Article Results for "ARE"

Commissioning Exterior Enclosures

by: Wagdy Anis, FAIA

Adapted with permission from the National Institute of Building Sciences/Building Enclosure Technology and Environment Council, this article originally appeared in the Winter 2008 issue of Journal of Building Enclosure Design. The commissioning process is a quality oriented process for achieving, verifying, and documenting that the performance of facilities, systems, and assemblies meets defined objectives and criteria. It assumes that owners, programmers, designers, contractors, commissioning team members, and operations and maintenance entities are fully accountable for the quality of their work.

Page 66

Standout at Sandia

by: Roger Schluntz, FAIA
Architect: Jacobs (formerly Carter & Burgess, Dallas)

Sandia National Laboratories, a sprawling complex on Albuquerque’s southern edge, is itself located within the expansive Kirtland Air Force Base property. As the mission of Sandia is primarily related to national security, access to the facilities is tightly controlled. Projects – most are funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration, the Department of Homeland Security, and the Department of Defense – are conducted through a vast array of highly sophisticated research and development programs. Sandia’s mission statement notes that its personnel are expected to create innovative, science-based, systems-engineering solutions to the nation’s most challenging national security problems.

J. Brough Schamp Photography
Page 70

A Teacher’s Gift

by: Stephen Sharpe

Even the best spaces for learning can’t substitute for good teaching, an intangible but absolutely essential component that if missing renders architecture an almost pointless exercise. Gifted teachers bring purpose to the architect’s design, and thoughtful design, like inspired teaching, can instill a sense of wonder in young minds. To excel in both the art of design and the art of teaching takes a rare blend of intuition, discipline, and compassion.

Page 5

Austin Firm Garners International Award

Miró Rivera Architects’ Pedestrian Bridge was among three projects receiving top tier recognition in the 2006 The Architectural Review Awards for Emerging Architecture. Considered the best international award for young architects, the annual program celebrates the work of designers under the age of 45 who are at the start of their independent careers.

photo by Paul Finkel
Page 14

Shared Resources

by: Michael Malone
Architect: VAI Architects

Within the re-emergent Oak Cliff neighborhood on Dallas’ south side, the new Arcadia Park Elementary School and Branch Library demonstrates how civic buildings can focus the life of a community around an institution. Designed by Dallas-based VAI Architects and located in a stunning site with elevated views towards downtown Dallas, the complex spreads out along a continuous linear spine that provides circulation between classroom wings and shared common amenities.

Miguel Casanova
Page 26

Sleek Landmark

by: Charles W. Graham, PhD, AIA
Architect: Parsons-3D/I

Seven stories tall and architecturally distinctive, Texas A&M University’s new Jack E. Brown Engineering Building serves effectively as a gateway to the College of Engineering. The site, along the campus arterial University Drive at the extreme northeast corner of the campus, is an ideal location for this sleek landmark. Motorists and pedestrians approaching from any direction can’t overlook this 205,000-square-foot facility, a noticeable departure from the more conventional designs of surrounding buildings. Among its many distinguishing characteristics are a meditation garden, a plaza overlooking a creek, and glass “sky lobbies” at the elevators that provide panoramic views of the campus to the south.

Jud Haggard
Page 30

‘Community’ College

by: Chris Schultz, AIA
Architect: Ford Powell & Carson Architects and Planners; Overland Partners Architects

The far northeastern section of metropolitan San Antonio is an amalgam of urbanizing late 19th Century farming communities and 20th Century bedroom suburbs extending in patchwork patterns of roofs, fields, and retail strip centers. For what it has in sheer volume of construction, the area generally lacks any cohesive center. Into this void has stepped the Alamo Community College District (ACCD) with a plan to create an entirely new joint-use facility—the Northeast Lakeview College. Not only is the institution to serve the educational and training needs of an estimated 15,000 students from the nine-community catchment area, but just as importantly, the facilities are to provide the surrounding areas with much-needed community resources.

Jim Arp
Page 42

Walker Creek Elementary

by: Andi Beierman
Architect: HKS Architects

Located in the North Richland Hills area of Dallas, Walker Creek Elementary embraces a new school design concept that integrates surrounding residential and urban environments. Built on 10.5 acres bordered by Parker, Simmons, and Bridge streets, the school serves 680 students in pre-kindergarten through fifth grade.

Blake Marvin
Page 53

Karen Wagner High School

by: Andi Beierman
Architect: PBK

Completed in August 2005, Karen Wagner High School is located on a 100-acre hilltop overlooking San Antonio’s downtown skyline. The footprint features a formation of two Y’s placed end-to-end. This design compresses the 399,949-sf building while allowing the maximum amount of natural light to permeate the interior

Jud Haggard
Page 55

Concepts in Concrete

by: Vance Pool

Concrete is a versatile material whose aesthetic properties are often not understood. When architects think of concrete they all too often think of bland tilt-up concrete warehouses, plain concrete sidewalks, and boring structural properties. Fortunately, many architects are seeing the limitless boundaries of what concrete can do, not only structurally, but aesthetically.

photo by Joe Ak er - Ak er/Zvonkovic Photography
Page 62

Six Texans Elected AIA Fellows

Six TSA members, along with 70 other architects from around the nation, were elected AIA Fellows by the 2007 Jury of Fellows on Feb. 23. The following Texans are among the new Fellows who will be invested in the College of Fellows during the AIA convention in San Antonio:

Page 19

Homeless Assistance Center

Sanctuary, light, and sustainability are the key themes of the design for the City of Dallas’ Homeless Assistance Center to be located on a three-acre downtown site. CamargoCopeland and Overland Partners are working together as the architects.

