Article Results for "architecture"

Robert R. Bruno (1945 – 2008)

by: Rick Price

Robert R. Bruno, known for his idiosyncratic Steel House that evolved over three decades of design and construction, died Dec. 9 at the age of 63 from complications of cancer. A member of the faculty of Texas Tech University’s College of Architecture in the late 1970s, Bruno later taught courses there periodically.

Kelly Ludwig, www.detourart.com , www.robertbruno.com
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Suburban Revival

by: Eurico R. Francisco
Architect: Omniplan

“Dallas is a place where the future looks better than the past,” states Ed Baum, the former dean of the University of Texas at Arlington’s School of Architecture and longtime Dallas resident. His description succinctly sums up both the regret of missed opportunities and the promise of better things to come. At the same time both sad and optimistic, his quip also captures the essence of the American city over the last 100 years or so—a place always expanding outward and leaving behind what came before, not just its downtown, but also its history. In short, the American city is forever searching for “a better future.” Dallas is a good example.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA
Page 64

Lake/Flato’s Shangri La in Top Ten Green

Lake/Flato Architects’ Shangri La Botanical Gardens and Nature Center in Orange is among the Top Ten Green Projects for 2009 as recognized by the AIA’s Committee on the Environment (COTE). Each year the national award celebrates excellence in sustainable architecture and design solutions that protect and enhance the natural environment.

Photo by Hester + Hardaway
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SAC Program Celebrates Milestone

by: Julie Cooper

In 1958, architect Vernon Helmke inaugurated a program at San Antonio College to prepare students for careers in architecture. Since offering those first classes in design, graphics, freehand drawing, and construction, SAC’s architectural curriculum has grown in size and reputation.

Photos courtesy San Antonio College
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TSA Design Awards Jury Selected

by: TA Staff

Three highly respected designers will judge the entries in the 2009 TSA Design Awards program. The jurors will be Philip Freelon, FAIA, president of the Freelon Group in Raleigh-Durham, N.C.; Mary Margaret Jones, FASLA, president of San Francisco-based landscape architecture firm Hargreaves Associates; and Rick Joy, AIA, of Rick Joy Architects in Tucson. The jury is set to meet May 15 in Austin.

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Hariri to Lead Studio Awards Jury

Gisue Hariri of Hariri & Hariri Architecture in New York City, has been selected to lead the 2009 Texas Society of Architects Studio Awards jury. This year’s TSA Studio Awards will be judged separately from the Design Awards, and the deadline for entries has been set later in the year to encourage more students to participate in the competition.

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AIA Houston Recognizes 12 Projects

by: Christian Sheridan

AIA Houston honored 12 projects at its 53rd annual Design Awards Dinner held on March 26 at the Rice Hotel’s Crystal Ballroom. Winners were selected from 115 entries in six categories: architecture, residential architecture, interior architecture, renovation/restoration, urban design, and on the boards.

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Designs on Volunteering

by: Margine Biswas

The opportunity to offer one’s knowledge and skills to young people can be an exceptionally rewarding experience. When such an opportunity arose recently, I joined several members of AIA Dallas’ Women in Architecture in preparing a presentation for middle school-aged girls to help them realize their potential for professional careers. Our presentation was part of the national “Expanding Your Horizons” program sponsored by the American Association of University Women.

Photo by Penny
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Art in the Park

by: PageSoutherlandPage
Architect: PageSoutherlandPage

In early 2004, a group of prominent local philanthropists negotiated a landmark deal with Houston Mayor Bill White. As outlined in the pact, the City of Houston contributed several downtown parcels in front of the George R. Brown Convention Center and the philanthropists agreed to fund the design and maintenance of a world-class park that promised to breathe new life into the urban core. Named through a public competition, the non-profit Discovery Green Conservancy opened the $122 million park in April 2008 to widespread acclaim. The 11.8-acre urban amenity is located near the southeast edge of downtown, between the Toyota Center basketball arena and Minute Maid Park baseball stadium.

Eric Laignel Photography; Chris Cooper Photography; Julie Pizzo
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The Stuff of Dreams

Amongst the challenges and tribulations of the day, we are compelled to make one parting comment about young people in architecture and their future.

Page 69

AIA Austin Awards 15 Projects

by: Rick Price

On April 18, AIA Austin recognized 15 projects at its 2009 Design Awards Gala held at the historic Browning Hangar on the redeveloped grounds of former Mueller Municipal Airport. Of the 115 submitted projects, 14 received Design Awards and one received a Studio Award.

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As Two Deans Depart, Two Others Arrive

by: TA Staff

Lars Lerup stepped down as dean of the Rice University School of Architecture on July 1, a move that leaves two of Texas’ eight accredited schools of architecture searching for replacements. Earlier this year Joe Mashburn, AIA, announced that he would depart the dean’s office at the University of Houston’s Gerald D. Hines College of Architecture.

