Article Results for "FAIA"

Ispirazione

by: Max Levy, FAIA

Max Levy, FAIA, talks about Venice and finding inspiration in the work of Carlo Scarpa.

Page 11

BIG little house

by: Canan Yetmen

Donna Kacmar, FAIA, has a new book on bigger, small houses in Texas.

Page 17

Why Small?

by: Donna Kacmar, FAIA

Bigger isn’t always better, even in Texas.

Page 31

Lake|Flato Architects Recognized by Interior Design Magazine

Interior Design magazine honorees for its 30th annual Hall of Fame Awards include David Lake, FAIA, and Ted Flato, FAIA, of Lake|Flato Architects.

Page 94

My Middle-Aged City Members Only

by: David Heymann, FAIA

The biological paradigm that explains cities as entities remains in vogue, and David Heymann embraces it for his discussion of Austin’s growing pains.

Page 15

Kenneth E. Bentsen, FAIA (1926–2013)

by: Stephen Fox

Important Houston architect Kenneth Edward Bentsen, FAIA, died on September 24, 2013.

PHOTO OF KENNETH E. BENTSEN, FAIA, COURTESY HIS FAMILY.
Page 19

David W. George, FAIA (1922–2013)

by: V. Aubrey Hallum, AIA Emeritus, and Jeff Hallum, Assoc. AIA

David W. George, FAIA (1922–2013) was an architect’s architect, a gentle¬man’s gentleman, a man without guile.

PHOTO OF DAVID GEORGE, FAIA, BY HOLLY REED.
Page 17

On the Bayou

by: Guy Hagstette, FAIA

An ambitious agenda for linear green space, compatible urban development, flood control, and multi-modal access along 10 miles of the Buffalo Bayou is transforming Houston.

RENDERING COURTESY THOMPSON DESIGN
GROUP AND BUFFALO BAYOU PARTNERSHIP. RENDERINGS COURTESY LAKE|FLATO AND BNIM. PHOTO COURTESY BNIM. PHOTOS OF HOBBY CENTER
BRIDGE AND SABINE PROMENADE COURTESY SWA GROUP AND BUFFALO BAYOU PARTNERSHIP. RENDERINGS COURTESY SWA GROUP.
Page 48

Minding the Gap

by: Gregory Ibañez, FAIA

With the opening of the new restaurant pavilion designed by Thomas Phifer, Klyde Warren Park’s success should only increase — its transformation of downtown Dallas is nothing short of astonishing.

PHOTOS BY THOMAS MCCONNELL AND MEI-CHUN JAU. RENDERING BY THE OFFICE OF JAMES BURNETT.
Page 60

A Walk in the Park with Willis Winters, FAIA

by: Gerald Moorhead, FAIA

Willis Winters, FAIA, is in the position to have the greatest impact on the quality of life in Dallas of any public official.

Nicole Mlakar
Page 86

Materials and Sustainability

by: Donna Kacmar, FAIA

The Materials Research Collaborative at the University of Houston is pushing sustainability and providing valuable tools for the students and local design community.

PHOTOS OF MRC BY JULIE PIZZO WOOD
Page 13

Society of Architectural Historians in Austin

by: Gerald Moorhead, FAIA

The 67th Annual Conference of the Society of Architectural Historians (SAH) will be held in Austin April 9–13.

PHOTO BY DAVID SCHALLIOL COURTESY SOCIETY OF ARCHITECTURAL HISTORIANS
PHOTO OF THE GREAT CREATE COURTESY NASHER SCULPTURE CENTER
Page 19

Raymond Brochstein, FAIA

by: Nonya Grenader, FAIA

Houston's fearless leader, Raymond Brochstein, FAIA, demonstrates and demands excellence.

Photography by Julie Pizzo Wood
Page 88

Preservation Texas Honor Awards

Award winners announced for the 2013 Preservation Texas Honor Awards.

Page 19

Playing Up Waller Creek

by: Catherine Gavin

Austin’s Waller Creek Conservancy continues its mission to draw attention to the neglected urban waterway. Waller Wall, a temporary installation designed by UT Austin students and Murray Legge, FAIA, was on display at SXSW.

Photos by Casey Dunn and Patrick Wong
Page 9

Painted Churches

by: Gerald Moorhead, FAIA

The unexpected, rich colors of the interiors of the “Painted Churches” found across South Texas are important examples of the state’s late 19th-century architectural heritage.

Page 13

The Boatmakers’ Craft

by: Ingrid Spencer

Shipley Architects designed a house that only boat-builders could detail so effortlessly.

