Article Results for "ARE"

AIA San Antonio Presents Design Awards

by: AIA San Antonio Staff

After jurors carefully evaluated 53 entries from 20 local architectural firms and one individual AIA member, the AIA San Antonio chapter announced the winners of its 2008 Design Awards. A total of 13 projects were recognized with awards in early November. Kell Muñoz topped the list with five awards.

Page 18

All Architecture, All the Time

by: Eagon Gleason

In the lab, we students are gathered in a tight group around Philip Johnson listening while he tells us of his recent visit to Taliesin West for a meeting with Frank Lloyd Wright. It’s almost as if we are walking with him as he describes in vivid detail his approach to the compound and begins making his way through the masterfully orchestrated series of rooms and passages; we take each turn with him, see each vista, revel at every ray of light, and feel in our viscera every quickening, every slowing through space and time.

Egan Gleason
Page 28

Direct from Bhutan

While some architects look askance at the seemingly strange importation of a foreign style onto the UTEP campus, the Bhutanese apparently are pleased that their architectural idiom has been incorporated into modern American buildings.

Temple Photo courtesy UTE P.
Page 39

A Resonant Ensemble

by: Willis Winters, FAIA
Architect: Allied Works Architecture; Booziotis & Company Architects

It is early afternoon at the new arts magnet school in downtown Dallas. Classes are in session and there is considerable activity in the building’s loft-like corridors. Students can be found working on class projects, but these are not the kinds of activities and assignments typically encountered in a high school curriculum.

Helene Binet; Jeremy Bittermann; Willis Winters, FAIA
Page 40

A Well-Centered Campus

by: Thomas M. Colbert, A IA
Architect: Thomas Phifer and Partners

Located near the geographic center of Houston’s frenetic urbanism, just below the crosshairs of its freeway system, the Rice University campus harbors an almost monastic quiet and tranquility. Rice, with a lot more land per student than at most urban universities, affords quite a bit of distance between students as they wander between the staid allees of shade trees and colonnaded brick buildings.

Scott Francis
Page 46

Mexican Modern In East Austin

by: Mario L. Sanchez, PhD
Architect: Cotera+Reed Architects

Founded in 1987, Southwest Key Programs, a national non-profit group based in Austin, manages a variety of social programs to benefit disadvantaged youth and their families. Intending for its new headquarters to act as a tool for neighborhood revitalization, the organization selected a site in a traditionally under-served area of the city to locate the Southwest Key East Austin Community Development Project.

Mike Osborne
Page 52

Homework Yields High Marks

by: Chris Schultz, AIA
Architect: Pfluger Associates Architects; Chumney & Associates

The North East Independent School District set several lofty learning objectives for the designers of its new prototypical middle school, José M. Lopez Middle School, in the fast-growing Stone Oak area of far-north San Antonio.

Chris Cooper Photography
Page 58

Andy Dekaney High School

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: SHW Group

Andy Dekaney High School recently received the 2008 Caudill Award, the highest honor given in the TASA /TASB Exhibit of School Architecture. Based on findings that students perform better in small groups, “Instruction Should Drive Construction” was the guiding philosophy for SH W Group’s design of the 486,000-square-foothigh school sited on 80.7 acres in Houston’s Spring Independent School District.

Richard Payne, FAIA
Page 69

Waxahachie Global High School

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: Huckabee & Associates

Waxahachie Global High School received the 2008 TASA /TASB Exhibit of School Architecture “Special Recognition for Outstanding School Renovation.” Huckabee and Associates restored the three-story, 1917 T.C. Wilemon building, transforming the 79,356-square-foot space into a high-tech campus equipped with the latest technology.

Paul Chaplo
Page 72

Neglected Territory

by: Jeffrey Brown, AIA

Ignored by many architects and most academics, tilt wall construction is nonetheless widespread. It is prevalent in the marketplace and ubiquitous on the landscape, yet tilt wall construction is considered a “low” form of building methodology utilized in commercial construction by “mainstream” architects and their co-conspirators in the building trades. As a result, tilt wall construction has been overlooked as an area for more extensive architectural exploration.

K.J. McNitt photo courtesy Elliott + Associates Architect s; TXU customer service center Photo Courtesy cunningham architect s
Page 74

Building Careers

by: Tom Cox

The architecture CLUSTER at Skyline High School began in 1972 as one of the magnet career programs offered by the Dallas Independent School District to help prepare students for a variety of professions. From the outset, the objective was to provide students with the essential concepts of the practice of architecture.

Tom Cox
Page 96

Halprin’s Heritage Plaza in Fort Worth Among ‘Endangered’ Places for 2009

by: Michal g. Tincup, ASLA

Texas is gifted with many celebrated public landscapes from the modern era, including Philip Johnson’s Fort Worth Water Gardens (1974) and Thanks-Giving Square (1974); Daniel Kiley’s Fountain Place (1986) and Dallas Museum of Art (1983); and Peter Walker’s Nasher Sculpture Center Garden (2005).

Page 12

Trammell Crow (1914-2009)

by: Gregory Ibanez

The noted Dallas developer Trammell Crow passed away at his East Texas farm on Jan. 14. He was 94 years old and had apparently been in failing health for some time. While Crow’s reach in the commercial real estate world was international in scope, he left an inescapable legacy in his hometown of Dallas.

