Article Results for "Light"

Vision 2030: West Dallas Gateway

Recognized with a 2009 Great Places Award, co-sponsored by the Environmental Design Research Association and Metropolis magazine, the West Dallas Gateway suggests redevelopment strategies for a blighted, post-industrial area of the city.

Page 22

Solar Control

by: J. Brantley Hightower

Jean-Paul Viguier’s Jane and Arthur Stieren Center for Exhibitions at the McNay Art Museum in San Antonio represents the latest example of what has become a growing typology in the state—the art museum with a glass ceiling. This development might seem odd in a state known for its blisteringly hot summers and intense sunlight, but the concept of lighting works of art from above is not a particularly new development.

Page 34

Enlightened Conversion

by: Geof Edwards
Architect: Poteet Architects

When Jim Poteet , AIA, of Poteet Architects converted a derelict 1940s-era auto paint shop into an art studio for noted San Antonio arts patron Linda Pace, he had no way of knowing he would be redesigning that same space just a few months later. Sadly, Pace passed away from breast cancer in 2007, only six months after her new studio was completed. Three months after her death, Poteet was asked to redesign the space as offices for the Pace Foundation, a nonprofit established by Pace prior to her death. The Foundation is dedicated to the display and loan of her renowned contemporary art collection; facilitating the artist-in-residence program at Artpace; and maintaining CHRISpark, the adjacent urban park.

Chris Cooper Photography
Page 50

The Art of Deference

by: Mark Oberholzer, AIA
Architect: Kallman, McKinnell & Wood Architects in association with Booziotis & Company Architects

A glimpse through the front doors of the Blanton Museum of Art reveals a soft blue light—it’s the new piece, Stacked Waters, a cast acrylic site-specific installation by artist Teresita Fernández. Wrapping around the walls of the atrium, Stacked Waters suffuses the space with unexpected and atmospheric light against the backdrop of the main stair hall. The effect illustrates how the Blanton is, in many ways, a deferential building— a backdrop not just to art on the inside but to the campus on the outside as well.

Emory Photography; Scott Melcer
Page 56

Urban Complex

by: Brian McLaren
Architect: JHP Architecture/Urban Design

Cityville Southwest Medical Center embodies the pioneer spirit. When opened in 2007, the mixed-use development shared the neighborhood with industrial brownfields, rusting steel warehouses, and a red-light district.

Steve Hinds; Stan Wolenski Photography
Page 46

Solar LED Fascia

University of Houston students Daniel De La Garza, Jared Wilson Thorn, Alfonso Villafuerte, and Chukwunoso Ofili have developed a concept for an eco-friendly, multi-purpose lighting system that could serve nightly as neighborhood and home security lighting and as solar-powered emergency lighting during power shortages.

Page 28

Terminal Clarity

by: Gregory Ibanez
Architect: Corgan with HKS and HNTB

Discussing Dallas Fort Worth International Airport Terminal D and its selection for a 2009 TSA Design Award, juror Philip Freelon, FAIA, said, “We thought that the project was a very good example of a public building, very prominent, but it still was handled with quite some sensitivity. We all have been in airports, probably more than we’d like, and this is one where you actually feel a sense of light and airy space, which is relaxing. Natural light was well used, and the high volume of the space gives it an open and comfortable feeling. We thought it was well worthy of an award.”

Craig Blackmon, FAIA; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 44

Garden Spot

by: Michael Malone
Architect: Cunningham Architects

From the street Cunningham Architects’ House in the Garden is a beautifully conceived and executed object, partially shielded behind an iconic wall constructed of stainless-steel wire grid and filled with fragments of slag glass. This idealized garden villa – really a giant porch – provides a delightful way to both view and inhabit a highly personalized landscape. It’s a thoughtful and well organized bit of place making; surprisingly its greatest success is as a foil and extension of an outdoor space that was originally part of the adjacent house.

James F. Wilson, Gisela Borghi; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 52

Haven for Art

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: Laguarda Low Architects

Once just another nondescript, single-story building indistinguishable from its neighbors that together comprise a light-industrial district wedged between downtown Dallas and the Trinity River, the Light & Sie Art Gallery now stands out. The reconfigured entry, framed by a box of aluminum panels, asserts a refined presence that quietly commands attention amid the clutter of storefronts along Leslie Street on the city’s near-west side. The 13,000-sf project is one of the latest examples in a transformative trend for the area where a few of the shopworn buildings have been repurposed as showrooms for the design trade and retail galleries for contemporary art.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 60

Folia Fictus

by: Jenny Kiel
Architect: Dillon Kyle Architecture

Once the site of an identical apartment building as the building the gallery now inhabits, is where the designers Dillon Kyle and Cedar Baldridge imagined a parking lot built for the artists of the gallery. The parking lot is actually used more by the guests and owners of the gallery but it makes a nod to the artwork inside. It is a unique integration of art, landscape, and function.

Casey Dunn Photography; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 68

Cross-Cultural Delight

by: Rick Lewis
Architect: Jackson & Ryan Architects

Although San Antonio’s iconic settings are significant especially when weighed for their economic benefits to Texas’ third largest city, the broader story of her heritage, traditions and, most importantly, her people is to be found in quarters beyond the shadows of high-rise downtown hotels.

Mark Scheyer/Houston; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 72

Enlightened Living

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: MJ Neal Architects

Wolfe Den, by MJ Neal, AIA, represents the Austin architect’s fifth TSA Design Award. The 2,300-sf residence, designed for a young professional couple, is a study in layers, light, and logic, and stands out in subtle contrast to Neal’s previous award-winning work, which includes Twin Peaks (2003), Ramp House (2004), Anthony Nak (2005), and Farley Studio (2007). “This is a much more subtle work than Ramp House and Twin Peaks. The division of space is central to this project,” says Neal, when asked to define the difference between this home and the three others (Twin Peaks comprises two side-by-side dwellings) on the same south Austin street. Sited in an eclectic neighborhood populated by mostly 1930s-era homes interspersed with hip makeovers, Wolfe Den is bordered on the east by a one-story bungalow and on the west by the strikingly modernist Ramp House. Further down the block are Twin Peaks.