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Stone Oak Branch Library

Designed by Marmon Mok Architecture, the 15,000-sf Stone Oak Branch Library will serve San Antonio’s growing population on the far northwestern edge of the city. The crescent-shaped building will be sited in a clearing among existing live oaks and will provide views of the Hill Country prairie’s native grasses, prickly pears, and elms, as well as neighboring limestone escarpments and a dry creek bed.

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Neighbors

by: Stephen Fox

Architectural historian Virginia McAlester; architect and historian Willis Winters, FAIA; journalist Prudence Mackintosh; and photographer Steve Clicque have produced an extraordinary work on the history and architecture of Dallas’ two best-known twentieth-century residential communities, Highland Park and University Park.

Page 31

Living Laboratory

by: Urs Peter Flueckiger

As our planet’s reserves of water and energy sources become increasingly limited, architects must develop forms of architecture that incorporate – even celebrate – sustainability design practices. Toward that end, my students at Texas Tech University are engaged in an ongoing project that focuses on a variety of solutions. The result is a living laboratory designed for the harsh microclimate of Foard County about 45 miles west of Wichita Falls.

Images by Urs Peter Flueckiger
Page 84

Foster + Partners Exhibit at Nasher

by: Gregory Ibanez

The Nasher Sculpture Center in Dallas has shown a significant interest in architecture during its relatively brief history.

Page 25

Rice Appoints New Dean

by: TA Staff

Sarah Whiting, a member of the Princeton University School of Architecture faculty and an expert in urban and architectural theory, has been named dean of the Rice University School of Architecture. Whiting officially takes command on Jan. 1.

Page 27

Constructed Ecologies

Rice University graduate students Zhan Chen and Brantley Highfill (with faculty sponsor Douglas Oliver) recently received second place for their design Constructed Ecologies in the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture “Concrete Thinking for a Sustainable World” International Student Design Competition.

Page 28

Architecture Criticism and the Public

by: David Dillon

I’ve just returned from a trip to Amsterdam and Paris, and one of the things that surprised me – besides $20 chicken salad sandwiches washed down with $15 glasses of vin ordinaire – was the number of architecture and design magazines for sale in airports, train stations, bookstores and sidewalk newsstands.

Photos by Lawrence Lander
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Lerup’s Legacy

by: Ben Koush

The program of the Rice School of Architecture (RSA) – encouraging students to create conceptual apparatuses for investigating contemporary urban phenomena – is outlined in its latest publication, Everything Must Move, released on the occasion of the fifth Kennon Symposium honoring Dean Lars Lerup as he steps down this year.

Photo by Lawrence Lander
Page 35

Eclectic Ensemble

by: Lawrence Connolly
Architect: Dick Clark Architecture with Michael Hsu Design Office

When Antoine Predock, FAIA, was in midst of conceiving the new Austin City Hall, he commented that the city was “terminally democratic.” He made the remark after his design survived a protracted review process that included more than a dozen town meetings and hearings before the City Council. A similar sort of public scrutiny – albeit on a smaller, neighborhood scale – resulted when Dick Clark Architecture added a zoning non-compliant residential building to its 1400 South Congress mixed-use project.

Paul Bardagjy; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
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Concrete Poetry

by: Jeffrey Brown, AIA
Architect: Elliott + Associates Architects

This word painting by Rand Elliott, FAIA, explains how he wants people to understand his latest award-winning project, ImageNet of Houston. Employing poetry or manifestoes to describe one’s work is not uncommon these days. Indeed, such material appears to be a prerequisite of the current media culture that promotes “starchitects,” “signature architects,” and one-hit wonders. Supportive text is, we are led to believe, required reading. If a building appears mundane, baffling, or otherwise underwhelming, just refer to the narrative. Within the architect’s words, we are told, lies the true meaning which will assure in our prosaic times that, yes, this is Architecture.

Scott McDonald, Hedrich Blessing; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 56

Light Show

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: Booziotis & Company, Thomas Phifer & Partners, nodesign

Craig Blackmon, FAIA
Page 96

Peterson Is First Woman To Receive Top TSA Honor

by: Mary Carolyn Hollers George

Carolyn Peterson, FAIA, is the forty-first recipient of the Texas Society of Architect’s highest award – the Medal for Lifetime Achievement in Honor of Llewellyn W. Pitts FAIA – presented annually to a TSA member for contributions to the profession of architecture and their community. From its inception in 1968 until this year, the honor’s awardees have been exclusively male.

photo courtesy Ken Slavin
Page 15

Drawn to Architecture

by: Bryce A. Weigand, FAIA

These drawings are excerpts from sketchbooks complied over the past 33 years. Presented in our Good Fulton & Farrell University (for AIA learning unit credits), they formed the structure of the presentations: “Drawn to Architecture: Sketches to Reality.”

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