Article Results for "Houston"

As Military Consolidates Operations, San Antonio Sees $3 Billion in Work

by: Raina Tilden

A total of $3 billion in new construction and renovation at San Antonio’s largest military installations – Fort Sam Houston, Lackland Air Force Base, and Randolph Air Force Base – is currently underway, funded mostly by a federal program that consolidates military facilities that are being closed in other parts of the country.

RTKL, Joint Program Management Office, Fort Sam Houston
Page 10

AIA Houston Awards 13 Projects

by: TA Staff

Thirteen projects were selected for 2010 AIA Houston Design Awards. The jury – Brian Johnsen of Johnsen Schmaling Architects in Milwaukee, Wis.; Juan Miró, AIA, of Miró Rivera Architects in Austin; and Amanda Kolson Hurley, executive editor of Washington, D.C.-based Architect magazine – met Feb. 26 at the Architecture Center Houston to review 132 entries from 59 local firms. Awards were presented March 25 at the Rice Hotel in Houston.

Page 19

Beacon of Hope

by: Kurt Neubek
Architect: FKP Architects

In late 2006 the hospital announced its Vision 2010, a $1.5 billion investment in four facilities—“the largest investment and program expansion ever by a single pediatric organization,” according to Texas Children’s Hospital. The first completed of the four projects is the $120 million, eight-story vertical expansion of the Feigin Center, designed by FKP Architects and encompassing 206,000 square feet. The building is named for the late Dr. Ralph Feigin (pronounced FI gin, with a long “i” and a hard “g”), the hospital’s influential and well respected physician-in-chief, the position he held until his death in 2008.

Aker/Zvonkovic Photography
Page 36

Morris Frank Library

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: m ARCHITECTS

The Morris Frank Library, designed by m Architects of Houston and completed in 2009, represents a new direction in services for the Houston Public Library System. Relocated from its original building, the library now resides on the ground floor of an existing atrium building in a revitalized low-income area of Houston.

G. Lyon Photography
Page 67

Legacy of Care

by: Stephen Sharpe

Renowned internationally for his breakthroughs in medical techniques, legendary heart surgeon Michael E. DeBakey, M.D., spent 60 years on the staff of Methodist Hospital and the faculty of Baylor College of Medicine at the Texas Medical Center in Houston. It is fitting that a new museum dedicated to his innovations and achievements sits at the heart of the medical center.

Gerald Moorhead
Page 80

New Expansion of Ideson Library Follows Cram’s Original Scheme

by: Gerald Moorhead

The Julia Ideson Building, Houston’s historic downtown library, has received an addition that finally completes its original 1926 scheme. Designed by Gensler’s Houston office, the four-story south extension replicates a wing that was omitted from the Boston firm Cram and Ferguson’s plan for the library, the only facility completed of the projected five-building Civic Center focused around Hermann Square, a block donated to the city in 1914 by philanthropist George H. Hermann.

Gerald Moorhead, FAIA
Page 12

Recap: Gulf Coast Green 2010

by: Filo Castore

Held in mid-April at the University of Houston, the fifth annual Gulf Coast Green Symposium and Professional Expo brought together a diverse group – architects, engineers, contractors, developers, students, educators, and government officials – to share information and network across disciplines.

Page 15

Casa Verde

Casa Verde, a conceptual project by Houston’s Morris Architects, was one of three projects awarded an Honorable Mention in the 2009 Dallas Urban Re:Vision international design competition that challenged participants to transform a 2.5-acre downtown parking lot into an entirely self-sustaining mixed-use, mixed-income development.

Page 20

H2Ouston

by: Maryalice Torres-MacDonald

In 1836, shortly after Texas won its independence from Mexico, two New York real estate developers, John and Augustus Allen, claimed just over 6,600 acres as the site of Houston. The site, located at the confluence of the Buffalo and White Oak bayous, is where Houston’s first port, known as Allen’s Landing, opened for business in 1841.

Texas Tech College of Architecture
Page 23

Cool, Composed, and Highly Secure

by: Jesse Hager
Architect: Leo A Daly/LAN + PageSoutherlandPage, A Joint Venture

From its beginning in 1994, the General Services Administration’s Design Excellence Program upset the status quo in how the federal government commissioned architectural services. The innovative program advocated high-quality design and architectural expression, two concepts not often associated with federal projects built in the latter half of the twentieth century.

Tim Hursley
Page 42

Fort Sam Rescues Its Heritage

by: Raina Tilden

Designated a National Historic Landmark in 1975, Fort Sam Houston has over 900 structures deemed historic (built before 1960), more than any other active military installation in the U.S.

