Article Results for "mixed-use"

Block 21

by: Canan Yetmen
Architect: Andersson-Wise Architects (Design Architect) and BOKA Powell (Architect of Record)

Andersson-Wise Architects’ Block 21 is one of the most successful mixed-use developments in downtown Austin.

Andrew Pogue, Art Gray, Jonathan Jackson, Thomas McConnell,
and Tim Hursley
Page 66

Dallas Arts District – Time for a Remix?

by: Joe Self, AIA

Trendy food trucks have arrived in the heart of the Dallas Arts District at lunchtime to populate an otherwise quiet section of downtown.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA, Justin Terveen
Page 54

A Conversation in Dallas

by: José Mismo

Roy is showing his new friend, Emily, around the city. They pause beneath a tree on Flora Street. It’s August and the shade offers them a bit of relief from the sun.

Page 54

Redeveloping Student Life

by: Lawrence Speck, FAIA, David Sharratt, and Samuel Wilson

Is it possible for architecture to transform, not just the physical character of a place, but also the behavior and patterns of life of people who live there? Can we think of redevelopment, not just in terms of changing buildings and spaces, but also in terms of altering interactions, attitudes, and lifestyles? Architects would tend to answer “yes” to both questions. And, fortunately, there is evidence to back them up.

Brian Mihealsick, Thomas McConnell, and Chris Cooper
Page 42

Gateway Park


Architect: Perkins + Will

Gateway Park, designed by Perkins+Will’s Dallas office for a site outside Jackson, Miss., is conceived as an emerging type of mixed-use development known as an “airport city.” The 4.45 million-sf project is located in Mississippi directly south of Jackson-Evers International Airport on 200 acres of woodland.

Page 25

Thin Living

The problem posed by visiting assistant professor Jeffrey S. Nesbit in his third-year design studio at Texas Tech called for a slender mixed-use tower to be built on a 450-sf lot in downtown Philadelphia immediately adjacent to an abandoned movie theater.

Page 23

Casa Verde

Casa Verde, a conceptual project by Houston’s Morris Architects, was one of three projects awarded an Honorable Mention in the 2009 Dallas Urban Re:Vision international design competition that challenged participants to transform a 2.5-acre downtown parking lot into an entirely self-sustaining mixed-use, mixed-income development.

Page 20

New Urbanist Outpost

In 1993, developer Tofigh Shirazi bought the land where he would eventually build Beachtown. A self-professed “supermodernist kind of guy,” the Iranian-cum-Texan brought Andres Duany to the site four years later. Duany, one of the founders of the New Urbanism movement and a principal of Miami-based Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company, was then commissioned to master plan a 260-acre mixed-use community.

Page 51

The Collector

The Collector, a conceptual project by Brendan O’Grady, AIA, of RTKL Associates in Dallas, is a mixed-use development imagined for construction in Shanghai. Planned to encompass more than 2.7 million square feet, the project is “designed to harness the energy of business, culture, and nature.”

Page 25

Worst-Case Scenario

by: Stephen Sharpe

In contrast to the photographs that illustrate the mixed-use projects profiled in this edition’s feature section, the University Park development in Austin is not a pretty picture. The owner’s ambitious plans for a high-density urban village on 23 acres along I-35 just north of downtown have fizzled, leaving a half-empty office building to stand alone amid an otherwise abandoned construction site. Tenants are angry, neighbors are frustrated, and everyone else is wondering how things went so wrong.

Roma Austin
Page 5

Aftermath

by: Gregory Ibanez

On March 28, 2000, Fort Worth was struck by a powerful tornado that followed West Seventh Street from the west side into the heart of downtown. The rare urban twister caused over $450 million dollars of damage in just over 10 minutes, and the bent steel beams of a former billboard remain as testament to its power and capriciousness. Ten years later, West Seventh Street is a vastly different place, with new development creating an urban corridor linking two of the jewels of Fort Worth—downtown’s Sundance Square and the Cultural District.

renderings of Museum Place master plan and hotel by Corvin Matei; Kimbell Expansion rendering by Renzo Piano Building Workshop; Center for Architecture photo by Brandon Burns; Museum Place photos by Steve Hinds Photography; W 7th photo by Gene Fichte; Modern Art Museum photo by Joe Ak er
Page 35

Stylized Urbanism

by: Jeffrey Brown, AIA
Architect: HOK with Laguarda Low Architects

At first blush, Houston Pavilions seems the type of urban in-fill project that provokes architectural deliberation due in part to its formulaic response to current market conditions—a major mixed-use complex in the central business district. Conventional wisdom (supported by favorable coverage in popular media) tells us that almost any large project in nearly any CBD must be a good thing.

Aker/Zvonkovic
Page 48

Urban Complex

by: Brian McLaren
Architect: JHP Architecture/Urban Design

Cityville Southwest Medical Center embodies the pioneer spirit. When opened in 2007, the mixed-use development shared the neighborhood with industrial brownfields, rusting steel warehouses, and a red-light district.

Steve Hinds; Stan Wolenski Photography
Page 46

Eclectic Ensemble

by: Lawrence Connolly
Architect: Dick Clark Architecture with Michael Hsu Design Office

When Antoine Predock, FAIA, was in midst of conceiving the new Austin City Hall, he commented that the city was “terminally democratic.” He made the remark after his design survived a protracted review process that included more than a dozen town meetings and hearings before the City Council. A similar sort of public scrutiny – albeit on a smaller, neighborhood scale – resulted when Dick Clark Architecture added a zoning non-compliant residential building to its 1400 South Congress mixed-use project.

