrayed in a coil-like shape, Miró Rivera Architects’ Trail Restroom is a captivating work of brutal simplicity.

Paul Finkel –piston design; Paul Bardagjy Photography; Kraig Becker
Page 94

U.S. Courthouse

by: Mark T. Wellen
Architect: PageSoutherlandPage

The U.S. Courthouse in Alpine was universally admired by this year’s Design Awards jury for its simplicity of form and masterful response to the setting. The courthouse was a product of the U.S. General Service Administration’s Design Excellence Program with PageSoutherlandPage’s Austin office as the architect selected for the project.

Chris Cooper Photography
Page 98

Biomedical Learning Center

by: TA Staff
Architect: SHW Group

The SHW Group, an Austin-based architectural and planning firm best known for its educational building design, developed the University of Texas at Brownsville’s Biomedical Research Laboratories and Community Sciences Building.

Mark Trew Photography
Page 102

Bracken Bat Cave

by: TA Staff
Architect: Overland Partners Architects

Overland Partners of San Antonio has designed the environmentally sensitive 36,000-square-foot Bracken Bat Cave Nature Reserve in Comal County. The visitor’s center rests atop the underground cavern that harbors the world’s largest bat colony, home to more than 40 million Mexican free-tailed bats.

Page 104

University Research Study

by: Richard B. Ferrier, FAIA
Architect: Firm X

The University Research Study , completed by R.B Ferrier, FAIA, expands on traditional methods of architectural representation through a series of conceptual watercolor drawings. Ferrier, an associate professor at UT Arlington, teaches conceptual drawing as part of graduate design studio courses.

Page 108

The Shore

by: Emma Janzen
Architect: WDG Architecture Dallas

Located adjacent to Lady Bird Lake in Austin’s developing 27-acre Waterfront District, The Shore is a 22-story residential complex combining the luxury of lakeside living with the convenience of downtown accessibility. Designed for High Street Residential, a subsidiary of Dallas-based Trammell Crow Company, the complex sits within walking distance of the public hike and bike trail, Sixth Street’s nightlife, and the central business district.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA
Page 111

The Sapphire

by: Emma Janzen
Architect: ZCA Residential

ZCA Residential has designed a new resort-style 31-story condominium complex on South Padre Island. Commissioned by the Randall Davis Company, the Sapphire commands attention as the first visible building to newcomers crossing the Queen Isabella Causeway.

Aker/Zvonkovic Photography
Page 115

High Expectations

by: Joyce Chandran

When architects from Leo A Daly’s Dallas office and engineers from its sister company, Lockwood, Andrews & Newnam in Houston, were tasked with designing a transportation facility for the Houston Independent School District, all parties concluded that it was an opportunity to set a new standard in industrial building design.

Page 144

Regulating High-Performance Design

by: Stephen Sharpe

While Texas’ five largest cities have adopted policies mandating sustainable design standards for their new public buildings, the Texas Legislature has yet to pass any similar laws governing state-owned facilities.

Photo by Paul Bardagjy courtesy Page Southerland Page
Page 5

Modernism for the Borderland Exhibit Highlights Houses by Garland and Hilles

by: Laura Foster Kissack, AIA

Even two decades after architect Bill Palmore left his hometown of El Paso, a set of mid-century houses by two local designers still lingered in his memory. Later, as a professor of architecture at New York Institute of Technology (NYIT), Palmore revisited those modest residences and was struck at the exceptional integrity of the work of late El Paso architects Robert Garland and David Hilles.

Photos courtesy The Rubin Center
Page 12

Designer Treehouses on Display At San Antonio Botanical Garden

by: Alan Harmon, Assoc. AIA

Treehouses have touched most of our lives in one way or another. Who doesn’t feel nostalgic when recalling the thrill of building a clubhouse in the branches or dreaming of living in the leafy canopy like the heroes of the movie Swiss Family Robinson. Human nature seems to have an engrained concept of climbing in and lying under trees—we’re attracted to the beauty and sheltering aspect of nature.

Page 14

AIA Dallas Presents Design Awards

by: AIA Dallas Staff

Ten local architectural firms, plus a student design studio from the University of Texas at Arlington, earned top honors Sept. 18 at AIA Dallas’ 2008 Design Awards presented in an open-air ceremony on AT&T Plaza at Victory Park.

Page 16

LCU Modular Housing

SLS Partnership in Lubbock has designed an innovative and economical solution for creating a campus housing community that also may be the largest renovation project in North America using recycled shipping containers.

Page 20

Gauging Green

by: Lars Stanley, AIA and Lauren Woodward Stanley, AIA

t a time when our nation’s financial system seems to be imploding, it’s sometimes distressing to ponder what the future holds for the architectural profession. Our livelihoods are inextricably tied to the fortunes of the building industry, which quickly reacts to any economic downturn and in turn affects our work accordingly. Troubling, too, is the issue of global warming because our profession has an immediate and direct impact on the environment. And considering that buildings in the U.S. consume about 70 percent of the nation’s total electricity output and 12 percent of its water, it is evident that what we do as designers and builders in the future must be increasingly responsive to such grave issues.

Page 31

Ronald Goes Platinum

by: Laurie Zapalac
Architect: Eckols & Associates AIA

It is hard for most of us to imagine the range of emotions and needs that a family experiences when a child is sick enough to require hospitalization. The staff and designers of the new Ronald McDonald House in Austin have clearly given this a lot of thought. The project offers a welcome refuge for parents and loved ones who keep vigil as their child undergoes treatment nearby at the Dell Children’s Medical Center. The latest of a national network built by Ronald McDonald House Charities, the Austin facility also merges purposeful design with sustainability. The architects’ success in creating an energy-efficient building has been recognized with the highest rating by the U.S. Green Building Council, making the Ronald McDonald House in Austin one of only three buildings in Texas to achieve LEED Platinum.

Wade Griffith
Page 46

Mueller Central

by: Emma Janzen
Architect: Studio 8 Architects

When the Robert Mueller Municipal Airport shut down in 1999, the Austin City Council chose Catellus Development Group to transform the 711-acre site into a mixed-use “urban village.” As part of the development, local architectural firm Studio 8 was commissioned to design the first component—the renovation of an existing building that housed a private air terminal and an administrative office building.

McConnell Photography
Page 63

International on Turtle Creek

by: Emma Janzen
Architect: Good Fulton & Farrell Architects

The 250,000-square-foot International Harvester parts warehouse, located in the Old Trinity Industrial District near downtown Dallas, was originally constructed in 1948 and recently redesigned by local architecture firm Good Fulton & Farrell. Focused on contributing to the growth of Dallas’ Design District, the firm divided the warehouse into smaller units ranging from 1,549 square feet to 39,637 square feet, intended to house an assortment of furniture and interior design showrooms. The architects transformed the site by carving out an open-air corridor through the middle of the building.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA
Page 64

Commissioning Exterior Enclosures

by: Wagdy Anis, FAIA

Adapted with permission from the National Institute of Building Sciences/Building Enclosure Technology and Environment Council, this article originally appeared in the Winter 2008 issue of Journal of Building Enclosure Design. The commissioning process is a quality oriented process for achieving, verifying, and documenting that the performance of facilities, systems, and assemblies meets defined objectives and criteria. It assumes that owners, programmers, designers, contractors, commissioning team members, and operations and maintenance entities are fully accountable for the quality of their work.

Page 66

Offbeat and Off the Grid

by: Gerald Moorhead

More makeshift engineering than design, a collection of shiny corrugated metal buildings along State Highway 71 between Columbus and Ellinger has been expanding for about a year. Welcome to the Industrial Country Market.

Photo by Gerald Moorhead, FAIA
Page 80

A Teacher’s Gift

by: Stephen Sharpe

Even the best spaces for learning can’t substitute for good teaching, an intangible but absolutely essential component that if missing renders architecture an almost pointless exercise. Gifted teachers bring purpose to the architect’s design, and thoughtful design, like inspired teaching, can instill a sense of wonder in young minds. To excel in both the art of design and the art of teaching takes a rare blend of intuition, discipline, and compassion.

Page 5

Work Begins on ‘Discovery Green’ at Prime Downtown Houston Site

by: Andrea Exter

Downtown Houston will soon have a new 11.78-acre park stretching across three blocks directly in front of the George R. Brown Convention Center. Currently under construction, the park takes the place of two underused parking lots and a block of green space sandwiched in between. Designed as a multi-functional outdoor space and expected to cost $93 million to build, the new park promises to be an unexpected retreat within walking distance of the convention center, nearby hotels, and adjacent venues for professional sports.

Page 8

Education Meets Practice in Tech’s ‘Practicum + Studio’

by: Maryalice Torres-MacDonald

Recognized with one of six 2006 NCARB Prizes for excellence and innovation in bringing together architectural education and practice, Texas Tech University College of Architecture’s “Practicum + Studio” offers students the extraordinary opportunity to work side-by-side with architects in three cities.

photo by MaryAlice Torres-MacDonald
Page 12

Austin Firm Garners International Award

Miró Rivera Architects’ Pedestrian Bridge was among three projects receiving top tier recognition in the 2006 The Architectural Review Awards for Emerging Architecture. Considered the best international award for young architects, the annual program celebrates the work of designers under the age of 45 who are at the start of their independent careers.

photo by Paul Finkel
Page 14

San Antonio Announces Design Awards

Twelve projects received awards in A IA San Antonio’s 2006 Design Awards. The projects were announced on Oct. 25 at a ceremony held at the Pearl Stable. The awards presentation served as the finale of the chapter’s second annual “Architecture Month.”

Page 15

AIA Fort Worth Awards Seven Projects`

by: Ivonne Levin, AIA

AIA Fort Worth recognized seven projects at the chapter’s 2006 Design Awards ceremony held at the Modern Art Museum.

