Article Results for "architecture"

Notes from the Jury

by: Lee Burch, AIA

Each year the Texas Association of School Administrators and the Texas Association of School Boards (TASA/TASB) sponsors a jury competition to select projects for its Exhibit of School Architecture. For an architect such as me to be invited to participate on the jury, the event offers an opportunity to see what’s new, to see how the design of schools facilities has progressed, and to check up on the competition.

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Gloria Cisneros Pre-Kindergarten

by: Andi Beierman
Architect: SHW Group

Gloria Cisneros Pre-Kindergarten received the Caudill Award, the highest honor given in the 2006 TASA /TASB Exhibit of School Architecture. Designed specifically with four-year-old students in mind, the 45,793-sf school provides an environment that encourages children to feel welcome.

Mark Trew
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Building a Better Wall

by: Alex Lahti

What happens when you give sophomore architecture students bricks and mortar? Heroic cantilevers go out of style, and formal innovation follows from structural know-how. On Sept. 19 during the annual Brick Day, students at the University of Houston’s Gerald D. Hines College of Architecture had a chance to put to use the theory they learn in lecturer Robert Morris’ structures class.

Photo by Thomas Shea Courtesy University of Houston; Photo by Thomas Shea Courtesy University of Houston; Photo by Thomas Shea Courtesy University of Houston
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A Study of Place

by: David Richter, FAIA

This year marks the 150th anniversary of the American Institute of Architects. AIA local chapters and regions across the nation will be celebrating the year with projects designed to highlight the contributions of architecture to American culture, and to create lasting contributions to livable communities in America. For 2007, Texas Architect will mark AIA150 with a series of essays celebrating the rich diversity of Texas architecture, and contemplating the critical urban, environmental, and architectural issues facing the coming generation of Texans.

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Northeast Texas 2006 Design Awards

by: Brett Patrick, AIA

Seven projects were recognized at the Northeast Texas AIA annual Christmas party and chapter meeting. The jury panel consisted of Kenneth Apel, AIA, of HKS in Dallas; Gary Kirchoff, AIA, of HH Architects in Dallas; and Andrew Vernooy, AIA, dean of the Texas Tech School of Architecture

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Texas Projects Receive AIA Honors

Three projects in Texas were among the 29 projects recognized this year with AIA’s Honor Awards, the profession’s highest recognition of works that exemplify excellence in three categories—architecture, interior architecture, and urban design. The annual competition attracted a total of almost 700 entries, with independent juries reviewing submittals in each of the categories.

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East Biloxi Model Home

MC2 Architects of Houston was among 12 firms selected by Architecture for Humanity to design residential prototypes for its Model Home program. The goal of the program is to provide design services and financial assistance for the construction of new homes for families in East Biloxi, Miss., whose houses were destroyed in 2005 by Hurricane Katrina.

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A Progressive Look Back

by: Gregory Ibanez
Architect: Good Fulton & Farrell Architects

Over the last decade or so, “context” has become a prime determinant of form and materials in much of our architecture. As any architect who has appeared before a design review board can attest, it is a sacred tenet when judging the “appropriateness” of a given solution. Unfortunately, it has also become an easy rationale for non-critical architectural thinking. As the esteemed critic Ada Louise Huxtable so eloquently stated, “The fallacy of contextualism, the masquerade of matched materials, the cosmetic cover-up of architectural maquillage meant to make a building ‘fit’ surroundings that frequently change, are a trap into which many architects jump or fall.”

Charles D. Smith, AIA
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A Hopeful Look Forward

by: Stephen Sharpe

For a glimpse into the future of the architectural profession, the University of San Antonio College of Architecture offers a few hints. The College’s design studios present examples of the kind of diversity that has proved so elusive for the profession, with the demographic character of its student body giving the impression that progress may be just a few years away.

photo courtesy The University of Texas at San Antonio
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Dell Children’s Hospital in Austin Seeks First LEED Platinum Health-Care Rating

by: Jeanette Wiemers

On June 27, the Dell Children’s Medical Center of Central Texas will open its doors as the first hospital in the world expected to achieve platinum LEED certification from the U.S Green Building Council. Located on approximately 32 acres of the site formerly occupied by Austin’s Robert Mueller Municipal Airport, the four-story pediatric facility will replace the downtown Children’s Hospital of Austin with a complex three times its size.

renderings courtesy karl sberger architecture
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AIA Houston Awards 19 Projects

by: Geoffry Brune, AIA

AIA Houston honored 19 projects during the chapter’s 2007 Design Awards Dinner held on April 5 at the Majestic Metro Theater. The projects were selected from 136 entries submitted by local firms.

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25-Year Award Nominations Due June 1

The TSA 25-Year Award is an important public outreach program that focuses much-deserved attention on distinguished Texas architecture of enduring significance. The annual award recognizes a building or ensemble of buildings completed 25 to 50 years before, which has retained its central form, character, and architectural integrity.

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Edinburg Catholic High School

Inspired by traditional Spanish Colonial architecture, the design for Edinburg’s new 90,000-sf Catholic High School features a horseshoe shaped complex of classrooms and administrative offices that surrounds a large, landscaped courtyard.

