Article Results for "ARE"

Urban Ecologies

by: Catherine Gavin

With its stacked interchanges and sweeping flyovers, Texas has no shortage roadway feats, yet they often represent barriers for connectivity. Urban designers across the state are rethinking these roadways and using green infrastructure to reconnect downtown districts.

Page 9

Fosu Marina and Master Plan

by: OTA+

Austin-based OTA+ designed a new master plan and marina for the Fosu Lagoon area of Cape Coast, Ghana. The project proposes Africa’s tallest building.

Page 24

Worthy of World Heritage

by: Rachel Wright, AIA, and Anna Nau
Architect: Ford, Powell & Carson

Amid new bike trails and picnic tables, natural grasses and canoe slips, and native birds and shaded overlooks, four of San Antonio’s Spanish Colonial Missions are preparing to become the first World Heritage Site in Texas.

Mark Menjivar
Page 78

Material Arts

by: Catherine Gavin

Mies, materials, and digital fabrication — material arts are creative outlets providing new paths for architecture.

PHOTO BY JULIE PIZZO WOOD
Page 9

TASA/TASB

by: Texas Architect Staff

The 2012 Exhibit of School Architecture spon¬sored by the Texas Association of School Admin¬istration (TASA) and the Texas Association of School Boards (TASB) Convention awarded the Caudill Award to Lady Bird Johnson Middle School in Irving designed by Corgan Associates.

Page 14

...with Clovis Heimsath, FAIA

by: Lawrence Connolly, AIA

Although, keeping up with him has never been easy, Clovis Heimsath, FAIA, is a testament to architecture being a calling and not a profession — his practice and his lifestyle are seamless.

Julie Pizzo Wood
Page 60

Invest in Yourself and Your Career

by: Texas Architect Staff

Renew your American Institute of Architects (AIA) membership by March 31, 2013, to continue to receive important member benefits at the national, state, and local levels while sup¬porting the profession.

Page 67

Sustained Experience: Lead Pencil Studio’s “Diffuse Reflection Lab”

by: Matt Fajkus, AIA

Artists Annie Han and Daniel Mihalyo of Lead Pencil Studio are well-suited to explore the interstitial space between the fine and applied arts. “Diffuse Reflection Lab,” at the University of Texas at Austin Visual Arts Center, is a good example of their careful negotiation between the realms of art and architecture.

Jill Chan and The Artists
Page 10

Austin Community College at Highland Mall


Architect: Barnes Gromatzky Kosarek Architects

Austin’s Highland Mall sits largely abandoned. However Barnes Gromatzky Kosarek Architects’ proposal for the redevelopment of a former department store, into a new Austin Community College campus, floods the interior with light and activates the exterior with student gathering spaces.

Barnes Gromatzky Kosarek Architects, Elizabeth A. Day
Page 21

2013 Texas AIA Fellows

AIA has announced the 2013 members of the College of Fellows, and 13 are members of the Texas Society of Architects

Page 16

Buy Local

by: Catherine Gavin

In the ever-changing world of retail design, flexibility, simplicity, curb appeal, and storage are fundamental to continued success. Keepers, Eliza Page, and Rogue Running, all local Austin retailers, were pioneers of downtown shopping — and their continued relevance is a prom¬ising sign

Jud Haggard Photography, Casey Woods Photography, Juan Carlos DeLeon
Page 40

UTSA Summer Career Academy

High school and college students are invited to participate in a two-week Summer Career Academy in Architecture and Interior Design taught by faculty members of the College of Architecture at the University of Texas San Antonio’s downtown campus.

Page 74

Invest in Yourself and Your Career

Renew your American Institute of Architects (AIA) membership by March 31, 2013, to con¬tinue to receive important member benefits at the national, state, and local levels while supporting the profession.

Page 75

Preservation: The Past Meets the Present

by: Catherine Gavin

Courthouse and main street restoration programs are an exciting facet of historic preservation, but they generally represent the more traditional side of the field. This issue explores preservation in the context of rehabilitation, adaptive reuse, and contemporary design, illustrating how these projects can in fact meet prescribed sustainability standards.

Brantley Hightower, AIA
Page 5

Buildings of Texas, Volume One

by: Catherine Gavin

Geared for those with architectural wanderlust, “Buildings of Texas, Volume One” by Gerald Moorhead, FAIA, offers insights into the diversity of architecture throughout the state, and the promise that the travel to the metropo¬lises and hinterlands will be worth it.

photo by Elizabeth Hackler
Page 18

Fair Park Deco: Art and Architecture of the Texas Centennial Exposition

by: Anna Mod

“Fair Park Deco” is the third book by this author duo on Texas Art Deco. Jim Parsons and David Bush detail the Fair Park (Dallas) collection of Art Deco buildings, murals, sculptures, fountains, and landscape design, which are unrivaled nationally.