Paul Bardagjy; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 40

Big Spring’s Historic Settles Hotel Seen as Future Mixed-Use Project

by: Lawrence Connolly

The Settles Hotel, a prominent reminder of Big Spring’s prosperity during the oil boom of the late 1920s, still towers over the downtown although abandoned for almost 30 years. Despite several failed attempts within recent years to revive the neglected landmark, the 15-story Neo-Classical/Moderne icon isagain being studied for rehabilitation. This time by a native son who plans to convert the old hotel to commercial and residential mixed-use.

Photo by Anne Read; postcard image courtesy Settles Hotel Development Corporation
Page 13

6th & Brushy

by: Megan Braley
Architect: Lawrence Group Architects

The new 30,374-square-foot mixed-use building, named 6th & Brushy, is part of the first generation of live-work properties to be built in east Austin. The project is located at the corner of 6th and Brushy streets, two blocks east of Interstate 35.

McConnell Photo
Page 71

West 7th Street District

Centered in the heart of Fort Worth’s Museum and Cultural District, an exciting new urban redevelopment has been designed by Good Fulton & Farrell Architects of Dallas. Spanning five city blocks, 900,000 square feet, and conveniently situated across University Drive from The Modern Art Museum, the mixed-use complex is projected to re-establish the West 7th Street area as a thriving entertainment and shopping district.

Page 29

Helix Pedestrian Bridge

The globally acclaimed architectural firm RTKL Associates, of Dallas has designed a pedestrian bridge in Macao, China, called The Helix. Inspired by the cultural intersections of technology and nature, the 161 meter curvilinear footbridge stands 11 meters over a developing tropical garden and water park, connecting two shopping malls within a large mixed-use entertainment superstructure.

Page 29

AMLI II

by: Wendy Price Todd
Architect: PageSoutherlandPage

Located in downtown Austin ’s fledgling 2nd Street District, the new 18-story AMLI II integrates 35,000 square feet of ground-level retail space, four and one-half levels of above-ground parking, an activity deck on the fifth level above the garage, and 231 rental apartments on 17 floors.

Casey Dunn
Page 42

Mueller Central

by: Emma Janzen
Architect: Studio 8 Architects

When the Robert Mueller Municipal Airport shut down in 1999, the Austin City Council chose Catellus Development Group to transform the 711-acre site into a mixed-use “urban village.” As part of the development, local architectural firm Studio 8 was commissioned to design the first component—the renovation of an existing building that housed a private air terminal and an administrative office building.

McConnell Photography
Page 63

Regent Square

The largest of nine similar high-density, mixed-use projects planned for Houston, GID Urban Development Group’s Regent Square will transform 24 acres south of Allen Parkway into a four-block community connected by pedestrian walkways.

Page 23

Masterplan

Once considered prime targets for demolition, most buildings at the 26-acre former Pearl Brewery site are now scheduled for remodeling or restoration. San Antonio-based Lake/Flato Architects created a master plan for developer Silver Ventures that is intended to transform the site into a vibrant mixed-use community within the next decade.

plan courtesy lake/flat o architects
Page 39

Instant Community

by: Carl Gromatzky, AIA
Architect: JPRA Architects

The growing trend toward mixed-use developments in the United States is a welcome change from developments of the recent past where zoning more or less dictated single-use districts and led to an overall homogenization of our urban environment. And while they have much to offer, these new mixed-use developments have challenges to overcome if they are to thrive. It is clear that for them to function as relatively self-sufficient, sustainable communities, lessons must be incorporated from urban neighborhoods that have grown up over decades or, in some cases, centuries.

Paul Bardagjy; R. Greg Hursley
Page 34

Christ Church

by: Donna Kacmar
Architect: Leo A Daly/LAN + PageSoutherlandPage, A Joint Venture

Timothy Hursley
Page 40

Seaholm Mixed-Use Development

Redevelopment of the decommissioned Seaholm Power Plant (built 1950-1958) in Austin will transform the 7.8-acre site with a mix of office space, retail shops, condominiums, a boutique hotel, and special event space along the north shore of Lady Bird Lake (formerly Town Lake).

Page 16

Austin City Lofts


Architect: Page Southerland Page

This 82-unit, 14-story tower provides an anchor and landmark for a new mixed-use district in the southwest quadrant of downtown. A three-story, horizontal, stone volume houses the entry lobby, deep stacked porches, and a modest retail strip off a shady arcade. Parking for 164 vehicles is tucked behind and below.

Tim Griffith Photography
Page 34

Block 21 Mixed-Use Development

Planned as the third-tallest building in downtown Austin, the 30-story building will include a hotel and condominium tower, as well as street-level restaurants, a 30,000-sq. ft. children’s museum, and a 1,000-seat studio for live recordings of public television’s Austin City Limits.

Page 18

Mixed-Use Attraction

by: Karen Hastings
Architect: Ashley Humphries & Sanchez Architects, PLLC

When prevailing breezes blow near the corner of Trenton Road and North 10th Street in this South Texas border town, they coax unexpected organ-like music from the galvanized exterior stairs that help give TrentonView Center its distinctive contemporary look. Yet even without this unusual accompaniment, created by the interaction of wind with circular holes in TrentonView’s stair risers, this mixed-use rental retail and office complex on this city’s fast-developing north side would command attention.

Hester + Hardaway
Page 28
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