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Heroic Rescue in San Antonio

by: Mary Carolyn Hollers George

In her 2006 book, The Architectural Legacy of Alfred Giles, Mary Carolyn Hollers George revisits several works she featured in an earlier book, Alfred Giles: An English Architect in Texas and Mexico, published in 1972. In the years between the two books, a renewed appreciation for Giles’ architecture resulted in restorations and renovations of his buildings, including many in San Antonio. Giles (1853–1920) arrived in San Antonio in his 20s and built a successful design business that took him across South Texas and into northern Mexico. This excerpt, from “Chapter One: Heroic Rescues in San Antonio, Texas,” tells of an almost desperate effort by one architect to save one building, which contrasted sharply with a much larger project – the Crockett Block – that was well-funded and rallied support from several groups. THE restoration of the Crockett Block in 1983–84 was accomplished with the ample financial backing of a group of investors as well as enthusiastic civic support. It was an anchor for the revitalization of Alamo Plaza and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as a contributing structure in the Alamo Plaza Historic District.

photos courtesy trinity university press
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AIA Lubbock Completes Mercado Design

by: Andrea Exter

Originated as AIA Lubbock’s chapter gift to the city of Lubbock in commemoration of AIA150, the design of the North University Avenue Mercado is complete. This planned indoor/outdoor public plaza in North Lubbock will embrace the art, architecture, and culture of the local Hispanic community at an already identified site targeted for redevelopment.

rendering and site plan courtesy aia lubbock
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AIA Austin Awards 17 Projects

by: Brian Carlson

AIA Austin honored 17 projects during the chapter’s 2007 Awards and Honors Gala held on May 12 at the Texas Memorial Museum on the University of Texas campus. The projects were selected from a pool of 65 entries submitted by local firms

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groHome

The 2007 Solar Decathlon team at Texas A&M University’s College of Architecture has developed its entry for the biannual international competition sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy.

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Borderland Modernism

by: William Palmore

“Sustainable design,” the emerging amalgamation of principles and strategies for conserving the use of energy by buildings, is rapidly becoming the most important force in contemporary architecture. Potentially prescriptive, sustainable design strongly implies the need for a very different architecture. Owing to what seems the profession’s long-term habit of neglecting energy conservation, an anxiety surrounds the subject, stimulated by concerns that a designer’s creativity might be restricted or a client’s preferences compromised.

Model and photo by William Palmore; Plan by Thomas Lozada, New York Institue of Technology; © J. Paul Getty trust.
used with permission. julius shulman photograph archive research library at the Getty Trust Institute
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Architecture for a Unique Time and Place

by: William Palmore

The story of Garland and Hilles tells as much about the post-war housing boom and subsequent increase of Cold War military spending as it does about architecture. El Paso, home to venerable Ft. Bliss and the newly important Biggs Air Field, was poised to grow rapidly. The population more than doubled to 276,678 in the decade between 1950 and 1960.

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Texas A&M Performing Arts Center

by: Jeanette Wiemers
Architect: Cotten Landreth Kramer Architects & Associates; Holzman Moss Architecture

Taking advantage of the project’s scenic location along Corpus Christi Bay, Holzman Moss Architecture of New York City, the design architect for the team, designed the Performing Arts Center at Texas A&M University – Corpus Christi to offer stunning views as well as first-rate acoustics.

Hester + Hardaway
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‘Adventures’ on the Bayou

by: Barrie Scardino

In the six months since Architecture Center Houston opened, ArCH has welcomed more than 2,500 people to a wide range of activities – from workshops and exhibitions to architecture walking tours and even a small concert – but we are most excited about an event coming up this summer.

photographs by joe aker | a-z photography
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In Mississippi, Houston Design Firms Assist Post-Katrina Housing Recovery

by: Kari Smith

Two years after Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast, the residents of this once-close-knit Mississippi community are still trying to recover from unprecedented devastation. In some areas of East Biloxi, nearly 80 percent of housing is estimated to have been lost or made uninhabitable from the hurricane.

Top photo courtesy MC 2; bottom photo by Brett Zamore
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Linda Pace (1945–2007)

by: Jim Poteet

On July 2, San Antonio lost Linda Pace, the city’s greatest patron of contemporary art and architecture, after a six-month battle with cancer. The daughter of Pace Foods founder David Pace and Margaret Pace Willson, a founder of the Southwest School of Art and Craft, she studied art at Trinity University. Pace later became an accomplished artist and prodigious art collector.

Photos Courtesy Artpace San Antonio; Top photo Copyright 2002 James McGoon.
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Richard Payne’s Texas Towns

by: Thomas McKittrick, FAIA

In his most recent book, Texas Towns and The Art of Architecture: A Photographer’s Journey, Richard Payne, FAIA, chronicles beautiful examples of architecture in small, dying towns across Texas. At the same time, Payne’s images offer glimpses of the waning lives of people in those towns. Texas Architect asked Tom McKittrick, FAIA, to interview Payne about the underlying message he wanted to convey through the book’s black-and-white photographs and his essay that introduces them. Responding to fairly open-ended questions from his long-time friend, Payne touched upon some of these points. Excerpts follow.

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Houston Legacy: Hugo V. Neuhaus, Jr.

by: Val Glitsch

On Aug. 2, more than 400 guests attended an opening preview of Houston Mod’s third architectural exhibition, Hugo V. Neuhaus, Jr., Residential Architecture, 1948-1966, at Architecture Center Houston. Neuhaus was the premier gentleman architect for Houston’s elite society in the 1950s.

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