Page 16

Outlook for a Downturn

by: Stephen Sharpe

Just how troublesome are current economic conditions in Texas? To gain insight, Texas Architect invited six architects to join a roundtable discussion where they were asked to assess their local markets and offer near-term forecasts. The roundtable discussion took place in Austin on Jan. 19.

Julie Pizzo; original photography by istock and shutterstock
Page 30

Campus Conversion

by: Kurt Neubek, FAIA and John Clegg, AIA
Architect: HarrisonKornberg Architects

The Houston Community College (HCC) System is one of the nation’s largest, with 23 locations across the metropolitan area. Since its creation in 1971, the system has acquired a diverse range of facilities and adapted them for educational purposes.

Michael Stravato
Page 52

Landmark Encore

by: Bart Shaw
Architect: Marquis Group

Montgomery Ward published its first catalogue in 1872 and soon found great success shipping farm equipment and other goods across the U.S. via rail. In the 1920s the company built nine regional facilities that combined distribution centers and retail outlets, including one in Fort Worth in 1928. The eight-story Mission Revival building, completed in nine months by general contractor Thos. S. Byrne, was expanded and renovated several times over the years. Enclosing 600,000 square feet, the U-shaped edifice teemed with fervent activity through the 1960s.

Craig Smith
Page 58

Hyatt Lost Pines Resort

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: HKS Hill Glazier Studio

Page 72

Survey: Texas Slow to Adopt BIM

by: Andy MacPhillimy, AIA

The software capabilities that are the foundation for Building Information Modeling, or BIM, have been under development for more than 20 years, and in the last few years awareness and interest in BIM by the AEC industry have grown remarkably. However, a recent survey indicates that the AEC industry in Texas has been slow to adopt BIM. Those few in Texas who are now using BIM, survey respondents state that adoption of the new technology has resulted in wide-ranging changes in the way they design and deliver projects.

Page 74

Adapt, Transform, Forget…

by: Fernando Brave

The modernist dictum that “form follows function” does not appear a viable equation in adaptive re-use where function must follow form. Take, for example, the re-purposing of the ubiquitous and increasingly unappealing big box. Texas Architect asked a group of artists and designers to do just that, to consider the fate of a vacant Circuit City building. Their responses are diverse, and can be grouped into three distinct categories—adapted, transformed, and forgotten.

Page 84

EPA Extols Houston, D/FW for Efficiency

Houston and the Dallas-Fort Worth metropolitan area are among the top five cities in the nation with the most buildings enrolled in the Energy Star program administered by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The federal program promotes energy conservation and reduction of greenhouse gases by designing buildings to be more energy efficient.

Page 10

AIA Awards Texas Housing Projects

Two projects by Texas firms are among the 17 residential buildings recognized in the 2009 AIA Housing Awards. The awards program, now in its ninth year, was established to recognize the best in housing design and promote the importance of good housing as a necessity of life, a sanctuary for the human spirit, and a valuable national resource.

Photos by (left) Hester & Hardaway and (right) Charles Davis Smith, AIA
Page 12

SAC Program Celebrates Milestone

by: Julie Cooper

In 1958, architect Vernon Helmke inaugurated a program at San Antonio College to prepare students for careers in architecture. Since offering those first classes in design, graphics, freehand drawing, and construction, SAC’s architectural curriculum has grown in size and reputation.

Photos courtesy San Antonio College
Page 14

TSA Design Awards Jury Selected

by: TA Staff

Three highly respected designers will judge the entries in the 2009 TSA Design Awards program. The jurors will be Philip Freelon, FAIA, president of the Freelon Group in Raleigh-Durham, N.C.; Mary Margaret Jones, FASLA, president of San Francisco-based landscape architecture firm Hargreaves Associates; and Rick Joy, AIA, of Rick Joy Architects in Tucson. The jury is set to meet May 15 in Austin.

Page 17

Vision 2030: West Dallas Gateway

Recognized with a 2009 Great Places Award, co-sponsored by the Environmental Design Research Association and Metropolis magazine, the West Dallas Gateway suggests redevelopment strategies for a blighted, post-industrial area of the city.

Page 22

Designs on Volunteering

by: Margine Biswas

The opportunity to offer one’s knowledge and skills to young people can be an exceptionally rewarding experience. When such an opportunity arose recently, I joined several members of AIA Dallas’ Women in Architecture in preparing a presentation for middle school-aged girls to help them realize their potential for professional careers. Our presentation was part of the national “Expanding Your Horizons” program sponsored by the American Association of University Women.

Photo by Penny
Page 25

Language in the Landscape

by: Daniel Olsen

The rural Southwest provides a place for landscape to wordlessly tell stories, reveal history, and offer solace. A few hours spent “listening” to this landscape reminds us that our spoken and written languages are human constructs.

