Article Results for "Houston"

Methodist Hospital Research Institute

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: WHR Architects with KPF and CO Architects

Completed in October 2010, the Methodist Hospital Research Institute (TMHRI) is a 440,000-sf facility dedicated to translational research and nano-medicine located within the Texas Medical Center in Houston.

Joe Aker
Page 94

After Sloughing Off Gray, Houston Courts Building Is Pink Once Again

by: Anna Mod

Following a $65 million restoration, the 1910 Harris County Civil Courts Building in downtown Houston was rededicated on Aug. 23. The 29-month project, partially funded by a grant through the Texas Historic Courthouse Preservation Program, returned the architectural luster to a building that had sustained significant deterioration over several decades due to deferred maintenance, overcrowding, and unsympathetic alterations.

Nash Baker/Vaughn Construction
Page 20

St. Emanuel House

by: Ben Koush, AIA

It has been quite some time since a modern house in Houston has received so much attention. In fact, it’s been more than 50 years since Bolton & Barnstone’s flat-topped, cool as a cucumber Gordon House (1955) was published as many times in the local, national, and international press.

Hester + Hardaway Photographers
Page 40

Inspired Inquiry

by: Stephen Sharpe, Hon. TSA

The best architecture combines the rigor of scientific inquiry with the inspired explorations of art. Equal amounts of science and art produced the four projects profiled on the following pages—two designed for scientific research and two related to the arts.

Page 47

Dance Partner

by: Geoffrey Brune, FAIA

What makes a building an icon? One characteristic is distinct contrast with its context, in form and/or exterior material, that draws attention to the building and away from its surroundings.

Nic Lehoux
Page 60

Notre Dame Catholic Church

by: Noelle Heinze

The Notre Dame Catholic Church in Houston, designed by Turner Duran Architects, replaces existing facilities with a 1,100-seat sanctuary and expanded parking on the existing 20-acre campus.

Geoff Lyon
Page 74

UTEP’s Green Roof Thrives in Desert; Modular System Monitored for Data

by: Lauren Woodward Stanley, Lars Stanley

As green roofs are increasingly explored and utilized, the range of their application is following suit. No longer only perceived as a technological option for regions with abundant rainfall (the Pacific Northwest, for example), they are making headway in hotter and drier climes, albeit with some tentativeness. Now, with a recent installation at the University of Texas at El Paso, the Lone Star State can claim significant green-roof forays on the institutional level from its east end (near Houston) to its westernmost point.

Javier Greigo, UTEP
Page 15

AIA LRGV Announces Design Awards

by: James Rodriguez

During its annual award banquet on Dec. 12, AIA Lower Rio Grande Valley announced the results of its 2009 Design Awards program. The selections were made by a jury that met in Houston during the TSA convention in October.

Page 16

Oliver Named UH Architecture Dean

by: TA Staff

Patricia Belton Oliver, FAIA, who served from 2001-2008 as senior vice president of educational planning and architecture at the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, Calif., has been named dean of the Gerald D. Hines College of Architecture at the University of Houston. Oliver succeeds Joe Mashburn, AIA, who held the post for the last 11 years.

Page 23

Sakowitz Apartments

With its mission to build and operate high-quality affordable housing for more than 1,000 adults in Houston, the not-for-profit developer New Hope Housing will move closer to its goal late next year with completion of the Sakowitz Apartments.

Page 26

Seamless Expansion

by: Fernando Brave
Architect: Hopkins Architects with Hanbury Evans Wright Vlattas + Company

While other prominent universities in the U.S. comprise a fusion of signature stylistic expressions, Rice University has focused on architecture that reinforces the well synchronized, harmonious feel of its campus. Aside from some unique buildings – such as Thomas Pfeiffer’s Brochstein Pavilion and the school’s off-site Data Center and the Library Service Center by Carlos Jimenez – that provide interesting drama to the otherwise prevailing architectural uniformity,

Robert Benson Photography
Page 38

Vertical Challenge

by: Edward Richardson

My four-year-old niece, Jocelyn, compares them to “those pads that frogs jump on” and likes to imagine herself as some sort of energized amphibian as she climbs, leaps, and hops her way to the top. Her description is in reference to the new climbing installation or “climber” at the Children’s Museum of Houston’s recently completed expansion (by Jackson & Ryan Architects). The climber, designed and constructed by Spencer Luckey, frames an almost constant ingress of squealing, gleeful adventurers as they navigate the varied vertical pathways rising from the basement level of the addition. Boasting more than 70,000 linear feet of cable, 120,000 ring connectors, and 130 levels, the intricate assemblage plays a central role in the new exhibition space at the museum.

Paul Finkel/Piston Design
Page 76

AIA Recognizes Brochstein Pavilion

One Texas project – the Brochstein Pavilion at Rice University by Thomas Phifer and Partners – is among 14 projects recognized with 2010 Institute Honor Awards for Architecture.

Page 11

Malarkey Named ‘Young Architect’

Brian Malarkey, AIA, of Kirksey in Houston is among nine honorees in this year’s list of AIA “Young Architects.” The Young Architects Award is given to individuals who have shown exceptional leadership and made significant contributions to the profession in an early stage of their architectural career.