photo by Elizabeth Hackler
Page 19

Notes on Sketching

by: Joe Self, AIA

Sketching is a quiet, private thing. When shared, a sketch is revealed like a confidence — almost a secret.

sketches by Joe Self, AIA
Page 20

Streets, Plazas, Stairs

by: J. Sinclair Black, FAIA

Built into a bowl between the mountains, the topography of the historic town of Taxco, Mexico is radical, and the streets are not only narrow, but also extremely steep.

sketch by J. Sinclair Black, FAIA
Page 23

Reuse, Recycle, and Reinvent

by: Ben Koush

Studio RED Architects’ rehabilitation of a former warehouse for use as the Houston Permitting Center was centered on rigorously researched sustainability, deference to the industrial character of the old building, and the installation of an intensely local public art program.

Hester + Hardaway Photographers; MN | Photography
Page 48

Johnson Renewed

by: Gerald Moorhead, FAIA

Bodron+Fruit’s careful rehabilitation and restoration of Philip Johnson’s Beck House in Dallas resulted in a livable home that is true to both its historic character and the lifestyle of the new owners.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA; David McWilliams
Page 54

Seher Shah’s “Constructed Landscapes”

by: Rachel Adams

With degrees in art and architecture, artist Seher Shah’s areas of interest include overlapping historical and geographical elements, reconstructing modernist architecture and urban monuments, and examining futurist landscapes.

PHOTO OF “OBJECT RELIC (UNITÉ D’HABITATION)” COURTESY THE ARTIST.
PHOTO OF “OBJECT REPETITION (LINE TO DISTANCE)” BY JULIE WOOD PIZZO.
Page 10

Down and Up House

by: Stephen Fox

Karen Lantz, AIA, of Lantz Full Circle | Enter Architecture purchased a lot in Houston’s Ranch Estates subdivision and then proceeded to think long and hard about the house she wanted to design there for herself and her husband. The building is an in-depth study in local Texas materials.

Paul Hester and Jack Thompson
Page 24

Weekend with Turrell

by: Nonya Grenader, FAIA

Houston is home to three permanent installations by artist James Turrell: “Skyspace” at Live Oak Friends Meeting House; “The Light inside” at Wilson Tunnel, Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; and “Twilight Epiphany” Skyspace at Rice University. Each yields distinctly different effects, yet they are profoundly connected by the artist’s immersive exploration of light.

PHOTO COURTESY MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, HOUSTON. PHOTOS OF THE LIVE OAK MEETING HOUSE BY PAUL HESTER. PHOTOS OF “THE LIGHT INSIDE” AND “ARCO” COURTESY MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, HOUSTON. PHOTOS BY CASEY DUNN AND JULIE PIZZO WOOD.
Page 34

Warehouse Transformation

by: TA Staff

For its new home, Overland Partners converted the 26,000-sf Hughes Warehouse in the burgeoning River North area of downtown San Antonio.

Dror Baldinger, AIA
Page 76

Public Interest Design

by: Margaret R. Sledge, AIA

Is Sambo Mockbee the Howard Roark of our time? Margaret Sledge argues that his fundamental role in starting the Auburn University Rural Studio program was a catalyst for the growth of public interest design.

PHOTOS BY TIM HURSLEY.
Page 14

Astrodome Update

by: Ben Koush

After much uncertainty, things are starting to look up for Houston’s Astrodome.

PHOTO COURTESY OF CHUCK LEE 713-298-8098
Page 18

An Investment Firm Embraces Transparency

Michael Malone Architects designed an office for Highland Capital Management that is founded on the firm’s forward-thinking approach to investing: transparency.

Jud Haggard
Page 90

Williamson County Regional Animal Shelter


Architect: Connolly Architects & Consultants

Connolly Architects & Consultants’ Williamson County Regional Animal Shelter is a smart, clear plan with features that enhance the safety and welfare of the animals and people who use the facility.

Hester + Hardaway
Page 102

Talking Shop with Four Under 40

by: Canan Yetmen

Career building, like any other kind of building, can be a tricky business, but these four under 40 are making their way by starting new firms and by building leadership in small communities.

Nicole Mlakar and Julie Pizzo Wood
Page 111

AIA LRGV 2011 Design Awards

by: Texas Architect Staff

The jury for the Lower Rio Grande Valley AIA chapter’s 2011 Design Awards Jury selected four projects for recognition. Jurors were Thomas Hayne Upchurch, AIA, of Brenham; Rick del Monte, FAIA, of Dallas; Donna Kacmar, FAIA, of Houston.

Page 20

Prototype Housing for Modest Means


Architect: Edward M. Baum, FAIA

Edward M. Baum, FAIA, seeks to provide an alternative to traditional single-family homes by clustering four 1,350-sf residential units that share common interior walls and rigorously controlling construction costs.

