Article Results for "ARE"


Rita Catinella Orrell features a few of the new sustainable products on display at last October’s Greenbuild International Conference and Expo in New Orleans.

Page 24

Big Ideas

Architect-designed bus stops in San Antonio, Austin, and Dallas are adding a bit of design to street corners.

Dror Baldinger, AIA; Thomas McConnell; Nicholas McWhirter; Charles David Smith, AIA
Page 50

Edible Architecture

by: Catherine Gavin

Igor Siddiqui and Jen Wong are creating edible architectural materials for Austin’s April Fusebox Festival, thinkEAST Living Charrette to Shape a New Creative Community.

Page 7

2014 AIA San Antonio Design Awards

Texas Architect magazine features the 2014 AIA San Antonio Design Awards.

Page 22


Rita Catinella Orrell reviews a collection of innovative cladding materials.

Page 28

Designing for Ageing

by: Ingrid Spencer

While most adults say they would strongly prefer to stay in their homes as they age, many houses and communities in the U.S. are not set up to meet the needs of the elderly and less mobile.

Kimberly Davis
Page 40

A Living Building in North Texas

by: Margaret Sledge, AIA

Lake|Flato Architects' Josey Pavilion aspires to be the first Living Building in Texas.

Casey Dunn Photography
Page 56

AIA Dallas Presents: 2B An Architect

AIA Dallas’ 2B An Architect, held on March 7, invited high school sophomores to explore a career in architecture.

Page 95

2014 Preservation Texas Honor Awards

Texas Architect magazine features the 2014 Preservation Texas Honor Awards.

Page 19


by: Brett Koenig Greig

Are yogurt, bacteria, and yeast the keys to sustainability? Igor Siddiqui and Jen Wong, curators of Austin’s Edible Materials Lab, think playing with food has the potential to change the way we build.

Page 15

Tiltwallism: A Treatise on the Architectural Potential of Tiltwall Construction

by: Mitch Bloomquist, Assoc. AIA

Are tilt-walls the solution to the problem of architects’ disengagement with the most common forms of construction? Author Jeffrey Brown, AIA, offers a primer on tilt-up construction and a critique of its absence from serious architectural practice.

Page 12

Lessons by the Sea

by: Erika Huddleston

Sea Scout Base Galveston, a newly completed maritime educational center by Shipley Architects and Randall-Porterfield Architects, seeks to accomplish two goals: to inspire learners to care about the maritime environment, and to withstand the hurricanes and storms that so often threaten the Texas coast.

Bao Loi and Arlen Kennedy
Page 80

Networks for Resilience

The National Resilience Initiative, which seeks to establish a network of design studios that focus on developing built environments that are resilient in the face of natural disaster, recently added two new studios to its roster.

Page 94

Amarillo Museum of Art Biennial 600 – Sculpture Members Only

by: Leigh A. Arnold

The Amarillo Museum of Art (AMoA) debuts Biennial 600 — the sixth in an ongoing series of juried biennial exhibitions that explore specific areas of artistic practice through a particular material.

Page 22

The Farmer and the Cowman

by: Brantley Hightower, AIA

Traditional architectural projects are now the noteworthy outliers.

Page 41

Dixon Water Foundation Josey Pavilion Members Only

by: Margaret Sledge, AIA

Lake|Flato Architects' Dixon Water Foundation Josey Pavilion is a Texas Society of Architects 2015 Design Award winner.

Casey Dunn Photography
Page 60

Parkland Hospital

by: Ron Stelmarski, AIA

The new Parkland Hospital, a megablock more than two million square feet in size, embraces the landscape and the city beyond its boundaries.

Assassi Productions
Page 76

Everyday Architect

by: Canan Yetmen

If you were to take a fingerprint sample of Austin’s building boom, chances are good the evidence would point to one prolific architectural instigator: Michael Hsu, AIA.

