Article Results for "Austin"

The Art of Deference

by: Mark Oberholzer, AIA
Architect: Kallman, McKinnell & Wood Architects in association with Booziotis & Company Architects

A glimpse through the front doors of the Blanton Museum of Art reveals a soft blue light—it’s the new piece, Stacked Waters, a cast acrylic site-specific installation by artist Teresita Fernández. Wrapping around the walls of the atrium, Stacked Waters suffuses the space with unexpected and atmospheric light against the backdrop of the main stair hall. The effect illustrates how the Blanton is, in many ways, a deferential building— a backdrop not just to art on the inside but to the campus on the outside as well.

Emory Photography; Scott Melcer
Page 56

The Park on Barton Creek

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: Merriman Associates/Architects

The Park on Barton Creek combines corporate office functionality with the natural setting of the South Austin greenbelt. Designed by Merriman Associates/Architects, the project features two five-story, 100,000-squarefoot buildings set along the western edge of the site to minimize impact to the heavily wooded Barton Creek.

Squire Haskins Photography
Page 62

AIA Austin Awards 15 Projects

by: Rick Price

On April 18, AIA Austin recognized 15 projects at its 2009 Design Awards Gala held at the historic Browning Hangar on the redeveloped grounds of former Mueller Municipal Airport. Of the 115 submitted projects, 14 received Design Awards and one received a Studio Award.

Page 17

Archives of the Episcopal Church

The Archives of the Episcopal Church, designed by Studio 8 Architects of Austin, is a five-story, 70,000-sf building that will be the new home for the church’s national archives, which are currently housed in a late-1950s campus as part of the Southwest Episcopal Seminary

Page 21

Austin’s Upscale Downtown

by: Stephen Sharpe

On June 25 construction on the Austonian residential tower reached the height of 51 floors, making it the tallest building in Austin. The project, designed by Ziegler Cooper Architects, will ultimately top out later this year at 56 floors (683 feet with glass crown) above Congress Avenue.

Images courtesy Ziegler Cooper Architects
Page 32

Canyon Village

by: Lawrence Connolly
Architect: Alejandro Aravena; Cotera+Reed Architects

For St. Edward’s Universit y to achieve a desired national prominence as an institution of higher learning, President George E. Martin set out in 2001 to double the student enrollment to 4,000 by 2010. Martin knew that would require significant capital improvements, so he commissioned Philadelphia’s H2L2 to masterplan the 498-acre hilltop campus.

Cristobal Palma Photography; Andy Mattern,
Artimbo.com
Page 54

Design Awards 2009

The 2009 TSA Design Awards jury met in Austin on May 15 to view 261 submittals of built work. The jurors were Mary Margaret Jones, FASLA, of Hargreaves Associates (San Francisco, Cambridge, and New York); Rick Joy, AIA, of Rick Joy Architects (Tucson); and Philip Freelon, FAIA, of the Freelon Group (Durham, N.C.)

Illustrations by Bryce Weigand
Page 39

Eclectic Ensemble

by: Lawrence Connolly
Architect: Dick Clark Architecture with Michael Hsu Design Office

When Antoine Predock, FAIA, was in midst of conceiving the new Austin City Hall, he commented that the city was “terminally democratic.” He made the remark after his design survived a protracted review process that included more than a dozen town meetings and hearings before the City Council. A similar sort of public scrutiny – albeit on a smaller, neighborhood scale – resulted when Dick Clark Architecture added a zoning non-compliant residential building to its 1400 South Congress mixed-use project.

Paul Bardagjy; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 40

Enlightened Living

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: MJ Neal Architects

Wolfe Den, by MJ Neal, AIA, represents the Austin architect’s fifth TSA Design Award. The 2,300-sf residence, designed for a young professional couple, is a study in layers, light, and logic, and stands out in subtle contrast to Neal’s previous award-winning work, which includes Twin Peaks (2003), Ramp House (2004), Anthony Nak (2005), and Farley Studio (2007). “This is a much more subtle work than Ramp House and Twin Peaks. The division of space is central to this project,” says Neal, when asked to define the difference between this home and the three others (Twin Peaks comprises two side-by-side dwellings) on the same south Austin street. Sited in an eclectic neighborhood populated by mostly 1930s-era homes interspersed with hip makeovers, Wolfe Den is bordered on the east by a one-story bungalow and on the west by the strikingly modernist Ramp House. Further down the block are Twin Peaks.

Viviane Vives
Page 84

Ella Wooten Park Pool House

by: Susan Butler
Architect: Studio 8 Architects

The Ella Wooten Park Pool House, designed by Studio 8 Architects, is located within the redevelopment of Austin’s former Mueller Airport. The park serves as a public gathering place that embodies the city in both its locally derived design and emphasis on green technology.

