Article Results for "SOM"

Options Approved for Governor’s Mansion

by: TA Staff

Plans to build an addition – albeit much smaller than one proposed earlier this year that sparked outcries of protest from some preservationists – to the Governor’s Mansion appeared to be moving forward at press time.

Page 15

AIA Houston Awards 13 Projects

by: TA Staff

Thirteen projects were selected for 2010 AIA Houston Design Awards. The jury – Brian Johnsen of Johnsen Schmaling Architects in Milwaukee, Wis.; Juan Miró, AIA, of Miró Rivera Architects in Austin; and Amanda Kolson Hurley, executive editor of Washington, D.C.-based Architect magazine – met Feb. 26 at the Architecture Center Houston to review 132 entries from 59 local firms. Awards were presented March 25 at the Rice Hotel in Houston.

Page 19

Keeping Up with the Joneses

by: Lawrence Connolly
Architect: HKS

As if straight from a big-budget science-fiction movie, the new Cowboys Stadium in Arlington looks like a colossal alien spacecraft tethered to the ground by a pair of monumental steel arches. Some locals even refer to it as Death Star, but it does not appear threatening.

Blake Marvin/HKS
Page 32

PSU Overlook Pavilion

by: Sean Burkholder
Architect: Overland Partners Architects

Integrating architecture into any given context while maintaining design integrity is a fine art. Architects must constantly walk the line between over- or under-contextualizing a building to support its strength as a unique entity within its environment. Somewhere between total disregard to surroundings and cliché facsimiles of geologic or biologic imagery, a good architect can find a project’s meaning without being overt. Such sought-after balance has been gracefully achieved by Overland Partners with the firm’s new Overlook Pavilion at Penn State University.

Jeffrey Totaro
Page 56

Pearl Stable

by: Douglas Lipscomb, AIA
Architect: Ford, Powell & Carson Architects and Planners

Upon seeing the renovated Pearl Stable one can fully appreciate how past generations respected even the most prosaic of structures. The stable building was originally constructed in 1894 to house the horses that pulled the beer wagons of the Pearl Brewing Company. The elegance of the original two-story, elliptical structure derives from the simplicity of its plan – with horse stalls arranged on the ground floor around its perimeter and its core – and the richness of the corbelled and patterned brick on the exterior. The second floor served as the hay loft from which feed could be dropped through the chutes to the horses below. At the center of the roof was a handsome cupola that provided ventilation to the stables.

Paul Bardagjy
Page 60

Romanian Adventure

by: J. Tom Ashley, FAIA

Sometime after midnight in May 2009, I arrived in the Romanian capital of Bucharest as part of the twenty-sixth group of Peace Corps volunteers to serve in this former Soviet bloc country. All 37 of us had met in Washington, D.C., for orientation before flying together overseas.

Page 27

The Blanton That Could Have Been

by: J. Brantley Hightower

While studying at UT Austin in the spring of 1998, my classmates and I had the opportunity to attend a series of public lectures given by the seven short-listed architects for the Jack S. Blanton Museum of Art. The list was impressive and when Herzog & de Meuron was ultimately chosen we were thrilled by the prospect of what the Swiss firm would design. The insertion of a thoughtful work within the Spanish Mediterranean-style campus was certainly something to be eagerly anticipated.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA ; Illustration by Richard Carman, courtesy Herzog & de Meuron and UT Austin
Page 27

Direct from Bhutan

While some architects look askance at the seemingly strange importation of a foreign style onto the UTEP campus, the Bhutanese apparently are pleased that their architectural idiom has been incorporated into modern American buildings.

Temple Photo courtesy UTE P.
Page 39

Trammell Crow (1914-2009)

by: Gregory Ibanez

The noted Dallas developer Trammell Crow passed away at his East Texas farm on Jan. 14. He was 94 years old and had apparently been in failing health for some time. While Crow’s reach in the commercial real estate world was international in scope, he left an inescapable legacy in his hometown of Dallas.

