Article Results for "architecture"

Three Projects Take El Paso Awards

Three projects received awards in AIA El Paso’s 2005 Design Awards ceremony on Oct. 27. The projects were reviewed by a panel of eight jurors, all staff members of the New York City firm of Holzman Moss Architecture— Malcolm Holzman, FAIA; Michael Connolly; Steve Benesh; Jose Reyes, AIA; Chiun Ng; Lyna Vuong; Matt Kirschner; and Curtis Pittman.

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Texas State University Campus Master Plan

With help from Boston firm Ayers/Saint/Gross, Texas State University began development of a 10-year master plan in 2003 to accommodate its expected growth of the 455-acre campus in San Marcos. The plan is based on five principles: to maintain identity, emphasize sense of community, accentuate the natural environment, exhibit cohesive architecture, and develop ease of mobility around the campus.

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Mansfield Medical Center

Christopher Lamb and Daniel Romo’s design for a 269,000-sf medical center was among 14 concepts presented in December by teams of Texas A&M University architecture students working in collaboration with architects at Dallas-based HKS. The proposed site covers 40 acres in Mansfield, just south of Fort Worth.

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Words of Wisdom

Texas Architect posed the question: “What advice would you give to graduating architecture students?” The responses from the practitioners and educators who were asked ranged from the practical to the ideological to the intellectual. The heart of all their messages is to follow one’s heart and trust in intuition when making choices about where to work and in which area to focus.

Paul Hester
Page 30

The Brick Wanted to Dance

by: Anna Mod
Architect: RoTo Architects with HKS

“The brick said it wanted to dance,” exclaims Michael Rotondi, FAIA, when asked about the veneer on the new Art and Architecture Building at Prairie View A&M University. Designed by Rotondi’s firm, RoTo Architects in Los Angeles, the 105,000-sf complex adds a dramatic presence to this rural campus located 50 miles west of Houston.

Assassi Productions
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Grading School Design

by: Bob Hackler

Thirty years ago I left teaching in the public school classroom and headed for graduate school and a degree in architecture at Texas A&M. Nine years of classroom duty have greatly influenced my perception of what constitutes quality educational environs for students and faculty. They were an influence again while serving last year as a juror for TASA/TASB’s annual school design award program.

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Tivy High School

by: Ashley St. Clair
Architect: Pfluger Associates, Architects with Artisan Group, Inc.

Designed by Pfluger Associates, Tivy High School received the Caudill Award, the highest honor given in the 2005 TASA /TAS B Exhibit of School Architecture. Having long outgrown the district’s previous high school building, Kerrville ISD opened the 269,302-sf school in August 2003.

Robert Fiertek; Gary Hatch
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Richardson High School

by: Ashley St. Clair
Architect: PBK Architects, Inc.

Previously serving grades 10-12, Richardson High School admitted 720 freshmen earlier this year. PBK Architects designed the campus renovations and additions to provide space for the increased student population. The project received TASA /TAS B Exhibit of School Architecture awards in the value, design, educational appropriateness, and process of planning categories.

Jud Haggard Photography
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Mansfield Timberview High School

by: Ashley St. Clair
Architect: Huckabee & Associates, Inc.

Completed in May 2004, Mansfield Timberview High School received awards in the value, design, and educational appropriateness categories in the 2005 Exhibit of School Architecture. Huckabee & Associates designed the 420,000-sf campus using cost-effective building solutions to minimize maintenance expenses for the life of the campus structures, including a total masonry system and terrazzo floors.

Paul Chaplo
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Spicewood Elementary School

by: Ashley St. Clair
Architect: Fromberg Associates, Ltd.

Completed in May 2004, Spicewood Elementary received awards in the value, design, & process of planning categories in the 2005 Exhibit of School Architecture. Modeled after another local elementary school campus designed by Fromberg Associates, the architects incorporated lessons learned and updated the materials palette to reflect the school’s rural Hill-Country setting

Randy Fromberg, AIA
Page 63

One Hundred Years of Studio

by: Stephen Sharpe

This June marks the centennial of the first graduating class from any school in Texas that taught architecture as a degree program. The degrees in architectural engineering were awarded to three young men at the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas, now known as Texas A&M University.

courtesy of TAMU College of Architecture
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AG Ruling on Engineers Seen as Victory for Architects, But Questions Remain

by: Stephen Sharpe

While a recent ruling by the state’s attorney general leaves much still to be resolved, the opinion did unequivocally state that the Texas Board of Professional Engineers (TBPE) was incorrect in claiming architecture as a subset of engineering. The ruling, released Jan. 10, is expected to stifle the TBPE’s message to the public that engineers can practice architecture, called “building design” in a statement released by the engineering board in June 2005.

