Article Results for "ARE"

Healthful Hospitality

by: Nestor Ifanzon
Architect: Page Southerland Page

The new Baylor Regional Medical Center is one of those institutional facilities that challenges visitors to peel away its layers for a better appreciation of the project and its context. To fully appreciate the building requires an understanding of the combination of factors that led to its conception, specifically those related to statistics that forebode a healthcare crisis in Texas. Among those factors are the rapidly expanding growth of the state’s major cities and the large number of aging baby boo

Craig Blackmon, FAIA; Yunjoo Namkoong
Page 36

Garland ISD Special Events Center

by: Ashley St. Clair
Architect: HKS, Inc.

In designing the Garland ISD Special Events Center, HKS architect Dan Phillips aimed to create a non-traditional structure that would provide an energetic space for school and community events. As a result, the distinctively designed assembly and conferencing center, opened in August 2005, looks more like a state-of-the-art performance hall than a typical school field house.

Blake Marvin
Page 48

Irresponsible Claims

by: James B. Atkins, Grant A. Simpson

Claims against architects are often written in a way to try to take advantage of a particular state law, or to put the design professional in as unflattering position as possible. The following examples are styled after actual claims filed against design professionals, and they are typical of what a design professional may expect if an owner unhappy with the quality of the work claims the architect should pay all or a portion of the cost of remedying nonconforming work.

Page 56

Prospect and Refuge

by: Justin Allen Howard

Architecture is the practice of optimism in the face of the destructive powers of nature and man. It is a defiant standing of ground between the whim of nature and the will of man. Architects seek to design places of meaning and permanence, but we are constantly reminded of the forces at work against the built environment.

Page 64

‘Green’ Renewal

by: Stephen Sharpe

Albiet tangential to this edition’s “Color” theme, the profession’s achievements in sustainable design deserve to be acknowledged at every opportunity. The fact that three of the AIA Committee on the Environment’s Top Ten Green Projects are in Texas demonstrates how the state’s architects are successfully responding to their clients’ desire for buildings that minimize environmental impact and maximize the energy-efficient attributes of high-performance design.

Steve Hudson Courtesy W.O. Neuhaus Architects
Page 5

Taniguchi Set to Unveil Revised Design this Summer for Asia House Houston

by: Ronnie Self

Yoshio Taniguchi, best known in the U.S. for his recent expansion of the Museum of Modern Art in New York City, will unveil his latest schematic design for Houston’s Asia House later this summer. The client, Asia Society Texas, has acquired two facing parcels totaling 78,000 square feet along one block of Southmore Boulevard between Caroline and Austin streets in the city’s Museum District. The 35,000-sq. ft. facility is expected to open in summer 2009 and will serve as a venue for cultural, artistic, educational, and business exchange.

courtesy asia society texas
Page 10

AIA Houston Presents Design Awards

AIA Houston recognized 15 projects in the chapter’s 2006 Design Awards. The jury – Margaret Helfand of Helfand Architecture; Steve Cassell of Architecture Research Office; Zack McKown of Tsao & McKown Architects; and Rob Rogers of Rogers Marvel Architects – selected the winners from 113 submittals.

Page 14

Girl Scout Leadership Center

The Sally Cheever Girl Scout Leadership Center, designed by Marmon Mok, will be a 30,000-sq. ft. regional headquarters serving Girl Scouts in the San Antonio area and nine surrounding counties. The wooded seven-acre site just north of San Antonio International Airport offered the architect the opportunity to embrace the spirit of the Girl Scouts by taking a “nature in the city” approach that has resulted in several environmental-friendly attributes, including rainwater collection, hiking paths, and native landscaping.

Page 16

Rural Fabric

by: Liz Axford

When asked about sources of inspiration for The Quilts of Gee’s Bend, which debuted at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston in the fall of 2002, the quiltmakers often cited their surroundings. In the current exhibit, Gee’s Bend: The Architecture of the Quilt, debuting once again at the MFAH, the curators have worked to make this connection more apparent.

Illustrations courtesy MFAH
Page 20

Playing It Up

by: Val Glitsch
Architect: Upchurch Architects

The recently completed Day School for Christ Lutheran Church in Brenham puts a new face on school design for this small city Northwest of Houston. Previously occupying a small house and shared weekday use of a rather bleak set of Sunday School rooms, 125 children (with their 24 teachers) now occupy a building Upchurch Architects has designed just for them.

Hester + Hardaway
Page 32

Cool Spaces

by: Frank Jacobus
Architect: Barnes Gromatzky Kosarek Architects; Goetting & Associates; Jaster-Quintanilla (joint venture)

The 2002 expansion of the Austin Convention Center, a near doubling of the facility’s size, as well as the concurrent construction of a new convention center hotel, prompted city officials to consider an important question: Where will all those additional people park? Ultimately, the officials decided on a project that paired the city’s Convention Center Department and Austin Energy, the municipal electrical utility, and created 650-plus parking spaces while also providing chilled water for downtown customers.

Thomas McConnell
Page 36

NorthPark Center Expansion

by: Jennifer Lee
Architect: Omniplan Inc.

The recent expansion of NorthPark Center in Dallas by Omniplan represents the second major alteration of the innovative 1964 shopping mall. Originally developed by Raymond D. Nasher in an L-shaped plan, NorthPark has been reconfigured as a closed square with double the amount of retail space.