Page 16

Dallas Cowboys’ Stadium

The concept for the 2.3 million-sf sports venue in Arlington features a monumental pair of boxed arches that will support the largest retractable roof of its kind in the world. The stadium, designed by HKS Architects, is scheduled to open in 2009.

Page 19

TAMU Interdisciplinary Life Sciences Building

The 228,000-sq. ft. Interdisciplinary Life Sciences Building, designed by Perkins & Will’s Houston office, is the largest single construction project in the 130-year history of Texas A&M University. The $95 million, three story building is sited prominently across from the historic Simpson Drill Field and will serve as both a physical and conceptual link between the main campus life sciences corridor and the west campus research facilities.

Page 19

UTenSAils: A Design-Develop-Build Project

by: Mahesh B. Senagala

In my design-develop-build studio at the University of Texas at San Antonio, the cross-disciplinary notions of collaboration, leadership, and entrepreneurialism take center stage. In the spring 2005 semester, aided by $102,490 in sponsorships, four full-scale permanent tensile membrane structures were successfully designed, engineered, and erected within a five-month period.

Page 21

Shared Resources

by: Michael Malone
Architect: VAI Architects

Within the re-emergent Oak Cliff neighborhood on Dallas’ south side, the new Arcadia Park Elementary School and Branch Library demonstrates how civic buildings can focus the life of a community around an institution. Designed by Dallas-based VAI Architects and located in a stunning site with elevated views towards downtown Dallas, the complex spreads out along a continuous linear spine that provides circulation between classroom wings and shared common amenities.

Miguel Casanova
Page 26

Sleek Landmark

by: Charles W. Graham, PhD, AIA
Architect: Parsons-3D/I

Seven stories tall and architecturally distinctive, Texas A&M University’s new Jack E. Brown Engineering Building serves effectively as a gateway to the College of Engineering. The site, along the campus arterial University Drive at the extreme northeast corner of the campus, is an ideal location for this sleek landmark. Motorists and pedestrians approaching from any direction can’t overlook this 205,000-square-foot facility, a noticeable departure from the more conventional designs of surrounding buildings. Among its many distinguishing characteristics are a meditation garden, a plaza overlooking a creek, and glass “sky lobbies” at the elevators that provide panoramic views of the campus to the south.

Jud Haggard
Page 30

Fluid Transition

by: Mark Lam
Architect: Hellmuth, Obata + Kassabaum

When the University of Houston commissioned HOK Architects to design a new student services building, the campus lacked a clearly defined organizational concept and was more of a loose conglomeration of disparate buildings without a clear master plan. The architects’ solution attempts to establish an order by continuing the use of the form, materials, and rhythm of the neighboring Miesian-style Bayou Building while also introducing a fresher, more visually appealing character. By this approach, the design concept became one of juxtaposition and transition.

Aker/Zvonkovic; Drew Donovan
Page 38

Notes from the Jury

by: Lee Burch, AIA

Each year the Texas Association of School Administrators and the Texas Association of School Boards (TASA/TASB) sponsors a jury competition to select projects for its Exhibit of School Architecture. For an architect such as me to be invited to participate on the jury, the event offers an opportunity to see what’s new, to see how the design of schools facilities has progressed, and to check up on the competition.

Page 46

Gloria Cisneros Pre-Kindergarten

by: Andi Beierman
Architect: SHW Group

Gloria Cisneros Pre-Kindergarten received the Caudill Award, the highest honor given in the 2006 TASA /TASB Exhibit of School Architecture. Designed specifically with four-year-old students in mind, the 45,793-sf school provides an environment that encourages children to feel welcome.

Mark Trew
Page 49

Bridgeport Elementary School

by: Andi Beierman
Architect: Claycomb Associates Architects

Bridgeport Elementary was designed with the idea of creating a facility where the school itself could become a tool for learning. The 84,000-sf, $10.5 million school embraces the theme of “Texas Tradition” and emphasizes the history of Bridgeport, the surrounding community, and the flora and fauna of Texas.

Kevin Smith, AIA
Page 51

Walker Creek Elementary

by: Andi Beierman
Architect: HKS Architects

Located in the North Richland Hills area of Dallas, Walker Creek Elementary embraces a new school design concept that integrates surrounding residential and urban environments. Built on 10.5 acres bordered by Parker, Simmons, and Bridge streets, the school serves 680 students in pre-kindergarten through fifth grade.

Blake Marvin
Page 53

Karen Wagner High School

by: Andi Beierman
Architect: PBK

Completed in August 2005, Karen Wagner High School is located on a 100-acre hilltop overlooking San Antonio’s downtown skyline. The footprint features a formation of two Y’s placed end-to-end. This design compresses the 399,949-sf building while allowing the maximum amount of natural light to permeate the interior

Jud Haggard
Page 55

A Study of Place

by: David Richter, FAIA

This year marks the 150th anniversary of the American Institute of Architects. AIA local chapters and regions across the nation will be celebrating the year with projects designed to highlight the contributions of architecture to American culture, and to create lasting contributions to livable communities in America. For 2007, Texas Architect will mark AIA150 with a series of essays celebrating the rich diversity of Texas architecture, and contemplating the critical urban, environmental, and architectural issues facing the coming generation of Texans.

Page 80

Three New Bridges to Span Trinity River

by: Andrea Exter

Imagine the Trinity River as an urban centerpiece of downtown Fort Worth. Now a reality in the making, the city is moving forward with a plan called the Trinity River Vision, an 800-acre, $435-million project that is expected to double the size of downtown Fort Worth. At the heart of the plan, three bridges entice the community and transform the landscape.

Renderings courtesy Bing Thom Architects
Page 8

Northeast Texas 2006 Design Awards

by: Brett Patrick, AIA

Seven projects were recognized at the Northeast Texas AIA annual Christmas party and chapter meeting. The jury panel consisted of Kenneth Apel, AIA, of HKS in Dallas; Gary Kirchoff, AIA, of HH Architects in Dallas; and Andrew Vernooy, AIA, dean of the Texas Tech School of Architecture

Page 15

Texas Projects Receive AIA Honors

Three projects in Texas were among the 29 projects recognized this year with AIA’s Honor Awards, the profession’s highest recognition of works that exemplify excellence in three categories—architecture, interior architecture, and urban design. The annual competition attracted a total of almost 700 entries, with independent juries reviewing submittals in each of the categories.

Page 17

Taniguchi Unveils Asia House Design

Japanese architect Yoshio Taniguchi unveiled his schematic design (shown at right) in December for Asia House, Asia Society Texas Center’s 38,000-sf facility in Houston’s museum district.

photo of model by Toshiharu Kitajima
Page 17

Homeless Assistance Center

Sanctuary, light, and sustainability are the key themes of the design for the City of Dallas’ Homeless Assistance Center to be located on a three-acre downtown site. CamargoCopeland and Overland Partners are working together as the architects.

Page 21

John Igo Branch Library

Planned as one of the largest branch libraries for the City of San Antonio, the project is designed to preserve the natural landscape and history of the land. The 16,555-sf library, designed by RVK Architects, will be built at the edge of a 24-acre tract that will be developed as a municipal park.

Page 21

East Biloxi Model Home

MC2 Architects of Houston was among 12 firms selected by Architecture for Humanity to design residential prototypes for its Model Home program. The goal of the program is to provide design services and financial assistance for the construction of new homes for families in East Biloxi, Miss., whose houses were destroyed in 2005 by Hurricane Katrina.

Page 21

Austin’s Search for Civic Substance

by: Dean Almy

IF all goes according to plan, on the morning of Feb. 25 the five-story structural frame that was once part of a planned $124-million office building for the Intel Corporation will be imploded to make way for a new federal courthouse. The skeletal remains of the unfinished project, abandoned by Intel in 2001 after a downturn in the technology sector, loomed for six years over the southwestern quadrant of downtown.

illustration by dean almy; opposite PAGE, ILLUSTRATION BY BLACK + VERNOOY ARCHITECTS AND URBAN PLANNERS
Page 22

Canal Street Catalyst

by: Donna Kacmar
Architect: Val Glitsch, FAIA

While the need is great, new low-income apartments aren’t easy to come by in Houston’s inner city. The new Canal Street Apartments in Houston’s Second Ward respond to that need with a welldesigned complex of 133 single-room occupancy (SRO) rental units. The project was commissioned by New Hope Housing, Inc., a nonprofit corporation founded in 1993 to provide SRO apartments for low-income adults who choose to live alone.

Miro Dvorscak; Val Glitsch, FAIA
Page 28

A Progressive Look Back

by: Gregory Ibanez
Architect: Good Fulton & Farrell Architects

Over the last decade or so, “context” has become a prime determinant of form and materials in much of our architecture. As any architect who has appeared before a design review board can attest, it is a sacred tenet when judging the “appropriateness” of a given solution. Unfortunately, it has also become an easy rationale for non-critical architectural thinking. As the esteemed critic Ada Louise Huxtable so eloquently stated, “The fallacy of contextualism, the masquerade of matched materials, the cosmetic cover-up of architectural maquillage meant to make a building ‘fit’ surroundings that frequently change, are a trap into which many architects jump or fall.”

Charles D. Smith, AIA
Page 34

Mission Expressed

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: Richter Architects in association with WHR Architects

The unique mission of the Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies takes singular expression in its new headquarters on the campus of Texas A&M University–Corpus Christi. Located just a few miles from the Gulf, the perpetually windswept site is protected from the open sea by Mustang Island, the slender barrier island that buffers the South Texas coastline. Nature is omnipresent, its latent energy palpable in the salty breeze, its mysterious beauty pervasive but veiled by waves and sand. Considering the HRI’s locale and purpose, there is little surprise that Richter Architects found inspiration for the design of the 57,000-sf facility in the surrounding marine environment.