Andy Mattern
Page 89

Feds Break Ground in Austin

The U.S. General Services Administration broke ground Sept. 2 on a long-awaited federal courthouse in downtown Austin, an event made possible by the federal lawmakers authorized $116 million for the project when Congress passed the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act earlier this year.

Image Courtesy General Services Administration
Page 16

Natural Adaptation

by: Mark Oberholzer, AIA
Architect: GS&C

When Graeber Simmons & Cowan began the design of Advanced Micro Device’s (AMD) new campus in southwest Austin, it was with an appreciation of the environmentally sensitive nature of the site, consisting of 59 acres with varying topography and ecology. GS&C has set a new standard for the region’s corporate campuses in his attempt not just to satisfy environmental criteria but to incorporate them for the benefit of AMD’s culture and the buildings’ users.

Greg Hursley; Patrick Wong; Benedict Kim
Page 62

Efficient Infill

by: Carl Gromatzky, AIA
Architect: Jacobs

The University of Texas at Austin has a rich history of campus planning. Previous plans, especially those by Cass Gilbert and Paul Cret in the early twentieth century, contributed immeasurably to the overall quality of the campus environment. Buildings erected during that era both defined and responded to outdoor spaces, the two components coalescing to create the public realm of the UT campus.

Paul Bardagjy
Page 68

Efficient Infill

by: Carl Gromatzky, AIA
Architect: McKinney York Architects

The University of Texas at Austin has a rich history of campus planning. Previous plans, especially those by Cass Gilbert and Paul Cret in the early twentieth century, contributed immeasurably to the overall quality of the campus environment. Buildings erected during that era both defined and responded to outdoor spaces, the two components coalescing to create the public realm of the UT campus.

McConnell Photography
Page 68

Citibank Offices

by: Susan Butler
Architect: Marmon Mok

The 17,500-sf Citibank, built on an in-fill site at 5th and Rio Grande streets in downtown Austin, includes a street-level retail banking lobby, four drive-through lanes, and two upper floors for offices of commercial banking. Marmon Mok designed the $5 million project.

Dror Baldinger, AIA; Lawrence Lander
Page 74

AIA Fort Worth Awards 5 Projects

by: Ivonne Levin, AIA

The local chapter of the AIA recognized four projects in the General Design category and one project in the Mayor’s Award category in ceremonies that took place at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth. The members of the 2007 jury were Julie Eizenberg, AIA, of Koning Eizenberg Architecture in Los Angeles; Errol Barron, FAIA, of Errol Barron/Michael Toups in New Orleans; and Kevin Alter, Assoc. AIA, of Alterstudio Architects in Austin.

Page 18

Creole Influence Along the Border

by: Stephen Fox

The Lower Río Grande Valley chapter of the American Institute of Architects kicked off its fifteenth annual conference on Sept. 27 with a day-long tour of nineteenth-century architecture in the border cities of Brownsville and Matamoros, Tamaulipas. Called “A Tale of Two Cities,” the tour was led by Gregory Free, principal of an Austin design firm specializing in historical restoration.

Courtesy Wayne Bell, FAIA
Page 27

Quiet Standout

by: J. Brantley Hightower
Architect: Perkins+Will

The study of campus architecture in Texas is truly a lesson in cultural diversity. Just by sampling schools in the University of Texas System, one would observe everything from a Beaux-Arts rendering of Spanish Mediterranean motifs on the Austin campus to a playful reinterpretation of Bhutanese monasteries in El Paso.

James Steinkamp
Page 44

All Aboard!

by: Stephen Sharpe

Commuter rail is returning to Austin, bringing with it several transit oriented developments (TOD) that will drive the creation of new live/work/play neighborhoods centered around at least eight train stations. Perhaps as early as this fall, Austin will join Dallas and Houston in reviving urban rail travel as a means to reduce traffic congestion and as a catalyst for thoughtful intracity planning. That means more people in and around Austin will have the option of leaving their cars at home.

map courtesy City of Austin Neighborhood Planning & Zoning Department; rendering courtesy MWM Design Group
Page 5

AIA Honors Austin Firm’s Work

Anthony Nak Flagship Store, a high-end jewelry boutique designed by MJ Neal Architects of Austin, has been recognized with a 2008 AIA Honor Award for Interior Architecture. Located in downtown Austin, Anthony Nak represents the only project with a Texas connection among this year’s slate of winners.

Page 11

CNU Set to Convene in Booming Austin To See Changes, Honor Local Urbanist

by: Stephen Sharpe

When hundreds of architects and urban planners convene here in March for the Congress of the New Urbanism’s CNU XVI, one of their main topics of conversation will be: Can Austin be a truly great city?

