Article Results for "Austin"

Preservation Texas Announces 2012 Honor Awards

Preservation Texas recently announced its 2012 Honor Awards, which includes 10 awards and a special commendation recognizing the best of preservation in Texas. Individuals and projects in Austin, Dallas, Galveston, Houston, Marshall, San Antonio, and West Texas received awards.

Courtesy of Preservation Texas
Page 117

Texas Architects Convention Offers ARE Study Classes

The Texas Society of Architects and AIA Austin are offering three specialized study classes on the Architect Registration Examination (ARE) during the Texas Architects 73rd Annual Convention and Design Expo, Oct. 18-20, in Austin. The classes are “Tips and Tricks for using the NCARB Practice Software”; “Archibowl - Come on Down!”; and “NCARB and You: IDP, ARE, and Certification.”

Page 119

Catherine Gavin Appointed Editor of Texas Architect

Texas Architect has welcomed Catherine Gavin to Austin as editor of the magazine, effective with the January/February issue.

Holly Reed
Page 8

Texas Architects 2012 Honor Awards

During its 73rd Annual Convention in Austin, Texas Society of Architects recognized the following as this year’s Honor Awards recipients for significant contributions to the architectural profession and the quality of the built environment.

Page 14

Liz Lambert Receives 2012 Cornerstone Award

The Texas Society of Architects recently named Austin hotelier Liz Lambert as the recipient of its 2012 Cornerstone Award.

Page 16

Team Selected for Linear Park in Downtown Austin

As the culmination of an international competition to revitalize Austin’s downtown Waller Creek, a team led by Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates (MVVA) and Thomas Phifer and Partners has been selected to design a 1.5-mile-long linear park. The announcement was made October 18.

Waller Creek Conservancy
Page 71

Balcones House

by: Al York, AIA

The Austin firm Pollen Architecture and Design has created a home that ties itself tightly to a dramatic landscape of densely-packed small hills and steep valleys.

Patrick Wong; Whit Preston; Casey Dunn; Lars Frazer; Bill Salens
Page 26

Redeveloping Student Life

by: Lawrence Speck, FAIA, David Sharratt, and Samuel Wilson

Is it possible for architecture to transform, not just the physical character of a place, but also the behavior and patterns of life of people who live there? Can we think of redevelopment, not just in terms of changing buildings and spaces, but also in terms of altering interactions, attitudes, and lifestyles? Architects would tend to answer “yes” to both questions. And, fortunately, there is evidence to back them up.

Brian Mihealsick, Thomas McConnell, and Chris Cooper
Page 42

Architects Plan Advocacy Day at Capitol for Grass-Roots Lobbying of Legislators

by: TA Staff

On Jan. 25, the Texas Society of Architects/AIA will sponsor its first Advocates for Architecture Day at the State Capitol, an event that is expected to attract 200 architects for individual constituent-legislator conferences. With the event taking place during the first weeks of the biannual Texas Legislature, the agenda calls for the architects to meet with elected officials to advocate for their support of measures intended to enhance the built environment and maintain the integrity of the architectural profession.

Elizabeth Hackler
Page 11

Enfield Residence

by: Thomas Hayne Upchurch
Architect: Frank Welch & Associates

Being the architect on the house for his daughter, Liz Tirrell, and her family, was “like a surgeon operating on his own daughter,” says Frank Welch, FAIA. While he admits to being “very nervous” about the project, she recalls the experience as “fun” and one that offered fresh insights into her father’s extraordinary design skills.

Charles David Smith
Page 33

Traces of UTSOA’s First Century

by: Allison Gaskins

This past fall, the University of Texas at Austin’s School of Architecture celebrated its centennial with various symposia, lectures, and gatherings held under the banner of “UTSOA 100: Traces & Trajectories.”

J. Hal Box, Perkins + Will, RNL Design, Austin History Center/Austin Public Library
Page 84

Speck Awarded AIA Topaz Medallion

by: TA Staff

Lawrence Speck, FAIA, professor and former dean at the University of Texas at Austin School of Architecture and a principal of Page Southerland Page, has been awarded the American Institute of Architects’ 2011 Topaz Medallion for Excellence in Architecture Education.

Page 12

The Shape of Texas and Austin Firm Recognized with 2011 THC Awards

by: TA Staff

Each year the Texas Historical Commission recognizes individuals, organizations, and programs that have achieved success in efforts to preserve the state’s architectural heritage. Included in the 2011 THC program are awards for The Shape of Texas radio program and the Austin architecture firm Clayton & Little Architects.