Michael Burns
Page 46

Subtle Layers

by: Heather McKinney, FAIA

Rammed earth wall, rippling Venetian plaster, and colorful-blocks of the Margo Sawyer designed art walls, Page’s Torcasso residence achieves the sublime.

Robert Reck
Page 60

AIA Austin Awards

AIA Austin announced the recipients of its 2014 Design and Honor awards competition in May. The jury included Steve Dumez, FAIA, of New Orleans, and Marsha Maytum, FAIA, of San Francisco.

Page 18

Designing for Density

by: Richard M. Miller, FAIA
Architect: James M. Evans, AIA

Mt. Vernon Townhomes, designed by Houston-based Collaborative Designworks, maximizes Houston’s denser-development possibilities and adds a handsome multifamily project to Montrose.

Benjamin Hill Photography
Page 34

Notes on a Jury

by: Catherine Gavin

The statewide design awards wrapped up, and according to juror Marlon Blackwell, FAIA, there “is not a lot of formal gymnastics, just good, sound building.”

Page 9

Munday Library

by: Gerald Moorhead, FAIA
Architect: Fiske Crowell, FAIA

The Munday Library makes its place in architectural history by learning from its predecessors, rather than mimicking them, and by finding modern purposes for very old spatial types.

Casey Dunn Photography
Page 78

Elliot’s “Ugly Drawings”

by: Catherine Gavin

Rand Elliot, FAIA, claims he loves his “ugly drawings” for their power, not their grace.

Page 7

My Beautiful City Austin

by: David Heymann, FAIA

David Heymann, FAIA, talks about Austin’s laid-back lifestyle and why he moved here to practice architecture.

Page 11

Pratt Collection

by: Michael Malone, AIA

James Pratt, FAIA, has gifted his archives to the Hunt Institute for Engineering and Humanity at Southern Methodist University.

Page 17

Risky Habit[at]: Dynamic Living on the Buffalo Bayou

Risky Habit[at]: Dynamic Living on the Buffalo Bayou, by Peter Jay Zweig, FAIA, of the University of Houston, is among the 2014 Studio Award winners.

Page 27

...with Clovis Heimsath, FAIA

by: Lawrence Connolly, AIA

Although, keeping up with him has never been easy, Clovis Heimsath, FAIA, is a testament to architecture being a calling and not a profession — his practice and his lifestyle are seamless.

Julie Pizzo Wood
Page 60

2013 Texas AIA Fellows

AIA has announced the 2013 members of the College of Fellows, and 13 are members of the Texas Society of Architects

Page 16

A Fresh Patina

by: Gregory Ibañez, FAIA

The Gensler-designed Patina store, a new retail concept offering floor and wall-covering products along with in-house interior design consultation in Dallas, is an ambi¬tious attempt by Acme Brick to fill a void in the marketplace while creating an entirely new shopping model.

Bruce Damonte Photography
Page 46

Eugene George, FAIA: 1922-2013

by: Stephen Sharpe, Hon. AIA

W. Eugene George, FAIA, one of the leading architects in the historic preservation movement, passed away on January 16, 2013. George will long be remembered for his invaluable contributions to the conservation of the architectural heritage of the State of Texas, and for his profound influence on students and professional leaders alike.

Convention photo by Acme Brick; Portrait courtesy Mary Carolyn Hollers George
Page 8

William F. Stern, FAIA: 1947-2013

by: Rives Taylor, FAIA

William “Bill” Stern, FAIA, of Houston, who passed away in March of 2013, is remembered as a passionate advocate of urban planning, design, and fine arts. He contributed 36 years of design rigor, public advocacy and engagement, and often passionate leadership to the architecture and design community in Houston.

HEADSHOT COURTESY ERIC HESTER; PORCH IMAGE COURTESY DAVID BUCEK, FAIA
Page 11

Buildings of Texas, Volume One

by: Catherine Gavin

Geared for those with architectural wanderlust, “Buildings of Texas, Volume One” by Gerald Moorhead, FAIA, offers insights into the diversity of architecture throughout the state, and the promise that the travel to the metropo¬lises and hinterlands will be worth it.

photo by Elizabeth Hackler
Page 18

Streets, Plazas, Stairs

by: J. Sinclair Black, FAIA

Built into a bowl between the mountains, the topography of the historic town of Taxco, Mexico is radical, and the streets are not only narrow, but also extremely steep.

sketch by J. Sinclair Black, FAIA
Page 23

4415 Perry Street

by: Filo Castore, AIA

Designed by Val Glitsch, FAIA, for New Hope Housing — an independent nonprofit organization that offers quality, affordable single-room occupancy (SRO) housing to low-income-earning adults — 4415 Perry Street in Houston is a sustainable solution for an underserved population.