Page 11

Pfluger Bridge Extension

The project will extend the James D. Pfluger Bicycle and Pedestrian Bridge northward to connect the Lady Bird Lake hike-and-bike trail to the Lamar Corridor and downtown. The bridge, completed in 2001, is named in the memory of James D. Pfluger, FAIA, who helped push the City of Austin’s development of the popular lakeside trail system.

Page 20

Urban Aerie on 2nd Street

by: Wendy Price Todd
Architect: Page Southerland Page

Casey Dunn
Page 38

Mixing It Up in SoCo

by: Lawrence Connolly
Architect: Dick Clark Architecture and Michael Hsu Design Office

Anyone who has visited Austin’s eclectic strip of retail and restaurants along South Congress knows the SoCo entertainment district to be a vortex of bohemian conviviality. The city’s head-long rush to grow and densify is readily apparent along the wide avenue that stretches below downtown. SoCo encompasses a few commercial blocks comprised of small buildings, none more than three stories tall. Residential neighborhoods back up to the businesses, and the homeowners are notorious for opposing the slightest change in the street frontage.

Paul Bardagjy
Page 50

Austin’s Emerging Projects

Austin's Emerging Projects

Page 76

Jury Selected for 2008 Design Awards

The jury for the 2008 TSA Design Awards will be arts writer Judith Dupré and architects Steven Ehrlich, FAIA, and Billie Tsien, AIA. The three are scheduled to meet June 27 in Austin to review entries and make their selections. The deadline for entries is May 30.

Page 22

A World of Small Wonders

by: Thomas Hayne Upchurch
Architect: Karlsberger

Healthcare architecture has made significant strides over the past 20 years to provide environments that are more sensitive to the needs of patients, families, physicians, and staff. There is a greater understanding that wellness and healing are supported not only by advances in medicine and technologies in diagnostics and treatment, but also by the quality of the building’s environment. Designed for the Seton Healthcare Network by Karlsberger of Columbus, Ohio, the Dell Children’s Medical Center of Central Texas in Austin builds on these improvements to the healthcare environment and takes its design to an even higher level while also achieving ambitious goals for environmental stewardship.

John Durant; Thomas McConnell
Page 34

Nature’s Sway

by: Murray Legge, AIA

Built on the banks of Lake Bastrop this interfaith chapel forms a contemplative moment within the pine forest just east of Austin. Commissioned by the Boy Scouts of America Capitol Area Council, the open-air structure hosts all manner of religious gatherings. The gate-like structure, oriented east to west, frames a view across the lake of the setting sun.

images by Murray Legge, AIA
Page 80

Buy Local

by: Stephen Sharpe

A recent article in the real estate section of the Austin American-Statesman called attention to a growing demand among homebuyers for “Texas contemporary.” The interest is such that even production homebuilders are beginning to introduce spec models patterned after the regional vernacular of the Hill Country.

Photo by Steven Vaughan; courtesy the Michael Malone Studio at WKMC Architects
Page 5

Museum Hopes Third Time a Charm For New Home in Downtown Austin

by: Wendy Price Todd

The Austin Museum of Art’s announcement in February of a joint venture with Hines of Houston marks the third time since the 1980s that hopes have been raised for a new downtown AMOA home.

Page 14

AIA Austin Awards Seven Projects

by: Brian Carlson

AIA Austin honored seven projects during the chapter’s 2008 Awards and Honors Gala held on April 19 at the Mexican American Cultural Center. The projects were selected from a pool of 65 entries submitted by local firms.

Page 18

A Little Room

The Los Angeles team of Amy Wynne and Mark Leveno received the Grand Prize (including $1,000) in the Temporary Outdoor Gallery Space Temporary Outdoor Gallery Space (TOGS) Ideas Competition sponsored by Art Alliance Austin and AIA Austin.

Page 22

Historical Fusion

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: Curry Boudreaux Architects

To drive the backroads of rural Texas is to travel through history. Just below the surface of many small towns, a palpable immigrant heritage dwells. The signs are sometimes obvious, the annual festivals celebrating a community’s cultural origins and the museums dedicated to preserving the locals’ ethnic roots. Also, the old churches, many built by the hands of those who settled the area, often serve as tangible reminders of the unique narrative of a peoples’ journey from faraway native lands in their quest for a new, more tolerant home.

G. Lyon Photography, Inc.
Page 36

Cultural Monument

by: Edward Burian
Architect: CasaBella Architects + Del Campo & Maru

The recently completed first phase of the Mexican American Cultural Center (MACC) for the Cultural Affairs Division of the City of Austin’s Parks and Recreation Department is dedicated to the creation, preservation, presentation, and promotion of Mexican-American cultural arts and heritage. Envisioned as a resource both for the local community and visitors through education and community participation, the center focuses on fostering an understanding and appreciation of Hispanic culture, as well as ambitiously featuring indigenous cultures of Americas. The programs and educational curriculum at the MACC includes the visual arts, theater, dance, literature, music, multi-media, and the culinary arts.

