Article Results for "architecture"

Architecture Criticism and the Public

by: David Dillon

I’ve just returned from a trip to Amsterdam and Paris, and one of the things that surprised me – besides $20 chicken salad sandwiches washed down with $15 glasses of vin ordinaire – was the number of architecture and design magazines for sale in airports, train stations, bookstores and sidewalk newsstands.

Photos by Lawrence Lander
Page 32

Lerup’s Legacy

by: Ben Koush

The program of the Rice School of Architecture (RSA) – encouraging students to create conceptual apparatuses for investigating contemporary urban phenomena – is outlined in its latest publication, Everything Must Move, released on the occasion of the fifth Kennon Symposium honoring Dean Lars Lerup as he steps down this year.

Photo by Lawrence Lander
Page 35

Eclectic Ensemble

by: Lawrence Connolly
Architect: Dick Clark Architecture with Michael Hsu Design Office

When Antoine Predock, FAIA, was in midst of conceiving the new Austin City Hall, he commented that the city was “terminally democratic.” He made the remark after his design survived a protracted review process that included more than a dozen town meetings and hearings before the City Council. A similar sort of public scrutiny – albeit on a smaller, neighborhood scale – resulted when Dick Clark Architecture added a zoning non-compliant residential building to its 1400 South Congress mixed-use project.

Paul Bardagjy; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 40

Concrete Poetry

by: Jeffrey Brown, AIA
Architect: Elliott + Associates Architects

This word painting by Rand Elliott, FAIA, explains how he wants people to understand his latest award-winning project, ImageNet of Houston. Employing poetry or manifestoes to describe one’s work is not uncommon these days. Indeed, such material appears to be a prerequisite of the current media culture that promotes “starchitects,” “signature architects,” and one-hit wonders. Supportive text is, we are led to believe, required reading. If a building appears mundane, baffling, or otherwise underwhelming, just refer to the narrative. Within the architect’s words, we are told, lies the true meaning which will assure in our prosaic times that, yes, this is Architecture.

Scott McDonald, Hedrich Blessing; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 56

Light Show

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: Booziotis & Company, Thomas Phifer & Partners, nodesign

Craig Blackmon, FAIA
Page 96

Peterson Is First Woman To Receive Top TSA Honor

by: Mary Carolyn Hollers George

Carolyn Peterson, FAIA, is the forty-first recipient of the Texas Society of Architect’s highest award – the Medal for Lifetime Achievement in Honor of Llewellyn W. Pitts FAIA – presented annually to a TSA member for contributions to the profession of architecture and their community. From its inception in 1968 until this year, the honor’s awardees have been exclusively male.

photo courtesy Ken Slavin
Page 15

Drawn to Architecture

by: Bryce A. Weigand, FAIA

These drawings are excerpts from sketchbooks complied over the past 33 years. Presented in our Good Fulton & Farrell University (for AIA learning unit credits), they formed the structure of the presentations: “Drawn to Architecture: Sketches to Reality.”

Page 26

The Lure of the Industrial

by: J. Brantley Hightower

At least two things bind all architects together: our vacation photos tend to include more buildings than people and at some point we read Le Corbusier’s Towards a New Architecture. While it has since been revealed that the title and other portions of the book were initially translated poorly, the book remains arguably the most influential manifesto of the early modernist period. Although Corbusier’s grand pronouncements are at times both endearingly naïve and annoyingly heavy handed, his general thesis was certainly revolutionary for its day and prophetic given all that came later.

Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Control Tower 19, Santa Fe Railway Milepost 51, Dallas; image courtesy Library of Congress, Prints &
Photographs Division, HAER , Reproduction number HAER TEX, 57-DAL, 5-5; Photos at far right by J. Brantley Hightower, AIA
Page 44

Local Legacy

by: Ken Slavin
Architect: Marmon Mok with AIA San Antonio Building Committee (J. Douglas Lipscomb, AIA; Chris Schultz, AIA; G

Hosting a convention for 19,000 architects might sound like a daunting task. For AIA San Antonio, as the local chapter for the 2007 AIA national conference, planning the annual gathering was just one item of its agenda. At the same time, the chapter’s leaders were also designing a new Center for Architecture, a “legacy project” to fulfill requirements from the national headquarters for a tangible, local initiative that would live long beyond the four-day convention.

Giles & Pearlstone Photography
Page 52

Bold Identity

by: Thomas Hayne Upchurch
Architect: Collaborative Designworks

Oiltanking Texas City is a terminal for receiving, storing, and distributing petroleum-based products. Approximately 100 acres in size, the site is located within the Texas City Industrial Park, a landscape of contiguous oil refineries and chemical plants that edge the west side of Galveston Bay. The overall site is dominated by shipping docks and sections of land dotted with storage tanks, laced together by interior roadways. At its southwest corner is the office building for the terminal’s operations. Comprised of almost 13,000 sf, the architecture of the Oiltanking office building stands as the relatively diminutive control point within a site of disproportionate scale.

Aker/Zvonkovic Photography; Collaborative Designworks
Page 56

Bullish on Materials

by: Malcolm Holzman, FAIA

Architecture for me is not about concealment but rather about divulging its very nature to the widest possible audience. Materials are not a mystery; they are an essential building ingredient, our heritage, and part of our everyday lives.