Hiebert Photography & Professional Imaging
Page 24

Preservation In Houston

by: David C. Bucek, FAIA

With its 20 protected historic districts, Houston is a city that is increasingly embracing both old and new.

PHOTOS BY PAUL HESTER AND JULIE PIZZO WOOD
Page 40

Reuse, Recycle, and Reinvent

by: Ben Koush

Studio RED Architects’ rehabilitation of a former warehouse for use as the Houston Permitting Center was centered on rigorously researched sustainability, deference to the industrial character of the old building, and the installation of an intensely local public art program.

Hester + Hardaway Photographers; MN | Photography
Page 48

Johnson Renewed

by: Gerald Moorhead, FAIA

Bodron+Fruit’s careful rehabilitation and restoration of Philip Johnson’s Beck House in Dallas resulted in a livable home that is true to both its historic character and the lifestyle of the new owners.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA; David McWilliams
Page 54

In the Trenches with Emily Little, FAIA

by: Canan Yetmen

Judging by the dozens of construction projects currently underway in Austin’s historic core, preservation architect Emily Little, FAIA, won’t be getting bored any time soon.

Nicole Mlakar
Page 71

Uncovering Spanish Frescos

by: Rebecca Roberts

The discovery of original Spanish frescos in San Antonio’s Mission Concepción guided the restoration of the interior led by Carolyn Peterson, FAIA, of Ford, Powell & Carson.

MARK MENJIVAR
Page 80

Light Sketches

by: Max Levy, FAIA

Max Levy, FAIA, knows how to bring daylight into a room in beautiful and creative ways. “Light Sails,” rods, trellises, and apertures in the ceiling, these five sketches demonstrate why he is a master of light.

Max Levy, FAIA
Page 32

Weekend with Turrell

by: Nonya Grenader, FAIA

Houston is home to three permanent installations by artist James Turrell: “Skyspace” at Live Oak Friends Meeting House; “The Light inside” at Wilson Tunnel, Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; and “Twilight Epiphany” Skyspace at Rice University. Each yields distinctly different effects, yet they are profoundly connected by the artist’s immersive exploration of light.

PHOTO COURTESY MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, HOUSTON. PHOTOS OF THE LIVE OAK MEETING HOUSE BY PAUL HESTER. PHOTOS OF “THE LIGHT INSIDE” AND “ARCO” COURTESY MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, HOUSTON. PHOTOS BY CASEY DUNN AND JULIE PIZZO WOOD.
Page 34

Made in the Shade

by: Kevin Sloan

Natural light is essential to architecture, but when thinking about the sunlight in Texas, one of its qualities seems to dominate all the others: heat. Shade structures by architects Bud Oglesby, FAIA; O’Neil Ford, FAIA; Max Levy, FAIA; Murray Legge, FAIA; and Foster + Partners provide significant examples of passive designs to beat the heat.

PHOTO COURTESY LZT ARCHITECTS. PHOTOS BY BILL MILLER PHOTOGRAPHY. ELEVATIONS COURTESY MAX LEVY ARCHITECT. PHOTOS COURTESY LZT ARCHITECTS AND FORD, POWELL & CARSON. PHOTO BY CHARLES DAVIS SMITH, AIA.
Page 40

Nature Meets Science

by: Gregory Ibañez, FAIA

Morphosis Architects has claimed possibly the most visible place in the conversation about Dallas’ object buildings with the fractured, vertical form of the Perot Museum of Nature and Science.

Thomas McConnell
Page 66

WJE Office Building

by: TA Staff

When PageSoutherlandPage proposed using high thermal mass concrete walls as a means of reducing energy consumption in the new office building for Austin engineers Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates, the team saw it as an interesting case for experimentation.

Casey Dunn Photography
Page 74

...with Richard Payne, FAIA

by: Lawrence Speck, FAIA

An icon and indisputably the dean of architectural photographers in Texas, Richard Payne, FAIA, has been a registered architect since 1964 and a full-time architectural photographer for almost 45 years.

Nicole Mlakar
Page 83

Simplicity and Restraint

by: Catherine Gavin, Editor

The 2013 Texas Architects Design Awards jurors: Ann Beha, FAIA, of Ann Beha Architects in Boston; Julie Eizenberg, AIA, of Koning Eizenberg in Santa Monica; and Douglas Stockman, AIA, of el dorado in Kansas City honored a refreshing batch of 11 projects for their design excellence.

