Article Results for "SOM"

Letters to the Editor

by: Aaron Seward

Aaron Seward discusses his return to Texas and some of his plans for shaping Texas Architect magazine, including the reintroduction of the letters section.

Page 7

Staying Engaged

by: Corey Squire

Lake|Flato Architects is known for its sustainably designed homes. When some of its clients started noticing higher-than-expected energy bills, the firm revisted the houses and installed energy-monitoring devices to get to the root of the problem.

Page 54

Control Systems

by: Rita Catnella Orrell

In the January-February 2016 issue, TA’s products editor selects some of the most innovative building control systems on the market today.

Page 18

Poteet Architects’ Poolside Pavilion

The owners of a Victorian home in San Antonio’s historic King Williams neighborhood wanted a little something extra in the backyard.

Page 80

Behind the Scenes

by: Ronnie L. Self, AIA

Kendall/Heaton could be the most prominent Texas practice you’ve never heard about. Focusing solely on architect of record services, the firm has completed some of the state’s highest-profile projects, designed by a cast of the world’s most famous architects.

Page 41

Healthcare International

by: Florence Tang, Assoc. AIA

WHR, working in collaboration with Arup and KHR Arkitekter, recently won a competition for a new hospital in Denmark. The design combines the best aspects of European and American approaches to health care.

Page 54

Verses on Designing and Building

by: Aaron Seward

Sometimes the only way to convey the spirit of a conference is through a journalistic poem.

Page 11

Architecture Center Houston's Uncommon Modern Exhibition Members Only

See some of the Bayou City’s unexpected modern architectural gems.

Page 14

Field with No Center

by: Jack Murphy, Assoc. AIA

Artist Margo Sawyer partners with architects, engineers, glass blowers, metal fabricators, car painters, and others in her sometimes-monumental, but always joyful, works.

Jeff Wilson
Page 79

Dallas Modern

by: Eurico Francisco, AIA

“Dallas Modern” showcases some of the finest modern houses in the city. Reviewer Eurico Francisco, AIA, calls the book “a visual and intellectual delight.”

Page 11

Brad Cloepfil and Rives to Keynote TxA “Stories” Convention

The Texas Society of Architects 2015 Convention and Design Expo focuses on the theme of “Stories.” Keynotes by architect Brad Cloepfil and poetry slam champion Rives will anchor the convention, which will include some 70 educational sessions, 30 tours, and dozens of events.

Page 21

Michelle Rossomando, AIA

by: Catherine Gavin

Partner at Austin’s McKinney York Architects, Michelle Rossomando, AIA, leads by example and has a lot of fun in the process.

Page 81

Designing for Density

by: Richard M. Miller, FAIA
Architect: James M. Evans, AIA

Mt. Vernon Townhomes, designed by Houston-based Collaborative Designworks, maximizes Houston’s denser-development possibilities and adds a handsome multifamily project to Montrose.

Benjamin Hill Photography
Page 34

Perforated House

by: Ben Koush
Architect: LOJO Architecture

Houston’s Perforated House is a mash-up of virtuoso formal composition, a multifaceted conceptual program, and some tricked-out detailing that comes together in a compelling mix.

Luis Ayala, AIA
Page 42

On Point with Inga Saffron

by: Canan Yetmen

Inga Saffron’s ground-level, sometimes cheeky, always laser-focused writing earned her the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for Criticism, making her only the sixth architecture critic to win the award in its 44-year history, as well as the first in 15 years.

Page 13

“I Have Seen the Future: Norman Bel Geddes Designs America”

“I Have Seen the Future: Norman Bel Geddes Designs America, ” a recent exhibit at the University of Texas Harry Ransom Center (HRC) captured Bel Geddes vision of the future and his fundamental belief in the coexistence of art and architecture.

Edith Lutyens and Norman Bel Geddes Foundation / Harry Ransom Center
Page 12

Re-Tailoring Retail

by: Aaron Seward

Three projects — Rackspace Hosting (an internet company in the old Windsor Park Mall in San Antonio), the McAllen Public Library (in an old Walmart), and Montgomery Plaza (a condominium in former Mont¬gomery Ward facility in Fort Worth) — offer a cross section of some of the design concerns and sociological effects of rehabilitating abandoned shopping malls.