Paul Bardagjy
Page 52

6th & Brushy

by: Megan Braley
Architect: Lawrence Group Architects

The new 30,374-square-foot mixed-use building, named 6th & Brushy, is part of the first generation of live-work properties to be built in east Austin. The project is located at the corner of 6th and Brushy streets, two blocks east of Interstate 35.

McConnell Photo
Page 71

House Proud

by: Heather McKinney, FAIA

Lisa Germany’s latest book, Great Houses of Texas, was published this year by Harry N. Abrams Publishing Company illustrated with photographs by Grant Mudford. The author recently answered questions posed by Austin architect Heather McKinney, FAIA.

Page 31

Lessons from Rome

by: Taeg Nishimoto

“Lessons from Rome” explores the enduring impact of the ancient metropolis on Robert Venturi, Tod Williams, Thomas Phifer, and Paul Lewis. The four architects are Fellows of the American Academy in Rome (AAR) whose experiences there continue to inform their design work. Curated and produced by Smilja Milovanovic-Bertram, an assistant professor at the UT Austin School of Architecture, the exhibition juxtaposes photographs of Rome with images of the architects’ subsequent work. The exhibition, funded through grants from the Graham Foundation for Advanced Visual Studies and UT Austin, opens on Oct. 20 at Texas A&M University’s College of Architecture.

Pantheon photo by Smilja Milovanovic-Bertram; Cranbrook School Natatorium photo by Michael
Page 35

2008 Design Awards Jury

Last February TSA’s Design Awards Committee, with representatives from almost all of the 17 AIA chapters across Texas, gathered in Austin to elect a jury for this year’s program. Texas has been privileged to host a variety of astounding critics throughout the Design Award’s 57-year history. This year was no exception. Billie Tsien, AIA; Steven Ehrlich, FAIA; and Judith Dupré accepted the challenge of reviewing 267 Design Award entries and 87 Studio Award entries. The ensuing deliberations showcased each juror’s individual perspective and approach to their work.

Page 41

AMLI II

by: Wendy Price Todd
Architect: PageSoutherlandPage

Located in downtown Austin ’s fledgling 2nd Street District, the new 18-story AMLI II integrates 35,000 square feet of ground-level retail space, four and one-half levels of above-ground parking, an activity deck on the fifth level above the garage, and 231 rental apartments on 17 floors.

Casey Dunn
Page 42

Concrete Studio

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: Mell Lawrence Architects

Mell Lawrence, FAIA
Page 46

Karbach Residence

by: Lawrence Connolly
Architect: Tim Cuppett, AIA

Located just two blocks from the State Capitol, the three-story 20 x 150-foot sliver at 811 Congress represents one of the few remaining historic buildings in downtown Austin. The structure, originally built in 1874 and used over the years to house a series of retail establishments, had been ravaged by fire and abandoned when Dennis Karbach bought the property to turn it into a residence. He hired Tim Cuppett, AIA, to help him realize the potential for the 9,000-sq. ft. shell hidden beneath an outmoded 1950s-era perforated-metal brise soleil.

Paul Bardagjy; Woody Welch; Tim Cuppett
Page 70

Lake Austin Residence

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: Lake|Flato Architects

Designed as a “village by a canal ,” this waterside residence integrates a series of small-scale, gable-roofed buildings with a narrow site along an inlet of Lake Austin. The architects of Lake/Flato once again have exhibited their adroit touch with materials and adeptness for capturing abundant outdoor views. Clustered like a rustic encampment, the individual buildings are designed to seamlessly blend their interiors with the exterior environment.

Patrick Y. Wong; Paul Hester
Page 74

Residence 1414 Renovation

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: Miró Rivera Architects

As one of two Miró Rivera projects selected for Design Awards this year, the renovation of this 1940s house required a fine balance between modern updates and traditional aspects of the original design.

Paul Finkel – piston design
Page 86

Seton Medical Center

by: Emma Janzen
Architect: PageSoutherlandPage

Seton Medical Center, the largest medical and surgical acute care center in Austin, was in desperate need of a facelift. In 2005, Seton commissioned PageSoutherlandPage to expand and renovate its 1970s-era brick building. The scope of the expansion included 110,000 square feet of new facilities, including a day surgery center, a chapel with adjacent garden, a main entranceway, and a “front door image” for the hospital. When the work was completed, both the physical identity of the building and its capacity were improved.

Tim Griffith Photographer
Page 90

Trail Restroom

by: Dror Baldinger
Architect: Miró Rivera Architects

An assemblage of 49 Corten steel plates arrayed in a coil-like shape, Miró Rivera Architects’ Trail Restroom is a captivating work of brutal simplicity.