PHOTO OF HILLSIDE RESIDENCE BY CASEY DUNN PHOTOGRAPHY. PHOTO OF WEBB CHAPEL PARK
PAVILION BY EDUARD HUEBER/ARCHPHOTO. PHOTO OF FIRE|BEACH HOUSE BY ANDREW POGUE.
Page 11

On the AIA and Coming Together

by: Jeff Potter, FAIA

Jeff Potter, FAIA, discusses the need to collaborate across disciplines and encourage membership to ensure the longevity of the architectural profession.

PHOTO BY HOLLY REED.
Page 15

Notes on a Jury

by: Brian William Kuper, AIA

Texas Society of Architects 2013 Design Awards jurors: Ann Beha, FAIA, Ann Beha Architects, Boston; Julie Eizenberg, AIA, Koning Eizenberg in Santa Monica, Calif.; and Douglas Stockman, AIA, el dorado, Kansas City, Mo. awarded 11 designs as this years winners.

PHOTOS BY JULIE PIZZO WOOD.
Page 36

Renovation of 714 Main Street

by: Gerald Moorhead, FAIA

Using the original 1930s drawings, Schwarz Hanson Architects reconstructed the entire base 714 Main Street in Fort Worth — and this was just the beginning of the work to bring the building back to life.

Daniel Stober andJohn Roberts, AIA
Page 46

Webb Chapel Park Pavilion

by: Catherine Gavin

With its surprising cantilever and thin slits of blue sky framed in bright yellow, Cooper Joseph Studio’s Webb Chapel Park Pavilion in Dallas is a straightforward, yet playful design.

Eduard Hueber/ArchPhoto
Page 54

T3 Parking Structure

by: Rebecca Roberts

Parking has never been so pretty; the T3 Parking Structure in Austin, by Danze Blood Architects, uses design to redefine the typically banal experience of parking.

Whit Preston
Page 66

Val Glitsch, FAIA, Texas Architects 2014 President

by: Nonya Grenader, FAIA

When Val Glitsch, FAIA, begins her presidency of the Texas Society of Architects in 2014, she will bring with her the experience of 30 years as principal of her own distinguished firm and 15 years of meaningful leadership with the Society’s programs.

PHOTOS COURTESY VAL GLITSCH, FAIA. PHOTO OF PERRY STREET
BY HIEBERT PHOTOGRAPHY & PROFESSIONAL IMAGING.
Page 14

Elizabeth Chu Richter, FAIA

by: Lauraine Miller, Hon. TxA

CEO of Richter Architects in Corpus Christi, Elizabeth Chu Richter, FAIA, is the 2014 first vice president/2015 president of the American Institute of Architects. A tireless advocate for Texas architecture, Richter was the creator and co-executive producer of “The Shape of Texas.”

PHOTOS COURTESY RICHTER ARCHITECTS. PHOTO OF HARTE RESEARCH INSTITUTE FOR GULF OF MEXICO
STUDIES BY DAVID RICHTER, FAIA. PHOTO OF NATIONAL MUSEUM OF THE PACIFIC WAR BY JOE AKER.
Page 15

Obituary: In Memory of Natalie de Blois, FAIA (1921–2013)

by: Emily Little, FAIA

In 1980, when Natalie de Blois, FAIA, hit Austin, she dove into local politics, zoning issues, and Barton Springs Pool with gusto. She also just happened to be a woman who had designed some of the most innovative modern buildings in the United States.

PORTRAIT COURTESY SOM. PHOTO OF THE UNION CARBIDE BUILDING
BY EZRA STOLLER/ESTO. COURTESY SOM. PHOTOS OF SOM BUILDINGS BY EZRA STOLLER/ESTO. COURTESY SOM. PHOTOS
OF GINGERBREAD BUILD-OFF AND BOOK COVER COURTESY AIA HOUSTON.
Page 23

Texas Society of Architects Honor Awards

The Texas Society of Architects announces the recipients of our 2013 Honor Awards.

Page 29

Giesecke and Vosper at Texas A&M

by: Nancy McCoy, FAIA

In the midst of the Great Depression, two architects, Dr. Frederick E. Giesecke and Samuel C. P. Vosper, transformed the campus of Texas A&M University with 10 new buildings in just five years.

Thomas McConnell
Page 37

R J Marfa


Architect: Rand Elliott, FAIA, of Elliott + Associates Architects

The minimalist design R J Marfa by Rand Elliott, FAIA, of Elliott + Associates Architects strips out everything unnecessary to become an object in the landscape.

Page 41

More SROs for Houston Non-Profit

by: Texas Architect Staff

Just two months after breaking ground on its sixth single-room-occupancy (SRO) residential complex in Houston, New Hope Housing has announced plans to build a seventh. The non-profit organization, recognized for establishing a successful model for SRO properties in Texas, expects to accommodate a total of 964 low-income residents with rent-stabilized apartments by autumn 2013.