Jeff Wilson
Page 107

Urban Ecologies

by: Catherine Gavin

With its stacked interchanges and sweeping flyovers, Texas has no shortage roadway feats, yet they often represent barriers for connectivity. Urban designers across the state are rethinking these roadways and using green infrastructure to reconnect downtown districts.

Page 9

Fosu Marina and Master Plan

by: OTA+

Austin-based OTA+ designed a new master plan and marina for the Fosu Lagoon area of Cape Coast, Ghana. The project proposes Africa’s tallest building.

Page 24

Worthy of World Heritage

by: Rachel Wright, AIA, and Anna Nau
Architect: Ford, Powell & Carson

Amid new bike trails and picnic tables, natural grasses and canoe slips, and native birds and shaded overlooks, four of San Antonio’s Spanish Colonial Missions are preparing to become the first World Heritage Site in Texas.

Mark Menjivar
Page 78

Material Arts

by: Catherine Gavin

Mies, materials, and digital fabrication — material arts are creative outlets providing new paths for architecture.

Page 9

Shifting Leaves of Grass

by: Frederick R. Steiner

Alternative grasses are redefining landscape architecture and helping bring about a new ecological aesthetic in Texas.

Page 27

Painted Churches

by: Gerald Moorhead, FAIA

The unexpected, rich colors of the interiors of the “Painted Churches” found across South Texas are important examples of the state’s late 19th-century architectural heritage.

Page 13

Caret 6

by: Catherine Gavin

Caret 6, a dramatic installation by architect Kory Bieg of OTA+ and his Design V Studio at The University of Texas at Austin School of Architecture, is making its way around the state.

Page 17

A Sink in Every Room

by: Jen Wong

The hefty utilitarian demands of a salon, which include a sink in every room, are resolved seamlessly in this downtown Austin spa by Baldridge Architects.

Casey Dunn
Page 40

HDP Announces Competitions for 2014

Four competitions are being sponsored in 2014 by Heritage Documentation Programs (HDP) division of the U.S. National Park Service.

Page 87

Going Public

by: Rachel Adams
Architect: David Droese, AIA; Jim Poteet, FAIA

As contemporary collections continue to grow, exhibitors’ need for more space is providing the public with opportunities to see art. The Warehouse in Farmers Branch and SPACE Gallery in San Antonio are private collections that are now open to visitors.

Wade Griffith; Chris Cooper
Page 48

A Perfect Foil

by: Inga Saffron
Architect: Ross Conway, AIA

Gensler’s Dallas office strikes a beautiful balance between old and new at the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia.

Garrett Rowland
Page 62

Working Artifacts

by: Miriam Sitz
Architect: Jonathan R. Card, AIA; Kristin Wiese Hefty, AIA

Restaurants by Urbanist Design and Dado Group are causing a stir in San Antonio’s popular Pearl Brewery district.

Scott Martin; Ryann Ford
Page 70

AIA Houston Awards

AIA Houston announced the winners of its 2014 Design Awards. The honored projects, selected from among 108 entries, are on display in an exhibition, along with the 2014 Student Biennial, running through September 26.

Page 25

Ottomers Residence

by: Jack Murphy, Assoc. AIA
Architect: Vicent Snyder, AIA

Clear structural articulation and a folded corrugated metal roof are the major architectural features of the Ottmers Residence, a project designed to be built by a client on a very tight budget.

Vicent Snyder, AIA
Page 58

Mestizo City

by: Phil Zimmerman, Assoc. AIA
Architect: Geoffrey S. Edwards, AIA

Multiple bottles of colorful soda are transformed into a glowing cube called Mestizo City by Muñoz & Company.

Chris Gutierrez Muñoz & Company
Page 86

Dallas City Performance Hall

by: Aaron Seward
Architect: Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (Design Architect) and Corgan (Architect of Record)

Transparency to the street is key to the success of the Dallas City Performance Hall.

Hedrich Blessing Photographers
Page 94

Hughes Warehouse Adaptive Reuse

by: Jen Wong

The Hughes Warehouse by Overland Partners has transformed its San Antonio neighborhood.

