Article Results for "Award"

The Envelope


Architect: Buchanan Architecture

Rather than accepting the most general issues of zoning compliance, this project offers a very detailed response to the zoning constraints and its exceptions. The design solution should be considered, in part, as a product of thorough zoning research.

Jason Franzen
Page 44

The 505


Architect: Collaborative Designworks

The 505, a four-unit townhouse development, sits near Houston’s rejuvenated downtown. The architect spearheaded the project as an experimental design exercise that works within the economic and market constraints of a speculative housing development. The 505 sought to be financially successful and to make responsible use of land, incorporate sustainable design principles, enhance community sensibilities, and possess an architectural identity.

Aker/Zvoncovik Photography; G. Lyon Photography
Page 46

Floating Box House


Architect: Peter L Gluck and Partners, Architects

Surrounded by a grove of more than 200 live oaks, the house is located just outside Austin and stands between the city’s new urban skyline and its rural past.

Paul Warchol
Page 48

Footbridge


Architect: Miró Rivera Architects

With a design inspired in the reeds that line the edges of the lake, this pedestrian bridge is a light structure integrated with its setting. The bars/reeds intertwine at the abutments and “grow” over the bridge, camouflaging and turning it into a symbiotic, almost invisible link.

Paul Finkel
Page 50

Government Canyon


Architect: Lake/Flato Architects

The Visitor Center floats in a field of native grasses and restored oaks at the mouth of the canyon, forming a gateway to the 8,600-acre Government Canyon State Natural Area. The canyon’s rich ranching history is expressed in the exposed pipe structure.

Chris Cooper
Page 52

Guerra Branch Library


Architect: Sprinkle Robey Architects

The Guerra Branch Library is located in a working class, military neighborhood in San Antonio. Inspired by the soaring hangars at the adjacent Air Force Base, the building is organized in three volumes that are oriented to define an existing green space to the north and east, while limiting the harsh sunlight from the south and west.

Paul Hester
Page 54

Health & Science Building


Architect: Hellmuth, Obata + Kassabaum

The program is for a new Health and Science Building. The facility houses the chemistry, geology, biology, and physics/astronomy departments within the Natural Sciences Program, and the nursing, respiratory, occupational therapy, and dental hygiene departments within the Health Program.

Aker/Zvonkovic Photography
Page 56

Lake Tahoe Residence


Architect: Lake/Flato Architects

The historic mines of the region, with their simple shed forms on the sloping land, were the inspiration for the project. Use of exposed concrete, eathered wood, and rusted steel create a palette of low-maintenance materials. The crisp exterior materials give way to warm, natural woods on the interiors.

Jeff Dow Photography
Page 58

McKinney Farm House


Architect: Ron Wommack, FAIA

The project comprises a new barn and house built on a 150-acre farm just northeast of McKinney. A screened porch connects the 3,500-sq. ft. house to a carport and utility structure. The house is constructed of concrete block, cypress siding, glass, and galvanized metal.

Charles Smith
Page 60

Methodist Healthcare Ministries


Architect: Kell Muñoz Architects, Inc.

The architect’s commission for a new building to house the largest charitable religious foundation in South Texas was based upon the designers’ ability to represent the visionary culture of Methodist “works.” The client asked for a headquarters that would represent the purity and simplicity of the foundation’s calling to help the poor with healthcare while quietly asserting its importance to the region.

R. Greg Hursley; Chris Cooper; Paul Hester
Page 62

Rocking F Ranch


Architect: Mell Lawrence Architects

Farmhouse vernacular inspired this family retreat in rural Central Texas. The compound consists of three buildings that define the perimeter of a central yard skirting an oak grove—the main building with living areas and kitchen on the ground floor and guest rooms upstairs, a bedroom wing with the master suite in a tower adjacent to the children’s bedroom, and a carport.

Hester + Hardaway
Page 64

Sarofim Research Building


Architect: BNIM Architects

The Fayez S. Sarofim Research Building houses core research laboratories, administrative offices, and a glass auditorium. Located in the Texas Medical Center, the parti consists of a central atrium flanked by two wings—the southern containing administrative offices and the northern containing labs. The openness of the adjoining atrium gardens invites public passage through the building, giving the program a sense of transparency.