Page 28

Art in the Park

by: PageSoutherlandPage
Architect: PageSoutherlandPage

In early 2004, a group of prominent local philanthropists negotiated a landmark deal with Houston Mayor Bill White. As outlined in the pact, the City of Houston contributed several downtown parcels in front of the George R. Brown Convention Center and the philanthropists agreed to fund the design and maintenance of a world-class park that promised to breathe new life into the urban core. Named through a public competition, the non-profit Discovery Green Conservancy opened the $122 million park in April 2008 to widespread acclaim. The 11.8-acre urban amenity is located near the southeast edge of downtown, between the Toyota Center basketball arena and Minute Maid Park baseball stadium.

Eric Laignel Photography; Chris Cooper Photography; Julie Pizzo
Page 44

Art at Discovery Green

The designers of Discovery Green incorporated art installations throughout the park, including interactive pieces that invite visitors to have a little fun. Great care was taken to ensure the installations would be visually prominent yet nestled within the park’s environs. Many of the works are by well-known artists, including Doug Hollis, whose Mist Tree (shown at left) is the latest of his water-jet sculptures designed for outdoor spaces around the U.S. His large interactive Gateway Fountain (at right) entices children to cool down from the heat.

Page 48

The Park on Barton Creek

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: Merriman Associates/Architects

The Park on Barton Creek combines corporate office functionality with the natural setting of the South Austin greenbelt. Designed by Merriman Associates/Architects, the project features two five-story, 100,000-squarefoot buildings set along the western edge of the site to minimize impact to the heavily wooded Barton Creek.

Squire Haskins Photography
Page 62

Acme Brick Headquarters

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: Gideon Toal

Acme Brick established two goals with the design of their new headquarters—to respond to the wooded site, setting a standard for future development in the area, and to demonstrate the variety of design alternatives that can be achieved with brick veneer.

Craig D. Blackmon, FAIA; Steven Vaughan
Photography, Dallas
Page 64

Survival in Challenging Times

by: Jim Atkins, FAIA and Grant A. Simpson, FAIA

Here we go again; another recession. And since the work of the design professional is directly related to the economy, our livelihood thrives or suffers accordingly. Those good times that seemed as though they would never end seem to have ended, at least for the present. Projects have gone on hold, or away, friends have been laid off, and many employees are now wanting for something meaningful to do.

Photo illustrations by Julie Pizzo; sketch courtesy merr iman associates/architects
Page 68

The Stuff of Dreams

Amongst the challenges and tribulations of the day, we are compelled to make one parting comment about young people in architecture and their future.

Page 69

Inside-Out Studio

by: Brian Dougan

During the Spring 2007 semester, behind an anonymous tract house on a culdesac in suburban College Station, I designed and built an inside-out studio where I produce utilitarian and often highly decorated earthenware.

images courtesy brian dougan
Page 76

Archives of the Episcopal Church

The Archives of the Episcopal Church, designed by Studio 8 Architects of Austin, is a five-story, 70,000-sf building that will be the new home for the church’s national archives, which are currently housed in a late-1950s campus as part of the Southwest Episcopal Seminary

Page 21

Building in ‘Enough’

by: Val Glitsch
Architect: Nonya Grenader, FAIA

The site for the house Nonya Grenader, FAIA, designed for her family in Houston was selected for the beauty of the existing trees and shade and its ideal proximity as a construction site. Intimately acquainted with the amenities of the Southampton neighborhood, a deed-restricted subdivision near Rice, the Grenaders had lived next door for 11 years before their elderly neighbor offered to sell them her house in 1997. The 55x130-foot lot presented an opportunity to create a new environment tailored to their long-established live/work lifestyle.

Nash Baker Photographer
Page 34

Urban Complex

by: Brian McLaren
Architect: JHP Architecture/Urban Design

Cityville Southwest Medical Center embodies the pioneer spirit. When opened in 2007, the mixed-use development shared the neighborhood with industrial brownfields, rusting steel warehouses, and a red-light district.

Steve Hinds; Stan Wolenski Photography
Page 46

Canyon Village

by: Lawrence Connolly
Architect: Alejandro Aravena; Cotera+Reed Architects

For St. Edward’s Universit y to achieve a desired national prominence as an institution of higher learning, President George E. Martin set out in 2001 to double the student enrollment to 4,000 by 2010. Martin knew that would require significant capital improvements, so he commissioned Philadelphia’s H2L2 to masterplan the 498-acre hilltop campus.

Cristobal Palma Photography; Andy Mattern,
Artimbo.com
Page 54

Informed by the Land

by: Dror Baldinger
Architect: Craig McMahon Architects; Studio Industrielle (associated design firm)

Having neve r befo re visite d the Hill Count ry, the Futu re owne rs we re charmed by the natural beauty of the site where they eventually would build their house. Majestic oaks frame the views of distant farmland as the 350-acre property drops a 100 feet to the Guadalupe River.

Chris Cooper Photography
Page 60

Baylor University Medical Center at Dallas – New Family Center

by: Susan Butler
Architect: HDR Architecture

Located on the seventh floor of Baylor University Medical Center’s Truett Tower in Dallas, the New Family Center is a 22,000-sf renovation specializing in postpartum healthcare services.

Mark Trew Photography
Page 69

Bridging the Gap

by: Megan Headley

We’ll admit it, there’s a lot more to a building than just the glass. And while we as an industry are charged with knowing the ins and outs of all the countless types of glass products available— architects are being overwhelmed by the need to know so much more.