Viviane Vives
Page 84

Shedding Light on Lighting

by: Charles Thompson, AIA

Many architects remember a time when incandescent and T12 fluorescent lamps occupied a large part of our light fixture schedules. It was not really all that long ago. But now, there is a new game in town. Well, actually, lots of new games.

top left photo by Chris Cooper; bottom right photo by Charles Thompson, AIA
Page 94

Code Watch

Codes are popping up in an increasing number of communities interested in reducing light pollution (uplighting) and light trespass (shining light across a property line).

Page 95

Light Show

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: Booziotis & Company, Thomas Phifer & Partners, nodesign

Craig Blackmon, FAIA
Page 96

Stamp of Approval

by: Gerald Moorhead

First lit in 1852, the lighthouse on Matagorda Island is one of five included in a new set of commemorative stamps issued by the U.S. Postal Service. “Gulf Coast Lighthouses, ” which went on sale in July, also includes the historic lighthouses at Sabine Pass, La.; Biloxi, Miss.; Sand Island, Ala.; and Fort Jefferson, Fla. The fourth in an ongoing series, the new set is preceded by Pacific Lighthouses (2007), Southeastern Lighthouses (2003), and Great Lakes Lighthouses (1995), all designed by Howard E. Paine and illustrated with paintings by Howard Koslow.

(c)2008 USPS
Page 124

Studio Awards 2009

Architect: SHW Group

While undergoing tremendous political and socio-economic transition in light of the post-Saddam Hussein regime change, Kurdistan is embracing education and the power it has to transform a nation. This has led to a desire for schools that can serve as catalysts for the transformation, and the new Transformational School will become a prototype for introducing twenty-first-century educational methods.

Page 31

Studio Awards 2009

Architect: Nicholas Richardson

Simulation helps designers see virtual space as more than just a mirror of reality, allowing the user to test the potential realities – site conditions, material properties, lighting, and the laws of physics – of a design before constructing it at full scale.

Page 33

Studio Awards 2009

Architect: Jeremy Olbrys

The 89,000-sf museum in downtown Lima exhibits Peru’s collection of ancient and contemporary textiles while also providing spaces for research, preservation, education, and social/community events. It also utilizes lighting, scale, and spatial experience to properly display textiles.

Page 35

Interloop’s E-X-I-T Enters MoMA

On Nov. 7, 2007, the Museum of Modern Art in New York inducted into its permanent collection Interloop Architecture’s E-X-I-T sign custom designed for the Nasher Sculpture Center in Dallas. Fabricated with acrylic letters and illuminated by LED, the Houston firm’s creation joins other works in the MoMA Architecture and Design collection suchas Vignelli’s New York subway signage and the Flight Departure Panel from Solari di Udine.

Page 24

A Beauty with Brains

by: Nestor Ifanzon
Architect: Page Southerland Page, LLP

The new Natural Science and Engineering Research Laboratory at the University of Texas at Dallas creates an innovative scientific environment while simultaneously possessing an astonishing architectural presence. The design and construction of the four-story, 192,000-squarefoot research facility responds to UT Dallas’ strategic plan to establish a top-flight research institution that will serve as a catalyst for interdisciplinary research. University officials expect to fill the facility with high-level faculty and scientists from such disparate fields as electrical engineering, materials science and engineering, chemistry, biology, and behavioral and brain sciences.

Robert Canfield
Page 32

Sky Harbour Elementary

by: Megan Braley
Architect: Pfluger Associates Architects

The 98,620-square-foot Sky Harbour Elementary School, located in the Southwest Independent School District of San Antonio, has been transformed from a solid concrete, windowless building into a series of welcoming, light-filled spaces. Pfluger Associates of San Antonio created a two-story classroom addition with a new administrative area.

Clem Spalding; Michelle Dudley, AIA
Page 67


(This article was adapted from “Sustainability & Green Building Design with Brick Masonry,” an article that originally appeared in the October 2007 edition of Brick in Architecture published by the Brick Industry Association.) Many of the objectives of sustainab le design do not impact building material selection, but instead focus on building systems such as plumbing, lighting, air conditioning, etc. However, the versatility and durability of brick facilitate the use of brick masonry as part of many elements of sustainable design.

Photo by Mark Trew ; Courtesy HDR
Page 69

Mixing It Up in SoCo

by: Lawrence Connolly
Architect: Dick Clark Architecture and Michael Hsu Design Office

Anyone who has visited Austin’s eclectic strip of retail and restaurants along South Congress knows the SoCo entertainment district to be a vortex of bohemian conviviality. The city’s head-long rush to grow and densify is readily apparent along the wide avenue that stretches below downtown. SoCo encompasses a few commercial blocks comprised of small buildings, none more than three stories tall. Residential neighborhoods back up to the businesses, and the homeowners are notorious for opposing the slightest change in the street frontage.

Paul Bardagjy
Page 50

Lewisville Public Library

by: Megan Braley
Architect: F&S Partners Inc.

F&S Partners designed the new 55,000-square-foot addition to the existing 24,000-square-foot Lewisville Public Library. Clerestory windows form the exterior of the two-story concourse that connects the two building components. Natural light enters the building and creates a calm, welcoming atmosphere.

Craig Blackmon, FAIA
Page 56
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