Page 21

Canal Street Catalyst

by: Donna Kacmar
Architect: Val Glitsch, FAIA

While the need is great, new low-income apartments aren’t easy to come by in Houston’s inner city. The new Canal Street Apartments in Houston’s Second Ward respond to that need with a welldesigned complex of 133 single-room occupancy (SRO) rental units. The project was commissioned by New Hope Housing, Inc., a nonprofit corporation founded in 1993 to provide SRO apartments for low-income adults who choose to live alone.

Miro Dvorscak; Val Glitsch, FAIA
Page 28

A Progressive Look Back

by: Gregory Ibanez
Architect: Good Fulton & Farrell Architects

Over the last decade or so, “context” has become a prime determinant of form and materials in much of our architecture. As any architect who has appeared before a design review board can attest, it is a sacred tenet when judging the “appropriateness” of a given solution. Unfortunately, it has also become an easy rationale for non-critical architectural thinking. As the esteemed critic Ada Louise Huxtable so eloquently stated, “The fallacy of contextualism, the masquerade of matched materials, the cosmetic cover-up of architectural maquillage meant to make a building ‘fit’ surroundings that frequently change, are a trap into which many architects jump or fall.”

Charles D. Smith, AIA
Page 34

Rescue in the Park

by: Gerald Moorhead
Architect: Page Southerland Page

Abused, neglected, and arrested kids in Harris County now take the first steps to a more normal life in a multi-service facility set in a public park. Protection, shelter, food, health care, and schooling are provided at the centralized location of the new Harris County Youth Services Center, housing a number of county agencies, designed by the Houston office of Page Southerland Page.

Hester + Hardaway; Gerald Moorhead, FAIA
Page 44

Ullrich Water Treatment Plant Expansion

by: Courtnay Loch
Architect: CasaBella Architects

In constructing the $72 million Ullrich Water Treatment Plant expansion, the design team faced the challenge of addressing the community’s concerns while still adhering to the programmatic requirements.

Mike Osborne
Page 50

Metal Shines as Design Solution

by: Toy Henson

WHEN architects and building owners require an attractive and affordable roof or wall system for a commercial or institutional project, chances are metal will be at or near the top their list of material candidates. To be sure, there’s no shortage of commercial metal roof or wall systems from which to choose. And metal is extremely competitive with other exterior facade options because of its low life-cycle cost.

photo Courtesy the metal initiative
Page 51

Metal Takes Flight

by: Toy Henson
Architect: GRW Willis, Inc.

WITH traffic at Love Field and Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport at all-time highs, Dallas’ business air travelers are finding an alternative to long lines and delays in the form of a renovated and expanded Dallas Executive Airport, formerly known as Redbird Airport.

Scott Womack
Page 58

Focal Point

by: Brian H. Griggs, Assoc. AIA

Among AIA Lubbock’s programs planned under the celebratory banner of AIA150 is a community design charrette to plan an indoor/outdoor public plaza in north Lubbock, an area in need of an economic boost to create business growth, cultural identity, and pride of place.

illustration by Brian H. Griggs, Assoc. AIA
Page 64

Dell Children’s Hospital in Austin Seeks First LEED Platinum Health-Care Rating

by: Jeanette Wiemers

On June 27, the Dell Children’s Medical Center of Central Texas will open its doors as the first hospital in the world expected to achieve platinum LEED certification from the U.S Green Building Council. Located on approximately 32 acres of the site formerly occupied by Austin’s Robert Mueller Municipal Airport, the four-story pediatric facility will replace the downtown Children’s Hospital of Austin with a complex three times its size.

renderings courtesy karl sberger architecture
Page 17

Regent Square

The largest of nine similar high-density, mixed-use projects planned for Houston, GID Urban Development Group’s Regent Square will transform 24 acres south of Allen Parkway into a four-block community connected by pedestrian walkways.

Page 23

Clearly Enlightened

by: Dror Baldinger
Architect: Kell Muñoz Architects

Located at a very busy intersection in northwest San Antonio, the new and strikingly modern headquarters of the Methodist Healthcare Ministries (MHM) demonstrates an inspired blend of geometry, reason, and artistic instinct. From its new facility at South Texas Medical Center, the faith-based, nonprofit organization manages healthcare services an financial support to constituencies throughout the southern third of Texas. The MHM’s compositional qualities of site plan, floor plans, building sections, elevations, and details are all handled with great skill and technical control.

Joe Aker, Aker/Zvonkovic
Page 32

Masterplan

Once considered prime targets for demolition, most buildings at the 26-acre former Pearl Brewery site are now scheduled for remodeling or restoration. San Antonio-based Lake/Flato Architects created a master plan for developer Silver Ventures that is intended to transform the site into a vibrant mixed-use community within the next decade.

plan courtesy lake/flat o architects
Page 39

Found Object

by: Laurie Zapalac
Architect: Candid Rogers Architect

Just south of downtown San Antonio, nestled together within a few blocks on Lavaca Street are limestone dogtrots, wooden bungalows, and a few newcomers, including three regional modernist courtyard houses. It is a street of houses with good bones; some newly transformed, some restored more than a decade ago and a few still ripe for a keen eye and some elbow grease.

Chris Cooper
Page 42

United Way Center

by: Jeanette Wiemers
Architect: Gensler

In contrast to its previous ‘anonymous’ office building, United Way’s new campus near downtown Houston establishes a highly visible presence for the nonprofit organization that is also an asset to the surrounding community. Composed of two brick-and-glass buildings, a parking garage, and gardens, the 90,000-sf complex designed by Gensler was completed in March 2005.

Joe Aker, Aker/Zvonkovic
Page 57
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