James F. Wilson
Page 45

New Trends in Walls and Ceilings

by: TA Staff

New technologies are offering architects and designers further innovative solutions to increase their projects’ overall value through operational efficiency and long-term maintenance. These range from improved materials to enhanced techniques for their application.

Courtesy Page Southerland Page; Courtesy baker drywall; craig blackmon, faia; Courtesy aker-zvonkovic photography; Courtesy Panel specialists inc.; Courtesy alamo architects
Page 49

Rehab of Historic ‘Rock Ranch’ Recognized by Preservationists

by: J. Brantley Hightower

In his essay “The Necessity for Ruins,” J.B. Jackson writes of the importance of an “interval of neglect” in the history of a built object or landscape. “Ruins,” he notes, “provide the incentive for restoration, and for a return to origins.” While the old adage – we only miss things once they are gone – may very well be true, Jackson proposes that we also can appreciate things while they are here and take action before those things are lost forever.

Photos courtesy Steph en B. Cha mbers, AIA
Page 12

Houstonians Rally to Preserve Theaters

by: Gerald Moorhead

When the Greater Houston Preservation Alliance (GHPA) added two Art Deco theaters to its “most endangered” list in July, there was an unprecedented outcry to save the buildings from being razed. The response has been unique for Houston, where land value is king and buildings, the bearers of history and identity-of-place, are expendable. Within 10 days, more than 20,000 people had signed an online petition in support of GHPA’s actions to preserve the theaters.

Photos by gerald moorhead, fAIA
Page 15

Design Awards 2006

by: Michael Malone

Architects rarely have the opportunity to view the best work of their peers from around the state, so the TS A Design Awards’ jury review offers a unique vantage point. The event is much like a window from which to see the diversity of scope, scale, and issues our fellow professionals are working with. Sitting in while the jury meets is exciting. It also can be a humbling experience and, at moments, distressing when projects you believe have merit are summarily rejected.

staff photos
Page 30

2006 Design Awards Jury

by: Michael Malone

This year’s jury was exceptional in a number of ways—particularly for its regional diversity (Boston, New York City, and Baton Rouge) and the sheer number of awards its three jurors have amassed for design (more than 150 among them). Also notable to anyone observing the jurors working together was their commitment to rewarding excellence through careful review and consensus. Shown from left to right, the jurors were:

Page 31

Commerce Street Townhomes


Architect: Ron Wommack, FAIA

The eight-unit, inner-city townhouse project is located on a long-abandoned site in a former manufacturing area east of downtown Dallas. Two industrial structures across the street had been renovated into residential dwellings, and this project forms another street wall to bring scale and intimacy to this neighborhood.

Charles Smith
Page 38

Floating Box House


Architect: Peter L Gluck and Partners, Architects

Surrounded by a grove of more than 200 live oaks, the house is located just outside Austin and stands between the city’s new urban skyline and its rural past.

Paul Warchol
Page 48

Government Canyon


Architect: Lake/Flato Architects

The Visitor Center floats in a field of native grasses and restored oaks at the mouth of the canyon, forming a gateway to the 8,600-acre Government Canyon State Natural Area. The canyon’s rich ranching history is expressed in the exposed pipe structure.

Chris Cooper
Page 52

Guerra Branch Library


Architect: Sprinkle Robey Architects

The Guerra Branch Library is located in a working class, military neighborhood in San Antonio. Inspired by the soaring hangars at the adjacent Air Force Base, the building is organized in three volumes that are oriented to define an existing green space to the north and east, while limiting the harsh sunlight from the south and west.

Paul Hester
Page 54

Methodist Healthcare Ministries


Architect: Kell Muñoz Architects, Inc.

The architect’s commission for a new building to house the largest charitable religious foundation in South Texas was based upon the designers’ ability to represent the visionary culture of Methodist “works.” The client asked for a headquarters that would represent the purity and simplicity of the foundation’s calling to help the poor with healthcare while quietly asserting its importance to the region.

R. Greg Hursley; Chris Cooper; Paul Hester
Page 62

Rocking F Ranch


Architect: Mell Lawrence Architects

Farmhouse vernacular inspired this family retreat in rural Central Texas. The compound consists of three buildings that define the perimeter of a central yard skirting an oak grove—the main building with living areas and kitchen on the ground floor and guest rooms upstairs, a bedroom wing with the master suite in a tower adjacent to the children’s bedroom, and a carport.

Hester + Hardaway
Page 64

Sarofim Research Building


Architect: BNIM Architects

The Fayez S. Sarofim Research Building houses core research laboratories, administrative offices, and a glass auditorium. Located in the Texas Medical Center, the parti consists of a central atrium flanked by two wings—the southern containing administrative offices and the northern containing labs. The openness of the adjoining atrium gardens invites public passage through the building, giving the program a sense of transparency.

Richard Payne, FAIA
Page 66

TSA studio Awards

by: Stephen Sharpe

The review of Studio Award entries followed the jury’s finalizing its selections for Design Awards. From the 48 submittals, the jury kept 14 for a second round before deciding to award seven projects. Three of them in particular garnered praise from the jurors—Square of Circles by Jay Smith, AIA, of Dallas; Houston Skyscraper by Michael Kross, an architecture student at Rice University; and Design>Build>Texas by architecture students at UT Austin.

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