Article Results for "design"

Ullrich Water Treatment Plant Expansion

by: Courtnay Loch
Architect: CasaBella Architects

In constructing the $72 million Ullrich Water Treatment Plant expansion, the design team faced the challenge of addressing the community’s concerns while still adhering to the programmatic requirements.

Mike Osborne
Page 50

Metal Shines as Design Solution

by: Toy Henson

WHEN architects and building owners require an attractive and affordable roof or wall system for a commercial or institutional project, chances are metal will be at or near the top their list of material candidates. To be sure, there’s no shortage of commercial metal roof or wall systems from which to choose. And metal is extremely competitive with other exterior facade options because of its low life-cycle cost.

photo Courtesy the metal initiative
Page 51

Focal Point

by: Brian H. Griggs, Assoc. AIA

Among AIA Lubbock’s programs planned under the celebratory banner of AIA150 is a community design charrette to plan an indoor/outdoor public plaza in north Lubbock, an area in need of an economic boost to create business growth, cultural identity, and pride of place.

illustration by Brian H. Griggs, Assoc. AIA
Page 64

A Hopeful Look Forward

by: Stephen Sharpe

For a glimpse into the future of the architectural profession, the University of San Antonio College of Architecture offers a few hints. The College’s design studios present examples of the kind of diversity that has proved so elusive for the profession, with the demographic character of its student body giving the impression that progress may be just a few years away.

photo courtesy The University of Texas at San Antonio
Page 7

AIA Houston Awards 19 Projects

by: Geoffry Brune, AIA

AIA Houston honored 19 projects during the chapter’s 2007 Design Awards Dinner held on April 5 at the Majestic Metro Theater. The projects were selected from 136 entries submitted by local firms.

Page 19

Jury Selected for TSA Design Awards

The jury for the 2007 TSA Design Awards has been confirmed, with jurors scheduled to meet June 22–23 to review entries. The jury’s selections will be published in the September/October 2007 edition of Texas Architect. The awarded projects’ architects and owners will be honored during ceremonies at the TSA annual convention set Oct. 18-20 in Austin.

Page 21

Edinburg Catholic High School

Inspired by traditional Spanish Colonial architecture, the design for Edinburg’s new 90,000-sf Catholic High School features a horseshoe shaped complex of classrooms and administrative offices that surrounds a large, landscaped courtyard.

Page 23

Heroic Rescue in San Antonio

by: Mary Carolyn Hollers George

In her 2006 book, The Architectural Legacy of Alfred Giles, Mary Carolyn Hollers George revisits several works she featured in an earlier book, Alfred Giles: An English Architect in Texas and Mexico, published in 1972. In the years between the two books, a renewed appreciation for Giles’ architecture resulted in restorations and renovations of his buildings, including many in San Antonio. Giles (1853–1920) arrived in San Antonio in his 20s and built a successful design business that took him across South Texas and into northern Mexico. This excerpt, from “Chapter One: Heroic Rescues in San Antonio, Texas,” tells of an almost desperate effort by one architect to save one building, which contrasted sharply with a much larger project – the Crockett Block – that was well-funded and rallied support from several groups. THE restoration of the Crockett Block in 1983–84 was accomplished with the ample financial backing of a group of investors as well as enthusiastic civic support. It was an anchor for the revitalization of Alamo Plaza and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as a contributing structure in the Alamo Plaza Historic District.

photos courtesy trinity university press
Page 28

United Way Center

by: Jeanette Wiemers
Architect: Gensler

In contrast to its previous ‘anonymous’ office building, United Way’s new campus near downtown Houston establishes a highly visible presence for the nonprofit organization that is also an asset to the surrounding community. Composed of two brick-and-glass buildings, a parking garage, and gardens, the 90,000-sf complex designed by Gensler was completed in March 2005.

Joe Aker, Aker/Zvonkovic
Page 57

Morris Architects

by: Jeanette Wiemers
Architect: Morris Architects

In designing its new corporate headquarters, Morris Architects created a space that reflects the 70-year-old firm’s sophisticated background as well as its contemporary vision for the future. Completed in January 2006, the 27,000-sf facility showcases materials, furniture, and staff talent integral to the company’s core services of design and creativity.

Joe Aker, Aker/Zvonkovic
Page 59

Beware of Dangerous Terms

by: Richard Crowell

It is important that design professionals avoid requirements for certifying, guaranteeing or warranting in their professional contracts. By doing so, they assume a level of liability beyond the standard of care, a condition which is not covered by professional liability insurance policies.

Page 64

Restored Grandeur

by: Stephen Sharpe

Walking into the recently restored Cameron County Courthouse in Brownsville is like stepping back into a long-lost era when public buildings were designed to give citizens a sense of pride in their local government.

