Article Results for "Retail"

Retail Development and Design

by: Catherine Gavin

Retail design has the potential to go beyond just creating an interesting clean space for product presentation. This issue of Texas Architect looks at how good planning and design create effective community spaces and individual stores with a sense of place.

NorthPark Center and Omniplan
Page 5

Pioneering Shopping Centers

by: J. Brantley Hightower, AIA

Highland Park Village and NorthPark Center in Dallas, and the Galleria in Houston all blazed trails as shopping centers that spurred urban development. And today they continue to be examples of successful retail design, which from their inceptions sought to create a unique sense of place.

OMNIPLAN AND PETER CALVIN
Page 30

Standing Up to the Strip Mall

by: Rebecca Roberts

Building code necessitated a blast wall at the Met Retail site in Austin. Studio 8 Architects took the opportunity to customize the building’s aesthetic and break from typical highway architecture.

Andy Mattern; Brian Mihealsick
Page 36

Buy Local

by: Catherine Gavin

In the ever-changing world of retail design, flexibility, simplicity, curb appeal, and storage are fundamental to continued success. Keepers, Eliza Page, and Rogue Running, all local Austin retailers, were pioneers of downtown shopping — and their continued relevance is a prom¬ising sign

Jud Haggard Photography, Casey Woods Photography, Juan Carlos DeLeon
Page 40

A Fresh Patina

by: Gregory Ibañez, FAIA

The Gensler-designed Patina store, a new retail concept offering floor and wall-covering products along with in-house interior design consultation in Dallas, is an ambi¬tious attempt by Acme Brick to fill a void in the marketplace while creating an entirely new shopping model.

Bruce Damonte Photography
Page 46

Re-Tailoring Retail

by: Aaron Seward

Three projects — Rackspace Hosting (an internet company in the old Windsor Park Mall in San Antonio), the McAllen Public Library (in an old Walmart), and Montgomery Plaza (a condominium in former Mont¬gomery Ward facility in Fort Worth) — offer a cross section of some of the design concerns and sociological effects of rehabilitating abandoned shopping malls.

Lars Frazer Photography, Boultinghouse Simpson Gates Architects; Lara Swimmer Photography, Craig Smith Photography; Shands Photographics
Page 50

A Conversation in Dallas

by: José Mismo

Roy is showing his new friend, Emily, around the city. They pause beneath a tree on Flora Street. It’s August and the shade offers them a bit of relief from the sun.

Page 54

Silo

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: Sprinkle & Co. Architects (formerly Sprinkle Robey Architects)

Designed by Sprinkle & Co. Architects and completed in 2008, Silo’s second San Antonio location occupies 8,900 square feet and two floors within a suburban retail development. The owners requested that the architects preserve but also refresh the restaurant’s identity.

Chris Cooper; Paul Hester
Page 58

Seasoned with History

by: J. Brantley Hightower
Architect: Darryl Ohlenbusch, AIA

In the 1920s, the area of San Antonio now know n as Southtown was a thriving and culturally diverse community just south of downtown. It was in the Italian-American enclave of this district where an industrious entrepreneur built a corner building with retail at street level and living quarters above.

Chris Cooper Photography
Page 42

A Work in Progress

by: Kevin Sloan
Architect: Gromatzky Dupree & Associates

Park Lane is not your typical New Urbanist enclave. There is no tinge of nostalgia to the buildings, no sense of a walk down memory lane, nor the feel of a backdrop to a 1920s movie. Instead, crisp lines, angular building shapes, and modernist glass cubes are gathered along the familiar form of a street. Taken together, it is a project that manifests an interest in distinguishing urban design concepts from building style.

Steve Hinds Photography
Page 54

Landmark Encore

by: Bart Shaw
Architect: Marquis Group

Montgomery Ward published its first catalogue in 1872 and soon found great success shipping farm equipment and other goods across the U.S. via rail. In the 1920s the company built nine regional facilities that combined distribution centers and retail outlets, including one in Fort Worth in 1928. The eight-story Mission Revival building, completed in nine months by general contractor Thos. S. Byrne, was expanded and renovated several times over the years. Enclosing 600,000 square feet, the U-shaped edifice teemed with fervent activity through the 1960s.

Craig Smith
Page 58

Haven for Art

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: Laguarda Low Architects

Once just another nondescript, single-story building indistinguishable from its neighbors that together comprise a light-industrial district wedged between downtown Dallas and the Trinity River, the Light & Sie Art Gallery now stands out. The reconfigured entry, framed by a box of aluminum panels, asserts a refined presence that quietly commands attention amid the clutter of storefronts along Leslie Street on the city’s near-west side. The 13,000-sf project is one of the latest examples in a transformative trend for the area where a few of the shopworn buildings have been repurposed as showrooms for the design trade and retail galleries for contemporary art.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 60

Citibank Offices

by: Susan Butler
Architect: Marmon Mok

The 17,500-sf Citibank, built on an in-fill site at 5th and Rio Grande streets in downtown Austin, includes a street-level retail banking lobby, four drive-through lanes, and two upper floors for offices of commercial banking. Marmon Mok designed the $5 million project.