Page 22

On the Jobsite with Candid Rogers, AIA

by: Stephen Sharpe, Hon. TSA

It’s just six weeks away from the much-anticipated opening and Candid Rogers, AIA, is walking through his latest project, a former Magnolia Oil service station from the 1920s that is being renovated as a destination dining spot in San Antonio’s nuevo hip Southtown. Subcontractors are readying the floors for millwork scheduled for delivery in a few days. Rogers and his client, local chef Mark Bliss, are both eager to see the custom dining tables in place.

Scott Adams, AIA
Page 67

Garden Ridge Elementary School

by: Stephen Sharpe, Hon. TSA

SHW Group’s design of Garden Ridge Elementary School places the library at the center of campus, with a planted roof above and tubular skylights that draw daylight into the reading areas. Both elements are used as part of the school’s science curriculum, along with above-ground cisterns that collect rainwater and teach students about conservation of natural resources.

Page 73

Nominations Due Feb. 29 for Preservation Texas Awards

Preservation Texas’ 2012 Honor Awards program is open to any individual, organization, business, or agency that is involved with historic preservation in Texas. All projects, activities, or individual service must have been completed between January 2009 and December 2011. Nomination forms and information on award categories are posted at preservationtexas.org. Applicants will be notified by May 1, 2012 as to the status of their award nomination. Awards will be based on the quality of the project, its presentation, significance, and uniqueness. The impacts of the nominee’s project on the community will also be considered.

Page 78

Free Online Resources for ‘Whole Building Design’

A website maintained by the nonprofit National Institute of Building Sciences offers numerous resources at no charge to advance sustainable design, including online continuing education courses approved by the American Institute of Architects. The mission of the Whole Building Design Guide (www.wbdg.org) is to create successful high-performance buildings through an integrated team approach during a project’s planning and programming phases.

Page 78

Lessons in Survival

by: Ed Soltero, AIA

Throughout the history of human civilization, water has been revered as a life-giving force. Unfortunately, some modern societies have exploited this essential natural resource to deleterious extents. In El Paso, however, there’s a beacon of hope for the education of future generations about water conservation in the Chihuahuan Desert.

Carolyn Bowman Photography
Page 80

An Ordered Approach

by: Kevin W. Sloan, ASLA

Typical projects use spreadsheets for programming. The program for the new University of Texas at Dallas master plan, however, began with a conversation between Peter Walker, FASLA, and Margaret McDermott, a great patron of Dallas’ cultural milieu and widow of the late Texas Instrument co-founder Eugene McDermott. Walker recalls Mrs. McDermott saying, “Look, this is my husband’s and my life’s work. We want to leave this campus in as first class of an order as we can.”

Aerial Photography; Vince Yaeger; PWP Landscape Architecture
Page 40

New Accessibility Rules Become Law

by: Stephen Sharpe, Hon. TSA

On March 15, the long-awaited revisions to state accessibility standards become law. That date represents the culmination of efforts to synchronize overlapping federal and state guidelines that respond to the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. As a result, Texas practitioners will no longer be required to cross-check two sets of regulations to ensure that their projects are conforming to the appropriate laws.

Page 9

2012 Texas AIA Fellows

by: TA Staff

Among the 105 AIA members elevated this year to the AIA College of Fellows, eight are members of the Texas Society of Architects. The 2012 Fellows will be honored at an investiture ceremony during the AIA convention in May. The AIA fellowship program was developed to recognize architects who have made a significant contribution to society and the architecture profession on a national level.

Page 11

Evans Named AIA Young Architect

by: TA Staff

One Texan – James M. Evans, AIA, of Houston – is among the 13 recipients of the 2012 AIA Young Architects Award. Young Architects are defined by the AIA as professionals who have been licensed 10 years or fewer regardless of their age. The award honors individuals who have shown exceptional leadership and made significant contributions to the profession early in their careers.

Page 12

AIA San Antonio Design Awards

After carefully evaluating 60 entries from 24 local architectural firms, jurors for AIA San Antonio’s 2011 Design Awards program announced their selections during ceremonies held on Nov. 4 at Pearl Stable. Attendees also celebrated the recipients of the chapter’s Studio Awards, its Twenty-Five Year Award, and its annual Mayor’s Choice Award honoring a publicly funded architectural project.

Page 14

AIA LRGV Studio Awards

by: TA Staff

Two awards were presented by AIA Lower Rio Grande Valley in the chapter’s 2011 Studio Awards program. Carolina Civarolo, AIA, of Boultinghouse Simpson Architects in McAllen, received the Spark Award for Digital Media for the proposed renovation and expansion of the University of Texas–Pan American’s College of Business Administration in Edinburg. Ortiz Architecture & Environment in Weslaco was recognized with a Design Award for an Unbuilt
Project for its Weslaco Family Care Center & Occupational Medicine Clinic.

Page 16

Texas Among Top 10 States for LEED

Texas ranks eighth among states in the U.S. for the per capita amount of commercial and institutional square footage certified by the LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) rating system in 2011, according to figures released in January by the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC).