Lars Frazer Photography, Boultinghouse Simpson Gates Architects; Lara Swimmer Photography, Craig Smith Photography; Shands Photographics
Page 50

An Office for an Interiors Firm

A new office was the chance for the Houston-based architecture and interiors firm PDR to follow its own advice and build some¬thing that would respond to the firm’s culture while remaining flexible.

Scott McDonald for Hedrich Blessing
Page 88

Obituary: In Memory of Natalie de Blois, FAIA (1921–2013)

by: Emily Little, FAIA

In 1980, when Natalie de Blois, FAIA, hit Austin, she dove into local politics, zoning issues, and Barton Springs Pool with gusto. She also just happened to be a woman who had designed some of the most innovative modern buildings in the United States.

PORTRAIT COURTESY SOM. PHOTO OF THE UNION CARBIDE BUILDING
BY EZRA STOLLER/ESTO. COURTESY SOM. PHOTOS OF SOM BUILDINGS BY EZRA STOLLER/ESTO. COURTESY SOM. PHOTOS
OF GINGERBREAD BUILD-OFF AND BOOK COVER COURTESY AIA HOUSTON.
Page 23

The Education of an Architect

by: Frank Welch, FAIA

By the time I graduated from high school, I had begun to think about becoming an architect. I was visual, very influenced by movies and Life magazine. I liked to draw, but I was afraid of the technical courses that were required, the math and physics.

Holly Reed
Page 24

Lessons in Survival

by: Ed Soltero, AIA

Throughout the history of human civilization, water has been revered as a life-giving force. Unfortunately, some modern societies have exploited this essential natural resource to deleterious extents. In El Paso, however, there’s a beacon of hope for the education of future generations about water conservation in the Chihuahuan Desert.

Carolyn Bowman Photography
Page 80

Recollections of a Lifelong Ham

by: Dave Braden, FAIA

In 1949, when I went to work in the high-profile office of George Dahl, I met Harold (Hagie) Jones. We were both draftsmen working at adjacent tables on the back row, the only degreed architects in a room of 60 architectural draftsmen and a handful of engineers. Hagie was a graduate of Texas A&M and I had my Bachelor of Architecture from UT. While we had our differences, we shared some similarities.

Courtesy David Braden, FAIA
Page 26

Water, Bridges, and Dreams

by: Joe Self, AIA

The new Tarrant County College (TCC) campus, situated just northeast of the historic county courthouse, should be on any architect’s Fort Worth visit list. However, some background is required to understand how the placement and form of the buildings were developed and, ultimately, why the project was abbreviated.

Nic Lehoux; Craig Kuhner
Page 40

Military Hospital Addition

by: J. Brantley Hightower, AIA

Fort Sam Houston in San Antonio has served the medical needs of men and women in uniform since the 1870s. During that time, the complex grew incrementally until 1995 when a new facility was built to consolidate the Fort’s hospital operations. Containing over a million square feet of space, the massive Brooke Army Medical Center (BAMC – pronounced “Bam-See”) was clad in heavy masonry that gave it a somewhat institutional quality. While BAMC was functional, the needs of contemporary combat medical practice are constantly evolving and when the decision was made to absorb most of the operations of a nearby Air Force medical facility into the complex, a significant expansion became necessary to create what would eventually be known as the San Antonio Military Medical Center.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA
Page 74

Julia Ideson Building

by: Texas Architect Staff

The Julia Ideson Building — recently updated by Gensler and originally designed by Boston architects Cram & Ferguson (with associates Watkin and Glover) — opened its doors as Houston’s main library in 1926. However, Cram & Ferguson’s vision for the Ideson was not fully realized. A south wing and reading garden were eliminated due to budget constraints. In 2006, the Julia Ideson Library Preservation Partners raised $32 million to build a new archival wing for Houston Metropolitan Research Center and restore the Julia Ideson Building. The new wing opened in 2009 and follows Cram’s original plan, with some modification.

Courtesy of Gensler
Page 90
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