Photo: Shutterstock
Page 70

A Clear Vision

by: Donna Kacmar
Architect: Kirksey

The new Cullen Eye Institute in the Medical Building of Baylor College of Medicine in the Texas Medical Center combines multiple adult ophthalmology subspecialties under one roof. Dr. Dan B. Jones, chair of the Ophthalmology Department at Baylor, recognized the need to consolidate the existing adult ophthalmology practice into a single building on the new McNair Campus.

Aker/Zvonkovic
Page 72

Living Laboratory

by: Urs Peter Flueckiger

As our planet’s reserves of water and energy sources become increasingly limited, architects must develop forms of architecture that incorporate – even celebrate – sustainability design practices. Toward that end, my students at Texas Tech University are engaged in an ongoing project that focuses on a variety of solutions. The result is a living laboratory designed for the harsh microclimate of Foard County about 45 miles west of Wichita Falls.

Images by Urs Peter Flueckiger
Page 84

Fierce Competition

by: Stephen Sharpe

The effects of the economic downturn are now clearly apparent across the state. The evidence is rendered in less-than-optimistic forecasts as firms cautiously plan for 2010. The recession is brought into sharper relief when compared with the robust business climate enjoyed by design professionals for a decade prior to last year’s fourth quarter.

Photo courtesy University Health Syst em
Page 7

Charles Gwathmey 1938-2009

by: Juan Miro, AIA

Charles Gwathmey – Charlie, as most people called him – started off his career with a bang. Like two other giants of the American arts, Orson Wells and Norman Mailer, Charlie produced a masterpiece while he was still in his 20s. After graduating from Yale, Charlie traveled through Europe where he was able to experience first-hand the works of his most admired Modernist master, Le Corbusier.

Photo at left by Rosa Rivera; photo at right courtesy Gwathmey Siegel & Associates Architects
Page 19

Solar LED Fascia

University of Houston students Daniel De La Garza, Jared Wilson Thorn, Alfonso Villafuerte, and Chukwunoso Ofili have developed a concept for an eco-friendly, multi-purpose lighting system that could serve nightly as neighborhood and home security lighting and as solar-powered emergency lighting during power shortages.

Page 28

Design Awards 2009

The 2009 TSA Design Awards jury met in Austin on May 15 to view 261 submittals of built work. The jurors were Mary Margaret Jones, FASLA, of Hargreaves Associates (San Francisco, Cambridge, and New York); Rick Joy, AIA, of Rick Joy Architects (Tucson); and Philip Freelon, FAIA, of the Freelon Group (Durham, N.C.)

Illustrations by Bryce Weigand
Page 39

A Sonnet to Dwell In

by: Eurico R. Francisco
Architect: Buchanan Architecture

The area just north of downtown Dallas known as Oak Lawn is rich and diverse in demographics, land use, and building types. Having matured over time, Oak Lawn has evolved into a neighborhood of restaurants, churches, hotels, offices, and a varied assemblage of residential buildings.

Jason Franzen; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 48

Garden Spot

by: Michael Malone
Architect: Cunningham Architects

From the street Cunningham Architects’ House in the Garden is a beautifully conceived and executed object, partially shielded behind an iconic wall constructed of stainless-steel wire grid and filled with fragments of slag glass. This idealized garden villa – really a giant porch – provides a delightful way to both view and inhabit a highly personalized landscape. It’s a thoughtful and well organized bit of place making; surprisingly its greatest success is as a foil and extension of an outdoor space that was originally part of the adjacent house.

James F. Wilson, Gisela Borghi; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 52

Concrete Poetry

by: Jeffrey Brown, AIA
Architect: Elliott + Associates Architects

This word painting by Rand Elliott, FAIA, explains how he wants people to understand his latest award-winning project, ImageNet of Houston. Employing poetry or manifestoes to describe one’s work is not uncommon these days. Indeed, such material appears to be a prerequisite of the current media culture that promotes “starchitects,” “signature architects,” and one-hit wonders. Supportive text is, we are led to believe, required reading. If a building appears mundane, baffling, or otherwise underwhelming, just refer to the narrative. Within the architect’s words, we are told, lies the true meaning which will assure in our prosaic times that, yes, this is Architecture.

Scott McDonald, Hedrich Blessing; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 56

Haven for Art

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: Laguarda Low Architects

Once just another nondescript, single-story building indistinguishable from its neighbors that together comprise a light-industrial district wedged between downtown Dallas and the Trinity River, the Light & Sie Art Gallery now stands out. The reconfigured entry, framed by a box of aluminum panels, asserts a refined presence that quietly commands attention amid the clutter of storefronts along Leslie Street on the city’s near-west side. The 13,000-sf project is one of the latest examples in a transformative trend for the area where a few of the shopworn buildings have been repurposed as showrooms for the design trade and retail galleries for contemporary art.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 60

Elegant Tribute

by: Geof Edwards
Architect: Poteet Architects

Approaching the Linda Pace Foundation from the east, visitors are confronted with a strikingly graphic text piece on the building’s canvas-like facade, a short poem by Daniel Edgar Martinez: “beauty…it rubs against one’s tongue, it hangs there, hurting one, insisting on its own existence, finally it gets so one cannot stand the pain, then one must have beauty extracted.” It’s an “in your face” message that transcends its purpose as a public art piece and could describe the transformation of a derelict 1940sera auto paint shop into what is now the subtle and powerful beauty of the Linda Pace Foundation.