Drod Baldinger, AIA
Page 98

Texas Society of Architects 2014 Studio Awards

Five projects, three of which are done by students, are selected as the recipients of the 2014 Studio Awards.

Page 27


by: Texas Architect Staff

The 2012 Exhibit of School Architecture spon¬sored by the Texas Association of School Admin¬istration (TASA) and the Texas Association of School Boards (TASB) Convention awarded the Caudill Award to Lady Bird Johnson Middle School in Irving designed by Corgan Associates.

Page 14

...with Clovis Heimsath, FAIA

by: Lawrence Connolly, AIA

Although, keeping up with him has never been easy, Clovis Heimsath, FAIA, is a testament to architecture being a calling and not a profession — his practice and his lifestyle are seamless.

Julie Pizzo Wood
Page 60

Invest in Yourself and Your Career

by: Texas Architect Staff

Renew your American Institute of Architects (AIA) membership by March 31, 2013, to continue to receive important member benefits at the national, state, and local levels while sup¬porting the profession.

Page 67

Sustained Experience: Lead Pencil Studio’s “Diffuse Reflection Lab”

by: Matt Fajkus, AIA

Artists Annie Han and Daniel Mihalyo of Lead Pencil Studio are well-suited to explore the interstitial space between the fine and applied arts. “Diffuse Reflection Lab,” at the University of Texas at Austin Visual Arts Center, is a good example of their careful negotiation between the realms of art and architecture.

Jill Chan and The Artists
Page 10

Austin Community College at Highland Mall

Architect: Barnes Gromatzky Kosarek Architects

Austin’s Highland Mall sits largely abandoned. However Barnes Gromatzky Kosarek Architects’ proposal for the redevelopment of a former department store, into a new Austin Community College campus, floods the interior with light and activates the exterior with student gathering spaces.

Barnes Gromatzky Kosarek Architects, Elizabeth A. Day
Page 21

2013 Texas AIA Fellows

AIA has announced the 2013 members of the College of Fellows, and 13 are members of the Texas Society of Architects

Page 16

Buy Local

by: Catherine Gavin

In the ever-changing world of retail design, flexibility, simplicity, curb appeal, and storage are fundamental to continued success. Keepers, Eliza Page, and Rogue Running, all local Austin retailers, were pioneers of downtown shopping — and their continued relevance is a prom¬ising sign

Jud Haggard Photography, Casey Woods Photography, Juan Carlos DeLeon
Page 40

UTSA Summer Career Academy

High school and college students are invited to participate in a two-week Summer Career Academy in Architecture and Interior Design taught by faculty members of the College of Architecture at the University of Texas San Antonio’s downtown campus.

Page 74

Invest in Yourself and Your Career

Renew your American Institute of Architects (AIA) membership by March 31, 2013, to con¬tinue to receive important member benefits at the national, state, and local levels while supporting the profession.

Page 75

Preservation: The Past Meets the Present

by: Catherine Gavin

Courthouse and main street restoration programs are an exciting facet of historic preservation, but they generally represent the more traditional side of the field. This issue explores preservation in the context of rehabilitation, adaptive reuse, and contemporary design, illustrating how these projects can in fact meet prescribed sustainability standards.

Brantley Hightower, AIA
Page 5

Buildings of Texas, Volume One

by: Catherine Gavin

Geared for those with architectural wanderlust, “Buildings of Texas, Volume One” by Gerald Moorhead, FAIA, offers insights into the diversity of architecture throughout the state, and the promise that the travel to the metropo¬lises and hinterlands will be worth it.

photo by Elizabeth Hackler
Page 18

Fair Park Deco: Art and Architecture of the Texas Centennial Exposition

by: Anna Mod

“Fair Park Deco” is the third book by this author duo on Texas Art Deco. Jim Parsons and David Bush detail the Fair Park (Dallas) collection of Art Deco buildings, murals, sculptures, fountains, and landscape design, which are unrivaled nationally.