Paul Finkel –piston design; Paul Bardagjy Photography; Kraig Becker
Page 94

U.S. Courthouse

by: Mark T. Wellen
Architect: PageSoutherlandPage

The U.S. Courthouse in Alpine was universally admired by this year’s Design Awards jury for its simplicity of form and masterful response to the setting. The courthouse was a product of the U.S. General Service Administration’s Design Excellence Program with PageSoutherlandPage’s Austin office as the architect selected for the project.

Chris Cooper Photography
Page 98

Biomedical Learning Center

by: TA Staff
Architect: SHW Group

The SHW Group, an Austin-based architectural and planning firm best known for its educational building design, developed the University of Texas at Brownsville’s Biomedical Research Laboratories and Community Sciences Building.

Mark Trew Photography
Page 102

The Shore

by: Emma Janzen
Architect: WDG Architecture Dallas

Located adjacent to Lady Bird Lake in Austin’s developing 27-acre Waterfront District, The Shore is a 22-story residential complex combining the luxury of lakeside living with the convenience of downtown accessibility. Designed for High Street Residential, a subsidiary of Dallas-based Trammell Crow Company, the complex sits within walking distance of the public hike and bike trail, Sixth Street’s nightlife, and the central business district.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA
Page 111

Interstate 35 Makeover

Ever since 1962, when construction was completed on Interstate 35 through downtown Austin, the elevated highway effectively bisected the city between a prosperous west and a neglected east. Commissioned by the Downtown Austin Alliance to devise a solution to that perceived division, local firm Cotera + Reed Architects has imagined a permanent installation for a two-block section between Sixth and Eighth streets.

Page 20

Central Texas by the Book

The complex development issues affecting Austin and the surrounding region are best understood when viewed as interwoven layers of culture and history suffused with equal amounts of enlightened leadership, misguided policies, good fortune, and poor planning.

Page 28

Ronald Goes Platinum

by: Laurie Zapalac
Architect: Eckols & Associates AIA

It is hard for most of us to imagine the range of emotions and needs that a family experiences when a child is sick enough to require hospitalization. The staff and designers of the new Ronald McDonald House in Austin have clearly given this a lot of thought. The project offers a welcome refuge for parents and loved ones who keep vigil as their child undergoes treatment nearby at the Dell Children’s Medical Center. The latest of a national network built by Ronald McDonald House Charities, the Austin facility also merges purposeful design with sustainability. The architects’ success in creating an energy-efficient building has been recognized with the highest rating by the U.S. Green Building Council, making the Ronald McDonald House in Austin one of only three buildings in Texas to achieve LEED Platinum.

Wade Griffith
Page 46

Green All Over

by: Jonathan P. Rollins, AIA
Architect: HDR Architecture, Inc.

McKinney Green was the first LEED Platinum pre-certified shell and core project in Texas, to date one of only three in the state to achieve the highest rating from the U.S. Green Building Council. Sustainability was established as a priority at the outset of the project by developer West World Holding Inc., a division of a Netherlands-based company. Advocating an integrated process, their intent was to build on knowledge gained from this project in future U.S. projects. After HDR was selected as the architect, Austin Commercial Construction was engaged early in the process for its experience in managing information as well as its record of completed projects.

Mark Trew Photography
Page 58

Mueller Central

by: Emma Janzen
Architect: Studio 8 Architects

When the Robert Mueller Municipal Airport shut down in 1999, the Austin City Council chose Catellus Development Group to transform the 711-acre site into a mixed-use “urban village.” As part of the development, local architectural firm Studio 8 was commissioned to design the first component—the renovation of an existing building that housed a private air terminal and an administrative office building.

McConnell Photography
Page 63

Austin Firm Garners International Award

Miró Rivera Architects’ Pedestrian Bridge was among three projects receiving top tier recognition in the 2006 The Architectural Review Awards for Emerging Architecture. Considered the best international award for young architects, the annual program celebrates the work of designers under the age of 45 who are at the start of their independent careers.

photo by Paul Finkel
Page 14

Tight Site

by: Susan Williamson
Architect: Susman Tisdale Gayle

The new middle school building at St. Andrew’s Episcopal School in Austin represents one more step in a journey begun more than 15 years ago when school officials first collaborated with Austin architects Susman Tisdale Gayle. Over the years, STG has worked with the school to create a gracious campus composed of buildings set among large oaks and centered around what STG principal Jim Susman, AIA, calls “the community green”—the school’s athletic field.

