Article Results for "FAIA"

Independent for Life: Homes and Neighborhoods for an Aging America

by: John V. Nyfeler, FAIA

Architects are faced with the reality that we are an Aging Society.  Among the challenges of this future is the preference of people to “age in place,” living at home, in the same neighborhood. Our suitable homes today will not accommodate our needs as we age.

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David Webster George

by: Joe Self, AIA

Tucked back in the woods, at the end of a winding path, is an architect working outside of time. But David Webster George, FAIA, arranges patterns and places that are timeless. The unassuming approach to his house in Southlake masks the carefully situated environment he created in 1986, followed by a studio addition in 1991. Deer, coyote, and wild turkey roam the property. David is quick to point out that he resides within the Cross Timbers — a densely packed oak and scrub-bush region that extends from North Texas in a broad swath through Oklahoma and up into Kansas. For David, boundaries are set by nature and not by governments.

Holly Reed
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On the Road with Alexis McKinney, AIA, LEED AP

by: Noelle Heinze

For Alexis McKinney, AIA, the “road to registration” has led to the past. And today, her interest in historic preservation has led to downtown Houston, where McKinney and colleague Gerald Moorhead, FAIA, peruse two historic houses (1904 and 1905) that have been “mothballed” and relocated to a dramatic site yards from the city’s 42,000-seat baseball stadium. The project is one of several McKinney is working on.

Julie Pizzo
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AIA Releases Annual Institute Update

During the May 19 American Institute of Architects Business Meeting at the AIA Convention in Washington, D.C, EVP/Chief Executive Officer Robert Ivy, FAIA, began his presentation with the simple idea that now is a time of profound change within the Institute and beyond, as evidenced by the ambitious repositioning effort the AIA announced in April, the demographic transitions that will soon remake the AIA’s membership base, and the still-struggling economy that has left architects unmoored in an unstable financial climate for the last few years.

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Embracing Culture and Place

by: Brian Freese, AIA

The wind blows strong across the low, rolling plains of central Oklahoma. Standing quietly and listening to the wind in this place — where a razor-sharp horizon seams together land and sky — one can sense the spirits of Native Americans who for generations lived and thrived on the land. These were a people who found, after torturous travels westward during the Trail of Tears, a place that in its sheer vastness accepted them and offered the opportunity to rebuild their way of life. And so it was, and so it has been for the Chickasaw Nation in this place of raw and expansive beauty.

Art Grey
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The Big Picture

by: Val Glitsch, FAIA

In 2008 the YMCA of Greater Houston announced the imminent replacement of Kenneth Franzheim’s Italian Renaissance-inspired ten-story edifice that had provided classrooms, exercise facilities, and 132 single-room residential units since 1941. Aspiring to move in a more “family-friendly” direction, the organization stated the primary goal of the new 115,000-sf facility would be to assume a stronger community presence in downtown Houston.

Aker Imaging, Thomas McConnell
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The Hodge Orr Residence

by: by Michael Malone, AIA
Architect: David W George, FAIA

The Dallas neighborhood of Preston Hollow is home to a number of well-designed and often very significant houses by nationally recognized architects — Frank Lloyd Wright, Richard Meier, Steven Holl, and Edward Larrabee Barnes, to name a few. The neighborhood also has a considerable representation of local talent (including Max Levy, Russell Buchanan, Mark Wellen, Svend Fruit, Frank Welch, and Howard Meyer).

Thomas McConnell
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Notes on a Jury

by: Brian William Kuper, AIA

Our 2012 Design Awards jury met at the Texas Architects headquarters in Austin on June 7 and 8 to review the 227 entries submitted in this year’s program. As Chair of the 2012-2013 Design Committee, I enjoyed the privilege of being present during the deliberations of three distinguished and insightful jurors: Angie Brooks, AIA, of Brooks + Scarpa in LA; Eddie Jones, AIA, of Jones Studio in Phoenix; and James Timberlake, FAIA, of Kieran Timberlake in Philadelphia.

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Brownwood Park Pavilions

by: Eurico Francisco

The pavilions at Brownwood Park in north Dallas seem deceptively simple. The three structures — conceived by architect Joe McCall, FAIA, as “The Huddle” —appear at first to be a lighthearted concoction of shapes, colors, and textures. Get closer, though, and a clear idea supported by design rigor becomes evident.

Craig D. Blackmon, FAIA; Joe McCall, FAIA
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Tellepsen Family Downtown YMCA

by: Adapted from “The Big Picture,” by Val Glitsch, FAIA Texas Architect, July/August, 2012

In 2008 the YMCA of Greater Houston announced the imminent replacement of Kenneth Franzheim’s Italian Renaissance-inspired ten-story edifice that had provided classrooms, exercise facilities, and 132 single-room residential units since 1941. Aspiring to move in a more “family-friendly” direction, the organization stated the primary goal of the new 115,000-sf facility would be to assume a stronger community presence in downtown Houston.

Aker Imaging, Thomas McConnell
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Italy/Texas

by: Texas Architect Staff

"At once wistful and thought-provoking, light-hearted and profound.” That is how Dallas architect and contributing editor Max Levy, FAIA, described the set of Italy/Texas photo collages represented here in the following selections. We agree with Max that the images, created by UT School of Architecture student Emily Wiegand, are fascinating and promise to be a source of delight for our readers.

Emily Wiegand
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ArCH Hosts Deans’ Roundtable

by: Ardis Clinton, AIA

The Architecture Center Houston (ArCH) hosted a Deans’ Roundtable Discussion in September. Moderated by Larry Speck, FAIA, he opened the discussion with a national statistic that only 35% of architecture faculty are registered architects.