photo by Elizabeth Hackler
Page 19

Notes on Sketching

by: Joe Self, AIA

Sketching is a quiet, private thing. When shared, a sketch is revealed like a confidence — almost a secret.

sketches by Joe Self, AIA
Page 20

Streets, Plazas, Stairs

by: J. Sinclair Black, FAIA

Built into a bowl between the mountains, the topography of the historic town of Taxco, Mexico is radical, and the streets are not only narrow, but also extremely steep.

sketch by J. Sinclair Black, FAIA
Page 23

Reuse, Recycle, and Reinvent

by: Ben Koush

Studio RED Architects’ rehabilitation of a former warehouse for use as the Houston Permitting Center was centered on rigorously researched sustainability, deference to the industrial character of the old building, and the installation of an intensely local public art program.

Hester + Hardaway Photographers; MN | Photography
Page 48

Johnson Renewed

by: Gerald Moorhead, FAIA

Bodron+Fruit’s careful rehabilitation and restoration of Philip Johnson’s Beck House in Dallas resulted in a livable home that is true to both its historic character and the lifestyle of the new owners.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA; David McWilliams
Page 54

Seher Shah’s “Constructed Landscapes”

by: Rachel Adams

With degrees in art and architecture, artist Seher Shah’s areas of interest include overlapping historical and geographical elements, reconstructing modernist architecture and urban monuments, and examining futurist landscapes.

Page 10

Down and Up House

by: Stephen Fox

Karen Lantz, AIA, of Lantz Full Circle | Enter Architecture purchased a lot in Houston’s Ranch Estates subdivision and then proceeded to think long and hard about the house she wanted to design there for herself and her husband. The building is an in-depth study in local Texas materials.

Paul Hester and Jack Thompson
Page 24

Weekend with Turrell

by: Nonya Grenader, FAIA

Houston is home to three permanent installations by artist James Turrell: “Skyspace” at Live Oak Friends Meeting House; “The Light inside” at Wilson Tunnel, Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; and “Twilight Epiphany” Skyspace at Rice University. Each yields distinctly different effects, yet they are profoundly connected by the artist’s immersive exploration of light.

Page 34

Warehouse Transformation

by: TA Staff

For its new home, Overland Partners converted the 26,000-sf Hughes Warehouse in the burgeoning River North area of downtown San Antonio.

Dror Baldinger, AIA
Page 76

Public Interest Design

by: Margaret R. Sledge, AIA

Is Sambo Mockbee the Howard Roark of our time? Margaret Sledge argues that his fundamental role in starting the Auburn University Rural Studio program was a catalyst for the growth of public interest design.

Page 14

Astrodome Update

by: Ben Koush

After much uncertainty, things are starting to look up for Houston’s Astrodome.

Page 18

An Investment Firm Embraces Transparency

Michael Malone Architects designed an office for Highland Capital Management that is founded on the firm’s forward-thinking approach to investing: transparency.

Jud Haggard
Page 90

Williamson County Regional Animal Shelter

Architect: Connolly Architects & Consultants

Connolly Architects & Consultants’ Williamson County Regional Animal Shelter is a smart, clear plan with features that enhance the safety and welfare of the animals and people who use the facility.

Hester + Hardaway
Page 102

Talking Shop with Four Under 40

by: Canan Yetmen

Career building, like any other kind of building, can be a tricky business, but these four under 40 are making their way by starting new firms and by building leadership in small communities.

Nicole Mlakar and Julie Pizzo Wood
Page 111

AIA LRGV 2011 Design Awards

by: Texas Architect Staff

The jury for the Lower Rio Grande Valley AIA chapter’s 2011 Design Awards Jury selected four projects for recognition. Jurors were Thomas Hayne Upchurch, AIA, of Brenham; Rick del Monte, FAIA, of Dallas; Donna Kacmar, FAIA, of Houston.