Photos by chris cooper
Page 5

Piano Hired to Design Kimbell Addition

The Kimbell Art Foundation announced in April that Renzo Piano will design an addition to the Kimbell Art Museum. The addition will comprise a separate building located across the street from the internationally renowned museum designed by Louis Kahn, for whom Piano worked as a young man.

bottom photo courtesy the kimbell
Page 11

AIA Lubbock Completes Mercado Design

by: Andrea Exter

Originated as AIA Lubbock’s chapter gift to the city of Lubbock in commemoration of AIA150, the design of the North University Avenue Mercado is complete. This planned indoor/outdoor public plaza in North Lubbock will embrace the art, architecture, and culture of the local Hispanic community at an already identified site targeted for redevelopment.

rendering and site plan courtesy aia lubbock
Page 13

AIA Austin Awards 17 Projects

by: Brian Carlson

AIA Austin honored 17 projects during the chapter’s 2007 Awards and Honors Gala held on May 12 at the Texas Memorial Museum on the University of Texas campus. The projects were selected from a pool of 65 entries submitted by local firms

Page 15

Legislative Wrap-up: ‘Good Samaritan Bill’ Signed by Gov. Perry

by: TA Staff

After the dust had cleared from the tumultuous 80th Regular Session of the Texas Legislature, at least one measure that survived has enduring significance for the state’s design community. The so-called “Good Samaritan bill” (HB 823), signed into law by Gov. Rick Perr y, prov ides architects and engineers immunity while providing pro bono services following declared disaster. The bill was among the initiatives coordinated by the Texas Society of Architects.

Page 17

Fort Worth Museum of Science and History

Construction is set to begin in October on a new home for the Fort Worth Museum of Science and History. Designed by Legorreta+Legorreta of Mexico City with local firm Gideon Toal as the architect of record, the $65 million project will bring the museum’s total square footage to 125,500. The new building will offer more space for traveling exhibits, as well as permanently housing several added features

Page 19

Borderland Modernism

by: William Palmore

“Sustainable design,” the emerging amalgamation of principles and strategies for conserving the use of energy by buildings, is rapidly becoming the most important force in contemporary architecture. Potentially prescriptive, sustainable design strongly implies the need for a very different architecture. Owing to what seems the profession’s long-term habit of neglecting energy conservation, an anxiety surrounds the subject, stimulated by concerns that a designer’s creativity might be restricted or a client’s preferences compromised.

Model and photo by William Palmore; Plan by Thomas Lozada, New York Institue of Technology; © J. Paul Getty trust.
used with permission. julius shulman photograph archive research library at the Getty Trust Institute
Page 20

Radical Remedy

by: Joe Self
Architect: RTKL Associates

The Heart Hospital Baylor Plano is a vibrant diagram of the forces at play within the healthcare industry today. This new facility designed by RTKL houses a group of physicians offering their cardiovascular expertise in tandem with the larger Baylor Regional Medical Center at Plano across the drive.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA
Page 30

Market Driven

by: W. D. Collins II, AIA
Architect: Good Fulton & Farrell

Park Place Motorcars, having previously worked with Good Fulton & Farrell on several other automobile dealerships, asked the architects to provide a contemporary design for the sales and service areas of its new Mercedes-Benz dealership on Lemmon Avenue in Dallas. The owner wanted the new facility to reflect the shift in marketing strategy that Mercedes-Benz was undertaking to appeal to a broader market, particularly younger consumers of luxury automobiles. According to the architects, their primary objective was to express the lifestyle that Mercedes-Benz owners enjoy rather than design a place to sell cars.

Mark Knight
Page 42

Lancaster High School Auditorium

by: Jeanette Wiemers
Architect: Corgan Associates Inc.

In fall 2006, students in Lancaster IS D south of Dallas moved into the newly-designed Lancaster High School, a 408,000-sf facility designed to accommodate 2200 students.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA
Page 49

Texas A&M Performing Arts Center

by: Jeanette Wiemers
Architect: Cotten Landreth Kramer Architects & Associates; Holzman Moss Architecture

Taking advantage of the project’s scenic location along Corpus Christi Bay, Holzman Moss Architecture of New York City, the design architect for the team, designed the Performing Arts Center at Texas A&M University – Corpus Christi to offer stunning views as well as first-rate acoustics.

Hester + Hardaway
Page 51

Complex Array of Options Rewards Careful Study of Applications

by: Hank Chamberlain

With such abundance of new glazing technologies, the salient issue is what to do with them. These are not just new colors or patterns of existing products. Many of the new products are functionally different. Each new category of products adds a new parameter to the design optimization process. Opportunities abound for combining several of the new technologies in a single application.

Page 56

In Mississippi, Houston Design Firms Assist Post-Katrina Housing Recovery

by: Kari Smith

Two years after Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast, the residents of this once-close-knit Mississippi community are still trying to recover from unprecedented devastation. In some areas of East Biloxi, nearly 80 percent of housing is estimated to have been lost or made uninhabitable from the hurricane.

Top photo courtesy MC 2; bottom photo by Brett Zamore
Page 15

UT Austin Enters Third Solar Decathlon

by: Michael Garrison

Students at the University of Texas at Austin have a unique opportunity to design, fabricate and test the possibilities of combining renewable energy and contemporary dwelling design through their participation in the Solar Decathlon house competition. The program began in 2000, and UT students have participated in each of the three events that have taken place since then.

Photos courtesy UT Austin School of Architecture
Page 19
View: 25 50 100 All