Photo courtesy Joint Program Management Office, Fort Sa m Houston
Page 20

(Shell)ter for Home

(Shell)ter for Home, designed by Jeffrey Brown, AIA, of Powers Brown Architecture in Houston, is a 1,400-sf affordable housing solution based on Quonset hut construction (prefabricated, arched steel buildings introduced during WWII for their easy transport and assembly). Brown’s plan places the building on an east/west axis to respond to solar orientation and create public/private exterior space, along with “curb appeal.”

Page 25

GSA Regional Field Office

by: Filo Castore
Architect: Leo A Daly/LAN + PageSoutherlandPage; A Joint Venture

Rising above congested freeways, oversized houses, and drab strip malls, a new architectural landmark has been added to Houston’s horizon. A product of the General Service Administration’s Design Excellence Program, the austere and impressive governmental GSA Regional Field Office emerges from the nondescript suburban landscape with its simple form and emerald skin.

Tim Hursley
Page 72

Brays Crossing

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: Glassman Shoemake Maldonado Architects

Brays Crossing, designed by Glassman Shoemake Maldonado Architects, is a joint venture between New Hope Housing and the City of Houston to remodel a 1960s-era apartment complex adjacent to a major freeway in a crime-ridden neighborhood.

Eric Hester
Page 81

Stylized Urbanism

by: Jeffrey Brown, AIA
Architect: HOK with Laguarda Low Architects

At first blush, Houston Pavilions seems the type of urban in-fill project that provokes architectural deliberation due in part to its formulaic response to current market conditions—a major mixed-use complex in the central business district. Conventional wisdom (supported by favorable coverage in popular media) tells us that almost any large project in nearly any CBD must be a good thing.

Aker/Zvonkovic
Page 48

Montgomery ISD Aquatic Center

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: RWS Architects

Designed by Houston firm RWS Architects, the Montgomery Independent School District Aquatic Center is a 29,600-sf facility that hosts the district’s swim practice, competitions, and community programs for all age groups. The center’s glass lobby with clerestory is located at the entrance of the Montgomery IS D Athletic Complex and faces the main drive.

Susan Hernandez Photography
Page 62

Recovery Efforts On Coast Continue Four Months After Ike’s Devastation

by: Noelle Heinze

Page 12

Tech’s Students Consider Future Use Of the ‘Eighth Wonder of the World’

by: Maryalice Torres-MacDonald

Reconsidering the Houston Astrodome was the primary focus for the Practicum + Studio at Texas Tech University this past fall. Graduate students of the College of Architecture gain professional experience with local firms while engaging in a studio project that responds to identified community needs.

Page 12

UH Architecture Dean Plans Departure

by: TA Staff

After 11 years as architecture dean of the University of Houston, Joe Mashburn, AIA, has announced that he will step down prior to the start of the Fall 2009 semester.

Page 24

A Well-Centered Campus

by: Thomas M. Colbert, A IA
Architect: Thomas Phifer and Partners

Located near the geographic center of Houston’s frenetic urbanism, just below the crosshairs of its freeway system, the Rice University campus harbors an almost monastic quiet and tranquility. Rice, with a lot more land per student than at most urban universities, affords quite a bit of distance between students as they wander between the staid allees of shade trees and colonnaded brick buildings.

Scott Francis
Page 46

Andy Dekaney High School

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: SHW Group

Andy Dekaney High School recently received the 2008 Caudill Award, the highest honor given in the TASA /TASB Exhibit of School Architecture. Based on findings that students perform better in small groups, “Instruction Should Drive Construction” was the guiding philosophy for SH W Group’s design of the 486,000-square-foothigh school sited on 80.7 acres in Houston’s Spring Independent School District.

Richard Payne, FAIA
Page 69

Walnut Bend Elementary School

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: VLK Architects, Inc.

Walnut Bend Elementary School in the Houston Independent School District received the 2008 TASA /TASB Exhibit of School Architecture’s “Special Recognition for Outstanding Primary School” commendation.

G. Lyon Photography
Page 71

Noble Simplicity

by: Filo Castore
Architect: Ziegler Cooper Architects

How do you draw together more than 18,000 tons of masonry into a timeless cathedral in the crux of a kaleidoscopic metropolis? Start with a team effort that transcends cultural and ethnic distinctions, and creates an ageless, unadorned, and solemn house of worship for the whole community, a space of spartan simplicity that is at once soothing and inspiring.

Aker/Zvonkovic Photography
Page 80

Parra Named 2009 AIA Young Architect

by: TA Staff

Camilo Parra, AIA, of Houston is among eight recipients of the 2009 AIA Young Architects Award. The national honor is presented to professionals who have been licensed 10 years or less regardless of their age.

Page 10

Chipperfield Chosen for Master Site Plan As Menil Reconsiders Montrose Campus

by: Wendy Price Todd

A generation ago, the Menil Collection revealed an architecturally significant museum housing an extraordinary private art collection in an unspectacular Houston enclave.

the Menil Collection
Page 18
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