Article Results for "ARE"

Child’s Play

by: Stephen Sharpe

The best architects practicing today are essentially grown-up children, says Max Levy, FAIA, without a hint of disparagement. Drawing by hand releases a child-like sense of wonder, he explains. Unfortunately, by the time they reach adulthood, most designers have forgotten that feeling of creative release.

drawing by max levy, faia
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New Architectural Program in El Paso Targets Hispanics for Bachelor Degrees

by: Cory Chandler

The way that architecture professor and discipline coordinator Ken Gorski describes it, El Paso Community College is a campus with its heart residing on both sides of Texas’ border with Mexico. This description, more allegorically than geographically accurate, pegs the character of a campus that is 85 percent Hispanic and located in a city largely defined by its close proximity to Juarez, Mexico.

courtesy Texas Tech University
Page 11

Houston Firm’s Low-Cost Home Design Pledged to Help Ravaged New Orleans

by: Stephen Sharpe

Announced to fanfare surrounding actor Brad Pitt’s personal involvement with bringing affordable housing to this beleaguered city’s poorest residents, the Make It Right program unveiled designs in December for houses by some of the world’s cutting-edge architects. A total of 13 international, national, and regional firms were invited to create home designs for the Crescent City’s Lower Ninth Ward, one of the neighborhoods hardest hit by flooding in the wake of Hurricane Katrina in September 2005.

Rendering by Patrick Lopez, Courtesy BNIM Architect s
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A Half-Century of Best Works by Hines On View at Architecture Center Houston

by: Barrie Scardino

Starting with a project for a small office and warehouse in 1957, Gerald D. Hines began developing real estate in Houston with a keen eye for adding value to his projects with architectural excellence. A half-century later, having developed hundreds of buildings around the world, Hines has remained committed to raising the standards of commercial design by engaging the best practitioners.

Photos courtesy Hines
Page 14

Anfield Stadium

When the Liverpool Football Club decided to expand its Anfield Stadium in Stanley Park, the British soccer club hired Dallas-based architect HKS to design the 60,000-seat sports arena.

Page 26

A&M’s Vanguard

by: Lawrence Connolly

Texas A&M University is in the midst of the largest building program in the school’s history. Two dozen projects on the 130-year-old College Station campus – new buildings, enhanced infrastructure, and major renovations, including a $120 million makeover of Memorial Student Center – are scheduled to be completed within the next five years. This extraordinary $800 million effort is the result of former A&M President Dr. Robert Gates’ initiative that spawned growth strategies originally outlined in the 2004 campus master plan by Barnes Gromatzky Kosarek Architects in collaboration with Michael Dennis & Associates.

(left) courtesy Perkins+Will ; (right) courtesy Texas A&M University
Page 30

A Beauty with Brains

by: Nestor Ifanzon
Architect: Page Southerland Page, LLP

The new Natural Science and Engineering Research Laboratory at the University of Texas at Dallas creates an innovative scientific environment while simultaneously possessing an astonishing architectural presence. The design and construction of the four-story, 192,000-squarefoot research facility responds to UT Dallas’ strategic plan to establish a top-flight research institution that will serve as a catalyst for interdisciplinary research. University officials expect to fill the facility with high-level faculty and scientists from such disparate fields as electrical engineering, materials science and engineering, chemistry, biology, and behavioral and brain sciences.

Robert Canfield
Page 32

Careful Intervention

by: Tom Diehl
Architect: Kirksey

Architects at Kirksey faced two major challenges with the design of a nearly quarter millionsquare-foot building for Texas Woman’s University at the Texas Medical Center in Houston. First, the site comprised two 65-foot-wide perpendicular slivers of land at a prominent intersection in the burgeoning medical complex. Second, feasibility studies (conducted in a compressed timeframe) intended intended to confirm the validity of a land exchange ultimately represented a normative site analysis—one generating the organizational armature for subsequent decisions.

Aker/Zvonkovic Photography
Page 50

Carl Wunsche Sr. High School

by: Megan Braley
Architect: SHW Group

Carl Wunsche Sr. High School is a career academy located in the Spring Independent School District of Houston. SH W Group oriented the 273,178-square-foot school around three academic towers that each focuses on a specialized area of study.

Richard Payne, FAIA
Page 63

LaGrone Advanced Technology Complex

by: Megan Braley
Architect: PBK Architects

The 120,792-square-foot LaGrone Advanced Technology Complex, located in the Denton Independent School District, includes 16 academies that provide students with trade-specific technical skills. PBK Architects of Dallas has uniquely designed each academy to reflect a specific professional working environment that facilitates increased learning through experience.

Jud Haggard
Page 65

Sky Harbour Elementary

by: Megan Braley
Architect: Pfluger Associates Architects

The 98,620-square-foot Sky Harbour Elementary School, located in the Southwest Independent School District of San Antonio, has been transformed from a solid concrete, windowless building into a series of welcoming, light-filled spaces. Pfluger Associates of San Antonio created a two-story classroom addition with a new administrative area.

Clem Spalding; Michelle Dudley, AIA
Page 67

West Brazos Junior High

by: Megan Braley
Architect: SHW Group

West Brazos Junior High School, located in the Columbia- Brazoria Independent School District of Brazoria, is the first LEE D certified public school in Texas. SH W Group designed the 91,500-square-foot building to fit into its natural surroundings.