Page 65

Four Texas Teams Chosen as Semifinalists in Waller Creek Design Competition

Four Texas firms are among a nationwide total of nine that were chosen Jan. 30 as semifinalists for the Waller Creek Conservancy design competition, from a pool of 31 entries. The competition calls for a redesign of a 1.5-mile stretch of city parkland and urban space along Waller Creek in downtown Austin.

Page 66

Margaret Hunt Hill Opens to Traffic

by: Michael Malone, AIA

On March 29 the first cars rolled across the long-awaited Margaret Hunt Hill Bridge in Dallas. Designed by Spanish architect and engineer Santiago Calatrava, the bridge joins Reunion Tower and Pegasus as a standout on the icon-heavy Dallas skyline. It is named for the matriarch of the Hunt family which, through Hunt Petroleum, donated $12 million to the Trinity River Corridor Project in 2005.

Photos courtesy Craig D. Blackmon , FAIA; Michael Lyon
Page 12

Nine Historic Places Selected for Annual “Most Endangered” List

by: Texas Architect Staff

Preservation Texas, Inc., a statewide partner of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, has released its ninth annual list of “Texas’ Most Endangered Historic Places.” Of the nine sites listed, three are discussed below as having the potential for becoming important catalysts for economic development in their communities if they can be saved.

Photos courtesy Preservation Texas; Magnolia Hotel by Matthew Chase
Page 13

Conference Emphasizes Practice in the Hinterlands

by: Stephen Sharpe, Hon. AIA

For two days in February, a group of designers gathered in Midland to consider the challenges of producing top-flight architecture in a place far removed from the state’s larger urban areas. The event, dubbed “Architecture in the Hinterlands,” included an address by acclaimed Canadian architect Brian MacKay-Lyons that featured his work in remote Nova Scotia.

Thomas McConnell
Page 15

AIA Houston Design Awards

AIA Houston’s 2012 design awards competition resulted in recognition for 21 projects in eight categories out of a total of 127 entries. Eligibility was limited to projects completed within the last five years and located within the Houston metropolitan area or designed by an architect working in the Houston metropolitan area.

Houston Ballet photo by Nic Lehoux; Brockman Hall Photo by Peter Aaron /OTTO; Roy Kelly Garage photo By Dror Baldinger , AIA
Page 18

Recollections of a Lifelong Ham

by: Dave Braden, FAIA

In 1949, when I went to work in the high-profile office of George Dahl, I met Harold (Hagie) Jones. We were both draftsmen working at adjacent tables on the back row, the only degreed architects in a room of 60 architectural draftsmen and a handful of engineers. Hagie was a graduate of Texas A&M and I had my Bachelor of Architecture from UT. While we had our differences, we shared some similarities.

Courtesy David Braden, FAIA
Page 26

Clean Line Energy Partners

by: Noelle Heinze

Designed by Kirksey Architecture, Clean Line Energy Partners in downtown Houston is a 6,700-sf space housing an electricity transmission company that develops electrical transmission lines connecting wind farms to urban areas. Several factors guided the design, including a limited budget of $350,000. The client desired a sustainable, historic headquarters building with a design that would reflect the company’s fresh, hip brand.

Aker/Zvonkovic Photography
Page 72

Propaganda Hair Group

Dick Clark Architecture designed Propaganda Hair Group’s leased, 1,700-sf shell space within the Gables 5th Street Commons building in downtown Austin. The client requested a loft-like space with an open plan, minimal furnishings, and wood and concrete textures. The design focuses on ways to differentiate program areas within a single space, while offering an open atmosphere.

Paul Bardagjy
Page 75

Two Texas Design Firms among Four Waller Creek Competition Finalists

Two Texas design firms are among four design teams that have been chosen as finalists in an international competition to revitalize Austin’s downtown Waller Creek. More than 30 teams entered the competition late last year, and nine semifinalists were chosen in January.

Page 77

EPA’s Annual Energy Star Buildings List Includes Three Texas Cities

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has released its annual listing of U.S. metropolitan areas featuring the most Energy Star certified buildings for 2011, and three Texas cities — Dallas, Fort Worth, and Houston — have made the list. Energy use in commercial buildings accounts for nearly 20 percent of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions at a cost of more than $100 billion per year.

Page 77

AIA Convention and Design Expo, May 17-19, Washington, D.C.

The American Institute of Architects’ 2012 Convention Guide and Daily Schedule are now available online.

Page 78

The Big Idea

by: Stephen Sharpe, Hon. AIA

After almost 12 years at the helm of Texas Architect, I see even more clearly the truth in Burnham’s oftquoted assertion. Having worked so long with architects on articles about topics important to them, I understand the power of the big idea. That’s what drives the project, the impetus that transforms the concept into physical reality. Big ideas, I’ve learned, are essential to the architect.

