Article Results for "water"

Waller Creek Update

by: Ingrid Spencer

Since selecting a winning design by Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates and Thomas Phifer and Partners last fall, Austin’s Waller Creek Conservan¬cy has continued sprinting forward with its plans to transform the 1.5-mile creek corridor from ne¬glected waterway to vibrant downtown destination.

PHOTO OF THE TUNNEL EXCAVATION BY TODD SPENCER. PHOTO OF THE UT AUSTIN STUDIO BY MURRAY LEGGE, FAIA.
Page 57

Michael Van Valkenburgh on Austin’s Waller Creek

by: Texas Architect Staff

With construction of the Waller Creek tunnel well under way in Austin, the $146.5-million effort to transform the long-neglected flood plain has afforded a new vision for the city.

MICHAEL VAN VALKENBURGH ASSOCIATES INC.
AND THOMAS PHIFER AND PARTENERS
Page 10

Austin Aquatic Center


Architect: Runa Workshop

Runa Workshop’s Austin Aquatic Center integrates landscape and architecture to create a water management system with real ecological benefits.

Page 40

Atascocita Springs Elementary School

by: Noelle Heinze

For the design of Atascocita Springs Elementary School in Humble, the architects of PBK integrated elements that support its science and math curricula while also reflecting the town’s rich tradition in energy production. Interactive kiosks allow students to log the school’s consumption of water, natural gas, and electricity—exercises that tie the building’s sustainable design features to grade-level appropriate curriculum.

Jud Haggard Photography
Page 71

Garden Ridge Elementary School

by: Stephen Sharpe, Hon. TSA

SHW Group’s design of Garden Ridge Elementary School places the library at the center of campus, with a planted roof above and tubular skylights that draw daylight into the reading areas. Both elements are used as part of the school’s science curriculum, along with above-ground cisterns that collect rainwater and teach students about conservation of natural resources.

Page 73

Lessons in Survival

by: Ed Soltero, AIA

Throughout the history of human civilization, water has been revered as a life-giving force. Unfortunately, some modern societies have exploited this essential natural resource to deleterious extents. In El Paso, however, there’s a beacon of hope for the education of future generations about water conservation in the Chihuahuan Desert.

Carolyn Bowman Photography
Page 80

Up From the Ashes

by: Carlos N. Moreno, AIA

On the evening of May 6, 2008, an electrical short lead to an eruption of flames inside the upper levels of Old Main at Our Lady of the Lake University in San Antonio. Fortunately, no one was injured, but the four-alarm blaze destroyed the building’s dormered roof, top floor, and one of its circular four-story twin turrets. Although firefighters heroically extinguished the flames, water damage ultimately ruined most of the historic French Gothic-inspired landmark that dates to the institution’s late-nineteenth-century origins.

Chris Cooper Photography; Mark Menjivar
Page 54

Water, Bridges, and Dreams

by: Joe Self, AIA

The new Tarrant County College (TCC) campus, situated just northeast of the historic county courthouse, should be on any architect’s Fort Worth visit list. However, some background is required to understand how the placement and form of the buildings were developed and, ultimately, why the project was abbreviated.

Nic Lehoux; Craig Kuhner
Page 40

Texas Firms among AIA COTE Award Winners

On April 19, the American Institute of Architects’ Committee on the Environment (AIA–COTE) announced its Top Ten projects for 2012. This year’s batch of winners highlights community ties, social equity, and attentiveness to water issues. One Texas firm and three national/international firms with offices in Texas are among the winners.

Page 14

Charles Ewing Waterhouse, Jr., Architect and Renaissance Man for the Borderland

by: William Palmore

On October 26, a symposium in El Paso will explore the life and career of architect and artist Charles Ewing Waterhouse, Jr. The occasion, scheduled as part of Tom Lea Month, marks the first time a consideration of modern architecture in El Paso is included in the scholarly festivities.

Page 14

The Greater Texas Foundation

The Greater Texas Foundation (GTF) building is a collaboration among architecture firm Furman + Keil and an integrated project team that began before the design was initiated and continued throughout the design and construction process.

Casey Dunn Photography
Page 59

Founders Hall Academic Building

Founders Hall at the University of North Texas at Dallas campus is a multipurpose academic building that addresses current needs for the students, faculty, and staff, while allowing the campus to expand its curriculum and services. Designed by Overland Partners, the first floor of the 108,000-sf building contains public functions such as a library, open reading room, lecture theater, computer lab, large multipurpose spaces, and food service.