Chris Cooper Photography; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 64

Cross-Cultural Delight

by: Rick Lewis
Architect: Jackson & Ryan Architects

Although San Antonio’s iconic settings are significant especially when weighed for their economic benefits to Texas’ third largest city, the broader story of her heritage, traditions and, most importantly, her people is to be found in quarters beyond the shadows of high-rise downtown hotels.

Mark Scheyer/Houston; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 72

Enlightened Living

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: MJ Neal Architects

Wolfe Den, by MJ Neal, AIA, represents the Austin architect’s fifth TSA Design Award. The 2,300-sf residence, designed for a young professional couple, is a study in layers, light, and logic, and stands out in subtle contrast to Neal’s previous award-winning work, which includes Twin Peaks (2003), Ramp House (2004), Anthony Nak (2005), and Farley Studio (2007). “This is a much more subtle work than Ramp House and Twin Peaks. The division of space is central to this project,” says Neal, when asked to define the difference between this home and the three others (Twin Peaks comprises two side-by-side dwellings) on the same south Austin street. Sited in an eclectic neighborhood populated by mostly 1930s-era homes interspersed with hip makeovers, Wolfe Den is bordered on the east by a one-story bungalow and on the west by the strikingly modernist Ramp House. Further down the block are Twin Peaks.

Viviane Vives
Page 84

Code Watch

Codes are popping up in an increasing number of communities interested in reducing light pollution (uplighting) and light trespass (shining light across a property line).

Page 95

TSA Convention Preview: Exhibitors

The Texas Society of Architects welcomes these companies participating in the 2009 Expo in Houston (current as of August 4). Expo dates are October 23-24 at the George R. Brown Convention Center. Make plans now to visit their booths, pick up new product information, ask a question, or just see a friend. Keep and use this handy guide with booth numbers and contact information as a reference tool.

Page 103

Industrial Strength

by: Stephen Sharpe

Modernists are drawn to pure expressions of function, form that instantly communicates the essence of a building’s use. The Texas landscape is rich in examples, oftentimes overlooked because they are straightforward, generic, inconspicuous—precisely the qualities that make them worth our attention. J. Brantley Hightower, AIA , in a short essay “The Lure of the Industrial” on page 44, opens the feature section with musings on his and his fellow architects’ fascination with buildings “that reflect the most direct solutions to complex problems.”

Courtesy of Pearl Brewery
Page 5

RDA Civic Forum’s Post-Ike Forecast Calls for Improved Coastal Safeguards

by: Thomas M. Colbert, A IA

While Hurricane Ike may have roared through Texas over a year ago, public interest remains high in planning efforts to protect the Houston-Galveston region against such violent storms. In response to that interest, the Rice Design Alliance sponsored a three-part civic forum during the summer.

Page 19

New Cowboys Stadium Opens (and Shuts)

by: Lawrence Connolly

The latest in sports arena one-upmanship was formally unveiled when the $1.2 billion Cowboys Stadium, designed by HKS Sports & Entertainment Group, hosted a concert on June 6 by headliners George Strait and Reba McEntire.

photos courtesy Blake Marvin/HKS
Page 23

Drawn to Architecture

by: Bryce A. Weigand, FAIA

These drawings are excerpts from sketchbooks complied over the past 33 years. Presented in our Good Fulton & Farrell University (for AIA learning unit credits), they formed the structure of the presentations: “Drawn to Architecture: Sketches to Reality.”

Page 26

Studio Awards 2009


Architect: Bart Shaw, AIA

FEMA trailers are by their nature temporary and by their character demoralizing. What if a permanent solution could be deployed quickly enough to help people retain their community, spirit, and viability? Lift:Home was developed for this purpose.

Page 33

Studio Awards 2009


Architect: Hernan Molina

The project proposes to redevelop Valencia’s old harbor in Spain that represents the commitment of the city with a modern spirit, rich in options and aspirations. This project of renovation and master planning intends to recover the harbor in a sustainable manner. The project proposes: 1) to create a waterfront where none currently exists; 2) to integrate the port into the city; 3) to suitably separate the port and non-port uses; 4) to order traffic circulation along the seafront; 5) to resolve the area in which the dry river bed joins the sea; 6) to conserve and recover the heritage of the area; 7) to propose a suitable combination of public and private uses; and 8) to consider pre-existing uses for their integration into a sustainable environment.

Page 34

Studio Awards 2009


Architect: Miró Rivera Architects

Death and humans’ response to it have long held the power to bind cultures together and create places that transcend time and custom. Our collective respect for the dead and where they are laid to rest reaches across cultures like few other human experiences. It is the commonality of this reverence that guides the creation of Yarauvi, a necropolis at the center of the Dead Sea.

Page 36

The Lure of the Industrial

by: J. Brantley Hightower

At least two things bind all architects together: our vacation photos tend to include more buildings than people and at some point we read Le Corbusier’s Towards a New Architecture. While it has since been revealed that the title and other portions of the book were initially translated poorly, the book remains arguably the most influential manifesto of the early modernist period. Although Corbusier’s grand pronouncements are at times both endearingly naïve and annoyingly heavy handed, his general thesis was certainly revolutionary for its day and prophetic given all that came later.

Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Control Tower 19, Santa Fe Railway Milepost 51, Dallas; image courtesy Library of Congress, Prints &
Photographs Division, HAER , Reproduction number HAER TEX, 57-DAL, 5-5; Photos at far right by J. Brantley Hightower, AIA
Page 44

Place-Making in Progress

by: Vincent Canizaro, PhD
Architect: Lake/Flato Architects (design); Durand-Hollis Rupe Architects (architect of record)

A visit to the Pearl Development today is one of promise and potential. Still less than 50 percent complete, it is already contributing to life in San Antonio and has become a destination for an increasing and devoted following. How it has done so is based in a rare instance in which the interests of its developers, the local design community, and the public have coincided. Why this has occurred is due in large part to the unique makeup of the members of the project team, their shared goal to create a “transformational” and “authentic” place, and the cost-effective, socially engaging, and incremental process they have followed.

Casey Dunn, Greg Harrison
Page 46

Texas Rangers Retail Shop

by: Susan Butler
Architect: FIRM817

The newly completed Texas Rangers Retail Shop at Sundance Square in Fort Worth, designed by FIR M817, was not just intended to be a place to grab a Rangers shirt or tickets to the next game. The design of the 757-sf space was intended to let customers experience the feel of baseball through multiple sensory expressions.

Brandon Burns
Page 76

Design from the Inside Out

by: Jacqui Dodson, AIA

With businesses and project owners interest in keeping costs down and flexibility high, furniture planning takes a significant role in the overall development of a project. Whether it is an enclosed or open office, lobby, library, or classroom, planning for the location and quantity of furniture can help the architect to make the most of the square footage, configuration of a room, spacial relationships, and overall building design.

Page 78

The Direction of Furniture Design

Some recent trends in workplace cultures have led furniture companies to develop lines of product that are more flexible.

Page 79

Bullish on Materials

by: Malcolm Holzman, FAIA

Architecture for me is not about concealment but rather about divulging its very nature to the widest possible audience. Materials are not a mystery; they are an essential building ingredient, our heritage, and part of our everyday lives.

Photos by Tom Kessler
Page 88

Child’s Play

by: Stephen Sharpe

The best architects practicing today are essentially grown-up children, says Max Levy, FAIA, without a hint of disparagement. Drawing by hand releases a child-like sense of wonder, he explains. Unfortunately, by the time they reach adulthood, most designers have forgotten that feeling of creative release.

drawing by max levy, faia
Page 5

New Architectural Program in El Paso Targets Hispanics for Bachelor Degrees

by: Cory Chandler

The way that architecture professor and discipline coordinator Ken Gorski describes it, El Paso Community College is a campus with its heart residing on both sides of Texas’ border with Mexico. This description, more allegorically than geographically accurate, pegs the character of a campus that is 85 percent Hispanic and located in a city largely defined by its close proximity to Juarez, Mexico.

courtesy Texas Tech University
Page 11

Houston Firm’s Low-Cost Home Design Pledged to Help Ravaged New Orleans

by: Stephen Sharpe

Announced to fanfare surrounding actor Brad Pitt’s personal involvement with bringing affordable housing to this beleaguered city’s poorest residents, the Make It Right program unveiled designs in December for houses by some of the world’s cutting-edge architects. A total of 13 international, national, and regional firms were invited to create home designs for the Crescent City’s Lower Ninth Ward, one of the neighborhoods hardest hit by flooding in the wake of Hurricane Katrina in September 2005.

Rendering by Patrick Lopez, Courtesy BNIM Architect s
Page 13

A Half-Century of Best Works by Hines On View at Architecture Center Houston

by: Barrie Scardino

Starting with a project for a small office and warehouse in 1957, Gerald D. Hines began developing real estate in Houston with a keen eye for adding value to his projects with architectural excellence. A half-century later, having developed hundreds of buildings around the world, Hines has remained committed to raising the standards of commercial design by engaging the best practitioners.

Photos courtesy Hines
Page 14

Anfield Stadium

When the Liverpool Football Club decided to expand its Anfield Stadium in Stanley Park, the British soccer club hired Dallas-based architect HKS to design the 60,000-seat sports arena.

Page 26

A&M’s Vanguard

by: Lawrence Connolly

Texas A&M University is in the midst of the largest building program in the school’s history. Two dozen projects on the 130-year-old College Station campus – new buildings, enhanced infrastructure, and major renovations, including a $120 million makeover of Memorial Student Center – are scheduled to be completed within the next five years. This extraordinary $800 million effort is the result of former A&M President Dr. Robert Gates’ initiative that spawned growth strategies originally outlined in the 2004 campus master plan by Barnes Gromatzky Kosarek Architects in collaboration with Michael Dennis & Associates.