Joe Aker
Page 38

Rescue in the Park

by: Gerald Moorhead
Architect: Page Southerland Page

Abused, neglected, and arrested kids in Harris County now take the first steps to a more normal life in a multi-service facility set in a public park. Protection, shelter, food, health care, and schooling are provided at the centralized location of the new Harris County Youth Services Center, housing a number of county agencies, designed by the Houston office of Page Southerland Page.

Hester + Hardaway; Gerald Moorhead, FAIA
Page 44

METRO Administration Building

by: Courtnay Loch
Architect: PGAL

Designed by PGAL, the Lee P. Brown METRO Administration Building combines administrative services and public operations for the Metropolitan Transit Authority of Harris County (METR O) into a single 400,000-sf location.

Dana Hoff
Page 49

Ullrich Water Treatment Plant Expansion

by: Courtnay Loch
Architect: CasaBella Architects

In constructing the $72 million Ullrich Water Treatment Plant expansion, the design team faced the challenge of addressing the community’s concerns while still adhering to the programmatic requirements.

Mike Osborne
Page 50

Metal Shines as Design Solution

by: Toy Henson

WHEN architects and building owners require an attractive and affordable roof or wall system for a commercial or institutional project, chances are metal will be at or near the top their list of material candidates. To be sure, there’s no shortage of commercial metal roof or wall systems from which to choose. And metal is extremely competitive with other exterior facade options because of its low life-cycle cost.

photo Courtesy the metal initiative
Page 51

Focal Point

by: Brian H. Griggs, Assoc. AIA

Among AIA Lubbock’s programs planned under the celebratory banner of AIA150 is a community design charrette to plan an indoor/outdoor public plaza in north Lubbock, an area in need of an economic boost to create business growth, cultural identity, and pride of place.

illustration by Brian H. Griggs, Assoc. AIA
Page 64

A Hopeful Look Forward

by: Stephen Sharpe

For a glimpse into the future of the architectural profession, the University of San Antonio College of Architecture offers a few hints. The College’s design studios present examples of the kind of diversity that has proved so elusive for the profession, with the demographic character of its student body giving the impression that progress may be just a few years away.

photo courtesy The University of Texas at San Antonio
Page 7

AIA Houston Awards 19 Projects

by: Geoffry Brune, AIA

AIA Houston honored 19 projects during the chapter’s 2007 Design Awards Dinner held on April 5 at the Majestic Metro Theater. The projects were selected from 136 entries submitted by local firms.

Page 19

Jury Selected for TSA Design Awards

The jury for the 2007 TSA Design Awards has been confirmed, with jurors scheduled to meet June 22–23 to review entries. The jury’s selections will be published in the September/October 2007 edition of Texas Architect. The awarded projects’ architects and owners will be honored during ceremonies at the TSA annual convention set Oct. 18-20 in Austin.

Page 21

Edinburg Catholic High School

Inspired by traditional Spanish Colonial architecture, the design for Edinburg’s new 90,000-sf Catholic High School features a horseshoe shaped complex of classrooms and administrative offices that surrounds a large, landscaped courtyard.

Page 23

Heroic Rescue in San Antonio

by: Mary Carolyn Hollers George

In her 2006 book, The Architectural Legacy of Alfred Giles, Mary Carolyn Hollers George revisits several works she featured in an earlier book, Alfred Giles: An English Architect in Texas and Mexico, published in 1972. In the years between the two books, a renewed appreciation for Giles’ architecture resulted in restorations and renovations of his buildings, including many in San Antonio. Giles (1853–1920) arrived in San Antonio in his 20s and built a successful design business that took him across South Texas and into northern Mexico. This excerpt, from “Chapter One: Heroic Rescues in San Antonio, Texas,” tells of an almost desperate effort by one architect to save one building, which contrasted sharply with a much larger project – the Crockett Block – that was well-funded and rallied support from several groups. THE restoration of the Crockett Block in 1983–84 was accomplished with the ample financial backing of a group of investors as well as enthusiastic civic support. It was an anchor for the revitalization of Alamo Plaza and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as a contributing structure in the Alamo Plaza Historic District.

photos courtesy trinity university press
Page 28

United Way Center

by: Jeanette Wiemers
Architect: Gensler

In contrast to its previous ‘anonymous’ office building, United Way’s new campus near downtown Houston establishes a highly visible presence for the nonprofit organization that is also an asset to the surrounding community. Composed of two brick-and-glass buildings, a parking garage, and gardens, the 90,000-sf complex designed by Gensler was completed in March 2005.

Joe Aker, Aker/Zvonkovic
Page 57

Morris Architects

by: Jeanette Wiemers
Architect: Morris Architects

In designing its new corporate headquarters, Morris Architects created a space that reflects the 70-year-old firm’s sophisticated background as well as its contemporary vision for the future. Completed in January 2006, the 27,000-sf facility showcases materials, furniture, and staff talent integral to the company’s core services of design and creativity.

Joe Aker, Aker/Zvonkovic
Page 59

Beware of Dangerous Terms

by: Richard Crowell

It is important that design professionals avoid requirements for certifying, guaranteeing or warranting in their professional contracts. By doing so, they assume a level of liability beyond the standard of care, a condition which is not covered by professional liability insurance policies.

Page 64

Restored Grandeur

by: Stephen Sharpe

Walking into the recently restored Cameron County Courthouse in Brownsville is like stepping back into a long-lost era when public buildings were designed to give citizens a sense of pride in their local government.

Photos by chris cooper
Page 5

Piano Hired to Design Kimbell Addition

The Kimbell Art Foundation announced in April that Renzo Piano will design an addition to the Kimbell Art Museum. The addition will comprise a separate building located across the street from the internationally renowned museum designed by Louis Kahn, for whom Piano worked as a young man.

bottom photo courtesy the kimbell
Page 11

AIA Lubbock Completes Mercado Design

by: Andrea Exter

Originated as AIA Lubbock’s chapter gift to the city of Lubbock in commemoration of AIA150, the design of the North University Avenue Mercado is complete. This planned indoor/outdoor public plaza in North Lubbock will embrace the art, architecture, and culture of the local Hispanic community at an already identified site targeted for redevelopment.

rendering and site plan courtesy aia lubbock
Page 13

AIA Austin Awards 17 Projects

by: Brian Carlson

AIA Austin honored 17 projects during the chapter’s 2007 Awards and Honors Gala held on May 12 at the Texas Memorial Museum on the University of Texas campus. The projects were selected from a pool of 65 entries submitted by local firms

Page 15

Legislative Wrap-up: ‘Good Samaritan Bill’ Signed by Gov. Perry

by: TA Staff

After the dust had cleared from the tumultuous 80th Regular Session of the Texas Legislature, at least one measure that survived has enduring significance for the state’s design community. The so-called “Good Samaritan bill” (HB 823), signed into law by Gov. Rick Perr y, prov ides architects and engineers immunity while providing pro bono services following declared disaster. The bill was among the initiatives coordinated by the Texas Society of Architects.

Page 17

Fort Worth Museum of Science and History

Construction is set to begin in October on a new home for the Fort Worth Museum of Science and History. Designed by Legorreta+Legorreta of Mexico City with local firm Gideon Toal as the architect of record, the $65 million project will bring the museum’s total square footage to 125,500. The new building will offer more space for traveling exhibits, as well as permanently housing several added features

Page 19

Borderland Modernism

by: William Palmore

“Sustainable design,” the emerging amalgamation of principles and strategies for conserving the use of energy by buildings, is rapidly becoming the most important force in contemporary architecture. Potentially prescriptive, sustainable design strongly implies the need for a very different architecture. Owing to what seems the profession’s long-term habit of neglecting energy conservation, an anxiety surrounds the subject, stimulated by concerns that a designer’s creativity might be restricted or a client’s preferences compromised.

Model and photo by William Palmore; Plan by Thomas Lozada, New York Institue of Technology; © J. Paul Getty trust.
used with permission. julius shulman photograph archive research library at the Getty Trust Institute
Page 20

Radical Remedy

by: Joe Self
Architect: RTKL Associates

The Heart Hospital Baylor Plano is a vibrant diagram of the forces at play within the healthcare industry today. This new facility designed by RTKL houses a group of physicians offering their cardiovascular expertise in tandem with the larger Baylor Regional Medical Center at Plano across the drive.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA
Page 30

Market Driven

by: W. D. Collins II, AIA
Architect: Good Fulton & Farrell

Park Place Motorcars, having previously worked with Good Fulton & Farrell on several other automobile dealerships, asked the architects to provide a contemporary design for the sales and service areas of its new Mercedes-Benz dealership on Lemmon Avenue in Dallas. The owner wanted the new facility to reflect the shift in marketing strategy that Mercedes-Benz was undertaking to appeal to a broader market, particularly younger consumers of luxury automobiles. According to the architects, their primary objective was to express the lifestyle that Mercedes-Benz owners enjoy rather than design a place to sell cars.

Mark Knight
Page 42

Lancaster High School Auditorium

by: Jeanette Wiemers
Architect: Corgan Associates Inc.

In fall 2006, students in Lancaster IS D south of Dallas moved into the newly-designed Lancaster High School, a 408,000-sf facility designed to accommodate 2200 students.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA
Page 49

Texas A&M Performing Arts Center

by: Jeanette Wiemers
Architect: Cotten Landreth Kramer Architects & Associates; Holzman Moss Architecture

Taking advantage of the project’s scenic location along Corpus Christi Bay, Holzman Moss Architecture of New York City, the design architect for the team, designed the Performing Arts Center at Texas A&M University – Corpus Christi to offer stunning views as well as first-rate acoustics.

