Article Results for "architecture"

Pratt and Box: Brief History of a Firm

by: James Pratt

After the war, following his service with the U.S. Naval Engineers, Hal Box returned to Texas to restart his architecture career. Having shared an apartment while studying architect at the University of Texas, we were reunited in the early 1950s when we worked together for Don Nelson in Dallas.

Box Family, Marsha Miller, UT Austin School of Architecture
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KIDS Program in S.A. Schools Opens Young Minds to Design

by: Kimberley Drennan

Think you’re a better designer than a third grader? Think again, suggests Michael Imbimbo, AIA, of San Antonio. Having recently spent a semester working with a class at San Antonio ISD’s Hawthorne Elementary, Imbimbo came away from the experience with renewed respect for a child’s unbridled eagerness for exploration. “As creative as we architects think we are,” Imbimbo says, “we’re no match for a bright, happy, and enthusiastic third-grader.”

Southwest School of Art
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AIA Austin Presents Design Awards

by: Tamara L. Toon

AIA Austin honored 10 projects in its 2011 Design Awards Celebration. From a total of 77 submittals, the distinguished jury of architects selected three for Honor Awards, six for Citations of Honor, and one unbuilt project for a Studio Award.

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Requiem for a Lawn

by: J. Brantley Hightower

I consider myself incredibly fortunate to have grown up a short drive from the Kimbell Art Museum. While it might be a bit of a stretch to say that Louis Kahn’s vaulted masterpiece was the reason I decided to become an architect, it certainly did provide a compelling example of what great architecture could be.

J. Brantley Hightower
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by: Stephen Sharpe

The overarching idea behind the popular term placemaking is that thoughtful architecture can transform the public realm by establishing an interconnectedness within a community. This edition features five recent projects that represent successful placemaking on both large and small scale. The common thread running through all of them is how they each have created new or recreated lapsed relationships to their surroundings.

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Tour Spotlights Mid-Century Beaumont

by: Stephen Fox

A recent t our sponsored by Houston Mod, a design advocacy group, highlighted the residential architecture of Beaumont’s leading mid-century modernists. The day trip was the culmination of a series of events highlighting April as Modern Month, in which affiliates of the international DoCo-MoMo (Documentation and Conservation of Buildings, Sites and Neighborhoods of the Modern Movement) celebrated modern heritage locally and regionally.

Top Photo Courtesy Houston Mod; Bottom Photo by Gerald Moorhead, FAIA
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Convention Offers ‘Balance’ in Dallas

by: TA Staff

Every year since 1939, the statewide architecture community has gathered for professional development, fellowship, and the opportunity to see the best its host city has to offer. This year’s convention of the Texas Society of Architects builds on that long history.

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Livable Communities, Big and Small

by: Clovis Heimsath, FAIA

As architects and urban planners, let’s congratulate ourselves for what we are doing today as we glance back to the recent past. In the 1960s, community planning, particularly at the federal level, was sorely lacking. At that time, there was a widespread feeling that a building’s function was enhanced when isolated by typology with others of its kind. Codes specified zones – Industrial, commercial, or residential – and in many cases still do. But back then, the codes were reinforced by a climate of opinion that believed isolation was efficient and socially relevant.

Top Photo Courtesy The Woodlands Convention & Visitors Bureau; Bottom Photo By Paul Hester
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Nature and Human Nature

by: Max Levy, FAIA

Our nineteenth-century Texas forebears lived more closely with nature than we do, but of course they had little choice in the matter. Though we sometimes romanticize that close relationship, most early Texans probably would have traded the romance for a window unit air conditioner. Nevertheless, they made the most of their situation and there remains much that we can learn from them about the intersection of daily lives, architecture, and nature.

All Photos By Max Levy, Faia, With Exception Of Next Page Top Left Photo Courtesy Fort Worth Public Library And Amon Carter Museum; Next Page Top Right Photo Courtesy Fort Worth Museum Of Science And History
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Notes on the Jury

by: Michael Malone, AIA

On May 20, the 2011 design awards jury met to review the 257 entries submitted in this year’s program. The distinguished jury consisted of three exceptional professionals with diverse practice and professional experiences, along with a considerable love of architecture and design.

Photos By Julie Pizzo
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Rainwater Court

by: Andrea Exter
Architect: Dick Clark Architecture in association with Architecture for Humanity

A game-changer in more ways than one, Rainwater Court inspires hope and creates new opportunities for more than 600 children and other residents of Mahiga, a rural Kenyan community.

Turk Pipkin; Greg Elsner; Christy Pipkin; Christina Tapper
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Sam Houston Tollway Northeast Toll Plazas

by: Jesse Hager
Architect: RdlR Architects

Bridges are a cherished design problem. The clear span represents a common exercise for architecture students exploring essential concepts of structure, tension, and compression. Regrettably, architects are seldom commissioned to design a bridge project.