Casey Dunn; Jeffrey Ervin
Page 34

Austin’s Search for Civic Substance

by: Dean Almy

IF all goes according to plan, on the morning of Feb. 25 the five-story structural frame that was once part of a planned $124-million office building for the Intel Corporation will be imploded to make way for a new federal courthouse. The skeletal remains of the unfinished project, abandoned by Intel in 2001 after a downturn in the technology sector, loomed for six years over the southwestern quadrant of downtown.

illustration by dean almy; opposite PAGE, ILLUSTRATION BY BLACK + VERNOOY ARCHITECTS AND URBAN PLANNERS
Page 22

Ullrich Water Treatment Plant Expansion

by: Courtnay Loch
Architect: CasaBella Architects

In constructing the $72 million Ullrich Water Treatment Plant expansion, the design team faced the challenge of addressing the community’s concerns while still adhering to the programmatic requirements.

Mike Osborne
Page 50

Dell Children’s Hospital in Austin Seeks First LEED Platinum Health-Care Rating

by: Jeanette Wiemers

On June 27, the Dell Children’s Medical Center of Central Texas will open its doors as the first hospital in the world expected to achieve platinum LEED certification from the U.S Green Building Council. Located on approximately 32 acres of the site formerly occupied by Austin’s Robert Mueller Municipal Airport, the four-story pediatric facility will replace the downtown Children’s Hospital of Austin with a complex three times its size.

renderings courtesy karl sberger architecture
Page 17

Jury Selected for TSA Design Awards

The jury for the 2007 TSA Design Awards has been confirmed, with jurors scheduled to meet June 22–23 to review entries. The jury’s selections will be published in the September/October 2007 edition of Texas Architect. The awarded projects’ architects and owners will be honored during ceremonies at the TSA annual convention set Oct. 18-20 in Austin.

Page 21

The Austonian

Breaking ground later this year, Ziegler Cooper Architects’ 55-story highrise of luxury condominiums will tower 680 feet above Congress Avenue in downtown Austin. The $200 million project, scheduled to be completed in 2009, is expected to be the city’s tallest building.

Page 23

Roadside Attraction

by: Michael Rey, AIA
Architect: John Grable Architects

In the early 1940s, the strip of asphalt known then as Austin Road served as a lively portal to the city that many San Antonians fondly recall for its many amusements. Lined on both sides by diners, motor courts, and nightclubs, Austin Road was a place where families enjoyed chocolate malts on a hot summer day and young couples danced the night away. Now called Austin Highway, visitors and locals alike headed there back then to lose themselves in the simple pleasures that San Antonio is still known for today.

Chris Cooper
Page 50

AIA Austin Awards 17 Projects

by: Brian Carlson

AIA Austin honored 17 projects during the chapter’s 2007 Awards and Honors Gala held on May 12 at the Texas Memorial Museum on the University of Texas campus. The projects were selected from a pool of 65 entries submitted by local firms

Page 15

Instant Community

by: Carl Gromatzky, AIA
Architect: JPRA Architects

The growing trend toward mixed-use developments in the United States is a welcome change from developments of the recent past where zoning more or less dictated single-use districts and led to an overall homogenization of our urban environment. And while they have much to offer, these new mixed-use developments have challenges to overcome if they are to thrive. It is clear that for them to function as relatively self-sufficient, sustainable communities, lessons must be incorporated from urban neighborhoods that have grown up over decades or, in some cases, centuries.

Paul Bardagjy; R. Greg Hursley
Page 34

Art at the Domain

by: Jeanette Wiemers

Art is important to Austinites, says Lauren Harris, director of mall marketing at the Domain, so the project’s developer installed 22 works by local artists to enhance the uniqueness of the setting

Photo by R. Greg Hursley
Page 37

Stonewedge

by: Lawrence Connolly
Architect: Tim Cuppett, AIA

A prestigious Congress Avenue address and the excitement of living in the middle of downtown Austin wasn’t enough for Dennis Karbach. He also wanted suburban amenities in his five-bedroom townhouse, including a three-car garage, an outdoor swimming pool, and a yard. His architect was unfazed, despite the daunting challenge of meeting those needs in an old 20 x 150-foot, cave-like building.

Paul Bardagjy; Woody Welch; Tim Cuppett
Page 38

TSA Announces 2007 Honor Awards

by: TA Staff

The Texas Society of Architects has announced its annual Honor Awards to recognize significant contributions to the architectural profession and the quality of the built environment. The Honor Awards will be presented during the TSA annual convention to be held Oct. 18-20 in Austin.

Page 13

UT Austin Enters Third Solar Decathlon

by: Michael Garrison

Students at the University of Texas at Austin have a unique opportunity to design, fabricate and test the possibilities of combining renewable energy and contemporary dwelling design through their participation in the Solar Decathlon house competition. The program began in 2000, and UT students have participated in each of the three events that have taken place since then.

Photos courtesy UT Austin School of Architecture
Page 19

TSA Convention Preview: Exhibitors

The Texas Society of Architects is pleased to announce the list of companies participating in the 2007 Expo in Austin (current as of August 1). Expo dates are October 18-19 at the Austin Convention Center. Make plans now to visit their booths, pick up new product information, ask a question, or just see a friend. Keep and use this handy guide as a reference tool. With over 200 companies listed, you will find products to fulfill your architectural needs.