Hester + Hardaway
Page 51

Complex Array of Options Rewards Careful Study of Applications

by: Hank Chamberlain

With such abundance of new glazing technologies, the salient issue is what to do with them. These are not just new colors or patterns of existing products. Many of the new products are functionally different. Each new category of products adds a new parameter to the design optimization process. Opportunities abound for combining several of the new technologies in a single application.

Page 56

In Mississippi, Houston Design Firms Assist Post-Katrina Housing Recovery

by: Kari Smith

Two years after Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast, the residents of this once-close-knit Mississippi community are still trying to recover from unprecedented devastation. In some areas of East Biloxi, nearly 80 percent of housing is estimated to have been lost or made uninhabitable from the hurricane.

Top photo courtesy MC 2; bottom photo by Brett Zamore
Page 15

UT Austin Enters Third Solar Decathlon

by: Michael Garrison

Students at the University of Texas at Austin have a unique opportunity to design, fabricate and test the possibilities of combining renewable energy and contemporary dwelling design through their participation in the Solar Decathlon house competition. The program began in 2000, and UT students have participated in each of the three events that have taken place since then.

Photos courtesy UT Austin School of Architecture
Page 19

AIA Brazos Awards Two Projects

AIA Brazos recognized two projects in the chapter’s 2007 Design Awards. The projects were selected by a jurors Wes Good, AIA, of Kirksey; Lonnie Hoogeboom, AIA, of Natalye Appel & Associates; and Donna Kacmar, AIA, of architect works

Page 23

Transmod

As designed by Nocturnal Design Lab of Dallas for Metro Transit, Oklahoma City’s only mass transit system, the bus stop has been transformed from a purely functional element into a self-referential icon.

Page 24

Abu Dhabi Hospital and Clinic

Located in Abu Dhabi, the capital of the United Arab Emirates, the new hospital and clinic will represent a new age for Arabian healthcare. The Dallas office of Perkins+Will has designed this iconic 2.2 million-square foot building.

Page 24

The Crossroads

Texas Stadium has seen the Dallas Cowboys bring home five Super Bowl trophies, but now as the team moves to Arlington, the site offers an opportunity for 486 acres of expansive urban development.

Page 24

Design Awards 2007

by: Bryce A. Weigand, FAIA

Having observed this year’s Design Awards jury, I have several thoughts. One is, why doesn’t the Texas landscape/cityscape reflect more significantly the fine work that Texas architects submitted in this year’s design award program?

Photos by Ashley St. Clair
Page 30

Casa 218

by: J. Brantley Hightower
Architect: Candid Rogers Architect

While many Texas cities have experienced a renaissance of downtown residential development, this trend has been curiously absent in San Antonio.

Chris Cooper
Page 32

Chinati Gallery

by: Mark T. Wellen
Architect: Ford Powell & Carson Architects and Planners

Andy Mattern
Page 36

Christ Church

by: Donna Kacmar
Architect: Leo A Daly/LAN + PageSoutherlandPage, A Joint Venture

Timothy Hursley
Page 40

Farley Studio

by: Richard Wintersole
Architect: M.J. Neal Architects

After a chance encounter in a Fort Worth bar, things turned out pretty well for Kyle and Angela Farley. It was there the bartender introduced Kyle, a golfer and artist, to MJ Neal, AIA, who just happened to be teaching a design studio at the University of Texas at Arlington.

Viviane Vives; M.J. Neal, AIA
Page 44

Frame/Harper House

by: Ben Koush
Architect: Stern and Bucek Architects

Genius sometimes strikes quickly. According to one of those quintessential Texas stories, architect Harwood Taylor designed his residential masterpiece for childhood friend David Frame and his wife Gloria during a flight from Midland to Houston in Frame’s private plane in 1958.

Hester + Hardaway
Page 48

House at Wind Point

by: Michael Malone
Architect: Max Levy Architect

It’s not difficult to imagine William Butler Yeats sitting in the sublime inglenook of Max Levy’s House at Wind Point composing his poem The Lake Isle of Innisfree.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA; Max Levy, FAIA
Page 52

Menil House

by: Bruce Webb
Architect: Stern and Bucek Architects

The house Philip Johnson designed for John and Dominique de Menil in the Briarwood subdivision introduced the International Style to Houston’s opulent and architecturally conservative River Oaks neighborhood.

Hester + Hardaway
Page 56

NorthPark Center

by: Jonathan P. Rollins, AIA
Architect: Omniplan

As a second generation project for both owner and architect, the expansion of NorthPark Center both completes and refines the original design.

Craig Blackmon, FAIA
Page 60

Penn State SALA

by: Charles Rosenblum
Architect: Overland Partners Architects; WTW Architects

More than bringing together two allied disciplines of design education at Penn State, the new Stuckeman Family Building for the School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture also connects two campus grids at a pivotal point.

Jeffrey Totaro/ESTO
Page 64

Roma Plaza

by: Mario L. Sanchez, PhD
Architect: Kell Muñoz Architects

On the Rio Grande, midway between Laredo and Brownsville, Roma is the stellar setting for an award-winning civic design by Kell Muñoz Architects of San Antonio.

Chris Cooper; Dustin Brown
Page 68

Royal Bank of Scotland

by: William Rios, AIA
Architect: DMJM Rottet

Royal Bank of Scotland (RBS), an international financial institution offering diverse banking service to retail and corporate clients, appropriately maintains offices in downtown Houston.

Benny Chan
Page 72

Satterfield & Pontikes

by: Chris Koon, AIA
Architect: Kirksey

The new corporate headquarters in Houston for Satterfield & Pontikes Construction represents a rare building type where both the contractor and the client are one and the same.

Jud Haggard
Page 76

Triple-S Steel

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: Lake/Flato Architects

Glimpsed from a half-mile away, the first sight of Triple-S Steel Supply’s new facility in San Antonio is a welcome anomaly amidst the industrial landscape of the former Kelly Air Force Base.

Chris Cooper
Page 80

zeroHouse


Architect: Specht Harpman

ZeroHouse is a 650-square-foot prefabricated house designed to operate autonomously, with no need for utilities or waste connections. It generates its own electrical power, collects and stores rainwater, and processes all waste.

Page 84

Simmons Ambulatory Surgery Center

by: Megan Braley
Architect: Perkins+Will

Part of the Parkland Health and Hospital System, the 62,000-sf, freestanding building sits near a busy intersection across from Parkland Hospital. The Dallas office of Perkins+Will has designed a stunning image of glass juxtaposed against stone.

Mark Trew Photography
Page 89

Designing the Right Fit

by: Andy MacPhillimy, AIA

In my 30-plus years as an architect I have seen few moisture intrusion problems that were the result of product system failures. More frequently, failures occurred at the intersections and transition details between moisture barrier systems. Such failures were caused by a variety of issues, including trade craftsmanship, system product incompatibility, or failure in the “joint” design.

P. 91 image copyright Pali Rao and Andrew Johnson, 2007 istockphoto
Page 91

Local Councils Promote Education

The successful design and construction of a building’s exterior enclosure defines the aesthetic sense of a building, it secures protection from a variety of weather conditions, and today it is an integral part of strategies for sustainable building design.

Page 92

Courthouse Emanates from His Concept But Without Predock’s Name as Designer

by: Ed Soltero, AIA

The U.S. Courthouse now under construction in this border city’s downtown will not look like the building designed by Antoine Predock, FAIA. In fact, Predock expects its appearance to be so different that he has officially requested that his name be removed from the project. And for the same reason, Predock may disassociate himself from the U.S. Courthouse he designed for Las Cruces, a project also currently being built.

Construction photo by Ed Soltero, AIA; illustrations courtesy GSA
Page 9

IIDA Awards Five Interiors Projects

by: Megan Braley

In August, the Texas/Oklahoma chapter of the International Interior Design Association awarded its 2007 Design Excellence Awards to five entries. The winning projects were selected in the institutional, retail, healthcare, residential, and corporate categories. In addition, eight projects received Honorable Mention awards and three projects were presented the coveted Pinnacle Award.

Page 11

Students in UTSA Design-Build Studio Enhance Bexar County’s Russell Park

by: Diane Hays, AIA

UTSA’s College of Architecture has pioneered a new studio class whose goal is to expose architecture students to all aspects of a building project, from initial design through construction of the project.

Page 13

NYC’s Stern to Design Bush Library

While its exact site on the SMU campus remains undeclared, the architect of the future Bush Library is known—Robert A.M. Stern Architects of New York City. The architect selection was made public in late August. Stern’s office beat out two Texas firms that also had been short-listed, Lawrence W. Speck Studio of Page Southerland Page in Austin and Overland Partners of San Antonio.

Page 14

Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design

The Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design in Israel recently held an international competition for the design of a new campus near the center of Jerusalem. Corgan Associates submitted two entries, including the one shown here that incorporates traditional Jerusalem architectural elements – such as courtyards and gardens – to anchor the 322,500 square-foot campus to its historic surroundings.

Page 16

Solar House

Scheduled for completion next fall, the 5,000-square-foot residence is designed by Adams Architects as the first fully sustainable residential building in Houston. The project employs an intricate steel structure that props 150 photovoltaic panels 12 inches above the roof.

