Article Results for "FAIA"

Livable Communities, Big and Small

by: Clovis Heimsath, FAIA

As architects and urban planners, let’s congratulate ourselves for what we are doing today as we glance back to the recent past. In the 1960s, community planning, particularly at the federal level, was sorely lacking. At that time, there was a widespread feeling that a building’s function was enhanced when isolated by typology with others of its kind. Codes specified zones – Industrial, commercial, or residential – and in many cases still do. But back then, the codes were reinforced by a climate of opinion that believed isolation was efficient and socially relevant.

Top Photo Courtesy The Woodlands Convention & Visitors Bureau; Bottom Photo By Paul Hester
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Nature and Human Nature

by: Max Levy, FAIA

Our nineteenth-century Texas forebears lived more closely with nature than we do, but of course they had little choice in the matter. Though we sometimes romanticize that close relationship, most early Texans probably would have traded the romance for a window unit air conditioner. Nevertheless, they made the most of their situation and there remains much that we can learn from them about the intersection of daily lives, architecture, and nature.

All Photos By Max Levy, Faia, With Exception Of Next Page Top Left Photo Courtesy Fort Worth Public Library And Amon Carter Museum; Next Page Top Right Photo Courtesy Fort Worth Museum Of Science And History
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Singing Bell Ranch

by: Bart Shaw
Architect: Max Levy Architect

The term Max Levy, FAIA, uses to describe the weekend house he designed for Singing Bell Ranch is “ranch pragmatism.” The clients asked for a design that was functional and simple, which Levy provided in the form of an elongated rectangle oriented on an east-west axis to catch the prevailing breezes.“

Charles Smith
Page 80

Pitts Medal Goes to Cowan For Lifetime Achievement

by: Andrea Exter

Described as a “legend” by his peers, Tommy N. Cowan, FAIA, is a dedicated and lifelong leader. His interest in design and architecture began in the fifth grade when a teacher invited him to compete in Austin’s Wellesley Junior Art Show. Two of Cowan’s architectural drawings were submitted and both won top honors.

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AIA Brazos Honors Five Projects

by: Elizabeth Price, AIA

Five projects were recognized in July with AIA Brazos Design Awards from a total of 16 entries. Jurors were Michael Malone, AIA, of Michael Malone Architects in Dallas; Emily Little, FAIA, of Clayton & Little Architects in Austin; and Mark T. Wellen, AIA, of Rhotenberry Wellen Architects in Midland.

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Dance Partner

by: Geoffrey Brune, FAIA

What makes a building an icon? One characteristic is distinct contrast with its context, in form and/or exterior material, that draws attention to the building and away from its surroundings.

Nic Lehoux
Page 60

The Many Shades of Green

by: Duncan T. Fulton FAIA

There are many ways for a building to be “green.” While LEED may be the best known, it is by no means the only way, nor necessarily
always the best.

Page 76

Oliver Named UH Architecture Dean

by: TA Staff

Patricia Belton Oliver, FAIA, who served from 2001-2008 as senior vice president of educational planning and architecture at the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, Calif., has been named dean of the Gerald D. Hines College of Architecture at the University of Houston. Oliver succeeds Joe Mashburn, AIA, who held the post for the last 11 years.

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Perot Museum of Nature and Science

Construction began in November on the Perot Museum of Nature and Science on a 4.7-acre site in the Victory development just north of downtown Dallas. Thom Mayne, FAIA, of Morphosis, designed the $185 million project as a mammoth cube that appears to float over a landscaped plinth.

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New Texas Fellows Announced

by: TA Staff

Fourteen Texans are among the 134 architects elevated by the AIA to its prestigious College of Fellows, an honor awarded to members who have made contributions of national significance to the profession.

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Jury Selected for Design Awards

by: TA Staff

With the deadline having passed on April 23 for the 2010 TSA Design Awards, three jurors have been selected to review this year’s entries on May 21 at the TSA offices. The jurors are Adèle Naudé Santos, FAIA, dean of MIT’s School of Architecture and Planning and a principal of Santos Prescott and Associates in San Francisco; Tom Phifer, FAIA, of Thomas Phifer and Partners in New York; and Edward Bosley, director of the Gamble House in Pasadena, Calif., and an art historian on the faculty of the USC’s School of Architecture. They were chosen by the TSA Design Awards Committee, chaired by Michael Malone, AIA.

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Making a Case for Research

by: Jesse Hager

In their recent book, Evidence-Based Design for Multiple Building Types, David Watkins, FAIA, and Kirk Hamilton, FAIA, offer case studies involving several built projects that illustrate the importance of empirical research for the benefit of architects and owners. Though often associated with healthcare design, the authors state that evidence-based design is a methodology that can be used in any sort of architectural practice.