Page 19

Water-Wise

by: Lawrence Connolly
Architect: Barnes Gromatzky Kosarek Architects

The lower Colorado River’s expansive watershed touches on the lives of more than one million residents of 56 counties in central Texas. Managing supplies of drinking water from the river and harnessing its powerful flow for hydroelectricity are part of the Lower Colorado River Authority’s multi-faceted mission. However, the public utility’s most visible role involves the controlled release of water through six dams along the river’s 600-mile run to the Gulf of Mexico.

Thomas McConnell, Greg Hursley
Page 34

Midcentury Update

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: McKinney York Architects

McGarrah Jessee’s relocation to larger quarters in downtown Austin neatly coincides with the home-grown creative agency’s bursting out of its regional sphere of influence. Affectionately known as McJ, the company has steadily ratcheted up its staffing level as its roster of clients has expanded and its recognition for innovative and hugely successful advertising and branding campaigns has gone national. In December, after having outgrown its former offices in a converted warehouse, McJ re-established its base of operations in a former bank building, a midcentury treasure that had fallen on hard times.

Thomas McConnell
Page 52

Catalyst for Enlivening Austin’s Center, ‘Great Streets’ Proceeds Block by Block

by: Stephen Sharpe

Over a decade i n development, the City of Austin’s capital improvements program called Great Streets is changing the character of its downtown by broadening sidewalks and adding amenities to enhance the pedestrian realm.

Mike Knox, Jorge Rousselin, City of Austin
Page 14

Sisters’ Retreat

by: Matt Fajkus
Architect: Mell Lawrence Architects

“Light, space and order—these are the things that humans need just as much as they need bread or a place to sleep.” Le Corbusier’s observation of these three essential elements comes to mind when visiting the Sisters Retreat pool house and pavilion by Mell Lawrence Architects. Though the project possesses the typical attributes one might associate with a small recreational program, the unique quality of the design is manifest both in the overall layout as well as in its materiality and detailing, all of which embrace light in nuanced ways.

Mell Lawrence, JH Jackson Photography
Page 34

Sweet Leaf Tea Headquarters

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: Wiese Hefty Design Build

Designed by San Antonio firm Wiese Hefty Design Build, the Austin headquarters of Sweet Leaf Tea highlights the company’s brand while also displaying its eclectic office culture. The architects used building information modeling (BIM) software to design the almost 8,000-sf space, which is an adaptive reuse of a 1918 building in the Penn Field office complex.

Philip Thomas
Page 69

After Closing Gavel of Regular Session, TSA Sees Benefits to Architects Statewide

by: Stephen Sharpe

When the 82nd Legislature convened in January, expectations were low for the state’s architectural profession. The biggest issue facing lawmakers was a historic budget shortfall, which meant that new taxes might be levied on professional services, including those performed by architects.

Elizabeth Hackler
Page 10

Hal Box, FAIA: Visionary Educator

by: Lawrence Speck

Hal Box, FAIA, had a greater impact on architectural education in Texas than any single individual in the state’s history. He was a visionary and a consummate doer. He imagined a much more prominent position for Texas architecture in a national and international context, and he worked tirelessly and skillfully to use architectural education as a means to reach that ambitious goal.

Box Family, Marsha Miller, UT Austin School of Architecture
Page 12

Livestrong HQ in COTE Top Ten

by: TA Staff

The American Institute of Architects’ Committee on the Environment has included Lake/Flato Architect’s Livestrong Foundation’s headquarters among its 2011 Top Ten Green Projects, a national program that celebrates sustainable design excellence. Livestrong, located in Austin, was this year’s sole Texas honoree.

Paul Hester
Page 14

AIA Austin Presents Design Awards

by: Tamara L. Toon

AIA Austin honored 10 projects in its 2011 Design Awards Celebration. From a total of 77 submittals, the distinguished jury of architects selected three for Honor Awards, six for Citations of Honor, and one unbuilt project for a Studio Award.

Page 18

Mopac Trailhead

The design initiative by Miró Rivera Architects proposes a series of activity zones for a segment along the Lady Bird Lake Hike and Bike Trail in Austin where the trail extends underneath heavily trafficked Mopac Expressway (Loop 1).

Page 23

Unwrapped

by: Wendy Price Todd
Architect: Clayton&Little Architects

Structures from every era of a city’s history are of immeasurable importance to the texture of a community and its sense of place. Intangible sentiments can link people to buildings through experience, memory, or imagination. Yet, many factors can lead to the decline and even the demolition of a historical structure.

Casey Dunn
Page 46

Arthouse at the Jones Center

by: J. Brantley Hightower
Architect: LTL Architects

While it is not unusual for a renovation project to transform an individual building, it is noteworthy when such a project begins to change how people relate to the city around them.

Michael Moran
Page 44
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