Jeffrey Totaro Photography
Page 60

Water-Wise

by: Lawrence Connolly
Architect: Barnes Gromatzky Kosarek Architects

The lower Colorado River’s expansive watershed touches on the lives of more than one million residents of 56 counties in central Texas. Managing supplies of drinking water from the river and harnessing its powerful flow for hydroelectricity are part of the Lower Colorado River Authority’s multi-faceted mission. However, the public utility’s most visible role involves the controlled release of water through six dams along the river’s 600-mile run to the Gulf of Mexico.

Thomas McConnell, Greg Hursley
Page 34

AIA Austin Presents Design Awards

by: Tamara L. Toon

AIA Austin honored 10 projects in its 2011 Design Awards Celebration. From a total of 77 submittals, the distinguished jury of architects selected three for Honor Awards, six for Citations of Honor, and one unbuilt project for a Studio Award.

Page 18

25-Year Award for Fountain Place’s Prismatic Tower, Urban Waterscape

by: TA Staff

Since its completion in 1986, Fountain Place in downtown Dallas has been praised for both the geometrical precision of its 60-story tower clad in green glass and the extraordinary six-acre urban space that unfurls at its base.

Photos by Craig Blackmon, FAIA, Blackink Architectural Photography
Page 18

Cabin on Flathead Lake

by: Thomas Hayne Upchurch
Architect: Andersson-Wise Architects

Projecting into the southern end of Flathead Lake in northwestern Montana is a small peninsula of scattered ponderosa pines, towering over a terrain of steep cliff, ridges, and ravines, sloping down to the water’s edge.

Art Gray
Page 60

Rainwater Court

by: Andrea Exter
Architect: Dick Clark Architecture in association with Architecture for Humanity

A game-changer in more ways than one, Rainwater Court inspires hope and creates new opportunities for more than 600 children and other residents of Mahiga, a rural Kenyan community.

Turk Pipkin; Greg Elsner; Christy Pipkin; Christina Tapper
Page 72

AIA El Paso Awards 7 Projects

by: Frederic Dalbin

On Oct. 30, AIA El Paso recognized seven projects at its 2009 Design Award Banquet held at the historic Camino Real Hotel in downtown El Paso. Four projects received a Design Award and two projects received an Honorable Mention.

Page 16

Nine Awards Presented by AIA FW

by: Bart Shaw

On Oct. 6, the jury for AIA Fort Worth’s 2009 Design Awards program convened at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth. They viewed 40 projects submitted by local architects before deciding on the nine they selected for distinction.

Page 20

Boerne-Samuel V. Champion High School

by: Susan Butler
Architect: Pfluger Associates Architects; OCO Architects

Built to inform and inspire the students and the local community about conservation, Boerne-Samuel V. Champion High School in Boerne ISD is designed with a focus on the intelligent use of natural resources and protection of the natural environment.

Chris Cooper Photography
Page 63

Watermark Community Church

by: Susan Butler
Architect: Omniplan

In the fall of 2007, Watermark Community Church in Dallas completed phase two of a three-phase project that created an 11.5-acre campus master-planned and designed by Omniplan. First came the renovation of an eight-story office building to provide facilities for the church’s growing congregation, including spaces for adult education and children’s classes.

Peter Calvin
Page 66

H2Ouston

by: Maryalice Torres-MacDonald

In 1836, shortly after Texas won its independence from Mexico, two New York real estate developers, John and Augustus Allen, claimed just over 6,600 acres as the site of Houston. The site, located at the confluence of the Buffalo and White Oak bayous, is where Houston’s first port, known as Allen’s Landing, opened for business in 1841.

Texas Tech College of Architecture
Page 23

Richard Ferrier, FAIA (1944-2010)

by: Ron Kent, AIA

Richard Ferrier’s life was like a series of his watercolors—transparent at first, then opaque, and finally transparent again as he shared his heart and soul to his students and friends. When painting, he would begin by masking off the borders and soaking the page with water. Then came the magic as he blended cobalt blue and yellow ochre, mixtures that would then bleed into the wet parchment and travel as the angle set by his hands allowed. His life was like that, a magical work of art created from a broad range of hues.

Craig Kuhner
Page 20

AIA Fort Worth Awards Nine Projects

by: Bart Shaw

The jury for AIA Fort Worth’s 2008 Design Awards convened Oct. 14 at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth where they sifted through 40 projects before selecting nine for distinction.

Page 20

Highlight of LRGV Bi-National Tour: Visit to ‘Lost’ Town of Guerrero Viejo

by: Stephen Fox

A few months before the Lower Río Grande Valley chapter of the American Institute of Architects held its sixteenth annual Building Communities Conference in September, Hurricane Dolly blew the roof off the South Padre Island Convention Center.

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