Richard Payne, FAIA
Page 66

School of Nursing


Architect: BNIM Architects with Lake/Flato Architects

The School of Nursing enhances human health and productivity while having as little impact on the environment as possible. It is itself a healthy building that was built with 50-percent recycled materials and designed to reduce energy use by 40 percent and water use by 60 percent. The project, submitted for a LEE D Gold rating, was selected by the AIA Committee on the Environment as a 2006 Top Ten Green Project.

Hester + Hardaway
Page 68

Stonehedge Residence


Architect: Miró Rivera Architects

The challenge of this project was to work on a house (built in the 1980s) that the clients had recently renovated, but that they felt still needed further adjustments to improve the connection of the house’s interior spaces with the existing swimming pool and garden and to improve the quality of the public spaces of the house.

Paul Finkel of Piston Design
Page 70

Texas Hillel


Architect: Alterstudio Architects with Black + Vernooy Architecture and Urban Design

The design focused on two principal goals—to orchestrate an inviting building that would encourage students to venture within and to create a place where spirituality would be part of everyday life, not something removed to a sacred sphere.

Paul Bardagjy
Page 72

Wesley Gallery


Architect: Ford Powell & Carson Architects and Planners

An abandoned stable of crumbling adobe and concrete was converted to a permanent gallery.

Andy Mattern, Artimbo
Page 74

World Birding Center


Architect: Lake/Flato Architects

The design approach was to do more with less. The architecture learned from the regional vernacular, responded to the harsh climate, and minimized disturbance of existing habitat. The building creates a gateway between disturbed agricultural land and a 1,700-acre native habitat preserve.

Paul Hester
Page 76

TSA studio Awards

by: Stephen Sharpe

The review of Studio Award entries followed the jury’s finalizing its selections for Design Awards. From the 48 submittals, the jury kept 14 for a second round before deciding to award seven projects. Three of them in particular garnered praise from the jurors—Square of Circles by Jay Smith, AIA, of Dallas; Houston Skyscraper by Michael Kross, an architecture student at Rice University; and Design>Build>Texas by architecture students at UT Austin.

Page 78

CUBE


Architect: RTKL Associates

The concept is to create a single powerful iconic statement for the new focus of the Penn Plaza District. The idea is to make a singular architectural statement that has multiple identities, andmultiple reads.

Page 78

Unity Plaza Station


Architect: RTKL Associates

Like the vestibules and livings rooms of a residence, a city’s plazas are spaces of civic and cultural significance that articulate the urban structure.

Page 79

Design>Build>Texas


Architect: UT Austin School of Architecture

The architecture school recently initiated and completed Design>Build>Texas, a design/build studio for upper-level architecture students. This course was developed as an educational prototype as well as a prototype for the design and construction of an environmentally responsible house

Page 79

Square of Circles


Architect: Jay Smith, AIA

This design was a winning entry in the 2006 Ultimate Tree House design competition held by the Dallas Arboretum (see p. 120). The program required that the tree house be interactive, meet state accessibility requirements, and not attach to the tree.

Page 80

Hector Garcia Middle School


Architect: Perkins + Will

The architectural design for a new 175,000-sq. ft. school for 1,200 students reflects the programmed social organization planned around three teams of students per grade level, and includes a diverse range of academic spaces to support traditional, interdisciplinary, and project-based instructional models.

Page 80

MICA


Architect: RTKL Associates

A new 121,500-sq. ft. student housing for the Maryland Institute College of Art will serve as a gateway to the campus. The building includes living modules, art studios, a gallery, a blackbox theater, and a career development center.

Page 81

Houston Skyscraper


Architect: Michael Kross, student at Rice University

Increased mobility in communications and transportation has seen the traditional central business district lose favor to peripheral centers. Nowhere is this trend more salient than in Houston, where at least one of the motivations for building tall no longer applies.

Page 81
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