Page 34

AIA Austin Awards 15 Projects

by: Rick Price

Fifteen projects were selected for the 2010 AIA Austin Design Awards in April. The jury was comprised of Merrill Elam, AIA, of Mack Scogin Merrill Elam Architects in Atlanta, Ga.; Marlon Blackwell, FAIA, of Marlon Blackwell Architect in Fayetteville, Ark.; and Michael Imber, FAIA, of Michael G. Imber Architects in San Antonio. The three jurors reviewed over 100 submittals at the AIA Austin Center for Architecture.

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Jury Chosen for TSA Studio Awards

by: TA Staff

This year’s TSA Studio Awards will be judged by three Arizona architects, each respected for design work and commitment to sustainable architecture. Comprising the jury is Wendell Burnette, FAIA, of Wendell Burnette Architects in Phoenix; John Kane, FAIA, a founding principal of Architekton in Tempe: and Philip Weddle, AIA, of Weddle Gilmore Black Rock Studio in Scottsdale.

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Slender Profile

According to Scott Ziegler, FAIA, the slenderness ratio of the building maximizes the possibilities of the concrete structure. To go any higher, he says, would have required more exotic structural strategies common in the world’s tallest buildings, such as the Sears Tower or the Burj Dubai.

Page 57

Texas’ Influence Rises at AIA

by: Stephen Sharpe

Two recent events have raised the national stature of the AIA’s Texas component, the state with the third-largest membership in the American Institute of Architects. In June, during the AIA convention in Miami, delegates elected Jeff Potter, FAIA, of Dallas as the 2011 first vice president/president-elect, which will evolve into the 2012 AIA presidency.

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Survivors

by: Mort Levy, FAIA

Following the devastation of Hurricane Ike in September 2008, an engineer emerged from under the battered substructure of Galveston’s First Presbyterian Church to apprise Rev. David Green of the damage. “Pastor, your church has no foundation,” he said, apparently without thinking his statement’s underlying irony. Yes, perhaps its structural foundation was in need of repair, but the spiritual foundation of First Presbyterian, a survivor of more than a century of catastrophic weather events, has never weakened.

(Above) Photo Courtesy Library of Congress, LC-US Z62-126820 DLC, Prints & Photographs Division, HABS LC-US Z62 -126820 (Below) ‘Ike’ photo Courtesy FEMA; ‘1900’ Photo Courtesy Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, HABS LC-US Z62-120220
Page 30

The Perils of Substitutions - Part II

by: Jim Atkins, FAIA, and Grant A. Simpson, FAIA

Substitutions can carry many unbalanced risks for architects, but they are likely to endure, as we observed in Part I of this two-part series. The perceived positive results for owners and contractors will allow substitutions to prevail as a popular cost-reducing exercise, and architects will be expected to accept them and bear responsibility for their performance.

Page 86

TSA Announces 2010 Honor Awards

by: Noelle Heinze

During its 71st annual convention in San Antonio, Oct. 14-16, the Texas Society of Architects recognized the following as this year’s Honor Award recipients for significant contributions to the architectural profession and the quality of the built environment.

Page 11

Richard Ferrier, FAIA (1944-2010)

by: Ron Kent, AIA

Richard Ferrier’s life was like a series of his watercolors—transparent at first, then opaque, and finally transparent again as he shared his heart and soul to his students and friends. When painting, he would begin by masking off the borders and soaking the page with water. Then came the magic as he blended cobalt blue and yellow ochre, mixtures that would then bleed into the wet parchment and travel as the angle set by his hands allowed. His life was like that, a magical work of art created from a broad range of hues.

Craig Kuhner
Page 20

Romanian Adventure

by: J. Tom Ashley, FAIA

Sometime after midnight in May 2009, I arrived in the Romanian capital of Bucharest as part of the twenty-sixth group of Peace Corps volunteers to serve in this former Soviet bloc country. All 37 of us had met in Washington, D.C., for orientation before flying together overseas.

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The Problem with Owners

by: Barbara White Bryson, FAIA, and Canan Yetmen

A few months ago, a senior leader at a top-ranked university asked the assistant vice president of facilities and construction what he and his office were doing to capture construction savings related to the deflating market, especially as they were completing the buyout of remaining major projects.

Page 65

Clyde Porter Receives AIA Young Award

by: Stephen Sharpe

For his efforts to encourage minority, under-served, and low-income students to pursue careers as architects, the American Institute of Architects’ Board of Directors has selected Clyde Porter, FAIA, as the 2009 recipient of the Whitney M. Young Jr. Award.

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A Resonant Ensemble

by: Willis Winters, FAIA
Architect: Allied Works Architecture; Booziotis & Company Architects

It is early afternoon at the new arts magnet school in downtown Dallas. Classes are in session and there is considerable activity in the building’s loft-like corridors. Students can be found working on class projects, but these are not the kinds of activities and assignments typically encountered in a high school curriculum.

Helene Binet; Jeremy Bittermann; Willis Winters, FAIA
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Seventeen Texans Elevated as Fellows

by: TA Staff

The AIA 2009 Jury of Fellows elevated 17 Texans, along with 95 other architects from around the U.S., to the College of Fellows, in recognition of their contributions to the profession.

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