Article Results for "ARE"

Charles Gwathmey 1938-2009

by: Juan Miro, AIA

Charles Gwathmey – Charlie, as most people called him – started off his career with a bang. Like two other giants of the American arts, Orson Wells and Norman Mailer, Charlie produced a masterpiece while he was still in his 20s. After graduating from Yale, Charlie traveled through Europe where he was able to experience first-hand the works of his most admired Modernist master, Le Corbusier.

Photo at left by Rosa Rivera; photo at right courtesy Gwathmey Siegel & Associates Architects
Page 19

Solar LED Fascia

University of Houston students Daniel De La Garza, Jared Wilson Thorn, Alfonso Villafuerte, and Chukwunoso Ofili have developed a concept for an eco-friendly, multi-purpose lighting system that could serve nightly as neighborhood and home security lighting and as solar-powered emergency lighting during power shortages.

Page 28

Design Awards 2009

The 2009 TSA Design Awards jury met in Austin on May 15 to view 261 submittals of built work. The jurors were Mary Margaret Jones, FASLA, of Hargreaves Associates (San Francisco, Cambridge, and New York); Rick Joy, AIA, of Rick Joy Architects (Tucson); and Philip Freelon, FAIA, of the Freelon Group (Durham, N.C.)

Illustrations by Bryce Weigand
Page 39

A Sonnet to Dwell In

by: Eurico R. Francisco
Architect: Buchanan Architecture

The area just north of downtown Dallas known as Oak Lawn is rich and diverse in demographics, land use, and building types. Having matured over time, Oak Lawn has evolved into a neighborhood of restaurants, churches, hotels, offices, and a varied assemblage of residential buildings.

Jason Franzen; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 48

Garden Spot

by: Michael Malone
Architect: Cunningham Architects

From the street Cunningham Architects’ House in the Garden is a beautifully conceived and executed object, partially shielded behind an iconic wall constructed of stainless-steel wire grid and filled with fragments of slag glass. This idealized garden villa – really a giant porch – provides a delightful way to both view and inhabit a highly personalized landscape. It’s a thoughtful and well organized bit of place making; surprisingly its greatest success is as a foil and extension of an outdoor space that was originally part of the adjacent house.

James F. Wilson, Gisela Borghi; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 52

Concrete Poetry

by: Jeffrey Brown, AIA
Architect: Elliott + Associates Architects

This word painting by Rand Elliott, FAIA, explains how he wants people to understand his latest award-winning project, ImageNet of Houston. Employing poetry or manifestoes to describe one’s work is not uncommon these days. Indeed, such material appears to be a prerequisite of the current media culture that promotes “starchitects,” “signature architects,” and one-hit wonders. Supportive text is, we are led to believe, required reading. If a building appears mundane, baffling, or otherwise underwhelming, just refer to the narrative. Within the architect’s words, we are told, lies the true meaning which will assure in our prosaic times that, yes, this is Architecture.

Scott McDonald, Hedrich Blessing; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 56

Haven for Art

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: Laguarda Low Architects

Once just another nondescript, single-story building indistinguishable from its neighbors that together comprise a light-industrial district wedged between downtown Dallas and the Trinity River, the Light & Sie Art Gallery now stands out. The reconfigured entry, framed by a box of aluminum panels, asserts a refined presence that quietly commands attention amid the clutter of storefronts along Leslie Street on the city’s near-west side. The 13,000-sf project is one of the latest examples in a transformative trend for the area where a few of the shopworn buildings have been repurposed as showrooms for the design trade and retail galleries for contemporary art.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 60

Elegant Tribute

by: Geof Edwards
Architect: Poteet Architects

Approaching the Linda Pace Foundation from the east, visitors are confronted with a strikingly graphic text piece on the building’s canvas-like facade, a short poem by Daniel Edgar Martinez: “beauty…it rubs against one’s tongue, it hangs there, hurting one, insisting on its own existence, finally it gets so one cannot stand the pain, then one must have beauty extracted.” It’s an “in your face” message that transcends its purpose as a public art piece and could describe the transformation of a derelict 1940sera auto paint shop into what is now the subtle and powerful beauty of the Linda Pace Foundation.

Chris Cooper Photography; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 64

Cross-Cultural Delight

by: Rick Lewis
Architect: Jackson & Ryan Architects

Although San Antonio’s iconic settings are significant especially when weighed for their economic benefits to Texas’ third largest city, the broader story of her heritage, traditions and, most importantly, her people is to be found in quarters beyond the shadows of high-rise downtown hotels.

Mark Scheyer/Houston; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 72

Enlightened Living

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: MJ Neal Architects

Wolfe Den, by MJ Neal, AIA, represents the Austin architect’s fifth TSA Design Award. The 2,300-sf residence, designed for a young professional couple, is a study in layers, light, and logic, and stands out in subtle contrast to Neal’s previous award-winning work, which includes Twin Peaks (2003), Ramp House (2004), Anthony Nak (2005), and Farley Studio (2007). “This is a much more subtle work than Ramp House and Twin Peaks. The division of space is central to this project,” says Neal, when asked to define the difference between this home and the three others (Twin Peaks comprises two side-by-side dwellings) on the same south Austin street. Sited in an eclectic neighborhood populated by mostly 1930s-era homes interspersed with hip makeovers, Wolfe Den is bordered on the east by a one-story bungalow and on the west by the strikingly modernist Ramp House. Further down the block are Twin Peaks.

Viviane Vives
Page 84

Code Watch

Codes are popping up in an increasing number of communities interested in reducing light pollution (uplighting) and light trespass (shining light across a property line).