Page 12

Cynthia Woods Mitchell (1922-2009)

by: Barrie Scardino

Cynthia Woods Mitchell – like Ima Hogg, Dominique de Menil, and Jane Blaffer Owen – was an influential and discerning woman who changed the cultural and architectural landscape of the Houston area. Also like the others, Cynthia Mitchell had an eye for aesthetic perfection and a passion for beauty.

Mitchell Family
Page 15

Wright-Influenced NASA Landmark Redone as Offices for Houston Parks

by: Gerald Moorhead

One of Houston’s landmarks of modern architecture has been rededicated after a $16 million renovation. The historic Farnsworth & Chambers Co. building, designed by MacKie & Kamrath and completed in 1957, has been the home of Houston’s Parks and Recreation Department since 1977. Known as the Gragg Building after the donor of adjacent parkland, it is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and is a Registered Texas Historic Landmark and a City of Houston Landmark.

Houston Parks and Recreation, NASA
Page 16

Reprise of a Classic

by: Anna Mod
Architect: Stern and Bucek Architects

Schulenburg, situated about 100 miles west of Houston along Interstate 10, was founded in 1873 after Louis Schulenburg donated land surrounding the planned Galveston, Harrisburg and San Antonio Railway. Typical of late-nineteenth-century railroad towns, Schulenburg developed a wide commercial street lined with several blocks of one- and two-story masonry buildings facing the tracks. Architecturally, the downtown is still intact today although only a few businesses remain open due to the routine exodus for the nearby highway.

Hest + Hardaway
Page 60

Big Art

by: Mark Lam

Amongst its many fountains, gardens, and playgrounds, Houston’s Hermann Park is playing host to 15 newly installed monumental sculptures that have transformed the grounds into a landscape of exploration. Made possible by the Texan-French Alliance for the Arts, the works by French sculptor Bernar Venet will remain on display until October. (Three Indeterminate Lines is shown at top; the inset shows Random Combination of Indeterminate Lines.)

Nash Baker, McClain Gallery
Page 80

As Military Consolidates Operations, San Antonio Sees $3 Billion in Work

by: Raina Tilden

A total of $3 billion in new construction and renovation at San Antonio’s largest military installations – Fort Sam Houston, Lackland Air Force Base, and Randolph Air Force Base – is currently underway, funded mostly by a federal program that consolidates military facilities that are being closed in other parts of the country.

RTKL, Joint Program Management Office, Fort Sam Houston
Page 10

AIA Houston Awards 13 Projects

by: TA Staff

Thirteen projects were selected for 2010 AIA Houston Design Awards. The jury – Brian Johnsen of Johnsen Schmaling Architects in Milwaukee, Wis.; Juan Miró, AIA, of Miró Rivera Architects in Austin; and Amanda Kolson Hurley, executive editor of Washington, D.C.-based Architect magazine – met Feb. 26 at the Architecture Center Houston to review 132 entries from 59 local firms. Awards were presented March 25 at the Rice Hotel in Houston.

Page 19

Beacon of Hope

by: Kurt Neubek
Architect: FKP Architects

In late 2006 the hospital announced its Vision 2010, a $1.5 billion investment in four facilities—“the largest investment and program expansion ever by a single pediatric organization,” according to Texas Children’s Hospital. The first completed of the four projects is the $120 million, eight-story vertical expansion of the Feigin Center, designed by FKP Architects and encompassing 206,000 square feet. The building is named for the late Dr. Ralph Feigin (pronounced FI gin, with a long “i” and a hard “g”), the hospital’s influential and well respected physician-in-chief, the position he held until his death in 2008.

Aker/Zvonkovic Photography
Page 36

Morris Frank Library

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: m ARCHITECTS

The Morris Frank Library, designed by m Architects of Houston and completed in 2009, represents a new direction in services for the Houston Public Library System. Relocated from its original building, the library now resides on the ground floor of an existing atrium building in a revitalized low-income area of Houston.

G. Lyon Photography
Page 67

Legacy of Care

by: Stephen Sharpe

Renowned internationally for his breakthroughs in medical techniques, legendary heart surgeon Michael E. DeBakey, M.D., spent 60 years on the staff of Methodist Hospital and the faculty of Baylor College of Medicine at the Texas Medical Center in Houston. It is fitting that a new museum dedicated to his innovations and achievements sits at the heart of the medical center.

Gerald Moorhead
Page 80

New Expansion of Ideson Library Follows Cram’s Original Scheme

by: Gerald Moorhead

The Julia Ideson Building, Houston’s historic downtown library, has received an addition that finally completes its original 1926 scheme. Designed by Gensler’s Houston office, the four-story south extension replicates a wing that was omitted from the Boston firm Cram and Ferguson’s plan for the library, the only facility completed of the projected five-building Civic Center focused around Hermann Square, a block donated to the city in 1914 by philanthropist George H. Hermann.

Gerald Moorhead, FAIA
Page 12

Recap: Gulf Coast Green 2010

by: Filo Castore

Held in mid-April at the University of Houston, the fifth annual Gulf Coast Green Symposium and Professional Expo brought together a diverse group – architects, engineers, contractors, developers, students, educators, and government officials – to share information and network across disciplines.

Page 15
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