Article Results for "sustainable"

Back to the Garden

by: Rebecca Boles, AIA

The prairie has returned to Fort Worth’s Cultural District. Evicted long ago by urbanization, native flora have again taken root along University Drive where revived grassland heralds the emergence of a unique enterprise. So surprising is the sight of children at play in this field of prairie grasses that one may not immediately see the new building on the site.

Chris Cooper
Page 48

Texas Tech’s Green Future

by: Stephen Sharpe

This edition covers a broad sweep of variations on the “Design for Education” theme, from new facilities for private and public schools to an award-winning architecture course at UT Arlington that is now improving the everyday experiences of Arlington residents. There’s also a news article about a green roof on the campus of UT El Paso, an unlikely – but so far successful – attempt at sustainable design in a desert climate.

Brian Rex
Page 5

Rice’s Solar Decathlon Zerow House Advances Affordable Sustainability

by: Zach Mortice

The 20 solar-powered houses that lined the National Mall in October during the fourth Solar Decathlon made it clear that the sustainable design movement is becoming more self-assured and sophisticated. The projects, each designed and built by a team of students, used a wide variety of materials (stone, wood, steel, and plastic composite) and spatial organizations not seen in past decathlons.

Eric Hester
Page 11

Jury Chosen for TSA Studio Awards

by: TA Staff

This year’s TSA Studio Awards will be judged by three Arizona architects, each respected for design work and commitment to sustainable architecture. Comprising the jury is Wendell Burnette, FAIA, of Wendell Burnette Architects in Phoenix; John Kane, FAIA, a founding principal of Architekton in Tempe: and Philip Weddle, AIA, of Weddle Gilmore Black Rock Studio in Scottsdale.

Page 19

Environmental Impact

David Heymann concedes that the house is indeed very large, yet he is quick to point out the designs sustainable attributes. “It’s not smart growth, but its smarter to have one very big house than a dozen big houses,” he says. “Such houses are inevitable, and ignoring them for scalar impropriety does not resolve their environmental consequence.”

Page 41

Buzz Lofts

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: t. howard + associates/Parmadesign

Buzz Lofts, a live/work residential building designed by t. howard + associates, is sited on an urban block near downtown Dallas. Sustainable, modern, and artistic describe the design concept for the three-story building that rests above ground-floor parking.

Jay Brousseau
Page 83

Studio Awards 2010


Architect: Max Levy, FAIA

Color Clock House was conceived as a speculative house for a developer of an enclave of sustainable homes in Dallas.

Page 29

Studio Awards 2010


Architect: Bengie Daniels, AIA, Derek Keck , Jon Gately, and Michael Day

Pegboard is a sustainable and expandable shelter for the people in the African nation of Ghana.

Page 32

Lake/Flato’s Shangri La in Top Ten Green

Lake/Flato Architects’ Shangri La Botanical Gardens and Nature Center in Orange is among the Top Ten Green Projects for 2009 as recognized by the AIA’s Committee on the Environment (COTE). Each year the national award celebrates excellence in sustainable architecture and design solutions that protect and enhance the natural environment.

Photo by Hester + Hardaway
Page 12

Forwarding Dallas

Designed by Portugal firms Atelier Data and MOOV, Forwarding Dallas is one of three winning projects in Urban Revision’s Re:Vision Dallas competition to design a fully sustainable 2.5-acre block in downtown Dallas.

Page 21

Constructed Ecologies

Rice University graduate students Zhan Chen and Brantley Highfill (with faculty sponsor Douglas Oliver) recently received second place for their design Constructed Ecologies in the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture “Concrete Thinking for a Sustainable World” International Student Design Competition.

Page 28

Studio Awards 2009


Architect: Hernan Molina

The project proposes to redevelop Valencia’s old harbor in Spain that represents the commitment of the city with a modern spirit, rich in options and aspirations. This project of renovation and master planning intends to recover the harbor in a sustainable manner. The project proposes: 1) to create a waterfront where none currently exists; 2) to integrate the port into the city; 3) to suitably separate the port and non-port uses; 4) to order traffic circulation along the seafront; 5) to resolve the area in which the dry river bed joins the sea; 6) to conserve and recover the heritage of the area; 7) to propose a suitable combination of public and private uses; and 8) to consider pre-existing uses for their integration into a sustainable environment.

Page 34

AIA San Antonio Announces Awards

From the 58 projects entered in the 2007 AIA San Antonio Design Awards, jurors selected two for Honor Awards, three for Merit Awards, and five for Citation Awards. In addition, the jury recognized two of the award-winning projects for sustainable design. During ceremonies held Oct. 24 at the recently renovated Pearl Stable, two other awards were announced—the Mayor’s Choice Award honoring a publicly funded architectural project and the chapter’s 25-Year Design Award for a project `that has stood the test of time.