Rendering Courtesy Val Glitsch Architect
Page 14

Anderson Todd Celebrates 90 Years

by: Stephen Fox

Former students, colleagues, friends, and family of longtime Rice University architecture professor Anderson Todd, FAIA, gathered on Oct. 21 to celebrate his ninetieth birthday.

Courtesy Rice University School of Architecture
Page 16

AIA Fort Worth 2011 Design Awards

by: Tom Manganiello, Assoc. AIA

Recipients of the AIA Fort Worth’s 2011 Excellence in Design program were announced on Oct. 18 at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth. Jurors for the annual competition were Julie VandenBerg Snow, FAIA, of Julie Snow Architects in Minneapolis; Chris Carson, FAIA, of Ford Powell & Carson Architects & Planners in San Antonio; and Mark T. Wellen, AIA, of Rhotenberry Wellen Architects in Midland.

Page 18

AIA LRGV 2011 Design Awards

by: Texas Architect Staff

The jury for the Lower Rio Grande Valley AIA chapter’s 2011 Design Awards Jury selected four projects for recognition. Jurors were Thomas Hayne Upchurch, AIA, of Brenham; Rick del Monte, FAIA, of Dallas; Donna Kacmar, FAIA, of Houston.

Page 20

Prototype Housing for Modest Means


Architect: Edward M. Baum, FAIA

Edward M. Baum, FAIA, seeks to provide an alternative to traditional single-family homes by clustering four 1,350-sf residential units that share common interior walls and rigorously controlling construction costs.

Page 22

The Education of an Architect

by: Frank Welch, FAIA

By the time I graduated from high school, I had begun to think about becoming an architect. I was visual, very influenced by movies and Life magazine. I liked to draw, but I was afraid of the technical courses that were required, the math and physics.

Holly Reed
Page 24

Texan Inaugurated as AIA President

Jeffery Potter, FAIA, vice president of POTTER Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Planning, was inaugurated as the 88th president of the American Institute of Architects (AIA) during ceremonies held Dec. 9 at the Library of Congress in Washington, DC. He succeeds Clark D. Manus, FAIA, in representing the more than 76,000 AIA members.

Page 76

An Ordered Approach

by: Kevin W. Sloan, ASLA

Typical projects use spreadsheets for programming. The program for the new University of Texas at Dallas master plan, however, began with a conversation between Peter Walker, FASLA, and Margaret McDermott, a great patron of Dallas’ cultural milieu and widow of the late Texas Instrument co-founder Eugene McDermott. Walker recalls Mrs. McDermott saying, “Look, this is my husband’s and my life’s work. We want to leave this campus in as first class of an order as we can.”

Aerial Photography; Vince Yaeger; PWP Landscape Architecture
Page 40

Teaching Tool

by: Donna Kacmar, FAIA

As soon as you’ve parked your car (mine was parked in one of the spaces reserved for high-efficiency vehicles) and walk toward Gloria Marshall Elementary School, you realize this is not your average public school building. The covered path leads you past an “eco-garden”—laid out with individual planting beds for each grade and an adjacent pond, both fed by runoff from the roof drains and rainfall captured in an above-ground 5,000-gallon cistern.

Luis Ayala
Page 48

Ricardo Legorreta Vilchis (1931-2011)

by: Edward R. Burian

Considered by many to be an ambassador for Mexican culture, world-renowned architect Ricardo Legorreta, Hon. FAIA, died in Mexico City on Dec. 30 at the age of 80. Among the best known contemporary architects of Mexico, Legorreta received numerous awards and his work was extensively published. Legorreta received the 2000 AIA Gold Medal for his life’s work of inspiring architecture. His passing marks the end of an era of modern architecture in Mexico and the region.

Graciela Iturbide
Page 8

2012 Texas AIA Fellows

by: TA Staff

Among the 105 AIA members elevated this year to the AIA College of Fellows, eight are members of the Texas Society of Architects. The 2012 Fellows will be honored at an investiture ceremony during the AIA convention in May. The AIA fellowship program was developed to recognize architects who have made a significant contribution to society and the architecture profession on a national level.

Page 11

Catalytic Jam

by: Fernando Brave, FAIA

Like the music that inspired Dan Havel and Dean Ruck of Havel Ruck Projects to make Fifth Ward Jam, their latest collaboration is a social experiment. The duo, with help from local resident Sherman Miller, assembled Fifth Ward Jam using materials scavenged from dilapidated buildings in the Houston neighborhood.