Page 16

Transcendent Space

by: Alan Oakes

Man’s search for God has been described as a limitless horizon of being, and it is in this limitless horizon that architects work to design space where men and women might remove themselves from the noise and confusion of their daily lives. How do architects and their clients go about creating places where people can peaceably commune with God? Texas Architect invited television producer and church historian Alan Oakes to speak with designers and clergy about the common elements of process and design and experience that make space transcendent.

p22, Live Oak Meetinghou se (Houston) by leslie K. Elkins Architect, photos by Paul Hester; p.23 top left, Wesley Brethren Church (round Top), Architect Unknown, photo by Anat Geva, Phd; b ttom left, Anjum an-E-Najmi Islamic Mosque and School (irving), Courtesy Oglesby greenE Architects; bottom right, St. Catherine of Siena Catholic Church (austin) by Landry & Landry Architects & Pl anners, Photo by Duane Landry, FAIA
Page 23

Faithful Addition

by: Duncan T Fulton, FAIA
Architect: ARCHITEXAS

In the mid-1990s, the Roman Catholic Diocese of Dallas settled on a simple, but audacious goal: To commemorate the 100th anniversary of its cathedral by finally completing the building as originally designed by one of Texas’ most significant architects. The result is testament to both the power of the original work and the talent of those responsible for the remarkable addition that ensued.

Carolyn Brown
Page 28

Human Temple

by: James M. Evans, AIA
Architect: Natalye Appel + Associates Architects

Every new project affords the architect an opportunity and a challenge to develop a design concept that will take the built work beyond utilitarian shelter. For residential design this challenge can be even more difficult due to the extreme personal nature of the spaces to be created for the client, someone who has often spent a great deal of time considering what they expect from their new dwelling. For the Jain Residence, Natalye Appel + Associates Architects worked with the clients’ initial ideas for the project and expanded upon them to create an exceptionally well-articulated house.

Mark Green
Page 42

Zachry Construction Corporation

by: Megan Braley
Architect: Kell Muñoz Architects

The Employment & Conference Center of Zachry Construction Corporation is the first building to be LEED certified in San Antonio. Designed by Kell Muñoz Architects of San Antonio specifically with sustainable features in mind, the project was awarded Gold Certification by the U.S. Green Building Council, making it the fifth building in Texas to receive this high distinction.

Rick Hunter
Page 51

The Most Stylish Floors of Tomorrow Today

by: D. Christopher Davis

Linen textured tiles, century-old wood, bamboo rugs, buttery leather, and sponge are just some of the new looks that have donned the floors at the premium floor covering tradeshow, Surfaces, sponsored by the World Floor Covering Association. WFCA, the industry’s largest advocacy organization representing specialty floor covering retailers, manufacturers, distributors, and contractors, offers a top-line overview of the fashionable looks that are making their way to the floors of homes and businesses across the country this year.

P. 54 Photo Courtesy Anderson hardwood Floors; P. 55 Photo courtesy shawfloors.com
Page 52

Fort Worth’s Favorites

by: Stephen Darrow, AIA

AIA Fort Worth, in celebration of the American Institute of Architect’s 150th anniversary, has launched a Web site (www.aia150.aiafortworth.org) designed to inform the public about the best architectural design in and around Tarrant County.

Photo by Greg Hursley; courtesy Leonard Chapel
Page 60

‘Conversations’ on Texas Modernism

by: Gregory Ibanez

What was it like designing architecture in the International Style in conservative post-war North Texas? What inspired the pioneers of Texas Modernism? How was their work received by their clients and the public? And in what way is it different today? These were a few of the questions pondered during a symposium held Nov. 12 at the University of Texas at Arlington School of Architecture.

Photos by Robert Gries
Page 12

AIA LRGV Presents Design Awards

Four projects received Honor Awards in AIA LRGV’s 2005 Design Awards competition, held on Sept. 15 during the TSA annual convention. The jury—Val Glitsch, FAIA, of Val Glitsch FAIA Architect; Stephen Sharpe, editor of Texas Architect; and Mark Wellen, AIA, of Rhotenberry Wellen selected the award recipients from 17 entries.

Page 18

Three Projects Take El Paso Awards

Three projects received awards in AIA El Paso’s 2005 Design Awards ceremony on Oct. 27. The projects were reviewed by a panel of eight jurors, all staff members of the New York City firm of Holzman Moss Architecture— Malcolm Holzman, FAIA; Michael Connolly; Steve Benesh; Jose Reyes, AIA; Chiun Ng; Lyna Vuong; Matt Kirschner; and Curtis Pittman.

Page 18

San Antonio Announces Design Awards

AIA San Antonio honored 12 projects during the chapter’s 2005 Design Awards ceremony held at the Witte Museum’s Prassel Auditorium on Nov. 3. The projects were selected from a pool of 44 entries submitted by more than 20 local firms.

Page 20

Mansfield Medical Center

Christopher Lamb and Daniel Romo’s design for a 269,000-sf medical center was among 14 concepts presented in December by teams of Texas A&M University architecture students working in collaboration with architects at Dallas-based HKS. The proposed site covers 40 acres in Mansfield, just south of Fort Worth.

Page 22

The Brick Wanted to Dance

by: Anna Mod
Architect: RoTo Architects with HKS

“The brick said it wanted to dance,” exclaims Michael Rotondi, FAIA, when asked about the veneer on the new Art and Architecture Building at Prairie View A&M University. Designed by Rotondi’s firm, RoTo Architects in Los Angeles, the 105,000-sf complex adds a dramatic presence to this rural campus located 50 miles west of Houston.

Assassi Productions
Page 32

Out of the Box

by: Rebecca Boles
Architect: Hahnfeld Hoffer Stanford; Ellerbe Becket

The expanding curricula at Texas Christian University has generated the need for new buildings. As new programs have been added, TCU has been consistently infilling the campus master plan, adding approximately 600,000 square feet of new construction since 1996. Steve and Sarah Smith Entrepreneurs Hall, completed in February 2003, represents the second joint venture at TCU between design architect Ellerbe Becket and architect-of-record Hahnfeld Hoffer Stanford. The team also produced TCU’s Tucker Technology Center the year before.

Chad Davis
Page 48

Grading School Design

by: Bob Hackler

Thirty years ago I left teaching in the public school classroom and headed for graduate school and a degree in architecture at Texas A&M. Nine years of classroom duty have greatly influenced my perception of what constitutes quality educational environs for students and faculty. They were an influence again while serving last year as a juror for TASA/TASB’s annual school design award program.

Page 54

Tivy High School

by: Ashley St. Clair
Architect: Pfluger Associates, Architects with Artisan Group, Inc.

Designed by Pfluger Associates, Tivy High School received the Caudill Award, the highest honor given in the 2005 TASA /TAS B Exhibit of School Architecture. Having long outgrown the district’s previous high school building, Kerrville ISD opened the 269,302-sf school in August 2003.

Robert Fiertek; Gary Hatch
Page 55

Richardson High School

by: Ashley St. Clair
Architect: PBK Architects, Inc.

Previously serving grades 10-12, Richardson High School admitted 720 freshmen earlier this year. PBK Architects designed the campus renovations and additions to provide space for the increased student population. The project received TASA /TAS B Exhibit of School Architecture awards in the value, design, educational appropriateness, and process of planning categories.

Jud Haggard Photography
Page 59

Mansfield Timberview High School

by: Ashley St. Clair
Architect: Huckabee & Associates, Inc.

Completed in May 2004, Mansfield Timberview High School received awards in the value, design, and educational appropriateness categories in the 2005 Exhibit of School Architecture. Huckabee & Associates designed the 420,000-sf campus using cost-effective building solutions to minimize maintenance expenses for the life of the campus structures, including a total masonry system and terrazzo floors.

Paul Chaplo
Page 62

Spicewood Elementary School

by: Ashley St. Clair
Architect: Fromberg Associates, Ltd.

Completed in May 2004, Spicewood Elementary received awards in the value, design, & process of planning categories in the 2005 Exhibit of School Architecture. Modeled after another local elementary school campus designed by Fromberg Associates, the architects incorporated lessons learned and updated the materials palette to reflect the school’s rural Hill-Country setting

Randy Fromberg, AIA
Page 63

AG Ruling on Engineers Seen as Victory for Architects, But Questions Remain

by: Stephen Sharpe

While a recent ruling by the state’s attorney general leaves much still to be resolved, the opinion did unequivocally state that the Texas Board of Professional Engineers (TBPE) was incorrect in claiming architecture as a subset of engineering. The ruling, released Jan. 10, is expected to stifle the TBPE’s message to the public that engineers can practice architecture, called “building design” in a statement released by the engineering board in June 2005.

Page 8

AIA Houston Design Collection at the MFAH

AIA Houston, in conjunction with the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, has created a special collection to spotlight significant works of twentieth-century modern furniture and other household objects. By featuring classic examples from the period, the local chapter hopes to inform the public about the important roles of architects.

Page 12

Corpus Christi Awards Five Projects

AIA Corpus Christi awarded five projects during the chapter’s 2005 Design Awards ceremony held on Dec. 8 at the American Bank Center, one of the projects honored with an award. The jury – John DeSalvo, AIA, of Booth Hansen Architects; Frank Key, AIA, of Frank P. Key and Associates; and Jana McCann, AIA, of ROMA Design Group – selected the projects from 25 submittals entered by 10 local firms.

Page 15

Framing Publics

Framing Publics is a proposal for a newspaper’s broadcasting station located in New York City’s Bryant Park. Designed by Cathlyn Newell and Judson Moore, graduate students at Rice University’s School of Architecture, the project simultaneously constructs and supports two different kinds of “publics”—the physical area within the park and the virtual realm of broadcast news.

Page 16

Art League Houston School

The Art League Houston is raising $1 million to build a new Art League Houston School, designed by Irving Phillips, as well as to make improvements to the site and an existing gallery building. Located on Montrose Boulevard in Houston, the new school (its western elevation is shown here), will encompass 6,000 square feet. Site improvements are to include courtyard expansion, more suitable lighting, landscaping, and seating.

