Article Results for "Light"

Delight in Restraint

by: Jeffrey Brown

The announcement in Architectural Record’s January 2005 issue that Yoshio Taniguchi would design his first free-standing building outside of Japan in Houston’s revered Museum District brimmed with expectation. At that time, Taniguchi was considered an emerging “starchitect” whose addition to the Museum of Modern Art had been completed the previous year.

Hester & Hardaway
Page 44

Conference Emphasizes Practice in the Hinterlands

by: Stephen Sharpe, Hon. AIA

For two days in February, a group of designers gathered in Midland to consider the challenges of producing top-flight architecture in a place far removed from the state’s larger urban areas. The event, dubbed “Architecture in the Hinterlands,” included an address by acclaimed Canadian architect Brian MacKay-Lyons that featured his work in remote Nova Scotia.

Thomas McConnell
Page 15

Form Follows Market

by: Filo Castroe, AIA

More than 20 years after the last major high-rise building was completed in downtown Houston, the Bayou city skyline welcomes BG Group Place at 811 Main Street. Developed by the Hines CalPERS Green Development Fund and designed by Pickard Chilton, the graceful tower, completed in 2011, stands 46 stories tall at the core of the Central Business District (CBD) along the METRO light rail transit line and is strategically connected to the six-mile underground pedestrian tunnel system.

Peter Aaron/OTTO; Aker Imaging; Scott McDonald/Hendrick-
Blessing
Page 48

In the Light with Charles K. Thompson, FAIA

by: Larry Paul Fuller

It’s a Monday morning at Archillume Lighting Design in Austin. Founder Charles Thompson, FAIA, is just now back from a four-day road trip on his 2009 Harley Davidson Ultra Classic. His time on the open road to Big Bend and back has helped to recharge his energy and clear his mind. So he’s ready for whatever awaits him.

Julie Pizzo
Page 67

Texas Firms among AIA COTE Award Winners

On April 19, the American Institute of Architects’ Committee on the Environment (AIA–COTE) announced its Top Ten projects for 2012. This year’s batch of winners highlights community ties, social equity, and attentiveness to water issues. One Texas firm and three national/international firms with offices in Texas are among the winners.

Page 14

everyday

by: Larry Paul Fuller

Like the other two books highlighted here, everyday, by Leonard Volk, will be part of the featured activities (including book-signings by authors) in the AIA-Austin-hosted Reading Room at the Texas Society of Architects Convention and Design Expo in Austin October 18-20.

Page 20

Brownwood Park Pavilions

by: Eurico Francisco

The pavilions at Brownwood Park in north Dallas seem deceptively simple. The three structures — conceived by architect Joe McCall, FAIA, as “The Huddle” —appear at first to be a lighthearted concoction of shapes, colors, and textures. Get closer, though, and a clear idea supported by design rigor becomes evident.

Craig D. Blackmon, FAIA; Joe McCall, FAIA
Page 30

UT Austin Visual Arts Center

by: Thomas Hayne Upchurch, AIA

In the past there has been a sense of aloofness characterizing the Art Building on the UT Austin campus. Located on the northeast corner of San Jacinto and 23rd Street, across from Royal–Memorial Stadium, the two-story building has stood at a distance from the public. Although its main entry on the west side was connected to street level by a prominent exterior stair, the building’s solid volumes revealed little about its interior activities. Yet the south elevation of this mid-century modern building expressed a slight undulation in the soft orange brick veneer, rising to a cap of contrasting white concrete barrel vaults. These details created a bit of visual interest and a hint of greater possibilities within.

Frank Ooms
Page 58

UT Dallas Building Recognized with Metal Architecture Award

A new entrance to the University of Dallas campus, designed by Page Southerland Page, has received a 2012 Metal Architecture Design Award for “Interiors.” The Visitor Center and University Bookstore was one of 10 projects recognized in various award categories. The awards highlight creativity in the metal construction industry and the use of steel in innovative design.

Courtesy Page Southerland Page
Page 118

Italy/Texas

by: Texas Architect Staff

"At once wistful and thought-provoking, light-hearted and profound.” That is how Dallas architect and contributing editor Max Levy, FAIA, described the set of Italy/Texas photo collages represented here in the following selections. We agree with Max that the images, created by UT School of Architecture student Emily Wiegand, are fascinating and promise to be a source of delight for our readers.

Emily Wiegand
Page 120

Child’s Play

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: Legorreta + Legorreta; Gideon Toal

There is a child -like playfulness to the work of Ricardo Legorreta. When experiencing his projects, one intuits the architect’s delight in applying vivid colors and his fascination with simple geometric forms as if he had been handed a box of paints and a set of gigantic building blocks. Throughout his long career, Legorreta has perfected a rigorous approach to modernism infused with Latino vitality.

Juergen Nogai
Page 62

KRob Highlights Drawing Excellence

by: Julien Meyrat

The results of the 2010 Ken Roberts Memorial Delineation Competition were announced in November at the Dallas Museum of Art. Commonly known as “KRob,” the contest was established 36 years earlier by AIA Dallas to recognize excellence in the art of architectural delineation (originally hand-rendered works but later expanded to include computer-assisted drawings).

Page 16

Prism Cloud


Architect: Logan/Johnson

Houston firm Logan/Johnson conceived Prism Cloud as an energy-generating landscape pavilion near Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates. The pavilion will appear to hover over the desert terrain, alternately casting shadows and light on the surface of the sand. Five concrete piers anchor the pavilion to the ground, with a steel cable net – embedded with thin-film photovoltaic panels and glass prisms – that stretches between the piers.