Patrick Wong
Page 7

To Your Good Health

by: Larry Paul Fuller

In this edition about design for healthcare and wellness, we look at good buildings of both types. But the role of architects in public health goes far beyond their work on the hospitals, clinics, and fitness facilities routinely associated with these two categories. The broader purview includes their role in shaping more livable, sustainable, and healthy communities — the premise being that there is a direct correlation between the design of a community and the health of its people.

Photos by Michael Moran
Page 5

Registration Opens Mid July for Texas Architects Convention

by: TA Staff

Online registration opens mid July for the Texas Society of Architects Convention and Design Expo, October 18-20, in Austin. This year, the convention’s theme is “Influence.”

Page 13

Texas Firms among AIA COTE Award Winners

On April 19, the American Institute of Architects’ Committee on the Environment (AIA–COTE) announced its Top Ten projects for 2012. This year’s batch of winners highlights community ties, social equity, and attentiveness to water issues. One Texas firm and three national/international firms with offices in Texas are among the winners.

Page 14

Independent for Life: Homes and Neighborhoods for an Aging America

by: John V. Nyfeler, FAIA

Architects are faced with the reality that we are an Aging Society.  Among the challenges of this future is the preference of people to “age in place,” living at home, in the same neighborhood. Our suitable homes today will not accommodate our needs as we age.

Page 20

David Webster George

by: Joe Self, AIA

Tucked back in the woods, at the end of a winding path, is an architect working outside of time. But David Webster George, FAIA, arranges patterns and places that are timeless. The unassuming approach to his house in Southlake masks the carefully situated environment he created in 1986, followed by a studio addition in 1991. Deer, coyote, and wild turkey roam the property. David is quick to point out that he resides within the Cross Timbers — a densely packed oak and scrub-bush region that extends from North Texas in a broad swath through Oklahoma and up into Kansas. For David, boundaries are set by nature and not by governments.

Holly Reed
Page 24

Embracing Culture and Place

by: Brian Freese, AIA

The wind blows strong across the low, rolling plains of central Oklahoma. Standing quietly and listening to the wind in this place — where a razor-sharp horizon seams together land and sky — one can sense the spirits of Native Americans who for generations lived and thrived on the land. These were a people who found, after torturous travels westward during the Trail of Tears, a place that in its sheer vastness accepted them and offered the opportunity to rebuild their way of life. And so it was, and so it has been for the Chickasaw Nation in this place of raw and expansive beauty.

Art Grey
Page 38

Worthy of the Mission

by: Gin Kappler-Peeler, AIA

The story of the Moran Family Health Center is larger than just the account of relocating the San Jose Clinic from its outdated and undersized 50-year-old facility in downtown. Its true telling reveals the comprehensive delivery of a range of services that are interconnected and focused on the overall well-being and soundness of families.

Aker Imaging
Page 44

The Big Picture

by: Val Glitsch, FAIA

In 2008 the YMCA of Greater Houston announced the imminent replacement of Kenneth Franzheim’s Italian Renaissance-inspired ten-story edifice that had provided classrooms, exercise facilities, and 132 single-room residential units since 1941. Aspiring to move in a more “family-friendly” direction, the organization stated the primary goal of the new 115,000-sf facility would be to assume a stronger community presence in downtown Houston.

Aker Imaging, Thomas McConnell
Page 50

Fitness Finesse

by: Dan Killebrew, AIA

In a bucolic natural setting of rolling hills, the Northwood Club was established in 1946 by residents of north Dallas to provide golf and recreational activities for young families in an expanding city. The latest addition to the club — the fitness center, completed in 2010 —houses strength training, aerobics, a yoga studio, and child care services, along with food service for pool users and golfers.

 Good Fulton & Farrell Architects
Page 56

For Goodness' Sake

by: Larry Paul Fuller

There is good architecture. And then there is good architecture … as in architecture for the public good. This year’s statewide design award winners — 13 projects from Dallas, Houston, San Antonio, and Austin — are a case in point. I was struck, during the awards jury process, by how intent the jurors were on recognizing certain entries, not only for their merit in terms of design (even design merit as broadly defined), but also for their capacity to fulfill client aspirations for the public good.

Page 7

Charles Ewing Waterhouse, Jr., Architect and Renaissance Man for the Borderland

by: William Palmore

On October 26, a symposium in El Paso will explore the life and career of architect and artist Charles Ewing Waterhouse, Jr. The occasion, scheduled as part of Tom Lea Month, marks the first time a consideration of modern architecture in El Paso is included in the scholarly festivities.

