Article Results for "ARE"

AIA Dallas’ Latinos in Architecture Takes Volunteer Efforts to the Streets

by: Ellena Fortner Newsom

With the help of a local group of Latino architects, the west Dallas neighborhood known as La Bajada has organized to retain its cultural identity and single-family homes. The efforts are in response to plans by the City of Dallas to explore redevelopment scenarios that would transform an area along the Trinity River near the downtown into a high-density urban village. The area currently includes several small neighborhoods, one being La Bajada.

Georgina Sierra, Fred Pena
Page 18

Houston Announces Design Awards

by: Theodora Batchvarova

A diverse jury with a broad spectrum of interests and experience met at the Architecture Center Houston on Feb. 25 to evaluate a wide variety of submittals in this year’s AIA Houston Design Awards competition. Eligibility was limited to projects completed within the last five years and located in the Houston metropolitan area or designed by an architect working in the Houston metropolitan area.

Page 20

Capitol Comments: First Impressions

by: James Perry

All legislative sessions require good attention and vigilance, and the 2011 Session of the Texas Legislature has more than its share of issues and challenges. As the new Executive Vice President for the Texas Society of Architects, I was impressed and encouraged with the large turnout of architects for the first-ever Advocates for Architecture Day at the Capitol on Jan. 25.

McConnell Photography
Page 29

Why I Lobby for Architects

by: Yvonne Castillo

One might reasonably expect that Texans are paying close attention to how healthcare and public education will be impacted by the projected $27 billion shortfall. Not on the radar for many Texans, however, is how the severe fiscal situation and the resulting cuts could also impact their safety and welfare in public buildings. People spend 90% or more of their lives indoors.

Elizabeth Hackler
Page 30

Sisters’ Retreat

by: Matt Fajkus
Architect: Mell Lawrence Architects

“Light, space and order—these are the things that humans need just as much as they need bread or a place to sleep.” Le Corbusier’s observation of these three essential elements comes to mind when visiting the Sisters Retreat pool house and pavilion by Mell Lawrence Architects. Though the project possesses the typical attributes one might associate with a small recreational program, the unique quality of the design is manifest both in the overall layout as well as in its materiality and detailing, all of which embrace light in nuanced ways.

Mell Lawrence, JH Jackson Photography
Page 34

Ranch Pragmatism

by: Bart Shaw
Architect: Max Levy Architect

The allure of simple things is they make you look deeper. Such is the case with the new house at Singing Bell Ranch. When the quiet elegance of this weekend retreat settles upon you and the surrounding stillness sinks in, if you’re not careful you find yourself…not saying anything.

Charles Davis Smith
Page 56

Sweet Leaf Tea Headquarters

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: Wiese Hefty Design Build

Designed by San Antonio firm Wiese Hefty Design Build, the Austin headquarters of Sweet Leaf Tea highlights the company’s brand while also displaying its eclectic office culture. The architects used building information modeling (BIM) software to design the almost 8,000-sf space, which is an adaptive reuse of a 1918 building in the Penn Field office complex.

Philip Thomas
Page 69

Pratt and Box: Brief History of a Firm

by: James Pratt

After the war, following his service with the U.S. Naval Engineers, Hal Box returned to Texas to restart his architecture career. Having shared an apartment while studying architect at the University of Texas, we were reunited in the early 1950s when we worked together for Don Nelson in Dallas.

Box Family, Marsha Miller, UT Austin School of Architecture
Page 12

KIDS Program in S.A. Schools Opens Young Minds to Design

by: Kimberley Drennan

Think you’re a better designer than a third grader? Think again, suggests Michael Imbimbo, AIA, of San Antonio. Having recently spent a semester working with a class at San Antonio ISD’s Hawthorne Elementary, Imbimbo came away from the experience with renewed respect for a child’s unbridled eagerness for exploration. “As creative as we architects think we are,” Imbimbo says, “we’re no match for a bright, happy, and enthusiastic third-grader.”

Southwest School of Art
Page 16

Recap: Gulf Coast Green 2011

by: Filo Castore

More than 200 people gathered at the United Way of Houston on May 25 for the sixth annual Gulf Coast Green Symposium and Professional Expo. Attendees – including architects, engineers, contractors, developers, students, educators, and government officials – met to learn, share, and network at the event hosted by AIA Houston‘s Committee on the Environment.

Slyworks Photography
Page 21

Unwrapped

by: Wendy Price Todd
Architect: Clayton&Little Architects

Structures from every era of a city’s history are of immeasurable importance to the texture of a community and its sense of place. Intangible sentiments can link people to buildings through experience, memory, or imagination. Yet, many factors can lead to the decline and even the demolition of a historical structure.

Casey Dunn
Page 46

Streetwise

by: Gregory Ibanez
Architect: HOK (hotel); Gideon Toal (residences); Looney & Associates Dallas (hotel interiors)

For well over 150 years, the southern portion of downtown Fort Worth has seen much toil and trouble—gunfights, crusades, vice, and corruption. In a city rich with history, the area has had more than its share.

