Article Results for "FAIA"

... with Bill Wilson, FAIA

by: Laura N. Bennett, AIA

On the evening of Tuesday, July 31, 2012, a modest gathering of Bill Wilson supporters met at the Butter Churn Restaurant in Sinton to discover the results of a hard-fought Republican primary runoff election for the Texas Representative District 43 seat. After a long day at the office, I hopped in my car and sped to Sinton to join my colleague on this important night.

Julie Pizzo Wood, David Keith
Page 65

Redeveloping Student Life

by: Lawrence Speck, FAIA, David Sharratt, and Samuel Wilson

Is it possible for architecture to transform, not just the physical character of a place, but also the behavior and patterns of life of people who live there? Can we think of redevelopment, not just in terms of changing buildings and spaces, but also in terms of altering interactions, attitudes, and lifestyles? Architects would tend to answer “yes” to both questions. And, fortunately, there is evidence to back them up.

Brian Mihealsick, Thomas McConnell, and Chris Cooper
Page 42

Enfield Residence

by: Thomas Hayne Upchurch
Architect: Frank Welch & Associates

Being the architect on the house for his daughter, Liz Tirrell, and her family, was “like a surgeon operating on his own daughter,” says Frank Welch, FAIA. While he admits to being “very nervous” about the project, she recalls the experience as “fun” and one that offered fresh insights into her father’s extraordinary design skills.

Charles David Smith
Page 33

Fourteen Texans Elevated to FAIA

by: TA Staff

This year, 14 architects from Texas have earned an “F” – as in “FAIA” – for their significant contributions to the architectural profession. They are included in a nationwide total of 104 AIA members elevated to its College of Fellows.

Page 10

Speck Awarded AIA Topaz Medallion

by: TA Staff

Lawrence Speck, FAIA, professor and former dean at the University of Texas at Austin School of Architecture and a principal of Page Southerland Page, has been awarded the American Institute of Architects’ 2011 Topaz Medallion for Excellence in Architecture Education.

Page 12

1810 Bermuda

by: Michael Malone
Architect: Ron Wommack Architect

When Dee Mitchell first contacted Ron Wommack, FAIA, about the possibility of designing his new house, Mitchell said he intended to interview five architects and visit with each of them three times before deciding which one would get the commission. Later, when he called to tell Wommack he had the job, Mitchell offered that he so enjoyed visiting with him that he didn’t want the conversation to end.

Charles David Smith
Page 26

Excellence Overruled

by: Ed Soltero
Architect: Antoine Predock Architect, WHPacific

The face of federal architecture was certainly revamped under the auspices of the General Services Administration’s Design Excellence Program inaugurated in 1994 under the leadership of Ed Feiner, FAIA. Without question, the GSA’s revised protocol for the design of federal facilities represented a radical departure from the concrete bunkers and sterile buildings developed during Lyndon B. Johnson’s Great Society domestic programs era.

Alexander Vertikoff
Page 62

Hal Box, FAIA: Visionary Educator

by: Lawrence Speck

Hal Box, FAIA, had a greater impact on architectural education in Texas than any single individual in the state’s history. He was a visionary and a consummate doer. He imagined a much more prominent position for Texas architecture in a national and international context, and he worked tirelessly and skillfully to use architectural education as a means to reach that ambitious goal.

Box Family, Marsha Miller, UT Austin School of Architecture
Page 12

Stone-Face

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: Holzman Moss Bottino Architecture with ArchiTexas

Stone has long held the fascination of Malcolm Holzman, FAIA. Since the late 1970s, he has designed buildings around the U.S. that feature stone from local quarries in increasingly conspicuous ways. His experimentations with native limestone over the past two decades have yielded noteworthy public buildings in several places across Texas. The New York-based architect even wrote a book, Stonework, in which he paid homage to the ubiquitous natural material that provided ancient civilizations the world over with the means to erect monuments and structures that have stood for millennia.

Craig Blackmon, FAIA
Page 38

Anatomy of a Wall

by: Chuck Naeve

When Malcolm Holzman, FAIA, first approached Architectural Engineers Collaborative with the desire to use load-bearing stone in a modern building, he rekindled ideas that we at AEC I had been discussing for many years. Like Holzman, we were enamored with the capacity of stone to provide robust and beautiful buildings that last for centuries. We were also dissatisfied by common stone veneer where the stone functions largely as a rain-screen or an ornamental part of the facade.

Page 44

North Texas Showcase on Sustainability

by: Betsy del Monte, FAIA

There were some unusual sightings in Dallas in mid-July—pedestrians, lots of them, in spite of 101-degree heat. The occasion was the North Texas Sustainable Showcase 2011 that was staged at several venues within an easy walk from each other, giving reason for why many of the nearly 300 attendees were strolling along the sidewalks—a welcome site for the newly thriving Uptown neighborhood.

Greensourcedfw.Org
Page 20

Livable Communities, Big and Small

by: Clovis Heimsath, FAIA

As architects and urban planners, let’s congratulate ourselves for what we are doing today as we glance back to the recent past. In the 1960s, community planning, particularly at the federal level, was sorely lacking. At that time, there was a widespread feeling that a building’s function was enhanced when isolated by typology with others of its kind. Codes specified zones – Industrial, commercial, or residential – and in many cases still do. But back then, the codes were reinforced by a climate of opinion that believed isolation was efficient and socially relevant.