(left) courtesy Perkins+Will ; (right) courtesy Texas A&M University
Page 30

A Beauty with Brains

by: Nestor Ifanzon
Architect: Page Southerland Page, LLP

The new Natural Science and Engineering Research Laboratory at the University of Texas at Dallas creates an innovative scientific environment while simultaneously possessing an astonishing architectural presence. The design and construction of the four-story, 192,000-squarefoot research facility responds to UT Dallas’ strategic plan to establish a top-flight research institution that will serve as a catalyst for interdisciplinary research. University officials expect to fill the facility with high-level faculty and scientists from such disparate fields as electrical engineering, materials science and engineering, chemistry, biology, and behavioral and brain sciences.

Robert Canfield
Page 32

Careful Intervention

by: Tom Diehl
Architect: Kirksey

Architects at Kirksey faced two major challenges with the design of a nearly quarter millionsquare-foot building for Texas Woman’s University at the Texas Medical Center in Houston. First, the site comprised two 65-foot-wide perpendicular slivers of land at a prominent intersection in the burgeoning medical complex. Second, feasibility studies (conducted in a compressed timeframe) intended intended to confirm the validity of a land exchange ultimately represented a normative site analysis—one generating the organizational armature for subsequent decisions.

Aker/Zvonkovic Photography
Page 50

Carl Wunsche Sr. High School

by: Megan Braley
Architect: SHW Group

Carl Wunsche Sr. High School is a career academy located in the Spring Independent School District of Houston. SH W Group oriented the 273,178-square-foot school around three academic towers that each focuses on a specialized area of study.

Richard Payne, FAIA
Page 63

LaGrone Advanced Technology Complex

by: Megan Braley
Architect: PBK Architects

The 120,792-square-foot LaGrone Advanced Technology Complex, located in the Denton Independent School District, includes 16 academies that provide students with trade-specific technical skills. PBK Architects of Dallas has uniquely designed each academy to reflect a specific professional working environment that facilitates increased learning through experience.

Jud Haggard
Page 65

Sky Harbour Elementary

by: Megan Braley
Architect: Pfluger Associates Architects

The 98,620-square-foot Sky Harbour Elementary School, located in the Southwest Independent School District of San Antonio, has been transformed from a solid concrete, windowless building into a series of welcoming, light-filled spaces. Pfluger Associates of San Antonio created a two-story classroom addition with a new administrative area.

Clem Spalding; Michelle Dudley, AIA
Page 67

West Brazos Junior High

by: Megan Braley
Architect: SHW Group

West Brazos Junior High School, located in the Columbia- Brazoria Independent School District of Brazoria, is the first LEE D certified public school in Texas. SH W Group designed the 91,500-square-foot building to fit into its natural surroundings.

Richard Payne, FAIA
Page 68

SUSTAINABLE DESIGN WITH BRICK

(This article was adapted from “Sustainability & Green Building Design with Brick Masonry,” an article that originally appeared in the October 2007 edition of Brick in Architecture published by the Brick Industry Association.) Many of the objectives of sustainab le design do not impact building material selection, but instead focus on building systems such as plumbing, lighting, air conditioning, etc. However, the versatility and durability of brick facilitate the use of brick masonry as part of many elements of sustainable design.

Photo by Mark Trew ; Courtesy HDR
Page 69

Conservative Concrete

Durable, energy efficient and recyclable – a quick evaluation of concrete applications and it’s easy to determine that this versatile building material is sustainable. Just how major a role it will play as the green building movement continues to proliferate depends on how many are willing to take a closer look.

Photo by Thomas McConnell , Courtesy LZT Architects
Page 71

Handsome Composition

by: Bart Shaw
Architect: Corgan Associates, Inc.

In 1849, at the confluence of the Clear and West Forks of the Trinity River, a fort was erected to protect pioneers settling in an area occupied by Native Americans. There were eight villages that developed around Fort Worth, seven were occupied by Native Americans, and one inhabited by white immigrants. White Settlement became a center of trade, a place of social interaction and mingling of societies, that still retains a strong sense of community.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA
Page 80

Studies Abroad

by: Nancy Egan

Last spring, 21 designers from WHR Architects embarked on a nine-day tour of Japan. The firm’s principals intended the experience to be more than just a trip to look at buildings. They wanted to create a shared frame of reference, encourage collaboration, and broaden design consciousness among their staff.

Photos by David Watkins, FAIA
Page 88

Winner Selected for Dallas Center for Architecture Competition

by: W. Mark Gunderson, AIA

AIA Dallas, following examples from across the country (New York City and Houston considered obvious prologue) has taken the first steps towards the construction of a new 7,500-square foot venue intended to house its own activities as well as those of multiple organizations aligned with the architectural mission of the chapter including the Dallas Architectural Foundation and the Dallas Architecture Forum.

Rendering courtesy Peter Doncaster, AIA
Page 14

THC Awards $56M for Courthouses

The Texas Historical Commission in January awarded nearly $56 million to 17 counties in its latest round of matching grant under the auspices of its nationally recognized Texas Historic Courthouse Preservation Program. The counties set to receive funds in Round V of the program are Cass, Cooke, Fannin, Hall, Hamilton, Harris, Hood, Kendall, La Salle, Lavaca, McCulloch, Mills, Potter, Randall, Roberts, San Augustine, and Trinity.