Chad McGhee; Mark Gaynor
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The Work, Part II: Contract Obligations and Options

by: James B. Atkins, Grant A. Simpson

As we observed in Part I (published in the previous edition) of this two-part series, the term “the Work” in the construction contract comprises more than labor and materials. In fact, the success of a project relies heavily on the contractor’s ability to plan, coordinate, and execute the means, methods, techniques, sequences, and procedures required to put the Work in place. This is not a new concept. Ten Books on Architecture, written by Marcus Vitruvius Pollio in 30 BC for Roman Emperor Augustus, emphasizes planning as being integral to good building construction. In Part I we identified many of the components of the contractor’s Work Plan. We referred to several available resources and pointed out various indicators to look for as one administers the construction contract, including how to tell if a plan is in the works. In Part II we take the next step to examine alternatives and actions to take if there is a weak or nonexistent plan, including a look at efforts by some contractors to manipulate work scope to avoid conformance. We will conclude with a successful case study followed by suggestions for managing the risks and liabilities that so often arise when the Work is not properly planned or managed.

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Pitts Medal Goes to Cowan For Lifetime Achievement

by: Andrea Exter

Described as a “legend” by his peers, Tommy N. Cowan, FAIA, is a dedicated and lifelong leader. His interest in design and architecture began in the fifth grade when a teacher invited him to compete in Austin’s Wellesley Junior Art Show. Two of Cowan’s architectural drawings were submitted and both won top honors.

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Inspired Inquiry

by: Stephen Sharpe, Hon. TSA

The best architecture combines the rigor of scientific inquiry with the inspired explorations of art. Equal amounts of science and art produced the four projects profiled on the following pages—two designed for scientific research and two related to the arts.

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Back to the Garden

by: Rebecca Boles, AIA

The prairie has returned to Fort Worth’s Cultural District. Evicted long ago by urbanization, native flora have again taken root along University Drive where revived grassland heralds the emergence of a unique enterprise. So surprising is the sight of children at play in this field of prairie grasses that one may not immediately see the new building on the site.

Chris Cooper
Page 48

Texas Tech’s Green Future

by: Stephen Sharpe

This edition covers a broad sweep of variations on the “Design for Education” theme, from new facilities for private and public schools to an award-winning architecture course at UT Arlington that is now improving the everyday experiences of Arlington residents. There’s also a news article about a green roof on the campus of UT El Paso, an unlikely – but so far successful – attempt at sustainable design in a desert climate.

Brian Rex
Page 5

AIA El Paso Awards 7 Projects

by: Frederic Dalbin

On Oct. 30, AIA El Paso recognized seven projects at its 2009 Design Award Banquet held at the historic Camino Real Hotel in downtown El Paso. Four projects received a Design Award and two projects received an Honorable Mention.

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Oliver Named UH Architecture Dean

by: TA Staff

Patricia Belton Oliver, FAIA, who served from 2001-2008 as senior vice president of educational planning and architecture at the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, Calif., has been named dean of the Gerald D. Hines College of Architecture at the University of Houston. Oliver succeeds Joe Mashburn, AIA, who held the post for the last 11 years.

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Arlington Re-Imagined

by: Susan Appleton

One year after her course, The Everyday City, was recognized with an AIA Education Honor Award, University of Texas at Arlington Assistant Professor Wanda Dye has tasked her architecture students with improving the everyday life of all Arlington residents. Through collaboration with City of Arlington staff, their work is a natural extension of the investigations they undertook for The Everyday City. In that class, Dye asked them to re-imagine the most mundane and banal aspects of the suburban environment.

City of Arlington Urban Design Center, Andrew Oxley, Carlos Sierra
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Seamless Expansion

by: Fernando Brave
Architect: Hopkins Architects with Hanbury Evans Wright Vlattas + Company

While other prominent universities in the U.S. comprise a fusion of signature stylistic expressions, Rice University has focused on architecture that reinforces the well synchronized, harmonious feel of its campus. Aside from some unique buildings – such as Thomas Pfeiffer’s Brochstein Pavilion and the school’s off-site Data Center and the Library Service Center by Carlos Jimenez – that provide interesting drama to the otherwise prevailing architectural uniformity,

Robert Benson Photography
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AIA Recognizes Brochstein Pavilion

One Texas project – the Brochstein Pavilion at Rice University by Thomas Phifer and Partners – is among 14 projects recognized with 2010 Institute Honor Awards for Architecture.

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Wright-Influenced NASA Landmark Redone as Offices for Houston Parks

by: Gerald Moorhead

One of Houston’s landmarks of modern architecture has been rededicated after a $16 million renovation. The historic Farnsworth & Chambers Co. building, designed by MacKie & Kamrath and completed in 1957, has been the home of Houston’s Parks and Recreation Department since 1977. Known as the Gragg Building after the donor of adjacent parkland, it is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and is a Registered Texas Historic Landmark and a City of Houston Landmark.

Houston Parks and Recreation, NASA
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Bastrop Named ‘Distinctive Destination’

Bastrop is among this year’s Dozen Distinction Destinations as named by the National Trust for Preservation. The nonprofit organization compiles a list annually to call attention to cities and towns that “offer an authentic visitor experience by combining dynamic downtowns, cultural diversity, attractive architecture, cultural landscapes, and a strong commitment to historic preservation, sustainability, and revitalization.”

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‘Lost’ in the Borderlands

by: Stephen Fox

Austin architect W. Eugene George’s classic work, Lost Architecture of the Río Grande Borderlands, has returned to print in a handsome new edition.

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