Article Results for "ARE"

Italy/Texas

by: Texas Architect Staff

"At once wistful and thought-provoking, light-hearted and profound.” That is how Dallas architect and contributing editor Max Levy, FAIA, described the set of Italy/Texas photo collages represented here in the following selections. We agree with Max that the images, created by UT School of Architecture student Emily Wiegand, are fascinating and promise to be a source of delight for our readers.

Emily Wiegand
Page 120

Parting words. And phrases.

by: Larry Paul Fuller

“Shaping the built environment.” It’s a well-worn phrase for describing what architects are doing every day. As such, it says a lot, but there’s also more to say. For example, what about the role of the built environment in shaping people?

Denny Mingus
Page 5

ArCH Hosts Deans’ Roundtable

by: Ardis Clinton, AIA

The Architecture Center Houston (ArCH) hosted a Deans’ Roundtable Discussion in September. Moderated by Larry Speck, FAIA, he opened the discussion with a national statistic that only 35% of architecture faculty are registered architects.

ArCH
Page 10

The Happening on the South Plains

by: J. Brantley Hightower, AIA

While Lubbock is not typically mentioned alongside Marfa and Santa Fe when describing small communities that are defined by their cultural offerings, the city is nevertheless experiencing a remarkable transformation on account of its thriving art scene.

Tonja Hagy, Urs Peter “Upe” Flueckiger, J. Brantley Hightower, AIA, Denny Mingus, and Tom Kessler Photography
Page 34

Preservationists Save 1891 Cottage, Now Updated With ‘Green’ Strategies

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: Greg Lewis

Still, two years after Hurricane Ike, the lingering effects of the storm are widely evident in many parts of Galveston. Ike, reportedly the third costliest hurricane ever to make landfall in the U.S., waylaid the island city on Sept. 13, 2008 with 110-mph winds and a 17-foot storm surge that officials estimate damaged more than 80 percent of the existing houses. In fact, according to a City of Galveston report issued one year after the storm, many of those properties were either abandoned or in need of replacement due to the extent of damage and/or lack of flood insurance.

David Canright/Galveston Historical Foundation
Page 12

AIA El Paso Presents Awards

by: Robert Garland, III

This year’s AIA El Paso Design Awards program was juried by eight steemed architectural educators from Universidad Autonoma de Ciudad Juarez, located just across the international border. The jury met for two days and reviewed a total of 34 entries, ultimately recognizing five projects with awards for design excellence in four categories.

Page 23

Outstanding Intern Programs in Texas

by: Rebecca Boles

Many discussions about the practice of architecture end with the conclusion that architectural interns aren’t what they used to be. Well, that’s true: some of today’s emerging professionals are better trained because of improvements to the AIA’s Intern Development Program (IDP).

FK Architects, English + Associates Architects
Page 28

Informal Learning

Today’s architects are fully engaged with educators to design facilities for informal learning where students of all ages can benefit from nontraditional approaches to the pursuit of knowledge. In this annual “Design for Education” edition, Texas Architect looks at four very different types of academic projects that share a common thread in being uniquely created to accomplish the client’s specialized mission.

Page 39

Lakefront Learning

by: Dror Baldinger
Architect: Alamo Architects

Alamo Architects designed the first structures built under the 2005 master plan—Juniper Hall, a three-story building with 76,000 square feet of classrooms and faculty offices, and Redbud Learning Center, a 41,000-sf library. On the ground level, facing the lake, Redbud also includes a cyber café and an outdoor seating area. In between Juniper Hall and Redbud, one finds a well proportioned outdoor space. The space is the campus’ first attempt at considering the connectivity of program functions across an outdoor space. Forming and overlooking the modest plaza are the library and its writing lab, two of the most frequently visited spaces on campus.

Chris Cooper
Page 41

Principled Gestured

by: Gerald Moorhead
Architect: Michael Graves & Associates

Since the implementation of the 2004 Master Plan (by Barnes Gromatzky Kosarek Architects with Michael Dennis & Associates) at the College Station campus of Texas A&M University, new facilities must respond to mandates affecting a wide range of architectural issues. They include energy-efficient design principles, connections to the surrounding community, facade articulation, and the use of materials consistent with those at the historic core of the campus.

Richard Payne
Page 51

Child’s Play

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: Legorreta + Legorreta; Gideon Toal

There is a child -like playfulness to the work of Ricardo Legorreta. When experiencing his projects, one intuits the architect’s delight in applying vivid colors and his fascination with simple geometric forms as if he had been handed a box of paints and a set of gigantic building blocks. Throughout his long career, Legorreta has perfected a rigorous approach to modernism infused with Latino vitality.

Juergen Nogai
Page 62

Selecting the Best of Public Schools

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: Corgan Associates

John A. Dubiski Career High School, designed by Corgan Associates, is a 2,000-student career and technology school located in Grand Prairie. The school’s curriculum seeks to reduce the dropout rate and prepare graduates to enter college or the workforce. The four-story, 250,000-sf structure is designed to accommodate unique programmatic needs, including specific careertrack diploma programs.