Dror Baldinger, AIA; Lawrence Lander
Page 74

Texas Rangers Retail Shop

by: Susan Butler
Architect: FIRM817

The newly completed Texas Rangers Retail Shop at Sundance Square in Fort Worth, designed by FIR M817, was not just intended to be a place to grab a Rangers shirt or tickets to the next game. The design of the 757-sf space was intended to let customers experience the feel of baseball through multiple sensory expressions.

Brandon Burns
Page 76

Mixing It Up in SoCo

by: Lawrence Connolly
Architect: Dick Clark Architecture and Michael Hsu Design Office

Anyone who has visited Austin’s eclectic strip of retail and restaurants along South Congress knows the SoCo entertainment district to be a vortex of bohemian conviviality. The city’s head-long rush to grow and densify is readily apparent along the wide avenue that stretches below downtown. SoCo encompasses a few commercial blocks comprised of small buildings, none more than three stories tall. Residential neighborhoods back up to the businesses, and the homeowners are notorious for opposing the slightest change in the street frontage.

Paul Bardagjy
Page 50

AMLI II

by: Wendy Price Todd
Architect: PageSoutherlandPage

Located in downtown Austin ’s fledgling 2nd Street District, the new 18-story AMLI II integrates 35,000 square feet of ground-level retail space, four and one-half levels of above-ground parking, an activity deck on the fifth level above the garage, and 231 rental apartments on 17 floors.

Casey Dunn
Page 42

Karbach Residence

by: Lawrence Connolly
Architect: Tim Cuppett, AIA

Located just two blocks from the State Capitol, the three-story 20 x 150-foot sliver at 811 Congress represents one of the few remaining historic buildings in downtown Austin. The structure, originally built in 1874 and used over the years to house a series of retail establishments, had been ravaged by fire and abandoned when Dennis Karbach bought the property to turn it into a residence. He hired Tim Cuppett, AIA, to help him realize the potential for the 9,000-sq. ft. shell hidden beneath an outmoded 1950s-era perforated-metal brise soleil.

Paul Bardagjy; Woody Welch; Tim Cuppett
Page 70

‘Community’ College

by: Chris Schultz, AIA
Architect: Ford Powell & Carson Architects and Planners; Overland Partners Architects

The far northeastern section of metropolitan San Antonio is an amalgam of urbanizing late 19th Century farming communities and 20th Century bedroom suburbs extending in patchwork patterns of roofs, fields, and retail strip centers. For what it has in sheer volume of construction, the area generally lacks any cohesive center. Into this void has stepped the Alamo Community College District (ACCD) with a plan to create an entirely new joint-use facility—the Northeast Lakeview College. Not only is the institution to serve the educational and training needs of an estimated 15,000 students from the nine-community catchment area, but just as importantly, the facilities are to provide the surrounding areas with much-needed community resources.

Jim Arp
Page 42

NorthPark Center

by: Jonathan P. Rollins, AIA
Architect: Omniplan

As a second generation project for both owner and architect, the expansion of NorthPark Center both completes and refines the original design.

Craig Blackmon, FAIA
Page 60

Royal Bank of Scotland

by: William Rios, AIA
Architect: DMJM Rottet

Royal Bank of Scotland (RBS), an international financial institution offering diverse banking service to retail and corporate clients, appropriately maintains offices in downtown Houston.

Benny Chan
Page 72

Memorial Hermann Medical Plaza

by: Megan Braley
Architect: Kirksey

The new 31-story addition to the Texas Medical Center (TMC) offers 500,000-sf of retail, ambulatory surgery, and professional office space to an area that previously lacked adequate lease space for physicians.

Aker/Zvonkovic Photography
Page 87

IIDA Awards Five Interiors Projects

by: Megan Braley

In August, the Texas/Oklahoma chapter of the International Interior Design Association awarded its 2007 Design Excellence Awards to five entries. The winning projects were selected in the institutional, retail, healthcare, residential, and corporate categories. In addition, eight projects received Honorable Mention awards and three projects were presented the coveted Pinnacle Award.

Page 11

Seaholm Mixed-Use Development

Redevelopment of the decommissioned Seaholm Power Plant (built 1950-1958) in Austin will transform the 7.8-acre site with a mix of office space, retail shops, condominiums, a boutique hotel, and special event space along the north shore of Lady Bird Lake (formerly Town Lake).

Page 16

The Most Stylish Floors of Tomorrow Today

by: D. Christopher Davis

Linen textured tiles, century-old wood, bamboo rugs, buttery leather, and sponge are just some of the new looks that have donned the floors at the premium floor covering tradeshow, Surfaces, sponsored by the World Floor Covering Association. WFCA, the industry’s largest advocacy organization representing specialty floor covering retailers, manufacturers, distributors, and contractors, offers a top-line overview of the fashionable looks that are making their way to the floors of homes and businesses across the country this year.

P. 54 Photo Courtesy Anderson hardwood Floors; P. 55 Photo courtesy shawfloors.com
Page 52

NorthPark Center Expansion

by: Jennifer Lee
Architect: Omniplan Inc.

The recent expansion of NorthPark Center in Dallas by Omniplan represents the second major alteration of the innovative 1964 shopping mall. Originally developed by Raymond D. Nasher in an L-shaped plan, NorthPark has been reconfigured as a closed square with double the amount of retail space.

James F. Wilson
Page 45
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