Richard Payne, FAIA
Page 68


(This article was adapted from “Sustainability & Green Building Design with Brick Masonry,” an article that originally appeared in the October 2007 edition of Brick in Architecture published by the Brick Industry Association.) Many of the objectives of sustainab le design do not impact building material selection, but instead focus on building systems such as plumbing, lighting, air conditioning, etc. However, the versatility and durability of brick facilitate the use of brick masonry as part of many elements of sustainable design.

Photo by Mark Trew ; Courtesy HDR
Page 69

Conservative Concrete

Durable, energy efficient and recyclable – a quick evaluation of concrete applications and it’s easy to determine that this versatile building material is sustainable. Just how major a role it will play as the green building movement continues to proliferate depends on how many are willing to take a closer look.

Photo by Thomas McConnell , Courtesy LZT Architects
Page 71

Handsome Composition

by: Bart Shaw
Architect: Corgan Associates, Inc.

In 1849, at the confluence of the Clear and West Forks of the Trinity River, a fort was erected to protect pioneers settling in an area occupied by Native Americans. There were eight villages that developed around Fort Worth, seven were occupied by Native Americans, and one inhabited by white immigrants. White Settlement became a center of trade, a place of social interaction and mingling of societies, that still retains a strong sense of community.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA
Page 80

Studies Abroad

by: Nancy Egan

Last spring, 21 designers from WHR Architects embarked on a nine-day tour of Japan. The firm’s principals intended the experience to be more than just a trip to look at buildings. They wanted to create a shared frame of reference, encourage collaboration, and broaden design consciousness among their staff.

Photos by David Watkins, FAIA
Page 88

Winner Selected for Dallas Center for Architecture Competition

by: W. Mark Gunderson, AIA

AIA Dallas, following examples from across the country (New York City and Houston considered obvious prologue) has taken the first steps towards the construction of a new 7,500-square foot venue intended to house its own activities as well as those of multiple organizations aligned with the architectural mission of the chapter including the Dallas Architectural Foundation and the Dallas Architecture Forum.

Rendering courtesy Peter Doncaster, AIA
Page 14

THC Awards $56M for Courthouses

The Texas Historical Commission in January awarded nearly $56 million to 17 counties in its latest round of matching grant under the auspices of its nationally recognized Texas Historic Courthouse Preservation Program. The counties set to receive funds in Round V of the program are Cass, Cooke, Fannin, Hall, Hamilton, Harris, Hood, Kendall, La Salle, Lavaca, McCulloch, Mills, Potter, Randall, Roberts, San Augustine, and Trinity.

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Brochstein Pavilion

Construction is underway at Rice University in Houston on the 6,042-square-foot Brochstein Pavilion, a new gathering place planned for students, faculty, and staff. Composed primarily of glass, the pavilion will include a coffee house and a 10,728-square-foot landscaped, wrap-around plaza where 70 new trees will be added to the campus.

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Hill Country Montessori School

Designed by SHW Group, the Hill Country Montessori School in Boerne will demonstrate to its young occupants the importance of creating sustainable built environments by using architecture to promote education. The design of the buildings promotes both environmental and social awareness through transparency and access.

Page 20

Homage to the Square

by: Michael Malone
Architect: Morrison Seifert Murphy; Corgan Associates

Anchoring the eastern edge of downtown Dallas , One Arts Plaza is a defining presence as the tallest building in the expanding Dallas Arts District. As difficult as it is for any single building to define an edge, this outwardly restrained building could be seen as a textbook lesson on how a tall building, handled skillfully, can contribute to the urban fabric. At this moment, while construction just now begins on significant cultural landmarks but before those adjacent projects grab all the attention within the Arts District, the 24-story One Arts Plaza cannot be missed.

Charles Smith, AIA
Page 26

Rebel with a Cause

by: Rick Lewis
Architect: Jackson & Ryan Architects, Inc.

Contrary to popular belief , as perpetuated by tourist brochures aplenty, there is more to San Antonio’s urban identity than the renowned RiverWalk and hallowed Alamo Plaza. Significant as these iconic settings are, especially when weighed for their economic benefits to Texas’ third largest city, the broader story of San Antonio’s heritage, traditions and, most importantly, her people is to be found in quarters beyond the shadows of high-rise downtown hotels.

Mark Scheyer, Inc./Houston
Page 32

Mixing It Up in SoCo

by: Lawrence Connolly
Architect: Dick Clark Architecture and Michael Hsu Design Office

Anyone who has visited Austin’s eclectic strip of retail and restaurants along South Congress knows the SoCo entertainment district to be a vortex of bohemian conviviality. The city’s head-long rush to grow and densify is readily apparent along the wide avenue that stretches below downtown. SoCo encompasses a few commercial blocks comprised of small buildings, none more than three stories tall. Residential neighborhoods back up to the businesses, and the homeowners are notorious for opposing the slightest change in the street frontage.

Paul Bardagjy
Page 50

Lewisville Public Library

by: Megan Braley
Architect: F&S Partners Inc.

F&S Partners designed the new 55,000-square-foot addition to the existing 24,000-square-foot Lewisville Public Library. Clerestory windows form the exterior of the two-story concourse that connects the two building components. Natural light enters the building and creates a calm, welcoming atmosphere.

Craig Blackmon, FAIA
Page 56

Georgetown Public Library

by: Megan Braley
Architect: PBS&J Architects

The new 49,000-square-foot Georgetown Public Library offers residents a community space that reflects the historic nature of the city. PBS&J Architects closely followed the requirements of the City of Georgetown’s historic architectural review committee when designing the library.

Jud Haggard; Leigh Christian
Page 58
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