Charles David Smith
Page 71

Selecting the Best of Public Schools

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: SHW Group

Designed by SHW Group, Ennis Independent School District’s newly constructed junior high is a 195,000-sf facility on a 50-acre site. The design incorporates a contemporary feel and function. Classrooms are configured to be flexible to support interactive teaching through integrated technology. Large-group instruction spaces and a closed-circuit television studio are two significant features.

Mark McWilliams
Page 75

Award-Winning Workplace

by: Stephen Sharpe

About a year ago, when the staff of Texas Architect decided that this edition would focus on workplace design, no one could have foreseen the coincidence that the Texas Society of Architects/AIA itself would be relocating offices as the issue went to press. In another remarkable concurrence, the move takes TSA to the former home of fd2s, which was featured on the cover of the July/August 2002 edition. That issue was also dedicated to the subject of workplace design.

Page 5

Fourteen Texans Elevated to FAIA

by: TA Staff

This year, 14 architects from Texas have earned an “F” – as in “FAIA” – for their significant contributions to the architectural profession. They are included in a nationwide total of 104 AIA members elevated to its College of Fellows.

Page 10

AIA Honors Lake/Flato, Wyly, DAF

by: TA Staff

Among the recipients of 2011 AIA Institute Honors are two projects with Texas connections and the Dallas Architecture Forum.

Page 14

The Shape of Texas and Austin Firm Recognized with 2011 THC Awards

by: TA Staff

Each year the Texas Historical Commission recognizes individuals, organizations, and programs that have achieved success in efforts to preserve the state’s architectural heritage. Included in the 2011 THC program are awards for The Shape of Texas radio program and the Austin architecture firm Clayton & Little Architects.

Page 19

Ebb and Flow

The concept by two UT Arlington School of Architecture graduate students – Sarah Kuehn and Nakjune Seong – shared first place in an international urban design context to explore “live, work and play” opportunities in the heart of Fargo, N.D.

Page 20

In Working Order

by: Stephen Sharpe

The design of a workplace conveys a sense of that organization’s corporate culture. In this edition, Texas Architect profiles four different approaches that translate each client’s operations into physical space. The projects on the following pages are the result of close partnerships between architect and client to design an office where work flows as efficiently and effectively as possible.

McConnell Photography
Page 33

Water-Wise

by: Lawrence Connolly
Architect: Barnes Gromatzky Kosarek Architects

The lower Colorado River’s expansive watershed touches on the lives of more than one million residents of 56 counties in central Texas. Managing supplies of drinking water from the river and harnessing its powerful flow for hydroelectricity are part of the Lower Colorado River Authority’s multi-faceted mission. However, the public utility’s most visible role involves the controlled release of water through six dams along the river’s 600-mile run to the Gulf of Mexico.

Thomas McConnell, Greg Hursley
Page 34

Midcentury Update

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: McKinney York Architects

McGarrah Jessee’s relocation to larger quarters in downtown Austin neatly coincides with the home-grown creative agency’s bursting out of its regional sphere of influence. Affectionately known as McJ, the company has steadily ratcheted up its staffing level as its roster of clients has expanded and its recognition for innovative and hugely successful advertising and branding campaigns has gone national. In December, after having outgrown its former offices in a converted warehouse, McJ re-established its base of operations in a former bank building, a midcentury treasure that had fallen on hard times.

Thomas McConnell
Page 52

Green Acres Conference Center

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: Fitzpatrick Architects

The New Conference Center and Performance Hall at Green Acres Baptist Church in Tyler by Fitzpatrick Architects was completed in 2010. The facility, equipped with advanced acoustics, is designed to seat 2,200 people and includes full dining services for 1,450. The main hall footprint is a 150-ft square with a stage sized for a 50-piece orchestra.

Craig Blackmon, FAIA
Page 59

Sullivan Performing Arts Center

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: SHW Group

Designed by SHW Group and located adjacent to Texas High School in the Texarkana Independent School District, Sullivan Performing Arts Center is a 38,000-sf facility that houses the 1,000-seat John Thomas Theatre. The design is intended to serve as a catalyst for the local arts community.

Paul Bardagjy
Page 60

Arts Center at Texas Southmost College

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: Studio Red Architects

Designed by Studio Red Architects, the 54,000-sf Arts Center at Texas Southmost College on the grounds of the University of Texas at Brownsville is carefully sited to fit within the campus master plan. The building shares a connection with the campus through the incorporation of design elements – such as arches, arcades, and brick patterns – used on historic Fort Brown. A unique nautilus floor plan was developed to add multiple entrances.

Greg Phelps; Keith Talley
Page 62

In The Neighborhood

by: Charlie Burris

The Tremont Building in downtown Bryan was originally built in the 1920s by a Sicilian family as a dry goods store. It has been used for various other businesses over the years before becoming our firm’s home in 2007. My partners and I wanted a “sense of place” and a neighborhood feel of interconnectedness. I assumed nothing would be available in the historic downtown, but then this property appeared as we looked at options.

Charles David Smith
Page 68
View: 25 50 100 All