Page 26

Sisters’ Retreat

by: Matt Fajkus
Architect: Mell Lawrence Architects

“Light, space and order—these are the things that humans need just as much as they need bread or a place to sleep.” Le Corbusier’s observation of these three essential elements comes to mind when visiting the Sisters Retreat pool house and pavilion by Mell Lawrence Architects. Though the project possesses the typical attributes one might associate with a small recreational program, the unique quality of the design is manifest both in the overall layout as well as in its materiality and detailing, all of which embrace light in nuanced ways.

Mell Lawrence, JH Jackson Photography
Page 34

Sweet Leaf Tea Headquarters

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: Wiese Hefty Design Build

Designed by San Antonio firm Wiese Hefty Design Build, the Austin headquarters of Sweet Leaf Tea highlights the company’s brand while also displaying its eclectic office culture. The architects used building information modeling (BIM) software to design the almost 8,000-sf space, which is an adaptive reuse of a 1918 building in the Penn Field office complex.

Philip Thomas
Page 69

Tour Spotlights Mid-Century Beaumont

by: Stephen Fox

A recent t our sponsored by Houston Mod, a design advocacy group, highlighted the residential architecture of Beaumont’s leading mid-century modernists. The day trip was the culmination of a series of events highlighting April as Modern Month, in which affiliates of the international DoCo-MoMo (Documentation and Conservation of Buildings, Sites and Neighborhoods of the Modern Movement) celebrated modern heritage locally and regionally.

Top Photo Courtesy Houston Mod; Bottom Photo by Gerald Moorhead, FAIA
Page 22

Post-Rita ‘Grow Homes’ Completed

by: TA Staff

Two years after a statewide design competition yielded affordable housing prototypes to benefit victims of Hurricane Rita, two have been built and a third is under construction. The two completed projects were unveiled in November, slightly four years after Rita devastated Gulf Coast communities at the Texas-Louisiana border.

Rick Gardner Photography
Page 25

Science in a New Light

by: Charlie Burris
Architect: Perkins + Will

Opened last September , the $ 1 0 0 million Interdisciplinary Life Sciences Building represents a major step toward Texas A&M University’s goal of becoming one of the top 10 universities in the nation as set forth in its Vision 2020. The 230,000-sf ILSB, the largest single construction project in A&M’s 133-year history, is also the first academic facility to be built with the $1 billion earmarked by former TAMU President Robert Gates for improvements to the College Station campus.

Mark Trew Photography
Page 48

Dallas Arts District: Past and Future

by: Stephen Sharpe

The reinvigorated Dallas Arts District provides a timely opportunity to feature performance venues around the state while highlighting the Winspear Opera House and the Wyly Theatre. Both are stunning additions to the downtown cultural enclave that has evolved over three decades through the roller coaster ride of the boom-bust economic cycle.

Craig Blackmon, FAIA
Page 5

UTSA Team Places in HABS Contest

by: Stephen Sharpe

A team of students from the University of Texas at San Antonio has been recognized with the 2009 Kenneth Lanier Anderson Prize by the Texas Architectural Foundation (TAF) for measured drawings of the Spanish Governor’s Palace in San Antonio. The prize was presented in November in conjunction with the annual Charles E. Peterson Prize organized jointly by the National Park Service, the Athenaeum of Philadelphia, and the American Institute of Architects to highlight student work for the Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS).

UTSA Collecge of Architecture
Page 19

LRGV Showcases Heritage

by: Stephen Fox

In conjunction with its annual Building Communities Conference held in September, the Lower Río Grande Valley chapter of the AIA sponsored a daylong tour that highlighted preservation projects in and around Brownsville. Drizzle and unseasonably cool temperatures did not dampen the spirits of architectural sightseers as they examined a range of nineteenth- and twentieth-century sites.

Emily Little
Page 27

Drama Machine

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: REX/OMA architect of record Kendall/Heaton Associates

Rem Koolhaas (Pritzker honoree in 2000) and Joshua Prince-Ramus, enabled by enlightened patrons, designed the Wyly to function like no other traditional theater—vertically, with its main performance space at ground level and almost all support facilities placed at the building’s upper tiers. This daring experiment in the logistics of stagecraft exemplifies Koolhaas’s intellectual approach to re-interpreting an established building type from the ground up.

Iwan Baan, Tim Hursley
Page 36

St. Stephen Deacon + Martyr

by: Susan Butler
Architect: Alvidrez Architecture

Built last year, the St. Stephen Deacon + Martyr Sanctuary of the Catholic Diocese of El Paso represents the final phase of a project designed by Alvidrez Architecture. Comprising a total 42,000 sf on 7.5 acres, the project took 10 years to complete. The 25,745-sf sanctuary, its design inspired by the themes of light and journey, accommodates a capacity of 1,000 people and was completed on a $3.6m budget.

Fred Golden Photography
Page 69

Autism Treatment Center

The San Antonio Autism Treatment Center’s new outpatient clinic is designed by SHW Group as a learning tool for understanding the complex developmental disorder. Containing six therapy rooms and a sensory lab, the 6,000-sf project encourages sensory and social interaction skills through active group and one-on-one therapy. Working with autism specialists, the architects used six principles – acoustics; spatial sequencing; natural light; color, texture, and pattern; therapeutic horticulture; and rhythms – that help clients identify the spaces and anticipate a functional change.

Page 25

Defense Redesigned

by: Steven Land Tillotson

British historian Arnold J. Toynbee observed that the border of an enlightened and ascendant civilization is a fluid zone of contact. But, he cautioned, when its power of self-determination and its creative influence upon neighbors wane so does the mutual cooperation and communication shared with those neighbors until hostility transforms the border into a rigid military line.

Page 26
View: 25 50 100 All