Top Photo Courtesy The Woodlands Convention & Visitors Bureau; Bottom Photo By Paul Hester
Page 31

Nature and Human Nature

by: Max Levy, FAIA

Our nineteenth-century Texas forebears lived more closely with nature than we do, but of course they had little choice in the matter. Though we sometimes romanticize that close relationship, most early Texans probably would have traded the romance for a window unit air conditioner. Nevertheless, they made the most of their situation and there remains much that we can learn from them about the intersection of daily lives, architecture, and nature.

All Photos By Max Levy, Faia, With Exception Of Next Page Top Left Photo Courtesy Fort Worth Public Library And Amon Carter Museum; Next Page Top Right Photo Courtesy Fort Worth Museum Of Science And History
Page 34

Singing Bell Ranch

by: Bart Shaw
Architect: Max Levy Architect

The term Max Levy, FAIA, uses to describe the weekend house he designed for Singing Bell Ranch is “ranch pragmatism.” The clients asked for a design that was functional and simple, which Levy provided in the form of an elongated rectangle oriented on an east-west axis to catch the prevailing breezes.“

Charles Smith
Page 80

Pitts Medal Goes to Cowan For Lifetime Achievement

by: Andrea Exter

Described as a “legend” by his peers, Tommy N. Cowan, FAIA, is a dedicated and lifelong leader. His interest in design and architecture began in the fifth grade when a teacher invited him to compete in Austin’s Wellesley Junior Art Show. Two of Cowan’s architectural drawings were submitted and both won top honors.

Page 14

AIA Brazos Honors Five Projects

by: Elizabeth Price, AIA

Five projects were recognized in July with AIA Brazos Design Awards from a total of 16 entries. Jurors were Michael Malone, AIA, of Michael Malone Architects in Dallas; Emily Little, FAIA, of Clayton & Little Architects in Austin; and Mark T. Wellen, AIA, of Rhotenberry Wellen Architects in Midland.

Page 29

Dance Partner

by: Geoffrey Brune, FAIA

What makes a building an icon? One characteristic is distinct contrast with its context, in form and/or exterior material, that draws attention to the building and away from its surroundings.

Nic Lehoux
Page 60

The Many Shades of Green

by: Duncan T. Fulton FAIA

There are many ways for a building to be “green.” While LEED may be the best known, it is by no means the only way, nor necessarily
always the best.

Page 76

Oliver Named UH Architecture Dean

by: TA Staff

Patricia Belton Oliver, FAIA, who served from 2001-2008 as senior vice president of educational planning and architecture at the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, Calif., has been named dean of the Gerald D. Hines College of Architecture at the University of Houston. Oliver succeeds Joe Mashburn, AIA, who held the post for the last 11 years.

Page 23

Perot Museum of Nature and Science

Construction began in November on the Perot Museum of Nature and Science on a 4.7-acre site in the Victory development just north of downtown Dallas. Thom Mayne, FAIA, of Morphosis, designed the $185 million project as a mammoth cube that appears to float over a landscaped plinth.

Page 26

New Texas Fellows Announced

by: TA Staff

Fourteen Texans are among the 134 architects elevated by the AIA to its prestigious College of Fellows, an honor awarded to members who have made contributions of national significance to the profession.

Page 10

Jury Selected for Design Awards

by: TA Staff

With the deadline having passed on April 23 for the 2010 TSA Design Awards, three jurors have been selected to review this year’s entries on May 21 at the TSA offices. The jurors are Adèle Naudé Santos, FAIA, dean of MIT’s School of Architecture and Planning and a principal of Santos Prescott and Associates in San Francisco; Tom Phifer, FAIA, of Thomas Phifer and Partners in New York; and Edward Bosley, director of the Gamble House in Pasadena, Calif., and an art historian on the faculty of the USC’s School of Architecture. They were chosen by the TSA Design Awards Committee, chaired by Michael Malone, AIA.

Page 23

Making a Case for Research

by: Jesse Hager

In their recent book, Evidence-Based Design for Multiple Building Types, David Watkins, FAIA, and Kirk Hamilton, FAIA, offer case studies involving several built projects that illustrate the importance of empirical research for the benefit of architects and owners. Though often associated with healthcare design, the authors state that evidence-based design is a methodology that can be used in any sort of architectural practice.

Page 34

AIA Austin Awards 15 Projects

by: Rick Price

Fifteen projects were selected for the 2010 AIA Austin Design Awards in April. The jury was comprised of Merrill Elam, AIA, of Mack Scogin Merrill Elam Architects in Atlanta, Ga.; Marlon Blackwell, FAIA, of Marlon Blackwell Architect in Fayetteville, Ark.; and Michael Imber, FAIA, of Michael G. Imber Architects in San Antonio. The three jurors reviewed over 100 submittals at the AIA Austin Center for Architecture.

Page 16

Jury Chosen for TSA Studio Awards

by: TA Staff

This year’s TSA Studio Awards will be judged by three Arizona architects, each respected for design work and commitment to sustainable architecture. Comprising the jury is Wendell Burnette, FAIA, of Wendell Burnette Architects in Phoenix; John Kane, FAIA, a founding principal of Architekton in Tempe: and Philip Weddle, AIA, of Weddle Gilmore Black Rock Studio in Scottsdale.

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