Page 16

Progressive Preservation

by: Paul Homeyer
Architect: SHW Group

Designed in 1955 by Caudill, Rowlett and Scott, the Alvin Independent School District Administration Building was classic International Style. The gracefully proportioned Miesian box of solid masonry planes infilled with full-height expanses of curtain wall was recognized in its time as an exemplary work of modern architecture. Generous overhangs of the flat roof shaded the full-height window system composed of operable sashes (the building was not originally air-conditioned).

AZ Photo
Page 40

Sound Design

by: Elmer Hixson, PhD

All occupiable structures – from single-family dwellings to apartment complexes, from office buildings to lecture halls – should be “people friendly” environments. This includes climate control, adequate lighting, and appropriate acoustic properties.

Thaddeus Leopoulos; courtesy
Holzman moss architecture
Page 48

S.A. Considers New Plan for Main Plaza

by: J. Douglas Lipscomb, AIA

Current plans proposed to redevelop what is arguably Texas’ most historic urban space, Main Plaza in San Antonio, raise a multitude of questions regarding the nature of urban space, mobility, historic character, the public design and review process, and even municipal governance.

J. Douglas Lipscomb, aia; city of san antonio
Page 8

AIA Lubbock Design Awards Announced

Two projects received Honor Awards in AIA Lubbock’s 2005 Design Awards ceremony held on Dec. 5. The jury – David E. Lewis, AIA, of David E. Lewis, Architect; MJ Neal, AIA, of MJ Neal Architects; and Al York, AIA, of McKinney Architects – selected the award recipients among the entries.

Page 12

AIA Austin Awards Eleven Projects

AIA Austin honored 11 projects during the chapter’s 2006 Awards and Honors Gala held on Feb.25 at the Seaholm Power Plant. The projects were selected from a pool of 69 entries submitted by local firms.

Page 14

LBJ High School Theater

Located on one of Austin’s arts magnet school campuses, the LBJ High School Theater establishes a revitalized arts presence within a setting of utilitarian academic buildings. The theater building, designed by Austin-based LZT Architects, is composed of inner and outer shells, with the baffled walls of the interior expressed as colorful planes on the building’s exterior.

Page 16

Institute for Jazz Studies

Jeffrey Olgin, an architecture student at Texas Tech University, recently received the 2005 form•Z University Joint Study Award of Distinction in Architecture for his conceptual design for the Institute for Jazz Studies. Designed for a site at historic Fort Adams Park in Rhode Island where the Newport Jazz Festival takes place each year, the project consists of two distinct buildings that house the campus and museum, along with a bridging element that connects them to performance spaces.

Page 16

Edinburg City Hall

The City of Edinburg is beginning construction on a new city hall, designed by TAG International, that will consolidate city departments and provide a new focal point for the government seat. Embodying a contemporary interpretation of Spanish Colonial and Baroque architectural traditions, the 42,000-sf structure will include a three-story tower which will provide a visible city landmark.

Page 16

Inspired Connection

by: Lawrence Connolly
Architect: Miró Rivera Architects

With the delightfully unexpected and resourceful use of materials, Miró Rivera Architects has designed and supervised construction of a footbridge over an inlet of Lake Austin that pays homage to the site’s sensitive wetlands. The footbridge is the firm’s third completed project of a master plan for an eight-acre lakefront site that includes a three-acre inlet/lagoon. Preceding the bridge were a boat house and a guest house, with the main house planned as the next – and largest – component of the complex. Half of the residential site is designated as wetlands that serve as a migratory stop for egrets, cranes, and swans, and as such the site is regulated by the Texas Parks and Wildlife and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

Paul Finkel
Page 26

Whimsical Volumes

by: Jon Thompson
Architect: Sprinkle Robey Architects

Architecture in San Antonio was once identified by a palette of materials and colors established by O’Neil Ford based on his appreciation of regional building traditions. Responding to the modernist ethos that demanded an honest expression of materials, this “natural” palette combined Central Texas limestone, a standing-seam metal roof, and wood with the grain stained rather than hidden under a coat of paint. Then, in 1995, came the San Antonio Central Library designed by Ricardo Legorreta, FAIA.

Paul Hester
Page 40

Cultural Reflection

by: Mark Oberholzer, AIA
Architect: MC2 Architects

More than any other aspect of nature, water has forced its way into the collective consciousness of Gulf Coast cities with the threat of frequent floods and heavy rains during each hurricane season. While most designers think of water as something to be shed as quickly as possible from a building and its site, brothers Chung Nguyen, AIA, and Chuong Nguyen of MC_ Architects have conceived a remarkable double residence in Houston whose central feature is a pavilion surrounded by a manmade rainwater pond.

Richard Payne, FAIA
Page 44

Garland ISD Special Events Center

by: Ashley St. Clair
Architect: HKS, Inc.

In designing the Garland ISD Special Events Center, HKS architect Dan Phillips aimed to create a non-traditional structure that would provide an energetic space for school and community events. As a result, the distinctively designed assembly and conferencing center, opened in August 2005, looks more like a state-of-the-art performance hall than a typical school field house.

Blake Marvin
Page 48

Sites Seen and Sights Unseen

by: James B. Atkins, Grant A. Simpson

Building construction requires many workers and many trades. The contractors and subcontractors must coordinate and interface their work and plan how all the separate parts and pieces will fit together. A contractor coordinates the subcontractors and develops a work plan for delivering a completed project that conforms to the architect’s design.

images.com
Page 52

Irresponsible Claims

by: James B. Atkins, Grant A. Simpson

Claims against architects are often written in a way to try to take advantage of a particular state law, or to put the design professional in as unflattering position as possible. The following examples are styled after actual claims filed against design professionals, and they are typical of what a design professional may expect if an owner unhappy with the quality of the work claims the architect should pay all or a portion of the cost of remedying nonconforming work.

Page 56

Prospect and Refuge

by: Justin Allen Howard

Architecture is the practice of optimism in the face of the destructive powers of nature and man. It is a defiant standing of ground between the whim of nature and the will of man. Architects seek to design places of meaning and permanence, but we are constantly reminded of the forces at work against the built environment.

Page 64

‘Green’ Renewal

by: Stephen Sharpe

Albiet tangential to this edition’s “Color” theme, the profession’s achievements in sustainable design deserve to be acknowledged at every opportunity. The fact that three of the AIA Committee on the Environment’s Top Ten Green Projects are in Texas demonstrates how the state’s architects are successfully responding to their clients’ desire for buildings that minimize environmental impact and maximize the energy-efficient attributes of high-performance design.

Steve Hudson Courtesy W.O. Neuhaus Architects
Page 5

Texas ‘Green’ Projects Among AIA’s Top Ten

by: TA Staff

Texas has three projects among the AIA’s 2006 top 10 examples of sustainable architecture and green design solutions that protect and enhance the environment. The annual list of Top Ten Green Projects is selected by the AIA’s Committee on the Environment (COTE).

Page 8

Taniguchi Set to Unveil Revised Design this Summer for Asia House Houston

by: Ronnie Self

Yoshio Taniguchi, best known in the U.S. for his recent expansion of the Museum of Modern Art in New York City, will unveil his latest schematic design for Houston’s Asia House later this summer. The client, Asia Society Texas, has acquired two facing parcels totaling 78,000 square feet along one block of Southmore Boulevard between Caroline and Austin streets in the city’s Museum District. The 35,000-sq. ft. facility is expected to open in summer 2009 and will serve as a venue for cultural, artistic, educational, and business exchange.

courtesy asia society texas
Page 10

AIA Houston Presents Design Awards

AIA Houston recognized 15 projects in the chapter’s 2006 Design Awards. The jury – Margaret Helfand of Helfand Architecture; Steve Cassell of Architecture Research Office; Zack McKown of Tsao & McKown Architects; and Rob Rogers of Rogers Marvel Architects – selected the winners from 113 submittals.

Page 14

AIA West Texas Awards Five Projects

Five projects received awards in AIA West Texas’s 2006 Design Awards. The projects were reviewed by a panel three jurors—Ray Bailey, FAIA, of Bailey Architects; Rick Archer, FAIA, of Overland Partners; and Dan Shipley, FAIA, of Shipley Architects.

Page 15

Girl Scout Leadership Center

The Sally Cheever Girl Scout Leadership Center, designed by Marmon Mok, will be a 30,000-sq. ft. regional headquarters serving Girl Scouts in the San Antonio area and nine surrounding counties. The wooded seven-acre site just north of San Antonio International Airport offered the architect the opportunity to embrace the spirit of the Girl Scouts by taking a “nature in the city” approach that has resulted in several environmental-friendly attributes, including rainwater collection, hiking paths, and native landscaping.

Page 16

Advanced Micro Devices

In April 2005, Advanced Micro Devices announced plans for a new campus on a 59-acre tract at the southern edge of Austin to house its design and administrative staff. AMD hired Graeber Simmons & Cowan Architecture of Austin to design a masterplan as well as the individual components.

Page 16

The Porch House

“New Housing Prototypes for New Orleans” was a competition sponsored by Architectural Record and Tulane University’s School of Architecture that asked architecture students across North American to consider traditional New Orleans house types as a basis for proposing contemporary solutions to rebuilding in neighborhoods damaged by Hurricane Katrina. Five designs were selected by a jury among more than 500 entries.

Page 16

Graphic Design

by: Donna Kacmar
Architect: Michael Graves & Associates with PGAL

The new Houston Branch of the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas is hard to miss: its imposing form and graphic detailing rise above the trees along Allen Parkway just west of downtown. While its exterior appears heavy-handed from a distance, one must experience the inner workings to fully appreciate the facility’s design.

Richard Payne, FAIA
Page 28

Martel College at Rice University

by: Donna Kacmar

Michael Graves’ signature style also appears in another building recently completed in Houston. Martel College at Rice University (shown at left) exhibits similarities with the Federal Reserve, particularly in the treatment of Martel’s exterior where St. Joe brick is set in a “jumbo running-bond pattern” with precast concrete units used to mimic mortar. As with the Federal Reserve where he again played with the sense of scale on the facade, Graves was teamed with PGAL on the Rice project.