Page 98

NYC’s Stern to Design Bush Library

While its exact site on the SMU campus remains undeclared, the architect of the future Bush Library is known—Robert A.M. Stern Architects of New York City. The architect selection was made public in late August. Stern’s office beat out two Texas firms that also had been short-listed, Lawrence W. Speck Studio of Page Southerland Page in Austin and Overland Partners of San Antonio.

Page 14

Seaholm Mixed-Use Development

Redevelopment of the decommissioned Seaholm Power Plant (built 1950-1958) in Austin will transform the 7.8-acre site with a mix of office space, retail shops, condominiums, a boutique hotel, and special event space along the north shore of Lady Bird Lake (formerly Town Lake).

Page 16

Ballet Austin Sets the Stage

by: Jacqui Dodson, AIA
Architect: The Bommarito Group

Ballet Austin has been a fixture in the Austin arts community for more than 50 years. So when the ballet company and its academy, the fourth largest classical ballet academy in the nation decided to relocate to Austin’s ever-emerging Central Business District at the corner of 3rd and San Antonio, the idea fit like Cinderella’s slipper.

Casey Dunn Photography
Page 54

UT Austin’s SNAP House Comes Home

by: Samantha Randall

Following its return home in October from the 2005 Solar Decathlon, held in Washington, D.C., the University of Texas at Austin School of Architecture’s SNAP House began phase two of an already remarkable life. The 800-sf experimental, pre-fabricated dwelling has been donated for use as affordable housing in a neighborhood not far from the university campus. The house will be hooked into the Austin Energy grid, supplying enough power to eliminate the utility bills for its tenants while also supporting the needs of two adjacent homes.

Courtesy Solar Decathlon
Page 10

Vision Restored

by: Ben Heimsath
Architect: Ford Powell & Carson Architects and Planners

Clara Driscoll’s spirit looms over Laguna Gloria, her 1916 Mediterranean-style villa set along the banks of the Colorado River in Austin. Though she died in 1945, her personal touch remains palpable throughout the five-story house she and her husband Harry Sevier, a former state legislator, built on 28 acres formerly owned by Stephen F. Austin. The grounds in particular still bear her imprint, featuring landscaping inspired by gardens she had enjoyed while traveling in England and Italy.

Matthew Fuller; courtesy tbg partners
Page 24

AIA Austin Awards Eleven Projects

AIA Austin honored 11 projects during the chapter’s 2006 Awards and Honors Gala held on Feb.25 at the Seaholm Power Plant. The projects were selected from a pool of 69 entries submitted by local firms.

Page 14

LBJ High School Theater

Located on one of Austin’s arts magnet school campuses, the LBJ High School Theater establishes a revitalized arts presence within a setting of utilitarian academic buildings. The theater building, designed by Austin-based LZT Architects, is composed of inner and outer shells, with the baffled walls of the interior expressed as colorful planes on the building’s exterior.

Page 16

Inspired Connection

by: Lawrence Connolly
Architect: Miró Rivera Architects

With the delightfully unexpected and resourceful use of materials, Miró Rivera Architects has designed and supervised construction of a footbridge over an inlet of Lake Austin that pays homage to the site’s sensitive wetlands. The footbridge is the firm’s third completed project of a master plan for an eight-acre lakefront site that includes a three-acre inlet/lagoon. Preceding the bridge were a boat house and a guest house, with the main house planned as the next – and largest – component of the complex. Half of the residential site is designated as wetlands that serve as a migratory stop for egrets, cranes, and swans, and as such the site is regulated by the Texas Parks and Wildlife and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

Paul Finkel
Page 26

Staff Changes at Texas Architect

A close look at the masthead on the opposite page will clue alert readers to the departure of Art Director Rachel Wyatt and Associate Publisher Linda Trinh, as well as the promotion of Ashley St. Clair from assistant editor to art director. Rachel, who joined the TA staff in November 2004, is the new associate art director at Texas Monthly. Linda, after almost two years with the TA staff, has taken a position with Bulldog Solutions in Austin as a marketing campaign manager

Page 5

Taniguchi Set to Unveil Revised Design this Summer for Asia House Houston

by: Ronnie Self

Yoshio Taniguchi, best known in the U.S. for his recent expansion of the Museum of Modern Art in New York City, will unveil his latest schematic design for Houston’s Asia House later this summer. The client, Asia Society Texas, has acquired two facing parcels totaling 78,000 square feet along one block of Southmore Boulevard between Caroline and Austin streets in the city’s Museum District. The 35,000-sq. ft. facility is expected to open in summer 2009 and will serve as a venue for cultural, artistic, educational, and business exchange.

courtesy asia society texas
Page 10

Advanced Micro Devices

In April 2005, Advanced Micro Devices announced plans for a new campus on a 59-acre tract at the southern edge of Austin to house its design and administrative staff. AMD hired Graeber Simmons & Cowan Architecture of Austin to design a masterplan as well as the individual components.