Page 14

McGarrah Jessee Building

by: Adapted from “Midcentury Update,” by Stephen Sharpe, Hon. AIA Texas Architect, March/April, 2011

McGarrah Jessee’s relocation to larger quarters in downtown Austin neatly coincided with the home-grown creative agency’s bursting out of its regional sphere of influence. Affectionately known as McJ, the company has steadily ratcheted up its staffing level as its roster of clients has expanded and its recognition has gone national. Now, after having outgrown its former offices in a converted warehouse, McJ has re-established its base of operations in the Starr Building, a modernist landmark completed in 1954 and designed by local firm Kuehne, Brooks and Barr for the offices of American National Bank. The project achieved widespread acclaim at the time for its distinctively crisp interiors by Florence Knoll and a monumental mural created in situ by Seymour Fogel.

Thomas McConnell
Page 46

I-35 Makeover

by: Canan Yetmen

Downtown Austin’s east-west streets are sliced in half by the northsouth artery of IH-35. To the west, downtown rises, its sparkling towers radiating progress. To the east, the city of days past lingers, its
neighborhoods of humble homes and local businesses resolute. The freeway, elevated at the heart of the city, creates a physical and spiritual divide that has plagued Austin for decades.

Mike Osborne; Jett Butler; Thomas McConnell
Page 50

Kimber Modern B&B

by: Aaron Seward

As urban infill lots go, the roughly 12,000-sf triangular site that is now home to the Kimber Modern Bed & Breakfast presented Baldridge Architects with more than its fair share of challenges. For one, the rather
small plot rose 25 feet in elevation from the curb to the back lot line, a precipitous pitch. Furthermore, neighboring establishments created conditions that most would find undesirable for a boutique design hotel.

Casey Dunn
Page 54

Houston Food Bank

by: Ardis Clinton, AIA

Hope. Simply stated, it is the message of a new facility, on a mission to ultimately end hunger. Nestled in a warehouse district outside of downtown, the Houston Food Bank (HFB) building gleams with its spirited green color and metal cladding. The new 308,000-sf facility is the nation’s largest Feeding America food bank and source of food for hunger relief charities in 18 southeast Texas counties. Beyond feeding the hungry, the Houston Food Bank provides community services and education programs aimed at promoting good nutrition, assistance with federal and state Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Programs, job training, and employment help — all in an effort to break the cycle of food insecurity.

Slyworks Photography
Page 62

BioScience Research Collaborative at Rice University

by: Jason T. Chan, AIA

At the intersection of Rice University’s historic and growth axes is the BioScience Research Collaborative, a ten-story 477,000-sf translational research facility designed to facilitate multi-institutional research collaboration between Rice and various institutes from Texas Medical Center. This interdisciplinary facility embraces a wide range of disciplines, from chemistry to bioengineering, from organizations supporting startup research companies to the National Space Biomedical Research Institute — all with emphasis on improving human wellness through research.

Cesar Rubio Photography
Page 66

Military Hospital Addition

by: J. Brantley Hightower, AIA

Fort Sam Houston in San Antonio has served the medical needs of men and women in uniform since the 1870s. During that time, the complex grew incrementally until 1995 when a new facility was built to consolidate the Fort’s hospital operations. Containing over a million square feet of space, the massive Brooke Army Medical Center (BAMC – pronounced “Bam-See”) was clad in heavy masonry that gave it a somewhat institutional quality. While BAMC was functional, the needs of contemporary combat medical practice are constantly evolving and when the decision was made to absorb most of the operations of a nearby Air Force medical facility into the complex, a significant expansion became necessary to create what would eventually be known as the San Antonio Military Medical Center.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA
Page 74

Haven for Hope

by: Dror Baldinger, AIA

Haven for Hope Homeless Transformational Center is a groundbreaking project aimed at ameliorating homelessness in San Antonio. It emerged from the shared vision of two philanthropists: business leader Bill Greehey, and Phil Hardberger, Mayor of San Antonio from 2005-2009. Since its first-phase completion in 2008, Haven for Hope’s operational model has inspired other American cities to reassess their approaches to addressing homelessness.

Hester + Hardaway, Scott Adams Photography
Page 78

University Branch Library

by: Texas Architect Staff

University Branch Library, designed by Bailey Architects, is a two-story, 40,000-sf building on approximately 4.2 acres of the University of Houston Sugar Land campus. The library — for both university and public use — includes a variety of children and young adult services, reference resources, meeting and study areas, and staff work spaces.

Aker Imaging
Page 86

Texas Architects Convention Offers ARE Study Classes

The Texas Society of Architects and AIA Austin are offering three specialized study classes on the Architect Registration Examination (ARE) during the Texas Architects 73rd Annual Convention and Design Expo, Oct. 18-20, in Austin. The classes are “Tips and Tricks for using the NCARB Practice Software”; “Archibowl - Come on Down!”; and “NCARB and You: IDP, ARE, and Certification.”

Page 119

Italy/Texas

by: Texas Architect Staff

"At once wistful and thought-provoking, light-hearted and profound.” That is how Dallas architect and contributing editor Max Levy, FAIA, described the set of Italy/Texas photo collages represented here in the following selections. We agree with Max that the images, created by UT School of Architecture student Emily Wiegand, are fascinating and promise to be a source of delight for our readers.