Page 18

Brochstein Pavilion

Construction is underway at Rice University in Houston on the 6,042-square-foot Brochstein Pavilion, a new gathering place planned for students, faculty, and staff. Composed primarily of glass, the pavilion will include a coffee house and a 10,728-square-foot landscaped, wrap-around plaza where 70 new trees will be added to the campus.

Page 20

Hill Country Montessori School

Designed by SHW Group, the Hill Country Montessori School in Boerne will demonstrate to its young occupants the importance of creating sustainable built environments by using architecture to promote education. The design of the buildings promotes both environmental and social awareness through transparency and access.

Page 20

Homage to the Square

by: Michael Malone
Architect: Morrison Seifert Murphy; Corgan Associates

Anchoring the eastern edge of downtown Dallas , One Arts Plaza is a defining presence as the tallest building in the expanding Dallas Arts District. As difficult as it is for any single building to define an edge, this outwardly restrained building could be seen as a textbook lesson on how a tall building, handled skillfully, can contribute to the urban fabric. At this moment, while construction just now begins on significant cultural landmarks but before those adjacent projects grab all the attention within the Arts District, the 24-story One Arts Plaza cannot be missed.

Charles Smith, AIA
Page 26

Rebel with a Cause

by: Rick Lewis
Architect: Jackson & Ryan Architects, Inc.

Contrary to popular belief , as perpetuated by tourist brochures aplenty, there is more to San Antonio’s urban identity than the renowned RiverWalk and hallowed Alamo Plaza. Significant as these iconic settings are, especially when weighed for their economic benefits to Texas’ third largest city, the broader story of San Antonio’s heritage, traditions and, most importantly, her people is to be found in quarters beyond the shadows of high-rise downtown hotels.

Mark Scheyer, Inc./Houston
Page 32

Mixing It Up in SoCo

by: Lawrence Connolly
Architect: Dick Clark Architecture and Michael Hsu Design Office

Anyone who has visited Austin’s eclectic strip of retail and restaurants along South Congress knows the SoCo entertainment district to be a vortex of bohemian conviviality. The city’s head-long rush to grow and densify is readily apparent along the wide avenue that stretches below downtown. SoCo encompasses a few commercial blocks comprised of small buildings, none more than three stories tall. Residential neighborhoods back up to the businesses, and the homeowners are notorious for opposing the slightest change in the street frontage.

Paul Bardagjy
Page 50

Lewisville Public Library

by: Megan Braley
Architect: F&S Partners Inc.

F&S Partners designed the new 55,000-square-foot addition to the existing 24,000-square-foot Lewisville Public Library. Clerestory windows form the exterior of the two-story concourse that connects the two building components. Natural light enters the building and creates a calm, welcoming atmosphere.

Craig Blackmon, FAIA
Page 56

Georgetown Public Library

by: Megan Braley
Architect: PBS&J Architects

The new 49,000-square-foot Georgetown Public Library offers residents a community space that reflects the historic nature of the city. PBS&J Architects closely followed the requirements of the City of Georgetown’s historic architectural review committee when designing the library.

Jud Haggard; Leigh Christian
Page 58

Justice Served

by: Jonathan P. Rollins, AIA
Architect: Rees Associates, Inc.

The addition to and renovation of the George Allen Sr. courthouse consolidates all 45 of the Dallas County civil courts, formerly located in three buildings, into one central location. Providing 210,000 square feet of new space, the addition stacks its program with the highest traffic family court spaces on the bottom, served by escalators.

Craig Blackmon, FAIA
Page 66

‘Horizons’ Program Introduces Girls To Future Professional Opportunities

by: Margine Biswas

For the past eight years, AIA Dallas’ Women in Architecture has reached out to girls in elementary and middle-school grades through a national program called Expanding Your Horizons. The program encourages girls to continue their studies in math and science by introducing them to interesting career options in technical subjects.

photo by Penny Ball
Page 14

Two Texas Communities Picked for SDAT

by: Jeff Potter, AIA

Two Texas communities are among 10 selected across the U.S. for study this year by an AIA Sustainable Design Assistance Team (SDAT) to help develop strategies for improving environmental conditions and preserving a sense of place while faced with suburban sprawl.

Page 14

AIA Houston Awards 16 Projects

by: Kimberley Hickson, AIA

AIA Houston honored 16 projects during the chapter’s fifty-second annual Design Awards Dinner held on March 27 at the Rice Hotel. Winners were selected from 117 entries.

Page 16

Jury Selected for 2008 Design Awards

The jury for the 2008 TSA Design Awards will be arts writer Judith Dupré and architects Steven Ehrlich, FAIA, and Billie Tsien, AIA. The three are scheduled to meet June 27 in Austin to review entries and make their selections. The deadline for entries is May 30.

Page 22

One Park Place

Overlooking downtown Houston’s new urban park, the 37-story One Park Place will offer 346 units with a total net rentable space of 498,000 square feet. Designed by Jackson & Ryan Architects for the Finger Companies, the residential tower will provide residents an escape from the chaos of city life.

Page 23

The Designer’s ‘Hand’

by: Garrett Finney

In this high-tech age of ours, designers are discovering new and better ways to work with their heads. And they use their feet to march inexorably forward, constructing buildings and cities that transform the landscape. However, an exhibition now on display at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, reminds us that designers have lost their “hand.”

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