Page 16

Cool Spaces

by: Frank Jacobus
Architect: Barnes Gromatzky Kosarek Architects; Goetting & Associates; Jaster-Quintanilla (joint venture)

The 2002 expansion of the Austin Convention Center, a near doubling of the facility’s size, as well as the concurrent construction of a new convention center hotel, prompted city officials to consider an important question: Where will all those additional people park? Ultimately, the officials decided on a project that paired the city’s Convention Center Department and Austin Energy, the municipal electrical utility, and created 650-plus parking spaces while also providing chilled water for downtown customers.

Thomas McConnell
Page 36

University Federal Credit Union

by: Jennifer Lee
Architect: Antenora Architects

University Federal Credit Union’s new Brodie Lane branch in Austin illustrates the institution’s rethinking of its marketing strategy. According to the architect, the goal was to design a visually striking landmark that would reflect the advances in technology within the banking world while not alienating UFCU’s long-standing, less digital-savvy members.

Paul Bardagjy
Page 47

UT Austin Team Travels to Italy with Ideas for Rebuilding New Orleans and Environs

by: Jason Sowell; Frank Jacobus

A team of faculty and students from The University of Texas at Austin’s School of Architecture (UTSOA) has been invited to contribute its research and design ideas for the revitalization of New Orleans to the Venice Biennale. The exhibition, organized under the theme “Cities, Architecture and Society,” will run from Sept. 10 to Nov. 19.

illustrations courtesy UT Austin School of Architecture
Page 19

Austin City Lofts


Architect: Page Southerland Page

This 82-unit, 14-story tower provides an anchor and landmark for a new mixed-use district in the southwest quadrant of downtown. A three-story, horizontal, stone volume houses the entry lobby, deep stacked porches, and a modest retail strip off a shady arcade. Parking for 164 vehicles is tucked behind and below.

Tim Griffith Photography
Page 34

Cup City


Architect: Legge Lewis Legge

Cup City, a temporary interactive lounge sponsored by Starbucks, was constructed over the course of the three-day Austin City Limits Music Festival using 41 (6 x 15-foot) fence panels, zip ties, and approximately 25,000 pieces of garbage.

Legge Lewis Legge
Page 42

Floating Box House


Architect: Peter L Gluck and Partners, Architects

Surrounded by a grove of more than 200 live oaks, the house is located just outside Austin and stands between the city’s new urban skyline and its rural past.

Paul Warchol
Page 48

Footbridge


Architect: Miró Rivera Architects

With a design inspired in the reeds that line the edges of the lake, this pedestrian bridge is a light structure integrated with its setting. The bars/reeds intertwine at the abutments and “grow” over the bridge, camouflaging and turning it into a symbiotic, almost invisible link.

Paul Finkel
Page 50

Texas Hillel


Architect: Alterstudio Architects with Black + Vernooy Architecture and Urban Design

The design focused on two principal goals—to orchestrate an inviting building that would encourage students to venture within and to create a place where spirituality would be part of everyday life, not something removed to a sacred sphere.

Paul Bardagjy
Page 72

TSA studio Awards

by: Stephen Sharpe

The review of Studio Award entries followed the jury’s finalizing its selections for Design Awards. From the 48 submittals, the jury kept 14 for a second round before deciding to award seven projects. Three of them in particular garnered praise from the jurors—Square of Circles by Jay Smith, AIA, of Dallas; Houston Skyscraper by Michael Kross, an architecture student at Rice University; and Design>Build>Texas by architecture students at UT Austin.

Page 78

Block 21 Mixed-Use Development

Planned as the third-tallest building in downtown Austin, the 30-story building will include a hotel and condominium tower, as well as street-level restaurants, a 30,000-sq. ft. children’s museum, and a 1,000-seat studio for live recordings of public television’s Austin City Limits.

Page 18

Home for Homeless

by: Lauren Woodward Stanley, Lars Stanley
Architect: LZT Architects; Herman Thun, AIA; Murray Legge, AIA; Val Fuger, AIA; Alex Martinez; Luciana Misi; Do

In the ARCH (Austin Resource Center for the Homeless) the City of Austin has a facility that invites its transient residents to join the community. Designed by LZT Architects of Austin and completed in 2004, the building is located at a busy downtown corner (just four blocks from its central corridor, Congress Avenue) and makes the most of its multi-faceted character, housing an impressive variety of resources within its stout concrete frame. Indeed, the uncommon facade it presents to the street is testament to the many parties involved in realizing such a project.

Thomas McConnell Photography
Page 32
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