Page 16

SUSTAINABLE DESIGN WITH BRICK

(This article was adapted from “Sustainability & Green Building Design with Brick Masonry,” an article that originally appeared in the October 2007 edition of Brick in Architecture published by the Brick Industry Association.) Many of the objectives of sustainab le design do not impact building material selection, but instead focus on building systems such as plumbing, lighting, air conditioning, etc. However, the versatility and durability of brick facilitate the use of brick masonry as part of many elements of sustainable design.

Photo by Mark Trew ; Courtesy HDR
Page 69

Conservative Concrete

Durable, energy efficient and recyclable – a quick evaluation of concrete applications and it’s easy to determine that this versatile building material is sustainable. Just how major a role it will play as the green building movement continues to proliferate depends on how many are willing to take a closer look.

Photo by Thomas McConnell , Courtesy LZT Architects
Page 71

Gulf Coast Green Symposium in Houston To Work on Regional Problems, Solutions

Co-sponsored by AIA Houston, the Gulf Coast Green 2008 symposium and expo is scheduled April 3-6 at Reliant Park in Houston. The event will address timely issues of rising energy costs and global climate concerns. Tours of Houston will be given on April 4, and will feature folk art, green roof, Houston downtown, and sustainable engineering.

Page 13

Hill Country Montessori School

Designed by SHW Group, the Hill Country Montessori School in Boerne will demonstrate to its young occupants the importance of creating sustainable built environments by using architecture to promote education. The design of the buildings promotes both environmental and social awareness through transparency and access.

Page 20

Two Texas Communities Picked for SDAT

by: Jeff Potter, AIA

Two Texas communities are among 10 selected across the U.S. for study this year by an AIA Sustainable Design Assistance Team (SDAT) to help develop strategies for improving environmental conditions and preserving a sense of place while faced with suburban sprawl.

Page 14

Sustainable Healthcare Design

by: Stephen Sharpe

Gail Vittori is co-author of Sustainable Healthcare Architecture (Wiley Press, 2008) with Robin Guenther, FAIA. As co-director of the Center for Maximum Potential Building Systems, Vittori also helped develop the Green Guide for Health Care (www.gghc.org) and chairs the U.S. Green Building Council’s LEED for Healthcare Committee. TA Editor Stephen Sharpe recently nterviewed Vittori about her book and her purpose in writing it.

Page 32

CORE: A Compact Highly Adaptable Home

The design submittal from Hybrid/ORA of Seattle is the winner of the “99K House Competition” sponsored by the Rice Design Alliance and AIA Houston. The competition challenged architects to design a sustainable, single-family prototype that could be built for around $99,000 in Houston and replicated throughout the Gulf region.

Page 22

Regulating High-Performance Design

by: Stephen Sharpe

While Texas’ five largest cities have adopted policies mandating sustainable design standards for their new public buildings, the Texas Legislature has yet to pass any similar laws governing state-owned facilities.

Photo by Paul Bardagjy courtesy Page Southerland Page
Page 5

Focus on the gulf

The Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies is developing into the innovative, interdisciplinary research facility. With a gift of $46 million in 2000 and the charge to “make a difference,” Corpus Christi philanthropist Edward H. Harte set the researchers on their mission to support and advance the long-term sustainable use and conservation of the Gulf of Mexico.

courtesy Harte Research Institute
Page 41

Borderland Modernism

by: William Palmore

“Sustainable design,” the emerging amalgamation of principles and strategies for conserving the use of energy by buildings, is rapidly becoming the most important force in contemporary architecture. Potentially prescriptive, sustainable design strongly implies the need for a very different architecture. Owing to what seems the profession’s long-term habit of neglecting energy conservation, an anxiety surrounds the subject, stimulated by concerns that a designer’s creativity might be restricted or a client’s preferences compromised.

Model and photo by William Palmore; Plan by Thomas Lozada, New York Institue of Technology; © J. Paul Getty trust.
used with permission. julius shulman photograph archive research library at the Getty Trust Institute
Page 20

Instant Community

by: Carl Gromatzky, AIA
Architect: JPRA Architects

The growing trend toward mixed-use developments in the United States is a welcome change from developments of the recent past where zoning more or less dictated single-use districts and led to an overall homogenization of our urban environment. And while they have much to offer, these new mixed-use developments have challenges to overcome if they are to thrive. It is clear that for them to function as relatively self-sufficient, sustainable communities, lessons must be incorporated from urban neighborhoods that have grown up over decades or, in some cases, centuries.

Paul Bardagjy; R. Greg Hursley
Page 34

Local Councils Promote Education

The successful design and construction of a building’s exterior enclosure defines the aesthetic sense of a building, it secures protection from a variety of weather conditions, and today it is an integral part of strategies for sustainable building design.

Page 92
View: 25 50 100 All