Page 20

Prototype Housing for Modest Means

Architect: Edward M. Baum, FAIA

Edward M. Baum, FAIA, seeks to provide an alternative to traditional single-family homes by clustering four 1,350-sf residential units that share common interior walls and rigorously controlling construction costs.

Page 22

On the Jobsite with Candid Rogers, AIA

by: Stephen Sharpe, Hon. TSA

It’s just six weeks away from the much-anticipated opening and Candid Rogers, AIA, is walking through his latest project, a former Magnolia Oil service station from the 1920s that is being renovated as a destination dining spot in San Antonio’s nuevo hip Southtown. Subcontractors are readying the floors for millwork scheduled for delivery in a few days. Rogers and his client, local chef Mark Bliss, are both eager to see the custom dining tables in place.

Scott Adams, AIA
Page 67

Garden Ridge Elementary School

by: Stephen Sharpe, Hon. TSA

SHW Group’s design of Garden Ridge Elementary School places the library at the center of campus, with a planted roof above and tubular skylights that draw daylight into the reading areas. Both elements are used as part of the school’s science curriculum, along with above-ground cisterns that collect rainwater and teach students about conservation of natural resources.

Page 73

Nominations Due Feb. 29 for Preservation Texas Awards

Preservation Texas’ 2012 Honor Awards program is open to any individual, organization, business, or agency that is involved with historic preservation in Texas. All projects, activities, or individual service must have been completed between January 2009 and December 2011. Nomination forms and information on award categories are posted at Applicants will be notified by May 1, 2012 as to the status of their award nomination. Awards will be based on the quality of the project, its presentation, significance, and uniqueness. The impacts of the nominee’s project on the community will also be considered.

Page 78

Free Online Resources for ‘Whole Building Design’

A website maintained by the nonprofit National Institute of Building Sciences offers numerous resources at no charge to advance sustainable design, including online continuing education courses approved by the American Institute of Architects. The mission of the Whole Building Design Guide ( is to create successful high-performance buildings through an integrated team approach during a project’s planning and programming phases.

Page 78

Lessons in Survival

by: Ed Soltero, AIA

Throughout the history of human civilization, water has been revered as a life-giving force. Unfortunately, some modern societies have exploited this essential natural resource to deleterious extents. In El Paso, however, there’s a beacon of hope for the education of future generations about water conservation in the Chihuahuan Desert.

Carolyn Bowman Photography
Page 80

An Ordered Approach

by: Kevin W. Sloan, ASLA

Typical projects use spreadsheets for programming. The program for the new University of Texas at Dallas master plan, however, began with a conversation between Peter Walker, FASLA, and Margaret McDermott, a great patron of Dallas’ cultural milieu and widow of the late Texas Instrument co-founder Eugene McDermott. Walker recalls Mrs. McDermott saying, “Look, this is my husband’s and my life’s work. We want to leave this campus in as first class of an order as we can.”

Aerial Photography; Vince Yaeger; PWP Landscape Architecture
Page 40

New Accessibility Rules Become Law

by: Stephen Sharpe, Hon. TSA

On March 15, the long-awaited revisions to state accessibility standards become law. That date represents the culmination of efforts to synchronize overlapping federal and state guidelines that respond to the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. As a result, Texas practitioners will no longer be required to cross-check two sets of regulations to ensure that their projects are conforming to the appropriate laws.

Page 9

2012 Texas AIA Fellows

by: TA Staff

Among the 105 AIA members elevated this year to the AIA College of Fellows, eight are members of the Texas Society of Architects. The 2012 Fellows will be honored at an investiture ceremony during the AIA convention in May. The AIA fellowship program was developed to recognize architects who have made a significant contribution to society and the architecture profession on a national level.

Page 11

Evans Named AIA Young Architect

by: TA Staff

One Texan – James M. Evans, AIA, of Houston – is among the 13 recipients of the 2012 AIA Young Architects Award. Young Architects are defined by the AIA as professionals who have been licensed 10 years or fewer regardless of their age. The award honors individuals who have shown exceptional leadership and made significant contributions to the profession early in their careers.