Havel Ruck Projects and Fernando Brave
Page 68

Conference Emphasizes Practice in the Hinterlands

by: Stephen Sharpe, Hon. AIA

For two days in February, a group of designers gathered in Midland to consider the challenges of producing top-flight architecture in a place far removed from the state’s larger urban areas. The event, dubbed “Architecture in the Hinterlands,” included an address by acclaimed Canadian architect Brian MacKay-Lyons that featured his work in remote Nova Scotia.

Thomas McConnell
Page 15

Recollections of a Lifelong Ham

by: Dave Braden, FAIA

In 1949, when I went to work in the high-profile office of George Dahl, I met Harold (Hagie) Jones. We were both draftsmen working at adjacent tables on the back row, the only degreed architects in a room of 60 architectural draftsmen and a handful of engineers. Hagie was a graduate of Texas A&M and I had my Bachelor of Architecture from UT. While we had our differences, we shared some similarities.

Courtesy David Braden, FAIA
Page 26

In the Light with Charles K. Thompson, FAIA

by: Larry Paul Fuller

It’s a Monday morning at Archillume Lighting Design in Austin. Founder Charles Thompson, FAIA, is just now back from a four-day road trip on his 2009 Harley Davidson Ultra Classic. His time on the open road to Big Bend and back has helped to recharge his energy and clear his mind. So he’s ready for whatever awaits him.

Julie Pizzo
Page 67

Is Drawing Dead?

by: Bryce A. Weigand, FAIA

To explore the future of drawing in this digital age, the Yale School of Architecture hosted a symposium February 9-11 entitled “Is Drawing Dead?” Approximately 450 architects, students, historians, theorists, neurologists, digital gurus, and professors gathered in Hastings Hall in the Paul Rudolph-designed School of Architecture building to discuss and debate the question — an issue accentuated by the ready availability of digital drawing resources.

Julie Pizzo
Page 80

John S. Chase, FAIA (1925-2012)

by: Stephen Fox

John Saunders Chase died in Houston on March 29, 2012, at the age of 87. Chase was the first African American to enroll in and graduate from the architecture program at the University of Texas at Austin (March 1952), the first African American to be registered as an architect in Texas (1954), the first architect of his race in Texas to become a member of the American Institute of Architects (1954), and also the first architect of his race in Texas to be elected to Fellowship in the AIA (1990).

Archival photo courtesy Center for American History; Humanities Building © Gerald Moorhead, FAIA; Portrait by Robert Pandya, courtesy The Alcalde
Page 8

everyday

by: Larry Paul Fuller

Like the other two books highlighted here, everyday, by Leonard Volk, will be part of the featured activities (including book-signings by authors) in the AIA-Austin-hosted Reading Room at the Texas Society of Architects Convention and Design Expo in Austin October 18-20.

Page 20

The Architect’s Guide to Residential Design

by: Heather McKinney, FAIA

I am predisposed to like any book described as “A practical guide….” This book did not disappoint. Scrubbed free of architecteze and self-aggrandizement, the book offers simple, solid advice. Aimed at the architect (or future architect) reader, it is a primer that can teach even old dogs new tricks.

Page 20

Independent for Life: Homes and Neighborhoods for an Aging America

by: John V. Nyfeler, FAIA

Architects are faced with the reality that we are an Aging Society.  Among the challenges of this future is the preference of people to “age in place,” living at home, in the same neighborhood. Our suitable homes today will not accommodate our needs as we age.

Page 20

David Webster George

by: Joe Self, AIA

Tucked back in the woods, at the end of a winding path, is an architect working outside of time. But David Webster George, FAIA, arranges patterns and places that are timeless. The unassuming approach to his house in Southlake masks the carefully situated environment he created in 1986, followed by a studio addition in 1991. Deer, coyote, and wild turkey roam the property. David is quick to point out that he resides within the Cross Timbers — a densely packed oak and scrub-bush region that extends from North Texas in a broad swath through Oklahoma and up into Kansas. For David, boundaries are set by nature and not by governments.

Holly Reed
Page 24

On the Road with Alexis McKinney, AIA, LEED AP

by: Noelle Heinze

For Alexis McKinney, AIA, the “road to registration” has led to the past. And today, her interest in historic preservation has led to downtown Houston, where McKinney and colleague Gerald Moorhead, FAIA, peruse two historic houses (1904 and 1905) that have been “mothballed” and relocated to a dramatic site yards from the city’s 42,000-seat baseball stadium. The project is one of several McKinney is working on.

Julie Pizzo
Page 61

AIA Releases Annual Institute Update

During the May 19 American Institute of Architects Business Meeting at the AIA Convention in Washington, D.C, EVP/Chief Executive Officer Robert Ivy, FAIA, began his presentation with the simple idea that now is a time of profound change within the Institute and beyond, as evidenced by the ambitious repositioning effort the AIA announced in April, the demographic transitions that will soon remake the AIA’s membership base, and the still-struggling economy that has left architects unmoored in an unstable financial climate for the last few years.