Mike Winfrey; Robert Miller; Mark Bumgarner
Page 52

University of the Incarnate Word Parking Garage

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: Marmon Mok Architecture + McChessney/Blanco Architects

Designed by Marmon Mok, the 290,000-sf parking garage on the University of the Incarnate Word campus in San Antonio is located on a highly visible yet constrained site. The garage features 800 spaces for cars on nine tiers.

Dror Baldinger
Page 76

Frontier Renaissance

by: Dan Searight

Long-time friends and former business partners Randy Bacon and Jim Stuart were both looking for a small town where they might live at a slower pace. They were attracted to Marfa and Fort Davis, but those locales were too remote. They considered several small towns within a few hours’ drive of Fort Worth, hoping to find one with a historic courthouse and a downtown square. Stuart wanted a quiet place to pursue his ambitions as a writer, while Bacon required an artist studio near the West Texas subject matter he paints.

Rick Wintersole
Page 88

Museum Tower

The latest addition to the evolving Dallas Arts District is under construction on the block between the Nasher Sculpture Center and the Myerson Symphony Center. The 42-story Museum Tower is on track for owners to take occupancy of its 116 units (a total of 370,000 square feet) late next year.

Page 28

Livable Communities, Big and Small

by: Clovis Heimsath, FAIA

As architects and urban planners, let’s congratulate ourselves for what we are doing today as we glance back to the recent past. In the 1960s, community planning, particularly at the federal level, was sorely lacking. At that time, there was a widespread feeling that a building’s function was enhanced when isolated by typology with others of its kind. Codes specified zones – Industrial, commercial, or residential – and in many cases still do. But back then, the codes were reinforced by a climate of opinion that believed isolation was efficient and socially relevant.

Top Photo Courtesy The Woodlands Convention & Visitors Bureau; Bottom Photo By Paul Hester
Page 31

Armstrong Oil & Gas

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: Lake|Flato Architects (design); Bothwell Davis George Architects (architect of record)

In adapting a century-old machine shop for use as commercial offices, Lake/Flato Architects has preserved the essence of the building’s brawny, tradesman-like character. Yes, the interior has been reconfigured as elegantly austere workspaces, but everywhere are relics of its industrial past.

Frank Ooms
Page 40

Brown Residence

by: Mark T. Wellen
Architect: Lake|Flato Architects

The Phoenix area is rich in the tradition of masterful architects weaving eloquent designs into the powerful desert landscape. Wright, Soleri, and others have produced spirited designs, engaging their buildings in a dialogue with their austere settings.

Bill Timmerman
Page 56

Full Goods Warehouse and Il Sogno

by: Vincent Canizaro, PhD
Architect: Lake|Flato Architects (design); Durand-Hollis Rupe Architects (architect of record)

A visit to the Pearl development just North of downtown San Antonio underscores the promise of thoughtful, incremental urban placemaking. The 22-acre site was the home of Pearl Brewery until beer production ceased in 2001.

Casey Dunn
Page 68

Sam Houston Tollway Northeast Toll Plazas

by: Jesse Hager
Architect: RdlR Architects

Bridges are a cherished design problem. The clear span represents a common exercise for architecture students exploring essential concepts of structure, tension, and compression. Regrettably, architects are seldom commissioned to design a bridge project.

Chad McGhee; Mark Gaynor
Page 76

Sisters’ Retreat

by: Matt Fajkus
Architect: Mell Lawrence Architects

Located on a semi-urban 7.5-acre lot more than a few miles West of Austin, Sisters’ Retreat encompasses a shared pool house and play area for the families of two siblings, set amongst their small compound of homes. The site, surrounded by tall grass and within walking distance of Lake Austin, is reached by a short meander from the residences.

Hester+Hardaway Photographers, JH Jackson Photography
Page 84

Texas Center for Infectious Disease Hospital

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: O’Connell Robertson

The new Texas Center for Infectious Disease (TCID) hospital is the first free-standing infectious disease hospital constructed in the U.S. in more than 50 years and one of only six in the nation. Designed by O’Connell Robertson for the care and treatment of patients with tuberculosis, the 60,000-sf hospital replaces aging facilities on the Texas Department of State Health Services campus near Brooks City-Base in San Antonio.

Thomas McConnell
Page 91

Texas Architects Convention Preview: Exhibitors

More than 150 companies listed below are partnering with the Texas Society of Architects to produce a tradeshow experience that is valuable, diverse, and fun! Please join us in Hall C at the Dallas Convention Center October 27-28 to help drive the energy and success of this year’s Design Products & Ideas Expo.

Page 107

Blog of an Architect

by: Bob Borson, AIA

Last may, the number of websites was expected to exceed 324 million. That’s a lot of competition for architects who want their message heard. A more focused alternative is to create a blog and use social media to reach your target audience. The key word is “social” because it allows for an interactive dialogue between two or more people who share a common interest.

Page 124

Overwhelmed

by: Stephen Sharpe, Hon. TSA

Art and science – the theme of this edition – converge in the work of James Turrell, particularly in the meticulous design of his bedazzling “skyspaces.” Site specific, they are fine-tuned by the artist to such a degree that changes in external conditions can erode the science and efface the art.

Thomas Brown
Page 5
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