Richard Payne , FAIA
Page 31

Playing It Up

by: Val Glitsch
Architect: Upchurch Architects

The recently completed Day School for Christ Lutheran Church in Brenham puts a new face on school design for this small city Northwest of Houston. Previously occupying a small house and shared weekday use of a rather bleak set of Sunday School rooms, 125 children (with their 24 teachers) now occupy a building Upchurch Architects has designed just for them.

Hester + Hardaway
Page 32

Study in Green

by: Charles Rosenblum
Architect: Overland Partners Architects

A well-traveled sidewalk on the Penn State campus leads past Hort Woods, the university’s last swath of untouched forest. The path turns slightly at a large water tower before continuing on axis toward Henderson Mall, the historic main quad. When under-designed parking lots abutted this minor turn, it was essentially unnoticeable. Now, though, a great green curtain wall, four stories tall, closely faces this path. The patinated copper southwest facade of the new Stuckeman Family Building for the School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture seems to peel away from the structure here, ending in a cantilever.

Jeffrey Totaro/ESTO
Page 40

University Federal Credit Union

by: Jennifer Lee
Architect: Antenora Architects

University Federal Credit Union’s new Brodie Lane branch in Austin illustrates the institution’s rethinking of its marketing strategy. According to the architect, the goal was to design a visually striking landmark that would reflect the advances in technology within the banking world while not alienating UFCU’s long-standing, less digital-savvy members.

Paul Bardagjy
Page 47

New Trends in Walls and Ceilings

by: TA Staff

New technologies are offering architects and designers further innovative solutions to increase their projects’ overall value through operational efficiency and long-term maintenance. These range from improved materials to enhanced techniques for their application.

Courtesy Page Southerland Page; Courtesy baker drywall; craig blackmon, faia; Courtesy aker-zvonkovic photography; Courtesy Panel specialists inc.; Courtesy alamo architects
Page 49

Regional Inflections

by: Stephen Sharpe

This year’s Design Awards jury offered a study in regional vernacular, but not the architectural kind. It was their voices that fixed them to identifiable places on the map and hinted at the experiences that frame their sensibilities.

Paul Finkel
Page 5

UT Austin Team Travels to Italy with Ideas for Rebuilding New Orleans and Environs

by: Jason Sowell; Frank Jacobus

A team of faculty and students from The University of Texas at Austin’s School of Architecture (UTSOA) has been invited to contribute its research and design ideas for the revitalization of New Orleans to the Venice Biennale. The exhibition, organized under the theme “Cities, Architecture and Society,” will run from Sept. 10 to Nov. 19.

illustrations courtesy UT Austin School of Architecture
Page 19

Design Awards 2006

by: Michael Malone

Architects rarely have the opportunity to view the best work of their peers from around the state, so the TS A Design Awards’ jury review offers a unique vantage point. The event is much like a window from which to see the diversity of scope, scale, and issues our fellow professionals are working with. Sitting in while the jury meets is exciting. It also can be a humbling experience and, at moments, distressing when projects you believe have merit are summarily rejected.

staff photos
Page 30

2006 Design Awards Jury

by: Michael Malone

This year’s jury was exceptional in a number of ways—particularly for its regional diversity (Boston, New York City, and Baton Rouge) and the sheer number of awards its three jurors have amassed for design (more than 150 among them). Also notable to anyone observing the jurors working together was their commitment to rewarding excellence through careful review and consensus. Shown from left to right, the jurors were:

Page 31

Addison Pavilion


Architect: Cunningham Architects

The Pavilion defines the entry point of the Addison Arts and Events District. The Pavilion’s steel frame supports a flat roof deck of natural pine.

James F. Wilson; Craig Kuhner
Page 32

Austin City Lofts


Architect: Page Southerland Page

This 82-unit, 14-story tower provides an anchor and landmark for a new mixed-use district in the southwest quadrant of downtown. A three-story, horizontal, stone volume houses the entry lobby, deep stacked porches, and a modest retail strip off a shady arcade. Parking for 164 vehicles is tucked behind and below.

Tim Griffith Photography
Page 34

Bonfire Memorial


Architect: Overland Partners Architects

On Nov. 18, 1999, the 55-foot-tall stack under construction for the annual Bonfire collapsed, killing 12 Texas A&M students and injuring 27 others. The memorial is intended to open outside eyes to a deep, strong spirit and tradition that has united thousands of Aggies.

Frank White Photography
Page 36

Commerce Street Townhomes


Architect: Ron Wommack, FAIA

The eight-unit, inner-city townhouse project is located on a long-abandoned site in a former manufacturing area east of downtown Dallas. Two industrial structures across the street had been renovated into residential dwellings, and this project forms another street wall to bring scale and intimacy to this neighborhood.

Charles Smith
Page 38

Corinth Civil War Center


Architect: Overland Partners Architects

A joint project between the National Park Service and the Corinth Siege and Battle Commission, the Corinth Civil War Interpretive Center commemorates Corinth’s critical role in the Civil War.

Osborne Photography
Page 40

Cup City


Architect: Legge Lewis Legge

Cup City, a temporary interactive lounge sponsored by Starbucks, was constructed over the course of the three-day Austin City Limits Music Festival using 41 (6 x 15-foot) fence panels, zip ties, and approximately 25,000 pieces of garbage.

Legge Lewis Legge
Page 42

The Envelope


Architect: Buchanan Architecture

Rather than accepting the most general issues of zoning compliance, this project offers a very detailed response to the zoning constraints and its exceptions. The design solution should be considered, in part, as a product of thorough zoning research.

Jason Franzen
Page 44

The 505


Architect: Collaborative Designworks

The 505, a four-unit townhouse development, sits near Houston’s rejuvenated downtown. The architect spearheaded the project as an experimental design exercise that works within the economic and market constraints of a speculative housing development. The 505 sought to be financially successful and to make responsible use of land, incorporate sustainable design principles, enhance community sensibilities, and possess an architectural identity.

Aker/Zvoncovik Photography; G. Lyon Photography
Page 46

Floating Box House


Architect: Peter L Gluck and Partners, Architects

Surrounded by a grove of more than 200 live oaks, the house is located just outside Austin and stands between the city’s new urban skyline and its rural past.

Paul Warchol
Page 48

Footbridge


Architect: Miró Rivera Architects

With a design inspired in the reeds that line the edges of the lake, this pedestrian bridge is a light structure integrated with its setting. The bars/reeds intertwine at the abutments and “grow” over the bridge, camouflaging and turning it into a symbiotic, almost invisible link.

Paul Finkel
Page 50

Government Canyon


Architect: Lake/Flato Architects

The Visitor Center floats in a field of native grasses and restored oaks at the mouth of the canyon, forming a gateway to the 8,600-acre Government Canyon State Natural Area. The canyon’s rich ranching history is expressed in the exposed pipe structure.

Chris Cooper
Page 52

Guerra Branch Library


Architect: Sprinkle Robey Architects

The Guerra Branch Library is located in a working class, military neighborhood in San Antonio. Inspired by the soaring hangars at the adjacent Air Force Base, the building is organized in three volumes that are oriented to define an existing green space to the north and east, while limiting the harsh sunlight from the south and west.

Paul Hester
Page 54

Health & Science Building


Architect: Hellmuth, Obata + Kassabaum

The program is for a new Health and Science Building. The facility houses the chemistry, geology, biology, and physics/astronomy departments within the Natural Sciences Program, and the nursing, respiratory, occupational therapy, and dental hygiene departments within the Health Program.

Aker/Zvonkovic Photography
Page 56

Lake Tahoe Residence


Architect: Lake/Flato Architects

The historic mines of the region, with their simple shed forms on the sloping land, were the inspiration for the project. Use of exposed concrete, eathered wood, and rusted steel create a palette of low-maintenance materials. The crisp exterior materials give way to warm, natural woods on the interiors.

Jeff Dow Photography
Page 58

McKinney Farm House


Architect: Ron Wommack, FAIA

The project comprises a new barn and house built on a 150-acre farm just northeast of McKinney. A screened porch connects the 3,500-sq. ft. house to a carport and utility structure. The house is constructed of concrete block, cypress siding, glass, and galvanized metal.

Charles Smith
Page 60

Methodist Healthcare Ministries


Architect: Kell Muñoz Architects, Inc.

The architect’s commission for a new building to house the largest charitable religious foundation in South Texas was based upon the designers’ ability to represent the visionary culture of Methodist “works.” The client asked for a headquarters that would represent the purity and simplicity of the foundation’s calling to help the poor with healthcare while quietly asserting its importance to the region.

R. Greg Hursley; Chris Cooper; Paul Hester
Page 62

Rocking F Ranch


Architect: Mell Lawrence Architects

Farmhouse vernacular inspired this family retreat in rural Central Texas. The compound consists of three buildings that define the perimeter of a central yard skirting an oak grove—the main building with living areas and kitchen on the ground floor and guest rooms upstairs, a bedroom wing with the master suite in a tower adjacent to the children’s bedroom, and a carport.

Hester + Hardaway
Page 64

Sarofim Research Building


Architect: BNIM Architects

The Fayez S. Sarofim Research Building houses core research laboratories, administrative offices, and a glass auditorium. Located in the Texas Medical Center, the parti consists of a central atrium flanked by two wings—the southern containing administrative offices and the northern containing labs. The openness of the adjoining atrium gardens invites public passage through the building, giving the program a sense of transparency.