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Framing Publics

Framing Publics is a proposal for a newspaper’s broadcasting station located in New York City’s Bryant Park. Designed by Cathlyn Newell and Judson Moore, graduate students at Rice University’s School of Architecture, the project simultaneously constructs and supports two different kinds of “publics”—the physical area within the park and the virtual realm of broadcast news.

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Progressive Preservation

by: Paul Homeyer
Architect: SHW Group

Designed in 1955 by Caudill, Rowlett and Scott, the Alvin Independent School District Administration Building was classic International Style. The gracefully proportioned Miesian box of solid masonry planes infilled with full-height expanses of curtain wall was recognized in its time as an exemplary work of modern architecture. Generous overhangs of the flat roof shaded the full-height window system composed of operable sashes (the building was not originally air-conditioned).

AZ Photo
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AIA Austin Awards Eleven Projects

AIA Austin honored 11 projects during the chapter’s 2006 Awards and Honors Gala held on Feb.25 at the Seaholm Power Plant. The projects were selected from a pool of 69 entries submitted by local firms.

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Institute for Jazz Studies

Jeffrey Olgin, an architecture student at Texas Tech University, recently received the 2005 form•Z University Joint Study Award of Distinction in Architecture for his conceptual design for the Institute for Jazz Studies. Designed for a site at historic Fort Adams Park in Rhode Island where the Newport Jazz Festival takes place each year, the project consists of two distinct buildings that house the campus and museum, along with a bridging element that connects them to performance spaces.

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Whimsical Volumes

by: Jon Thompson
Architect: Sprinkle Robey Architects

Architecture in San Antonio was once identified by a palette of materials and colors established by O’Neil Ford based on his appreciation of regional building traditions. Responding to the modernist ethos that demanded an honest expression of materials, this “natural” palette combined Central Texas limestone, a standing-seam metal roof, and wood with the grain stained rather than hidden under a coat of paint. Then, in 1995, came the San Antonio Central Library designed by Ricardo Legorreta, FAIA.

Paul Hester
Page 40

Prospect and Refuge

by: Justin Allen Howard

Architecture is the practice of optimism in the face of the destructive powers of nature and man. It is a defiant standing of ground between the whim of nature and the will of man. Architects seek to design places of meaning and permanence, but we are constantly reminded of the forces at work against the built environment.

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Texas ‘Green’ Projects Among AIA’s Top Ten

by: TA Staff

Texas has three projects among the AIA’s 2006 top 10 examples of sustainable architecture and green design solutions that protect and enhance the environment. The annual list of Top Ten Green Projects is selected by the AIA’s Committee on the Environment (COTE).

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AIA Houston Presents Design Awards

AIA Houston recognized 15 projects in the chapter’s 2006 Design Awards. The jury – Margaret Helfand of Helfand Architecture; Steve Cassell of Architecture Research Office; Zack McKown of Tsao & McKown Architects; and Rob Rogers of Rogers Marvel Architects – selected the winners from 113 submittals.

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Advanced Micro Devices

In April 2005, Advanced Micro Devices announced plans for a new campus on a 59-acre tract at the southern edge of Austin to house its design and administrative staff. AMD hired Graeber Simmons & Cowan Architecture of Austin to design a masterplan as well as the individual components.

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The Porch House

“New Housing Prototypes for New Orleans” was a competition sponsored by Architectural Record and Tulane University’s School of Architecture that asked architecture students across North American to consider traditional New Orleans house types as a basis for proposing contemporary solutions to rebuilding in neighborhoods damaged by Hurricane Katrina. Five designs were selected by a jury among more than 500 entries.

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Rural Fabric

by: Liz Axford

When asked about sources of inspiration for The Quilts of Gee’s Bend, which debuted at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston in the fall of 2002, the quiltmakers often cited their surroundings. In the current exhibit, Gee’s Bend: The Architecture of the Quilt, debuting once again at the MFAH, the curators have worked to make this connection more apparent.

Illustrations courtesy MFAH
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Study in Green

by: Charles Rosenblum
Architect: Overland Partners Architects

A well-traveled sidewalk on the Penn State campus leads past Hort Woods, the university’s last swath of untouched forest. The path turns slightly at a large water tower before continuing on axis toward Henderson Mall, the historic main quad. When under-designed parking lots abutted this minor turn, it was essentially unnoticeable. Now, though, a great green curtain wall, four stories tall, closely faces this path. The patinated copper southwest facade of the new Stuckeman Family Building for the School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture seems to peel away from the structure here, ending in a cantilever.

Jeffrey Totaro/ESTO
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S.I. Morris (1914-2006)

by: Stephen Fox

The dean of Houston’s architecture community, Seth Irwin Morris Jr., died Aug. 1 at the age of 91.

courtesy morris architects
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