Article Results for "FAIA"

AIA Honors McKittrick with Kemper Award

Thomas McKittrick, FAIA, of Houston is the 2008 recipient of the Edward C. Kemper Award for his contributions to the profession through service to the American Institute of Architects. In 1991, he was honored with TSA’s Llewellyn W. Pitts Award (now called the Lifetime Achievement Medal), the Society’s highest recognition for an architect member.

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Trinity River Corridor Approved (Again)

by: Duncan T Fulton, FAIA

On Nov. 6, Dallas voters endorsed development of the Trinity River Corridor in general, and local government’s specific vision in particular. This was the second time in 10 years the electorate had been called to the polls on the issue. The first occurred in 1998 when the voters approved a $246 million bond issue for development of the corridor. The second election was a referendum challenging specific aspects of how the plan had developed since 1998.

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Pfluger Bridge Extension

The project will extend the James D. Pfluger Bicycle and Pedestrian Bridge northward to connect the Lady Bird Lake hike-and-bike trail to the Lamar Corridor and downtown. The bridge, completed in 2001, is named in the memory of James D. Pfluger, FAIA, who helped push the City of Austin’s development of the popular lakeside trail system.

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Encouraging Excellence While Maintaining Standards

by: David G Woodcock, FAIA

In November 2004 the Association for Preservation Technology International (APT) held its annual conference in Galveston. The conference theme, “Raising the Grade for Preservation,” was a play on words easily understood by the participants who were familiar with the heroic aftermath of the Great Storm of 1900 that resulted in the building of a protective seawall, a seven-year effort that added several feet of sand across much of the city, and the lifting of many surviving buildings from the threat of future storms.

Photo by Jason Jennings courtesy The Williams Company Architects
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Jury Selected for 2008 Design Awards

The jury for the 2008 TSA Design Awards will be arts writer Judith Dupré and architects Steven Ehrlich, FAIA, and Billie Tsien, AIA. The three are scheduled to meet June 27 in Austin to review entries and make their selections. The deadline for entries is May 30.

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Sustainable Healthcare Design

by: Stephen Sharpe

Gail Vittori is co-author of Sustainable Healthcare Architecture (Wiley Press, 2008) with Robin Guenther, FAIA. As co-director of the Center for Maximum Potential Building Systems, Vittori also helped develop the Green Guide for Health Care (www.gghc.org) and chairs the U.S. Green Building Council’s LEED for Healthcare Committee. TA Editor Stephen Sharpe recently nterviewed Vittori about her book and her purpose in writing it.

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RFI Shootout

by: Grant A. Simpson, FAIA, and Jim Atkins, FAIA

The architect’s documents in this part of the world have always been inherently conceptual. Additional information has typically been required by the contractor from the architect during the construction phase.

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TSA Medal for Lifetime Achievement

Velpeau (Vel) E. Hawes Jr., FAIA, graduated in 1958 with a bachelor of architecture degree from Texas A&M University in College Station. After four years of service as an infantry officer, he began a 38-year career as a licensed architect and licensed interior designer with several architectural firms in Dallas, including Omniplan, HOK, and PGAL.

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TSA Architecture Firm Award

Founded in 1953 by Harvey V. Marmon Jr. and Edward Mok, Marmon Mok is now led by Stephen R. Souter, FAIA, who has served as managing partner since 1988; William Reeves, AIA; Greg Houston, AIA; Dror Baldinger, AIA; Carlos Moreno, AIA; Mary Bartlett, AIA; Braint Harkiewicz, AIA; and Montgomery Howard, AIA.

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House Proud

by: Heather McKinney, FAIA

Lisa Germany’s latest book, Great Houses of Texas, was published this year by Harry N. Abrams Publishing Company illustrated with photographs by Grant Mudford. The author recently answered questions posed by Austin architect Heather McKinney, FAIA.

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2008 Design Awards Jury

Last February TSA’s Design Awards Committee, with representatives from almost all of the 17 AIA chapters across Texas, gathered in Austin to elect a jury for this year’s program. Texas has been privileged to host a variety of astounding critics throughout the Design Award’s 57-year history. This year was no exception. Billie Tsien, AIA; Steven Ehrlich, FAIA; and Judith Dupré accepted the challenge of reviewing 267 Design Award entries and 87 Studio Award entries. The ensuing deliberations showcased each juror’s individual perspective and approach to their work.