Page 95

TSA Convention Preview: Exhibitors

The Texas Society of Architects welcomes these companies participating in the 2009 Expo in Houston (current as of August 4). Expo dates are October 23-24 at the George R. Brown Convention Center. Make plans now to visit their booths, pick up new product information, ask a question, or just see a friend. Keep and use this handy guide with booth numbers and contact information as a reference tool.

Page 103

Industrial Strength

by: Stephen Sharpe

Modernists are drawn to pure expressions of function, form that instantly communicates the essence of a building’s use. The Texas landscape is rich in examples, oftentimes overlooked because they are straightforward, generic, inconspicuous—precisely the qualities that make them worth our attention. J. Brantley Hightower, AIA , in a short essay “The Lure of the Industrial” on page 44, opens the feature section with musings on his and his fellow architects’ fascination with buildings “that reflect the most direct solutions to complex problems.”

Courtesy of Pearl Brewery
Page 5

RDA Civic Forum’s Post-Ike Forecast Calls for Improved Coastal Safeguards

by: Thomas M. Colbert, A IA

While Hurricane Ike may have roared through Texas over a year ago, public interest remains high in planning efforts to protect the Houston-Galveston region against such violent storms. In response to that interest, the Rice Design Alliance sponsored a three-part civic forum during the summer.

Page 19

New Cowboys Stadium Opens (and Shuts)

by: Lawrence Connolly

The latest in sports arena one-upmanship was formally unveiled when the $1.2 billion Cowboys Stadium, designed by HKS Sports & Entertainment Group, hosted a concert on June 6 by headliners George Strait and Reba McEntire.

photos courtesy Blake Marvin/HKS
Page 23

Drawn to Architecture

by: Bryce A. Weigand, FAIA

These drawings are excerpts from sketchbooks complied over the past 33 years. Presented in our Good Fulton & Farrell University (for AIA learning unit credits), they formed the structure of the presentations: “Drawn to Architecture: Sketches to Reality.”

Page 26

Studio Awards 2009

Architect: Bart Shaw, AIA

FEMA trailers are by their nature temporary and by their character demoralizing. What if a permanent solution could be deployed quickly enough to help people retain their community, spirit, and viability? Lift:Home was developed for this purpose.

Page 33

Studio Awards 2009

Architect: Hernan Molina

The project proposes to redevelop Valencia’s old harbor in Spain that represents the commitment of the city with a modern spirit, rich in options and aspirations. This project of renovation and master planning intends to recover the harbor in a sustainable manner. The project proposes: 1) to create a waterfront where none currently exists; 2) to integrate the port into the city; 3) to suitably separate the port and non-port uses; 4) to order traffic circulation along the seafront; 5) to resolve the area in which the dry river bed joins the sea; 6) to conserve and recover the heritage of the area; 7) to propose a suitable combination of public and private uses; and 8) to consider pre-existing uses for their integration into a sustainable environment.

Page 34

Studio Awards 2009

Architect: Miró Rivera Architects

Death and humans’ response to it have long held the power to bind cultures together and create places that transcend time and custom. Our collective respect for the dead and where they are laid to rest reaches across cultures like few other human experiences. It is the commonality of this reverence that guides the creation of Yarauvi, a necropolis at the center of the Dead Sea.

Page 36

The Lure of the Industrial

by: J. Brantley Hightower

At least two things bind all architects together: our vacation photos tend to include more buildings than people and at some point we read Le Corbusier’s Towards a New Architecture. While it has since been revealed that the title and other portions of the book were initially translated poorly, the book remains arguably the most influential manifesto of the early modernist period. Although Corbusier’s grand pronouncements are at times both endearingly naïve and annoyingly heavy handed, his general thesis was certainly revolutionary for its day and prophetic given all that came later.

Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Control Tower 19, Santa Fe Railway Milepost 51, Dallas; image courtesy Library of Congress, Prints &
Photographs Division, HAER , Reproduction number HAER TEX, 57-DAL, 5-5; Photos at far right by J. Brantley Hightower, AIA
Page 44

Place-Making in Progress

by: Vincent Canizaro, PhD
Architect: Lake/Flato Architects (design); Durand-Hollis Rupe Architects (architect of record)

A visit to the Pearl Development today is one of promise and potential. Still less than 50 percent complete, it is already contributing to life in San Antonio and has become a destination for an increasing and devoted following. How it has done so is based in a rare instance in which the interests of its developers, the local design community, and the public have coincided. Why this has occurred is due in large part to the unique makeup of the members of the project team, their shared goal to create a “transformational” and “authentic” place, and the cost-effective, socially engaging, and incremental process they have followed.

Casey Dunn, Greg Harrison
Page 46

Texas Rangers Retail Shop

by: Susan Butler
Architect: FIRM817

The newly completed Texas Rangers Retail Shop at Sundance Square in Fort Worth, designed by FIR M817, was not just intended to be a place to grab a Rangers shirt or tickets to the next game. The design of the 757-sf space was intended to let customers experience the feel of baseball through multiple sensory expressions.

Brandon Burns
Page 76

Design from the Inside Out

by: Jacqui Dodson, AIA

With businesses and project owners interest in keeping costs down and flexibility high, furniture planning takes a significant role in the overall development of a project. Whether it is an enclosed or open office, lobby, library, or classroom, planning for the location and quantity of furniture can help the architect to make the most of the square footage, configuration of a room, spacial relationships, and overall building design.

Page 78

The Direction of Furniture Design

Some recent trends in workplace cultures have led furniture companies to develop lines of product that are more flexible.

Page 79

Bullish on Materials

by: Malcolm Holzman, FAIA

Architecture for me is not about concealment but rather about divulging its very nature to the widest possible audience. Materials are not a mystery; they are an essential building ingredient, our heritage, and part of our everyday lives.

Photos by Tom Kessler
Page 88
View: 25 50 100 All