Richard Payne, FAIA
Page 66

School of Nursing


Architect: BNIM Architects with Lake/Flato Architects

The School of Nursing enhances human health and productivity while having as little impact on the environment as possible. It is itself a healthy building that was built with 50-percent recycled materials and designed to reduce energy use by 40 percent and water use by 60 percent. The project, submitted for a LEE D Gold rating, was selected by the AIA Committee on the Environment as a 2006 Top Ten Green Project.

Hester + Hardaway
Page 68

Stonehedge Residence


Architect: Miró Rivera Architects

The challenge of this project was to work on a house (built in the 1980s) that the clients had recently renovated, but that they felt still needed further adjustments to improve the connection of the house’s interior spaces with the existing swimming pool and garden and to improve the quality of the public spaces of the house.

Paul Finkel of Piston Design
Page 70

Texas Hillel


Architect: Alterstudio Architects with Black + Vernooy Architecture and Urban Design

The design focused on two principal goals—to orchestrate an inviting building that would encourage students to venture within and to create a place where spirituality would be part of everyday life, not something removed to a sacred sphere.

Paul Bardagjy
Page 72

Wesley Gallery


Architect: Ford Powell & Carson Architects and Planners

An abandoned stable of crumbling adobe and concrete was converted to a permanent gallery.

Andy Mattern, Artimbo
Page 74

World Birding Center


Architect: Lake/Flato Architects

The design approach was to do more with less. The architecture learned from the regional vernacular, responded to the harsh climate, and minimized disturbance of existing habitat. The building creates a gateway between disturbed agricultural land and a 1,700-acre native habitat preserve.

Paul Hester
Page 76

TSA studio Awards

by: Stephen Sharpe

The review of Studio Award entries followed the jury’s finalizing its selections for Design Awards. From the 48 submittals, the jury kept 14 for a second round before deciding to award seven projects. Three of them in particular garnered praise from the jurors—Square of Circles by Jay Smith, AIA, of Dallas; Houston Skyscraper by Michael Kross, an architecture student at Rice University; and Design>Build>Texas by architecture students at UT Austin.

Page 78

Design>Build>Texas


Architect: UT Austin School of Architecture

The architecture school recently initiated and completed Design>Build>Texas, a design/build studio for upper-level architecture students. This course was developed as an educational prototype as well as a prototype for the design and construction of an environmentally responsible house

Page 79

Square of Circles


Architect: Jay Smith, AIA

This design was a winning entry in the 2006 Ultimate Tree House design competition held by the Dallas Arboretum (see p. 120). The program required that the tree house be interactive, meet state accessibility requirements, and not attach to the tree.

Page 80

Hector Garcia Middle School


Architect: Perkins + Will

The architectural design for a new 175,000-sq. ft. school for 1,200 students reflects the programmed social organization planned around three teams of students per grade level, and includes a diverse range of academic spaces to support traditional, interdisciplinary, and project-based instructional models.

Page 80

Tanna Allergy and Asthma Clinic

by: Andi Beierman
Architect: Nader Design Group

Privacy and bright, open spaces were the main goals for the Nader Design Group when developing the Tanna Allergy and Asthma Clinic. The waiting room and administration areas are infused with natural light from clerestory windows that crown a central light well.

Charles Smith
Page 83

Children’s Medical Center

by: Andi Beierman
Architect: HKS, Inc.

To complete a unique and challenging expansion for the Children’s Medical Center of Dallas, HKS and Centex worked together to design and build a six-story addition atop an existing six-story building.

Ed LaCasse
Page 85

Texas Architects Convention Preview: Exhibitors

The Texas Society of Architects is pleased to announce the list of companies participating in the 2006 Design Products & Ideas Expo in Dallas (current as of August 5). Expo dates are November 2-4 at the Dallas Convention Center. Make your plans to visit their booths to pick up new product information, ask a question, or just see a friend. Keep and use this handy guide as a future reference tool. With over 200 companies listed, you will find products to fulfill all of your architectural needs.

Page 99

Tree House Wonderland

by: Andi Beierman

Tree houses have always been structures that beckon the imagination and invite the curious inside to create grand tales and adventures. Now, the Dallas Arboretum invites the world to explore its Ultimate Tree Houses, a juried exhibit featuring innovative designs and modern architectural feats.

Page 120

A Grand Space for a Grande River

by: Mario L. Sanchez, PhD

The rehabilitation earlier this year of this small border community’s historic downtown plaza was a significant step towards the recovery of one of Texas’ prime public spaces. The work is part of a multi-phased project designed to re-invigorate Roma’s economy by attracting tourists to this once-thriving town located along the Rio Grande about midway between Laredo and Brownsville.

Courtesy Kell Muñoz, Courtesy Texas Historical Commission, Photo by Chris Cooper
Page 12

AIA Dallas Awards 13 Projects

by: Scott Marek

AIA Dallas recognized eight built projects and five unbuilt projects in the chapter’s 2006 Design Awards. Winners were chosen from a total of 72 built and 59 unbuilt entries.

Page 16

Park Planned for Dallas Arts District

A new 10-acre park has been announced as the latest component to the Dallas Arts District. Landscape architect Michel Desvigne of Paris was commissioned by the Dallas Center for the Performing Arts to design Performance Park.

Courtesy JJR-Smith Group
Page 16

National Nonprofit Opens Regional Office To Help Fort Worth Restore Sacred Places

by: Ingrid Spencer

For the last 12 years, local architect James Nader, AIA, has donated his services and that of his firm, Nader Design Group, to the renovation and restoration of historic churches. One congregation in particular, St. Andrews United Methodist Church in Fort Worth, has kept Nader especially busy, and the workload eventually led him to seek greater resources for congregations in need.

Page 17

Shotgun Chameleon

Designed by University of Houston architecture student Zui Ng (working with professors Rafael Longoria and Fernando Brave, AIA), Shotgun Chameleon was one of two entries by Texas designers to receive an Honor Award in the New Orleans Prototype Housing Competition co-sponsored by Architectural Record and Tulane University’s School of Architecture.

Page 18

Connected Campus

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: HKS

The design of RadioShack Riverfront Campus in downtown Fort Worth is an example of successful place-making achieved on a large scale. The 900,000-sq. ft. corporate headquarters interweaves the workday lives of 2,400 employees into a cohesive community while also leading the city’s efforts to extend its urban core northward along the Trinity River.

Blake Marvin; Ed LaCasse Photography
Page 22

Home for Homeless

by: Lauren Woodward Stanley, Lars Stanley
Architect: LZT Architects; Herman Thun, AIA; Murray Legge, AIA; Val Fuger, AIA; Alex Martinez; Luciana Misi; Do

In the ARCH (Austin Resource Center for the Homeless) the City of Austin has a facility that invites its transient residents to join the community. Designed by LZT Architects of Austin and completed in 2004, the building is located at a busy downtown corner (just four blocks from its central corridor, Congress Avenue) and makes the most of its multi-faceted character, housing an impressive variety of resources within its stout concrete frame. Indeed, the uncommon facade it presents to the street is testament to the many parties involved in realizing such a project.

Thomas McConnell Photography
Page 32

Open-Air Market

by: J. Brantley Hightower
Architect: Alamo Architects

It might at first seem counterintuitive to consider a shopping mall as an example of place-making. Malls are almost by definition place-less elements of an ever-expanding generic suburban landscape. While The Shops at La Cantera project is on the one hand yet another regional mall at the edge of yet another expanding suburb, its innovative design challenges the standard way of thinking about malls and in doing so creates a shopping experience that is truly unique to its place in the Hill Country just north of San Antonio.

Bob Wickley
Page 40

The Mondrian

by: Andi Beierman
Architect: RTKL

Implementing a unique multi-rise design, The Mondrian in the area of Dallas known as Cityplace features a 20-story tower with 146 units and an adjoining four-story structure with 72 urban-style lofts.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA
Page 45

Lofts On Post Oak

by: Andi Beierman
Architect: Wallace Garcia Wilson Architects, Inc.; Jackson & Ryan Arcitects

Situated among the upscale shopping centers in Houston’s Galleria, Lofts on Post Oak provides a much-needed residential center to complement the vibrant commercial streetscape along Post Oak Boulevard. T he complex, with a total of 351 residential units, includes an eight-story tower that houses 66 units offering contemporary living environments opposite buildings designed by I.M. Pei, Cesar Pelli, and Philip Johnson.

Architectural Photography
Page 47

Energy-Efficient Envelopes

by: Mark Oberholzer, AIA

Located at the edge of Houston’s Texas Medical Center, the Fayez S. Sarofim Research Building occupies a tight site between a transit center and Braeswood Bayou. The building design by BNIM Architects adopts a variety of high-performance wall system technologies that enhance the building’s energy efficiency while creating a subtle yet intriguing urban presence.

photo by Richard Payne, FAIA
Page 49

Energy-Efficient Envelopes

by: Mark Oberholzer, AIA
Architect: BNI M Architects

Located at the edge of Houston’s Texas Medical Center, the Fayez S. Sarofim Research Building occupies a tight site between a transit center and Braeswood Bayou. The building design by BNIM Architects adopts a variety of high-performance wall system technologies that enhance the building’s energy efficiency while creating a subtle yet intriguing urban presence.

photo by Richard Payne, FAIA
Page 49

Energy-Efficient Envelopes

by: Mark Oberholzer, AIA
Architect: Thompson, Ventulett, Stainback & Associates, Inc.; Arquitectonica International (Arena); Gignac & As

Located at the edge of Houston’s Texas Medical Center, the Fayez S. Sarofim Research Building occupies a tight site between a transit center and Braeswood Bayou. The building design by BNIM Architects adopts a variety of high-performance wall system technologies that enhance the building’s energy efficiency while creating a subtle yet intriguing urban presence.

photo by Richard Payne, FAIA; Courtesy Thompson Ventulett Stainback & Associates
Page 49
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