Emily Wiegand
Page 120

Parting words. And phrases.

by: Larry Paul Fuller

“Shaping the built environment.” It’s a well-worn phrase for describing what architects are doing every day. As such, it says a lot, but there’s also more to say. For example, what about the role of the built environment in shaping people?

Denny Mingus
Page 5

ArCH Hosts Deans’ Roundtable

by: Ardis Clinton, AIA

The Architecture Center Houston (ArCH) hosted a Deans’ Roundtable Discussion in September. Moderated by Larry Speck, FAIA, he opened the discussion with a national statistic that only 35% of architecture faculty are registered architects.

ArCH
Page 10

The Happening on the South Plains

by: J. Brantley Hightower, AIA

While Lubbock is not typically mentioned alongside Marfa and Santa Fe when describing small communities that are defined by their cultural offerings, the city is nevertheless experiencing a remarkable transformation on account of its thriving art scene.

Tonja Hagy, Urs Peter “Upe” Flueckiger, J. Brantley Hightower, AIA, Denny Mingus, and Tom Kessler Photography
Page 34

Preservationists Save 1891 Cottage, Now Updated With ‘Green’ Strategies

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: Greg Lewis

Still, two years after Hurricane Ike, the lingering effects of the storm are widely evident in many parts of Galveston. Ike, reportedly the third costliest hurricane ever to make landfall in the U.S., waylaid the island city on Sept. 13, 2008 with 110-mph winds and a 17-foot storm surge that officials estimate damaged more than 80 percent of the existing houses. In fact, according to a City of Galveston report issued one year after the storm, many of those properties were either abandoned or in need of replacement due to the extent of damage and/or lack of flood insurance.

David Canright/Galveston Historical Foundation
Page 12

AIA El Paso Presents Awards

by: Robert Garland, III

This year’s AIA El Paso Design Awards program was juried by eight steemed architectural educators from Universidad Autonoma de Ciudad Juarez, located just across the international border. The jury met for two days and reviewed a total of 34 entries, ultimately recognizing five projects with awards for design excellence in four categories.

Page 23

Outstanding Intern Programs in Texas

by: Rebecca Boles

Many discussions about the practice of architecture end with the conclusion that architectural interns aren’t what they used to be. Well, that’s true: some of today’s emerging professionals are better trained because of improvements to the AIA’s Intern Development Program (IDP).

FK Architects, English + Associates Architects
Page 28

Informal Learning

Today’s architects are fully engaged with educators to design facilities for informal learning where students of all ages can benefit from nontraditional approaches to the pursuit of knowledge. In this annual “Design for Education” edition, Texas Architect looks at four very different types of academic projects that share a common thread in being uniquely created to accomplish the client’s specialized mission.

Page 39

Lakefront Learning

by: Dror Baldinger
Architect: Alamo Architects

Alamo Architects designed the first structures built under the 2005 master plan—Juniper Hall, a three-story building with 76,000 square feet of classrooms and faculty offices, and Redbud Learning Center, a 41,000-sf library. On the ground level, facing the lake, Redbud also includes a cyber café and an outdoor seating area. In between Juniper Hall and Redbud, one finds a well proportioned outdoor space. The space is the campus’ first attempt at considering the connectivity of program functions across an outdoor space. Forming and overlooking the modest plaza are the library and its writing lab, two of the most frequently visited spaces on campus.

Chris Cooper
Page 41

Principled Gestured

by: Gerald Moorhead
Architect: Michael Graves & Associates

Since the implementation of the 2004 Master Plan (by Barnes Gromatzky Kosarek Architects with Michael Dennis & Associates) at the College Station campus of Texas A&M University, new facilities must respond to mandates affecting a wide range of architectural issues. They include energy-efficient design principles, connections to the surrounding community, facade articulation, and the use of materials consistent with those at the historic core of the campus.

Richard Payne
Page 51

Child’s Play

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: Legorreta + Legorreta; Gideon Toal

There is a child -like playfulness to the work of Ricardo Legorreta. When experiencing his projects, one intuits the architect’s delight in applying vivid colors and his fascination with simple geometric forms as if he had been handed a box of paints and a set of gigantic building blocks. Throughout his long career, Legorreta has perfected a rigorous approach to modernism infused with Latino vitality.

Juergen Nogai
Page 62

Selecting the Best of Public Schools

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: Corgan Associates

John A. Dubiski Career High School, designed by Corgan Associates, is a 2,000-student career and technology school located in Grand Prairie. The school’s curriculum seeks to reduce the dropout rate and prepare graduates to enter college or the workforce. The four-story, 250,000-sf structure is designed to accommodate unique programmatic needs, including specific careertrack diploma programs.