ArCH
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Texas Society of Architects 25-Year Award

by: Willis Winters, FAIA

Temple Emanu-El in Dallas, one of the most distinguished works of contemporary architecture in Texas built during the 1950s, has been recognized by a jury to receive the Texas Society of Architects 25-Year Award for 2012.

Craig D. Blackmon, FAIA
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... with Bill Wilson, FAIA

by: Laura N. Bennett, AIA

On the evening of Tuesday, July 31, 2012, a modest gathering of Bill Wilson supporters met at the Butter Churn Restaurant in Sinton to discover the results of a hard-fought Republican primary runoff election for the Texas Representative District 43 seat. After a long day at the office, I hopped in my car and sped to Sinton to join my colleague on this important night.

Julie Pizzo Wood, David Keith
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Redeveloping Student Life

by: Lawrence Speck, FAIA, David Sharratt, and Samuel Wilson

Is it possible for architecture to transform, not just the physical character of a place, but also the behavior and patterns of life of people who live there? Can we think of redevelopment, not just in terms of changing buildings and spaces, but also in terms of altering interactions, attitudes, and lifestyles? Architects would tend to answer “yes” to both questions. And, fortunately, there is evidence to back them up.

Brian Mihealsick, Thomas McConnell, and Chris Cooper
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Enfield Residence

by: Thomas Hayne Upchurch
Architect: Frank Welch & Associates

Being the architect on the house for his daughter, Liz Tirrell, and her family, was “like a surgeon operating on his own daughter,” says Frank Welch, FAIA. While he admits to being “very nervous” about the project, she recalls the experience as “fun” and one that offered fresh insights into her father’s extraordinary design skills.

Charles David Smith
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Fourteen Texans Elevated to FAIA

by: TA Staff

This year, 14 architects from Texas have earned an “F” – as in “FAIA” – for their significant contributions to the architectural profession. They are included in a nationwide total of 104 AIA members elevated to its College of Fellows.

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Speck Awarded AIA Topaz Medallion

by: TA Staff

Lawrence Speck, FAIA, professor and former dean at the University of Texas at Austin School of Architecture and a principal of Page Southerland Page, has been awarded the American Institute of Architects’ 2011 Topaz Medallion for Excellence in Architecture Education.

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1810 Bermuda

by: Michael Malone
Architect: Ron Wommack Architect

When Dee Mitchell first contacted Ron Wommack, FAIA, about the possibility of designing his new house, Mitchell said he intended to interview five architects and visit with each of them three times before deciding which one would get the commission. Later, when he called to tell Wommack he had the job, Mitchell offered that he so enjoyed visiting with him that he didn’t want the conversation to end.

Charles David Smith
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Excellence Overruled

by: Ed Soltero
Architect: Antoine Predock Architect, WHPacific

The face of federal architecture was certainly revamped under the auspices of the General Services Administration’s Design Excellence Program inaugurated in 1994 under the leadership of Ed Feiner, FAIA. Without question, the GSA’s revised protocol for the design of federal facilities represented a radical departure from the concrete bunkers and sterile buildings developed during Lyndon B. Johnson’s Great Society domestic programs era.

Alexander Vertikoff
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Hal Box, FAIA: Visionary Educator

by: Lawrence Speck

Hal Box, FAIA, had a greater impact on architectural education in Texas than any single individual in the state’s history. He was a visionary and a consummate doer. He imagined a much more prominent position for Texas architecture in a national and international context, and he worked tirelessly and skillfully to use architectural education as a means to reach that ambitious goal.

Box Family, Marsha Miller, UT Austin School of Architecture
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Stone-Face

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: Holzman Moss Bottino Architecture with ArchiTexas

Stone has long held the fascination of Malcolm Holzman, FAIA. Since the late 1970s, he has designed buildings around the U.S. that feature stone from local quarries in increasingly conspicuous ways. His experimentations with native limestone over the past two decades have yielded noteworthy public buildings in several places across Texas. The New York-based architect even wrote a book, Stonework, in which he paid homage to the ubiquitous natural material that provided ancient civilizations the world over with the means to erect monuments and structures that have stood for millennia.

Craig Blackmon, FAIA
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Anatomy of a Wall

by: Chuck Naeve

When Malcolm Holzman, FAIA, first approached Architectural Engineers Collaborative with the desire to use load-bearing stone in a modern building, he rekindled ideas that we at AEC I had been discussing for many years. Like Holzman, we were enamored with the capacity of stone to provide robust and beautiful buildings that last for centuries. We were also dissatisfied by common stone veneer where the stone functions largely as a rain-screen or an ornamental part of the facade.

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North Texas Showcase on Sustainability

by: Betsy del Monte, FAIA

There were some unusual sightings in Dallas in mid-July—pedestrians, lots of them, in spite of 101-degree heat. The occasion was the North Texas Sustainable Showcase 2011 that was staged at several venues within an easy walk from each other, giving reason for why many of the nearly 300 attendees were strolling along the sidewalks—a welcome site for the newly thriving Uptown neighborhood.

Greensourcedfw.Org
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Livable Communities, Big and Small

by: Clovis Heimsath, FAIA

As architects and urban planners, let’s congratulate ourselves for what we are doing today as we glance back to the recent past. In the 1960s, community planning, particularly at the federal level, was sorely lacking. At that time, there was a widespread feeling that a building’s function was enhanced when isolated by typology with others of its kind. Codes specified zones – Industrial, commercial, or residential – and in many cases still do. But back then, the codes were reinforced by a climate of opinion that believed isolation was efficient and socially relevant.

Top Photo Courtesy The Woodlands Convention & Visitors Bureau; Bottom Photo By Paul Hester
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