Page 12

AIA San Antonio Design Awards

After carefully evaluating 60 entries from 24 local architectural firms, jurors for AIA San Antonio’s 2011 Design Awards program announced their selections during ceremonies held on Nov. 4 at Pearl Stable. Attendees also celebrated the recipients of the chapter’s Studio Awards, its Twenty-Five Year Award, and its annual Mayor’s Choice Award honoring a publicly funded architectural project.

Page 14

AIA LRGV Studio Awards

by: TA Staff

Two awards were presented by AIA Lower Rio Grande Valley in the chapter’s 2011 Studio Awards program. Carolina Civarolo, AIA, of Boultinghouse Simpson Architects in McAllen, received the Spark Award for Digital Media for the proposed renovation and expansion of the University of Texas–Pan American’s College of Business Administration in Edinburg. Ortiz Architecture & Environment in Weslaco was recognized with a Design Award for an Unbuilt
Project for its Weslaco Family Care Center & Occupational Medicine Clinic.

Page 16

Texas Among Top 10 States for LEED

Texas ranks eighth among states in the U.S. for the per capita amount of commercial and institutional square footage certified by the LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) rating system in 2011, according to figures released in January by the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC).

Page 65

Four Texas Teams Chosen as Semifinalists in Waller Creek Design Competition

Four Texas firms are among a nationwide total of nine that were chosen Jan. 30 as semifinalists for the Waller Creek Conservancy design competition, from a pool of 31 entries. The competition calls for a redesign of a 1.5-mile stretch of city parkland and urban space along Waller Creek in downtown Austin.

Page 66

Margaret Hunt Hill Opens to Traffic

by: Michael Malone, AIA

On March 29 the first cars rolled across the long-awaited Margaret Hunt Hill Bridge in Dallas. Designed by Spanish architect and engineer Santiago Calatrava, the bridge joins Reunion Tower and Pegasus as a standout on the icon-heavy Dallas skyline. It is named for the matriarch of the Hunt family which, through Hunt Petroleum, donated $12 million to the Trinity River Corridor Project in 2005.

Photos courtesy Craig D. Blackmon , FAIA; Michael Lyon
Page 12

Nine Historic Places Selected for Annual “Most Endangered” List

by: Texas Architect Staff

Preservation Texas, Inc., a statewide partner of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, has released its ninth annual list of “Texas’ Most Endangered Historic Places.” Of the nine sites listed, three are discussed below as having the potential for becoming important catalysts for economic development in their communities if they can be saved.

Photos courtesy Preservation Texas; Magnolia Hotel by Matthew Chase
Page 13

Conference Emphasizes Practice in the Hinterlands

by: Stephen Sharpe, Hon. AIA

For two days in February, a group of designers gathered in Midland to consider the challenges of producing top-flight architecture in a place far removed from the state’s larger urban areas. The event, dubbed “Architecture in the Hinterlands,” included an address by acclaimed Canadian architect Brian MacKay-Lyons that featured his work in remote Nova Scotia.

Thomas McConnell
Page 15

AIA Houston Design Awards

AIA Houston’s 2012 design awards competition resulted in recognition for 21 projects in eight categories out of a total of 127 entries. Eligibility was limited to projects completed within the last five years and located within the Houston metropolitan area or designed by an architect working in the Houston metropolitan area.

Houston Ballet photo by Nic Lehoux; Brockman Hall Photo by Peter Aaron /OTTO; Roy Kelly Garage photo By Dror Baldinger , AIA
Page 18

Recollections of a Lifelong Ham

by: Dave Braden, FAIA

In 1949, when I went to work in the high-profile office of George Dahl, I met Harold (Hagie) Jones. We were both draftsmen working at adjacent tables on the back row, the only degreed architects in a room of 60 architectural draftsmen and a handful of engineers. Hagie was a graduate of Texas A&M and I had my Bachelor of Architecture from UT. While we had our differences, we shared some similarities.