Charles David Smith
Page 71

Selecting the Best of Public Schools

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: SHW Group

Designed by SHW Group, Ennis Independent School District’s newly constructed junior high is a 195,000-sf facility on a 50-acre site. The design incorporates a contemporary feel and function. Classrooms are configured to be flexible to support interactive teaching through integrated technology. Large-group instruction spaces and a closed-circuit television studio are two significant features.

Mark McWilliams
Page 75

Award-Winning Workplace

by: Stephen Sharpe

About a year ago, when the staff of Texas Architect decided that this edition would focus on workplace design, no one could have foreseen the coincidence that the Texas Society of Architects/AIA itself would be relocating offices as the issue went to press. In another remarkable concurrence, the move takes TSA to the former home of fd2s, which was featured on the cover of the July/August 2002 edition. That issue was also dedicated to the subject of workplace design.

Page 5

Fourteen Texans Elevated to FAIA

by: TA Staff

This year, 14 architects from Texas have earned an “F” – as in “FAIA” – for their significant contributions to the architectural profession. They are included in a nationwide total of 104 AIA members elevated to its College of Fellows.

Page 10

AIA Honors Lake/Flato, Wyly, DAF

by: TA Staff

Among the recipients of 2011 AIA Institute Honors are two projects with Texas connections and the Dallas Architecture Forum.

Page 14

The Shape of Texas and Austin Firm Recognized with 2011 THC Awards

by: TA Staff

Each year the Texas Historical Commission recognizes individuals, organizations, and programs that have achieved success in efforts to preserve the state’s architectural heritage. Included in the 2011 THC program are awards for The Shape of Texas radio program and the Austin architecture firm Clayton & Little Architects.

Page 19

Ebb and Flow

The concept by two UT Arlington School of Architecture graduate students – Sarah Kuehn and Nakjune Seong – shared first place in an international urban design context to explore “live, work and play” opportunities in the heart of Fargo, N.D.

Page 20

In Working Order

by: Stephen Sharpe

The design of a workplace conveys a sense of that organization’s corporate culture. In this edition, Texas Architect profiles four different approaches that translate each client’s operations into physical space. The projects on the following pages are the result of close partnerships between architect and client to design an office where work flows as efficiently and effectively as possible.

McConnell Photography
Page 33

Water-Wise

by: Lawrence Connolly
Architect: Barnes Gromatzky Kosarek Architects

The lower Colorado River’s expansive watershed touches on the lives of more than one million residents of 56 counties in central Texas. Managing supplies of drinking water from the river and harnessing its powerful flow for hydroelectricity are part of the Lower Colorado River Authority’s multi-faceted mission. However, the public utility’s most visible role involves the controlled release of water through six dams along the river’s 600-mile run to the Gulf of Mexico.

Thomas McConnell, Greg Hursley
Page 34

Midcentury Update

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: McKinney York Architects

McGarrah Jessee’s relocation to larger quarters in downtown Austin neatly coincides with the home-grown creative agency’s bursting out of its regional sphere of influence. Affectionately known as McJ, the company has steadily ratcheted up its staffing level as its roster of clients has expanded and its recognition for innovative and hugely successful advertising and branding campaigns has gone national. In December, after having outgrown its former offices in a converted warehouse, McJ re-established its base of operations in a former bank building, a midcentury treasure that had fallen on hard times.

Thomas McConnell
Page 52

Green Acres Conference Center

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: Fitzpatrick Architects

The New Conference Center and Performance Hall at Green Acres Baptist Church in Tyler by Fitzpatrick Architects was completed in 2010. The facility, equipped with advanced acoustics, is designed to seat 2,200 people and includes full dining services for 1,450. The main hall footprint is a 150-ft square with a stage sized for a 50-piece orchestra.

Craig Blackmon, FAIA
Page 59

Sullivan Performing Arts Center

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: SHW Group

Designed by SHW Group and located adjacent to Texas High School in the Texarkana Independent School District, Sullivan Performing Arts Center is a 38,000-sf facility that houses the 1,000-seat John Thomas Theatre. The design is intended to serve as a catalyst for the local arts community.

Paul Bardagjy
Page 60

Arts Center at Texas Southmost College

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: Studio Red Architects

Designed by Studio Red Architects, the 54,000-sf Arts Center at Texas Southmost College on the grounds of the University of Texas at Brownsville is carefully sited to fit within the campus master plan. The building shares a connection with the campus through the incorporation of design elements – such as arches, arcades, and brick patterns – used on historic Fort Brown. A unique nautilus floor plan was developed to add multiple entrances.

Greg Phelps; Keith Talley
Page 62

In The Neighborhood

by: Charlie Burris

The Tremont Building in downtown Bryan was originally built in the 1920s by a Sicilian family as a dry goods store. It has been used for various other businesses over the years before becoming our firm’s home in 2007. My partners and I wanted a “sense of place” and a neighborhood feel of interconnectedness. I assumed nothing would be available in the historic downtown, but then this property appeared as we looked at options.

Charles David Smith
Page 68
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