Article Results for "Restaurant"

Minding the Gap

by: Gregory Ibañez, FAIA

With the opening of the new restaurant pavilion designed by Thomas Phifer, Klyde Warren Park’s success should only increase — its transformation of downtown Dallas is nothing short of astonishing.

PHOTOS BY THOMAS MCCONNELL AND MEI-CHUN JAU. RENDERING BY THE OFFICE OF JAMES BURNETT.
Page 60

Uchiko

by: Texas Architect Staff

Completed in June 2010 by Michael Hsu Office of Architecture, Uchiko is a 4,954-sf sister restaurant to one of Austin’s popular restaurants, Uchi, which is operated by Chef Tyson Cole.

Paul Bardagjy
Page 55

Triniti Restaurant

by: Texas Architect Staff

MC2 Architects renovated a 1936 Houston art-deco building for its client, the owners of Triniti Restaurant. Perforated aluminum panels now clad the restaurant and diffuse the intense Texas sun in the interior space.

Stephen Gutierrez
Page 56

hopdoddy

by: Texas Architect Staff

The popular Austin burger spot, hopdoddy reflects recent trends in restaurant design. Located in West Anderson Plaza, which was renovated by Levy Architects, the interior build out was completed by Aubrey Carter Design Office in collaboration with their client Chuck Smith.

Casey Dunn, Matt Lankes
Page 58

... with Bill Wilson, FAIA

by: Laura N. Bennett, AIA

On the evening of Tuesday, July 31, 2012, a modest gathering of Bill Wilson supporters met at the Butter Churn Restaurant in Sinton to discover the results of a hard-fought Republican primary runoff election for the Texas Representative District 43 seat. After a long day at the office, I hopped in my car and sped to Sinton to join my colleague on this important night.

Julie Pizzo Wood, David Keith
Page 65

The Monterey

by: Catherine Gavin

A former gas station turned gastropub, The Monterey is helping to create a culinary outpost in San Antonio’s Southtown district.

Page 72

The Park’s Restaurant and Pavilion


Architect: Thomas Phifer and Partners of New York

The 5.2-acre park currently under construction over Woodall Rodgers Freeway on the north side of downtown Dallas will feature a performance pavilion and an adjacent restaurant, both designed by Thomas Phifer and Partners of New York, along with other public amenities.

Page 20

Designs of Trolley Stops Chosen For Dallas’ Bustling West Village

by: Paul Pascarelli

In the heart of the lively neighborhood called Uptown Dallas, the M-Line of the McKinney Avenue Transit Authority covers a 3.5-mile circuit with a fleet of preserved historic trolley cars. The vintage trolleys are an important link in an urban mass-transit system that connects Uptown Dallas with the downtown to the south, shuttling local residents and visitors to popular restaurants, shops, and night spots. At the upper reaches of Uptown is the live/work/play enclave known as West Village, located at the intersection of McKinney and Lemmon.

Page 20

Silo

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: Sprinkle & Co. Architects (formerly Sprinkle Robey Architects)

Designed by Sprinkle & Co. Architects and completed in 2008, Silo’s second San Antonio location occupies 8,900 square feet and two floors within a suburban retail development. The owners requested that the architects preserve but also refresh the restaurant’s identity.

Chris Cooper; Paul Hester
Page 58

Paggi House

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: J Square Architecture

Sited on a bluff overlooking Austin’s downtown skyline and Lady Bird Lake, the Paggi House recently underwent renovations that restore the original 1840s structure while adding a contemporary twist. Re-imagined by J Square Architecture, the 5,523-sf restaurant, which once served as an inn and a family home, gained a new roof, outdoor bar/dining space, restroom, and office.

J Square Architecture; Rebecca Fondren Photography
Page 58

August E’s

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: Mustard Design

August E’s was an established restaurant in need of a new location. In 2008, the business moved to an existing building one block off historic Main Street in Fredericksburg. Designed by Andrew E. Bray of Mustard Design, the project injected new life into a 4,900-sf structure that previously housed a 1950s automotive repair shop and later a furniture warehouse.

Green Dog Pictures
Page 60

Accessibility Exercise in Dallas Opens Eyes to New Perspective

by: Walter Kilroy, AIA

Have you ever wondered what it feels like to ask people in a restaurant to move from their seats so you can get to the handicapped seating area? Ever thought what a ramp looks like to a person in a wheelchair?

top and bottom right by Will Rutledge; bottom right photo courtesy F&S Partners
Page 14

A Sonnet to Dwell In

by: Eurico R. Francisco
Architect: Buchanan Architecture

The area just north of downtown Dallas known as Oak Lawn is rich and diverse in demographics, land use, and building types. Having matured over time, Oak Lawn has evolved into a neighborhood of restaurants, churches, hotels, offices, and a varied assemblage of residential buildings.

Jason Franzen; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 48

Mixing It Up in SoCo

by: Lawrence Connolly
Architect: Dick Clark Architecture and Michael Hsu Design Office

Anyone who has visited Austin’s eclectic strip of retail and restaurants along South Congress knows the SoCo entertainment district to be a vortex of bohemian conviviality. The city’s head-long rush to grow and densify is readily apparent along the wide avenue that stretches below downtown. SoCo encompasses a few commercial blocks comprised of small buildings, none more than three stories tall. Residential neighborhoods back up to the businesses, and the homeowners are notorious for opposing the slightest change in the street frontage.

Paul Bardagjy
Page 50

Cinnamon Shore

The first master-planned New Urbanism development on Texas’s Coastal Bend, Cinnamon Shore will be a 64-acre community development on Mustang Island between State Highway 361 and the Gulf of Mexico. At a cost of more than $235 million, Cinnamon Shore will include single-family homes and condominiums, as well as shops, restaurants, hotels, and office space surrounding a town center.

Page 19

Elegance Anew

by: Jonathan P. Rollins, AIA
Architect: Selzer Associates, Inc.

After a meticulous restoration, the gleaming terra cotta facade of the Thompson Building in downtown Dallas looks today much as it did when it was newly built in 1915. Constructed by Chicago- based Thompson Restaurants at 1520 Main Street, the two-story building featured two of the cafeteria chain’s signature architectural motifs—a large storefront window emblazoned with the name “Thompson’s” in oversize script, and a glossy white terra cotta facade meant to suggest cleanliness and elegance.

Steven Vaughan Photography, Dallas; Courtesy of Selzer Associates
Page 36

Block 21 Mixed-Use Development

Planned as the third-tallest building in downtown Austin, the 30-story building will include a hotel and condominium tower, as well as street-level restaurants, a 30,000-sq. ft. children’s museum, and a 1,000-seat studio for live recordings of public television’s Austin City Limits.

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