Courtesy David Braden, FAIA
Page 26

Clean Line Energy Partners

by: Noelle Heinze

Designed by Kirksey Architecture, Clean Line Energy Partners in downtown Houston is a 6,700-sf space housing an electricity transmission company that develops electrical transmission lines connecting wind farms to urban areas. Several factors guided the design, including a limited budget of $350,000. The client desired a sustainable, historic headquarters building with a design that would reflect the company’s fresh, hip brand.

Aker/Zvonkovic Photography
Page 72

Propaganda Hair Group

Dick Clark Architecture designed Propaganda Hair Group’s leased, 1,700-sf shell space within the Gables 5th Street Commons building in downtown Austin. The client requested a loft-like space with an open plan, minimal furnishings, and wood and concrete textures. The design focuses on ways to differentiate program areas within a single space, while offering an open atmosphere.

Paul Bardagjy
Page 75

Two Texas Design Firms among Four Waller Creek Competition Finalists

Two Texas design firms are among four design teams that have been chosen as finalists in an international competition to revitalize Austin’s downtown Waller Creek. More than 30 teams entered the competition late last year, and nine semifinalists were chosen in January.

Page 77

EPA’s Annual Energy Star Buildings List Includes Three Texas Cities

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has released its annual listing of U.S. metropolitan areas featuring the most Energy Star certified buildings for 2011, and three Texas cities — Dallas, Fort Worth, and Houston — have made the list. Energy use in commercial buildings accounts for nearly 20 percent of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions at a cost of more than $100 billion per year.

Page 77

AIA Convention and Design Expo, May 17-19, Washington, D.C.

The American Institute of Architects’ 2012 Convention Guide and Daily Schedule are now available online.

Page 78

The Big Idea

by: Stephen Sharpe, Hon. AIA

After almost 12 years at the helm of Texas Architect, I see even more clearly the truth in Burnham’s oftquoted assertion. Having worked so long with architects on articles about topics important to them, I understand the power of the big idea. That’s what drives the project, the impetus that transforms the concept into physical reality. Big ideas, I’ve learned, are essential to the architect.

Patrick Wong
Page 7

To Your Good Health

by: Larry Paul Fuller

In this edition about design for healthcare and wellness, we look at good buildings of both types. But the role of architects in public health goes far beyond their work on the hospitals, clinics, and fitness facilities routinely associated with these two categories. The broader purview includes their role in shaping more livable, sustainable, and healthy communities — the premise being that there is a direct correlation between the design of a community and the health of its people.

Photos by Michael Moran
Page 5

Registration Opens Mid July for Texas Architects Convention

by: TA Staff

Online registration opens mid July for the Texas Society of Architects Convention and Design Expo, October 18-20, in Austin. This year, the convention’s theme is “Influence.”

Page 13

Texas Firms among AIA COTE Award Winners

On April 19, the American Institute of Architects’ Committee on the Environment (AIA–COTE) announced its Top Ten projects for 2012. This year’s batch of winners highlights community ties, social equity, and attentiveness to water issues. One Texas firm and three national/international firms with offices in Texas are among the winners.

Page 14

Independent for Life: Homes and Neighborhoods for an Aging America

by: John V. Nyfeler, FAIA

Architects are faced with the reality that we are an Aging Society.  Among the challenges of this future is the preference of people to “age in place,” living at home, in the same neighborhood. Our suitable homes today will not accommodate our needs as we age.

Page 20

David Webster George

by: Joe Self, AIA

Tucked back in the woods, at the end of a winding path, is an architect working outside of time. But David Webster George, FAIA, arranges patterns and places that are timeless. The unassuming approach to his house in Southlake masks the carefully situated environment he created in 1986, followed by a studio addition in 1991. Deer, coyote, and wild turkey roam the property. David is quick to point out that he resides within the Cross Timbers — a densely packed oak and scrub-bush region that extends from North Texas in a broad swath through Oklahoma and up into Kansas. For David, boundaries are set by nature and not by governments.