Page 75

Embracing Culture and Place

by: Brian Freese, AIA

The wind blows strong across the low, rolling plains of central Oklahoma. Standing quietly and listening to the wind in this place — where a razor-sharp horizon seams together land and sky — one can sense the spirits of Native Americans who for generations lived and thrived on the land. These were a people who found, after torturous travels westward during the Trail of Tears, a place that in its sheer vastness accepted them and offered the opportunity to rebuild their way of life. And so it was, and so it has been for the Chickasaw Nation in this place of raw and expansive beauty.

Art Grey
Page 38

The Big Picture

by: Val Glitsch, FAIA

In 2008 the YMCA of Greater Houston announced the imminent replacement of Kenneth Franzheim’s Italian Renaissance-inspired ten-story edifice that had provided classrooms, exercise facilities, and 132 single-room residential units since 1941. Aspiring to move in a more “family-friendly” direction, the organization stated the primary goal of the new 115,000-sf facility would be to assume a stronger community presence in downtown Houston.

Aker Imaging, Thomas McConnell
Page 50

The Hodge Orr Residence

by: by Michael Malone, AIA
Architect: David W George, FAIA

The Dallas neighborhood of Preston Hollow is home to a number of well-designed and often very significant houses by nationally recognized architects — Frank Lloyd Wright, Richard Meier, Steven Holl, and Edward Larrabee Barnes, to name a few. The neighborhood also has a considerable representation of local talent (including Max Levy, Russell Buchanan, Mark Wellen, Svend Fruit, Frank Welch, and Howard Meyer).

Thomas McConnell
Page 30

Notes on a Jury

by: Brian William Kuper, AIA

Our 2012 Design Awards jury met at the Texas Architects headquarters in Austin on June 7 and 8 to review the 227 entries submitted in this year’s program. As Chair of the 2012-2013 Design Committee, I enjoyed the privilege of being present during the deliberations of three distinguished and insightful jurors: Angie Brooks, AIA, of Brooks + Scarpa in LA; Eddie Jones, AIA, of Jones Studio in Phoenix; and James Timberlake, FAIA, of Kieran Timberlake in Philadelphia.

Page 28

Brownwood Park Pavilions

by: Eurico Francisco

The pavilions at Brownwood Park in north Dallas seem deceptively simple. The three structures — conceived by architect Joe McCall, FAIA, as “The Huddle” —appear at first to be a lighthearted concoction of shapes, colors, and textures. Get closer, though, and a clear idea supported by design rigor becomes evident.

Craig D. Blackmon, FAIA; Joe McCall, FAIA
Page 30

Tellepsen Family Downtown YMCA

by: Adapted from “The Big Picture,” by Val Glitsch, FAIA Texas Architect, July/August, 2012

In 2008 the YMCA of Greater Houston announced the imminent replacement of Kenneth Franzheim’s Italian Renaissance-inspired ten-story edifice that had provided classrooms, exercise facilities, and 132 single-room residential units since 1941. Aspiring to move in a more “family-friendly” direction, the organization stated the primary goal of the new 115,000-sf facility would be to assume a stronger community presence in downtown Houston.

Aker Imaging, Thomas McConnell
Page 70

Italy/Texas

by: Texas Architect Staff

"At once wistful and thought-provoking, light-hearted and profound.” That is how Dallas architect and contributing editor Max Levy, FAIA, described the set of Italy/Texas photo collages represented here in the following selections. We agree with Max that the images, created by UT School of Architecture student Emily Wiegand, are fascinating and promise to be a source of delight for our readers.

Emily Wiegand
Page 120

ArCH Hosts Deans’ Roundtable

by: Ardis Clinton, AIA

The Architecture Center Houston (ArCH) hosted a Deans’ Roundtable Discussion in September. Moderated by Larry Speck, FAIA, he opened the discussion with a national statistic that only 35% of architecture faculty are registered architects.

ArCH
Page 10

Texas Society of Architects 25-Year Award

by: Willis Winters, FAIA

Temple Emanu-El in Dallas, one of the most distinguished works of contemporary architecture in Texas built during the 1950s, has been recognized by a jury to receive the Texas Society of Architects 25-Year Award for 2012.

Craig D. Blackmon, FAIA
Page 13

... with Bill Wilson, FAIA

by: Laura N. Bennett, AIA

On the evening of Tuesday, July 31, 2012, a modest gathering of Bill Wilson supporters met at the Butter Churn Restaurant in Sinton to discover the results of a hard-fought Republican primary runoff election for the Texas Representative District 43 seat. After a long day at the office, I hopped in my car and sped to Sinton to join my colleague on this important night.