Page 16

‘Cleansing’ History in Santa Fe

by: Thomas Hayne Upchurch

Driving down Cerrillos Road in Santa Fe one morning last summer while looking for a place to eat, I noticed a number of partially and fully demolished buildings edging the campus of the Santa Fe Indian School. It was a work in progress, a startling sight of splintered lumber, mangled masonry walls, some still stubbornly standing, and exposed interiors. I was somewhat familiar with the buildings, but only in passing. Now I wanted to remember what was gone.

Palace of the Governors Photo Archives, Negative No. 082540
Page 24

Outlook for a Downturn

by: Stephen Sharpe

Just how troublesome are current economic conditions in Texas? To gain insight, Texas Architect invited six architects to join a roundtable discussion where they were asked to assess their local markets and offer near-term forecasts. The roundtable discussion took place in Austin on Jan. 19.

Julie Pizzo; original photography by istock and shutterstock
Page 30

Survival in Challenging Times

by: Jim Atkins, FAIA and Grant A. Simpson, FAIA

Here we go again; another recession. And since the work of the design professional is directly related to the economy, our livelihood thrives or suffers accordingly. Those good times that seemed as though they would never end seem to have ended, at least for the present. Projects have gone on hold, or away, friends have been laid off, and many employees are now wanting for something meaningful to do.

Photo illustrations by Julie Pizzo; sketch courtesy merr iman associates/architects
Page 68

So You Want To Do Houses?

by: Michael Malone

A casual survey of why people become architects will inevitably lead to an early interest in or passion for the design of houses. It is therefore surprising to many people that not all architects design houses. Single-family residential design is something most architects feel they have the skills and knowledge to do effectively, but the reality is few of us makes an ongoing practice of it and even fewer can earn a meaningful living doing it. I know, I try to do it every day and it is tough.

Renderings courtesy the author.
Page 22

Terminal Clarity

by: Gregory Ibanez
Architect: Corgan with HKS and HNTB

Discussing Dallas Fort Worth International Airport Terminal D and its selection for a 2009 TSA Design Award, juror Philip Freelon, FAIA, said, “We thought that the project was a very good example of a public building, very prominent, but it still was handled with quite some sensitivity. We all have been in airports, probably more than we’d like, and this is one where you actually feel a sense of light and airy space, which is relaxing. Natural light was well used, and the high volume of the space gives it an open and comfortable feeling. We thought it was well worthy of an award.”

Craig Blackmon, FAIA; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 44

The Lure of the Industrial

by: J. Brantley Hightower

At least two things bind all architects together: our vacation photos tend to include more buildings than people and at some point we read Le Corbusier’s Towards a New Architecture. While it has since been revealed that the title and other portions of the book were initially translated poorly, the book remains arguably the most influential manifesto of the early modernist period. Although Corbusier’s grand pronouncements are at times both endearingly naïve and annoyingly heavy handed, his general thesis was certainly revolutionary for its day and prophetic given all that came later.

Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Control Tower 19, Santa Fe Railway Milepost 51, Dallas; image courtesy Library of Congress, Prints &
Photographs Division, HAER , Reproduction number HAER TEX, 57-DAL, 5-5; Photos at far right by J. Brantley Hightower, AIA
Page 44

The Direction of Furniture Design

Some recent trends in workplace cultures have led furniture companies to develop lines of product that are more flexible.

Page 79

Houston Firm’s Low-Cost Home Design Pledged to Help Ravaged New Orleans

by: Stephen Sharpe

Announced to fanfare surrounding actor Brad Pitt’s personal involvement with bringing affordable housing to this beleaguered city’s poorest residents, the Make It Right program unveiled designs in December for houses by some of the world’s cutting-edge architects. A total of 13 international, national, and regional firms were invited to create home designs for the Crescent City’s Lower Ninth Ward, one of the neighborhoods hardest hit by flooding in the wake of Hurricane Katrina in September 2005.

Rendering by Patrick Lopez, Courtesy BNIM Architect s
Page 13

Handsome Composition

by: Bart Shaw
Architect: Corgan Associates, Inc.