Photos by Tom Kessler
Page 88

New Architectural Program in El Paso Targets Hispanics for Bachelor Degrees

by: Cory Chandler

The way that architecture professor and discipline coordinator Ken Gorski describes it, El Paso Community College is a campus with its heart residing on both sides of Texas’ border with Mexico. This description, more allegorically than geographically accurate, pegs the character of a campus that is 85 percent Hispanic and located in a city largely defined by its close proximity to Juarez, Mexico.

courtesy Texas Tech University
Page 11

A Half-Century of Best Works by Hines On View at Architecture Center Houston

by: Barrie Scardino

Starting with a project for a small office and warehouse in 1957, Gerald D. Hines began developing real estate in Houston with a keen eye for adding value to his projects with architectural excellence. A half-century later, having developed hundreds of buildings around the world, Hines has remained committed to raising the standards of commercial design by engaging the best practitioners.

Photos courtesy Hines
Page 14

AIA Fort Worth Awards 5 Projects

by: Ivonne Levin, AIA

The local chapter of the AIA recognized four projects in the General Design category and one project in the Mayor’s Award category in ceremonies that took place at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth. The members of the 2007 jury were Julie Eizenberg, AIA, of Koning Eizenberg Architecture in Los Angeles; Errol Barron, FAIA, of Errol Barron/Michael Toups in New Orleans; and Kevin Alter, Assoc. AIA, of Alterstudio Architects in Austin.

Page 18

AIA Dallas Celebrates Design Excellence

The Dallas chapter of the American Institute of Architects announced the 2007 design award winners during its annual Design Awards Announcement and Celebration Party in the AT&T Victory Plaza on Sept. 19, 2007.

Page 20

Interloop’s E-X-I-T Enters MoMA

On Nov. 7, 2007, the Museum of Modern Art in New York inducted into its permanent collection Interloop Architecture’s E-X-I-T sign custom designed for the Nasher Sculpture Center in Dallas. Fabricated with acrylic letters and illuminated by LED, the Houston firm’s creation joins other works in the MoMA Architecture and Design collection suchas Vignelli’s New York subway signage and the Flight Departure Panel from Solari di Udine.

Page 24

Creole Influence Along the Border

by: Stephen Fox

The Lower Río Grande Valley chapter of the American Institute of Architects kicked off its fifteenth annual conference on Sept. 27 with a day-long tour of nineteenth-century architecture in the border cities of Brownsville and Matamoros, Tamaulipas. Called “A Tale of Two Cities,” the tour was led by Gregory Free, principal of an Austin design firm specializing in historical restoration.

Courtesy Wayne Bell, FAIA
Page 27

Quiet Standout

by: J. Brantley Hightower
Architect: Perkins+Will

The study of campus architecture in Texas is truly a lesson in cultural diversity. Just by sampling schools in the University of Texas System, one would observe everything from a Beaux-Arts rendering of Spanish Mediterranean motifs on the Austin campus to a playful reinterpretation of Bhutanese monasteries in El Paso.

James Steinkamp
Page 44

SUSTAINABLE DESIGN WITH BRICK

(This article was adapted from “Sustainability & Green Building Design with Brick Masonry,” an article that originally appeared in the October 2007 edition of Brick in Architecture published by the Brick Industry Association.) Many of the objectives of sustainab le design do not impact building material selection, but instead focus on building systems such as plumbing, lighting, air conditioning, etc. However, the versatility and durability of brick facilitate the use of brick masonry as part of many elements of sustainable design.

Photo by Mark Trew ; Courtesy HDR
Page 69

AIA Honors Austin Firm’s Work

Anthony Nak Flagship Store, a high-end jewelry boutique designed by MJ Neal Architects of Austin, has been recognized with a 2008 AIA Honor Award for Interior Architecture. Located in downtown Austin, Anthony Nak represents the only project with a Texas connection among this year’s slate of winners.

Page 11

Winner Selected for Dallas Center for Architecture Competition

by: W. Mark Gunderson, AIA

AIA Dallas, following examples from across the country (New York City and Houston considered obvious prologue) has taken the first steps towards the construction of a new 7,500-square foot venue intended to house its own activities as well as those of multiple organizations aligned with the architectural mission of the chapter including the Dallas Architectural Foundation and the Dallas Architecture Forum.

Rendering courtesy Peter Doncaster, AIA
Page 14

Hill Country Montessori School

Designed by SHW Group, the Hill Country Montessori School in Boerne will demonstrate to its young occupants the importance of creating sustainable built environments by using architecture to promote education. The design of the buildings promotes both environmental and social awareness through transparency and access.

Page 20

Healing Environments

by: Stephen Sharpe

The studio exercise called for students to design an addition for an assisted living facility for senior citizens in La Porte. The assignment was their first for the Spring 2008 design studio in the master’s program at Texas A&M University’s Department of Architecture.

Page 5

Legorreta Retrospective in San Antonio

by: Edward Burian

“The Architecture of Ricardo Legorreta,” a recent exhibition at the Blue Star Contemporary Art Center, was both a significant event in the cultural life of San Antonio and an important insight into the noted architect’s work process.

Images by Legorreta + Legorreta Architects courtesy of Blue Star Contemporary art center
Page 11

‘Horizons’ Program Introduces Girls To Future Professional Opportunities

by: Margine Biswas

For the past eight years, AIA Dallas’ Women in Architecture has reached out to girls in elementary and middle-school grades through a national program called Expanding Your Horizons. The program encourages girls to continue their studies in math and science by introducing them to interesting career options in technical subjects.

photo by Penny Ball
Page 14
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