Julie Pizzo Wood, David Keith
Page 65

Redeveloping Student Life

by: Lawrence Speck, FAIA, David Sharratt, and Samuel Wilson

Is it possible for architecture to transform, not just the physical character of a place, but also the behavior and patterns of life of people who live there? Can we think of redevelopment, not just in terms of changing buildings and spaces, but also in terms of altering interactions, attitudes, and lifestyles? Architects would tend to answer “yes” to both questions. And, fortunately, there is evidence to back them up.

Brian Mihealsick, Thomas McConnell, and Chris Cooper
Page 42

Enfield Residence

by: Thomas Hayne Upchurch
Architect: Frank Welch & Associates

Being the architect on the house for his daughter, Liz Tirrell, and her family, was “like a surgeon operating on his own daughter,” says Frank Welch, FAIA. While he admits to being “very nervous” about the project, she recalls the experience as “fun” and one that offered fresh insights into her father’s extraordinary design skills.

Charles David Smith
Page 33

Fourteen Texans Elevated to FAIA

by: TA Staff

This year, 14 architects from Texas have earned an “F” – as in “FAIA” – for their significant contributions to the architectural profession. They are included in a nationwide total of 104 AIA members elevated to its College of Fellows.

Page 10

Speck Awarded AIA Topaz Medallion

by: TA Staff

Lawrence Speck, FAIA, professor and former dean at the University of Texas at Austin School of Architecture and a principal of Page Southerland Page, has been awarded the American Institute of Architects’ 2011 Topaz Medallion for Excellence in Architecture Education.

Page 12

1810 Bermuda

by: Michael Malone
Architect: Ron Wommack Architect

When Dee Mitchell first contacted Ron Wommack, FAIA, about the possibility of designing his new house, Mitchell said he intended to interview five architects and visit with each of them three times before deciding which one would get the commission. Later, when he called to tell Wommack he had the job, Mitchell offered that he so enjoyed visiting with him that he didn’t want the conversation to end.

Charles David Smith
Page 26

Excellence Overruled

by: Ed Soltero
Architect: Antoine Predock Architect, WHPacific

The face of federal architecture was certainly revamped under the auspices of the General Services Administration’s Design Excellence Program inaugurated in 1994 under the leadership of Ed Feiner, FAIA. Without question, the GSA’s revised protocol for the design of federal facilities represented a radical departure from the concrete bunkers and sterile buildings developed during Lyndon B. Johnson’s Great Society domestic programs era.

Alexander Vertikoff
Page 62

Hal Box, FAIA: Visionary Educator

by: Lawrence Speck

Hal Box, FAIA, had a greater impact on architectural education in Texas than any single individual in the state’s history. He was a visionary and a consummate doer. He imagined a much more prominent position for Texas architecture in a national and international context, and he worked tirelessly and skillfully to use architectural education as a means to reach that ambitious goal.

Box Family, Marsha Miller, UT Austin School of Architecture
Page 12

Stone-Face

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: Holzman Moss Bottino Architecture with ArchiTexas

Stone has long held the fascination of Malcolm Holzman, FAIA. Since the late 1970s, he has designed buildings around the U.S. that feature stone from local quarries in increasingly conspicuous ways. His experimentations with native limestone over the past two decades have yielded noteworthy public buildings in several places across Texas. The New York-based architect even wrote a book, Stonework, in which he paid homage to the ubiquitous natural material that provided ancient civilizations the world over with the means to erect monuments and structures that have stood for millennia.

Craig Blackmon, FAIA
Page 38

Anatomy of a Wall

by: Chuck Naeve

When Malcolm Holzman, FAIA, first approached Architectural Engineers Collaborative with the desire to use load-bearing stone in a modern building, he rekindled ideas that we at AEC I had been discussing for many years. Like Holzman, we were enamored with the capacity of stone to provide robust and beautiful buildings that last for centuries. We were also dissatisfied by common stone veneer where the stone functions largely as a rain-screen or an ornamental part of the facade.

Page 44

North Texas Showcase on Sustainability

by: Betsy del Monte, FAIA

There were some unusual sightings in Dallas in mid-July—pedestrians, lots of them, in spite of 101-degree heat. The occasion was the North Texas Sustainable Showcase 2011 that was staged at several venues within an easy walk from each other, giving reason for why many of the nearly 300 attendees were strolling along the sidewalks—a welcome site for the newly thriving Uptown neighborhood.

Greensourcedfw.Org
Page 20
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