Article Results for "Houston"

Graphic Design

by: Donna Kacmar
Architect: Michael Graves & Associates with PGAL

The new Houston Branch of the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas is hard to miss: its imposing form and graphic detailing rise above the trees along Allen Parkway just west of downtown. While its exterior appears heavy-handed from a distance, one must experience the inner workings to fully appreciate the facility’s design.

Richard Payne, FAIA
Page 28

Martel College at Rice University

by: Donna Kacmar

Michael Graves’ signature style also appears in another building recently completed in Houston. Martel College at Rice University (shown at left) exhibits similarities with the Federal Reserve, particularly in the treatment of Martel’s exterior where St. Joe brick is set in a “jumbo running-bond pattern” with precast concrete units used to mimic mortar. As with the Federal Reserve where he again played with the sense of scale on the facade, Graves was teamed with PGAL on the Rice project.

Richard Payne , FAIA
Page 31

Playing It Up

by: Val Glitsch
Architect: Upchurch Architects

The recently completed Day School for Christ Lutheran Church in Brenham puts a new face on school design for this small city Northwest of Houston. Previously occupying a small house and shared weekday use of a rather bleak set of Sunday School rooms, 125 children (with their 24 teachers) now occupy a building Upchurch Architects has designed just for them.

Hester + Hardaway
Page 32

Houstonians Rally to Preserve Theaters

by: Gerald Moorhead

When the Greater Houston Preservation Alliance (GHPA) added two Art Deco theaters to its “most endangered” list in July, there was an unprecedented outcry to save the buildings from being razed. The response has been unique for Houston, where land value is king and buildings, the bearers of history and identity-of-place, are expendable. Within 10 days, more than 20,000 people had signed an online petition in support of GHPA’s actions to preserve the theaters.

Photos by gerald moorhead, fAIA
Page 15

S.I. Morris (1914-2006)

by: Stephen Fox

The dean of Houston’s architecture community, Seth Irwin Morris Jr., died Aug. 1 at the age of 91.

courtesy morris architects
Page 17

The 505


Architect: Collaborative Designworks

The 505, a four-unit townhouse development, sits near Houston’s rejuvenated downtown. The architect spearheaded the project as an experimental design exercise that works within the economic and market constraints of a speculative housing development. The 505 sought to be financially successful and to make responsible use of land, incorporate sustainable design principles, enhance community sensibilities, and possess an architectural identity.

Aker/Zvoncovik Photography; G. Lyon Photography
Page 46

Sarofim Research Building


Architect: BNIM Architects

The Fayez S. Sarofim Research Building houses core research laboratories, administrative offices, and a glass auditorium. Located in the Texas Medical Center, the parti consists of a central atrium flanked by two wings—the southern containing administrative offices and the northern containing labs. The openness of the adjoining atrium gardens invites public passage through the building, giving the program a sense of transparency.

Richard Payne, FAIA
Page 66

School of Nursing


Architect: BNIM Architects with Lake/Flato Architects

The School of Nursing enhances human health and productivity while having as little impact on the environment as possible. It is itself a healthy building that was built with 50-percent recycled materials and designed to reduce energy use by 40 percent and water use by 60 percent. The project, submitted for a LEE D Gold rating, was selected by the AIA Committee on the Environment as a 2006 Top Ten Green Project.

Hester + Hardaway
Page 68

TSA studio Awards

by: Stephen Sharpe

The review of Studio Award entries followed the jury’s finalizing its selections for Design Awards. From the 48 submittals, the jury kept 14 for a second round before deciding to award seven projects. Three of them in particular garnered praise from the jurors—Square of Circles by Jay Smith, AIA, of Dallas; Houston Skyscraper by Michael Kross, an architecture student at Rice University; and Design>Build>Texas by architecture students at UT Austin.

Page 78

Houston Skyscraper


Architect: Michael Kross, student at Rice University

Increased mobility in communications and transportation has seen the traditional central business district lose favor to peripheral centers. Nowhere is this trend more salient than in Houston, where at least one of the motivations for building tall no longer applies.

Page 81

Update: Threatened Houston Theaters

by: Gerald Moorhead

Since the last report on Houston’s endangered River Oaks and Alabama theaters (Sept/Oct 2006 TA, p. 15), the owner of the historic Art Deco movie houses, Weingarten Realty Investors, has made public its intentions. Both sites are planned for high-rise development, with the curved north section of the original River Oaks Shopping Center doomed to make way for a multi-story building.

Photo by Jim Parsons
Page 14

Shotgun Chameleon

Designed by University of Houston architecture student Zui Ng (working with professors Rafael Longoria and Fernando Brave, AIA), Shotgun Chameleon was one of two entries by Texas designers to receive an Honor Award in the New Orleans Prototype Housing Competition co-sponsored by Architectural Record and Tulane University’s School of Architecture.

Page 18

Lofts On Post Oak

by: Andi Beierman
Architect: Wallace Garcia Wilson Architects, Inc.; Jackson & Ryan Arcitects

Situated among the upscale shopping centers in Houston’s Galleria, Lofts on Post Oak provides a much-needed residential center to complement the vibrant commercial streetscape along Post Oak Boulevard. T he complex, with a total of 351 residential units, includes an eight-story tower that houses 66 units offering contemporary living environments opposite buildings designed by I.M. Pei, Cesar Pelli, and Philip Johnson.

Architectural Photography
Page 47

Energy-Efficient Envelopes

by: Mark Oberholzer, AIA

Located at the edge of Houston’s Texas Medical Center, the Fayez S. Sarofim Research Building occupies a tight site between a transit center and Braeswood Bayou. The building design by BNIM Architects adopts a variety of high-performance wall system technologies that enhance the building’s energy efficiency while creating a subtle yet intriguing urban presence.

photo by Richard Payne, FAIA
Page 49

Energy-Efficient Envelopes

by: Mark Oberholzer, AIA
Architect: BNI M Architects

Located at the edge of Houston’s Texas Medical Center, the Fayez S. Sarofim Research Building occupies a tight site between a transit center and Braeswood Bayou. The building design by BNIM Architects adopts a variety of high-performance wall system technologies that enhance the building’s energy efficiency while creating a subtle yet intriguing urban presence.

photo by Richard Payne, FAIA
Page 49

Energy-Efficient Envelopes

by: Mark Oberholzer, AIA
Architect: Thompson, Ventulett, Stainback & Associates, Inc.; Arquitectonica International (Arena); Gignac & As

Located at the edge of Houston’s Texas Medical Center, the Fayez S. Sarofim Research Building occupies a tight site between a transit center and Braeswood Bayou. The building design by BNIM Architects adopts a variety of high-performance wall system technologies that enhance the building’s energy efficiency while creating a subtle yet intriguing urban presence.

photo by Richard Payne, FAIA; Courtesy Thompson Ventulett Stainback & Associates
Page 49
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