In 1849, at the confluence of the Clear and West Forks of the Trinity River, a fort was erected to protect pioneers settling in an area occupied by Native Americans. There were eight villages that developed around Fort Worth, seven were occupied by Native Americans, and one inhabited by white immigrants. White Settlement became a center of trade, a place of social interaction and mingling of societies, that still retains a strong sense of community.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA
Page 80

A City’s Vision Becomes Reality

by: Stephen Sharpe

As reported on the following pages, One Arts Plaza represents the first major commercial venture to open for some time in the Dallas Arts District. Construction continues to swirl around the new project, designed by Morrison Seifert Murphy, as crews work on several significant buildings immediately adjacent to its site. One Arts Plaza, shown at the far left in the rendering provided by the Dallas Center for the Performing Arts, is set at the northeast end of Flora Street that bisects the Arts District. At the street’s other terminus is the Dallas Museum of Art, which, since the Edward Larrabee Barnes-designed complex opened in 1984, has been joined by neighboring cultural venues designed by other highly renowned architects.

Winspear Opera House and Annette Strauss Artist Square Renderings courtesy Foster + Partners; Wyly Theatre And Performance Park Renderings Courtesy Luxigon; Dallas Arts District Rendering Courtesy Dallas Center for the Performing Arts
Page 24

Living in Balance

by: Mark Schatz, AIA
Architect: Intexure Architects

Sometimes the best sense of well -being comes from being in tune with one’s environment in the sense that the environment is a carefully constructed mirror reflecting back views of our better personal qualities. When handled architecturally these expressions of our philosophy, values, and intentions can find their way into daily routines that then become a pattern for living, which constantly reinforces and reinvigorates.

Rame Hruska, AIA
Page 40

Misfires

RFIs can often be misused. Some examples include: INNAPROPRIATE QUESTIONS An RFI may ask for the size of fasteners to attach sheathing on the building. This is a proprietary issue that is typically determined by the product manufacturer.

Page 68

Historical Fusion

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: Curry Boudreaux Architects

To drive the backroads of rural Texas is to travel through history. Just below the surface of many small towns, a palpable immigrant heritage dwells. The signs are sometimes obvious, the annual festivals celebrating a community’s cultural origins and the museums dedicated to preserving the locals’ ethnic roots. Also, the old churches, many built by the hands of those who settled the area, often serve as tangible reminders of the unique narrative of a peoples’ journey from faraway native lands in their quest for a new, more tolerant home.

G. Lyon Photography, Inc.
Page 36

Lost and Found

by: Val Glitsch
Architect: Lake|Flato Architects in association with Jeffrey Carbo Landscape Architects and MESA Design Group

‘Shangri La’ conjures a dreamy utopia protected from the outside world. A much sought-after place of tranquility, ever-increasing wisdom, and beauty—the perfect paradise existing somewhere on this earth but hidden from sight. The movie-made-famous name, inspired by James Hilton’s 1933 Lost Horizon, is the heaven-on-earth place just waiting to be found.

Hester + Hardaway
Page 42

The Hidden Risks OF LEED

by: J. David Odom; Richard Scott, AIA; and George H. DuBose

Adapted with permission from Liberty Building Forensics Group, this article originally appeared in NCARB’s Monograph Series. Yesterday ’s seal of approval for new products was “It was developed by NASA.” Today the seal of approval is: it’s “organically produced,” LEED certified, “earth friendly,” or some variation of the above.

Page 117

Gauging Green

by: Lars Stanley, AIA and Lauren Woodward Stanley, AIA

t a time when our nation’s financial system seems to be imploding, it’s sometimes distressing to ponder what the future holds for the architectural profession. Our livelihoods are inextricably tied to the fortunes of the building industry, which quickly reacts to any economic downturn and in turn affects our work accordingly. Troubling, too, is the issue of global warming because our profession has an immediate and direct impact on the environment. And considering that buildings in the U.S. consume about 70 percent of the nation’s total electricity output and 12 percent of its water, it is evident that what we do as designers and builders in the future must be increasingly responsive to such grave issues.

Page 31
View: 25 50 100 All