Holly Reed
Page 24

Embracing Culture and Place

by: Brian Freese, AIA

The wind blows strong across the low, rolling plains of central Oklahoma. Standing quietly and listening to the wind in this place — where a razor-sharp horizon seams together land and sky — one can sense the spirits of Native Americans who for generations lived and thrived on the land. These were a people who found, after torturous travels westward during the Trail of Tears, a place that in its sheer vastness accepted them and offered the opportunity to rebuild their way of life. And so it was, and so it has been for the Chickasaw Nation in this place of raw and expansive beauty.

Art Grey
Page 38

Worthy of the Mission

by: Gin Kappler-Peeler, AIA

The story of the Moran Family Health Center is larger than just the account of relocating the San Jose Clinic from its outdated and undersized 50-year-old facility in downtown. Its true telling reveals the comprehensive delivery of a range of services that are interconnected and focused on the overall well-being and soundness of families.

Aker Imaging
Page 44

The Big Picture

by: Val Glitsch, FAIA

In 2008 the YMCA of Greater Houston announced the imminent replacement of Kenneth Franzheim’s Italian Renaissance-inspired ten-story edifice that had provided classrooms, exercise facilities, and 132 single-room residential units since 1941. Aspiring to move in a more “family-friendly” direction, the organization stated the primary goal of the new 115,000-sf facility would be to assume a stronger community presence in downtown Houston.

Aker Imaging, Thomas McConnell
Page 50

Fitness Finesse

by: Dan Killebrew, AIA

In a bucolic natural setting of rolling hills, the Northwood Club was established in 1946 by residents of north Dallas to provide golf and recreational activities for young families in an expanding city. The latest addition to the club — the fitness center, completed in 2010 —houses strength training, aerobics, a yoga studio, and child care services, along with food service for pool users and golfers.

 Good Fulton & Farrell Architects
Page 56

For Goodness' Sake

by: Larry Paul Fuller

There is good architecture. And then there is good architecture … as in architecture for the public good. This year’s statewide design award winners — 13 projects from Dallas, Houston, San Antonio, and Austin — are a case in point. I was struck, during the awards jury process, by how intent the jurors were on recognizing certain entries, not only for their merit in terms of design (even design merit as broadly defined), but also for their capacity to fulfill client aspirations for the public good.

Page 7

Charles Ewing Waterhouse, Jr., Architect and Renaissance Man for the Borderland

by: William Palmore

On October 26, a symposium in El Paso will explore the life and career of architect and artist Charles Ewing Waterhouse, Jr. The occasion, scheduled as part of Tom Lea Month, marks the first time a consideration of modern architecture in El Paso is included in the scholarly festivities.

Page 14

McGarrah Jessee Building

by: Adapted from “Midcentury Update,” by Stephen Sharpe, Hon. AIA Texas Architect, March/April, 2011

McGarrah Jessee’s relocation to larger quarters in downtown Austin neatly coincided with the home-grown creative agency’s bursting out of its regional sphere of influence. Affectionately known as McJ, the company has steadily ratcheted up its staffing level as its roster of clients has expanded and its recognition has gone national. Now, after having outgrown its former offices in a converted warehouse, McJ has re-established its base of operations in the Starr Building, a modernist landmark completed in 1954 and designed by local firm Kuehne, Brooks and Barr for the offices of American National Bank. The project achieved widespread acclaim at the time for its distinctively crisp interiors by Florence Knoll and a monumental mural created in situ by Seymour Fogel.

Thomas McConnell
Page 46

I-35 Makeover

by: Canan Yetmen

Downtown Austin’s east-west streets are sliced in half by the northsouth artery of IH-35. To the west, downtown rises, its sparkling towers radiating progress. To the east, the city of days past lingers, its
neighborhoods of humble homes and local businesses resolute. The freeway, elevated at the heart of the city, creates a physical and spiritual divide that has plagued Austin for decades.

Mike Osborne; Jett Butler; Thomas McConnell
Page 50
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