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University Research Study

by: Richard B. Ferrier, FAIA
Architect: Firm X

The University Research Study , completed by R.B Ferrier, FAIA, expands on traditional methods of architectural representation through a series of conceptual watercolor drawings. Ferrier, an associate professor at UT Arlington, teaches conceptual drawing as part of graduate design studio courses.

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Commissioning Exterior Enclosures

by: Wagdy Anis, FAIA

Adapted with permission from the National Institute of Building Sciences/Building Enclosure Technology and Environment Council, this article originally appeared in the Winter 2008 issue of Journal of Building Enclosure Design. The commissioning process is a quality oriented process for achieving, verifying, and documenting that the performance of facilities, systems, and assemblies meets defined objectives and criteria. It assumes that owners, programmers, designers, contractors, commissioning team members, and operations and maintenance entities are fully accountable for the quality of their work.

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Standout at Sandia

by: Roger Schluntz, FAIA
Architect: Jacobs (formerly Carter & Burgess, Dallas)

Sandia National Laboratories, a sprawling complex on Albuquerque’s southern edge, is itself located within the expansive Kirtland Air Force Base property. As the mission of Sandia is primarily related to national security, access to the facilities is tightly controlled. Projects – most are funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration, the Department of Homeland Security, and the Department of Defense – are conducted through a vast array of highly sophisticated research and development programs. Sandia’s mission statement notes that its personnel are expected to create innovative, science-based, systems-engineering solutions to the nation’s most challenging national security problems.

J. Brough Schamp Photography
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Symposium in March at A&M Examines Conservation of Texas’ WWII Heritage

by: David G Woodcock, FAIA

From out of the crucible of violence and heroism known as World War II arose what some call “the greatest generation.” For the soldiers who fought its battles and the civilians who endured its hardships, the effects of that cataclysmic event continue to resonate more than 60 years later. And much like those who experienced the war first-hand, time slowly but inexorably undermines the physical remnants of that global conflict.

courtesy Center for Heritage Conservation
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New Dallas Schools

by: Willis Winters, FAIA

The Texas schoolhouse is evolving into something new and different at the beginning of the twenty-first century as the state’s burgeoning growth has fueled an intense building campaign.

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A Study of Place

by: David Richter, FAIA

This year marks the 150th anniversary of the American Institute of Architects. AIA local chapters and regions across the nation will be celebrating the year with projects designed to highlight the contributions of architecture to American culture, and to create lasting contributions to livable communities in America. For 2007, Texas Architect will mark AIA150 with a series of essays celebrating the rich diversity of Texas architecture, and contemplating the critical urban, environmental, and architectural issues facing the coming generation of Texans.

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Six Texans Elected AIA Fellows

Six TSA members, along with 70 other architects from around the nation, were elected AIA Fellows by the 2007 Jury of Fellows on Feb. 23. The following Texans are among the new Fellows who will be invested in the College of Fellows during the AIA convention in San Antonio:

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Raymond D. Nasher (1921–2007)

by: Frank D. Welch, FAIA

Raymond D. Nasher of Dallas died March 16 at the age of 85. He was an entrepreneurial and arts patron giant who left an extraordinary legacy of a life imbued with an enthusiasm for modern art, particularly in the public realm.

top photo by stewart cohen, bottom left photo by tim hursley; courtesy of the Raymond and
Patsy Nasher Collection. Bottom Right photo by Hester + Hardaway.
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A Certifiable Risk

by: Jim Atkins, FAIA and Grant A. Simpson, FAIA

The architect’s certification of contractor applications for payment can be perhaps the most perplexing of all the architect’s construction phase responsibilities. Although architects are neither accountants nor construction experts and do not observe each piece of work as it is put in place, they are nonetheless generally expected to provide a professional certification that the contractor’s application for payment has been verified and is correct.

Image copyright Losevsky Pavel, 2007 Shutterstock, Inc.
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Victory Park

by: David Richter, FAIA

If you have flown into Dallas Love Field at night recently you might have noticed a striking new feature in the urban landscape. It has been likened to Times Square, but from a dark-sky snapshot it seems to harken more to the scale and energy of the Ginza. Either way, this is not the typical Dallas we have come to expect.

illustrations courtesy Hillwood development; photo by jermey woodhouse | pixelchrome.com
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Rigorous Inquiry

by: Stephen Sharpe

‘I think we’re being a little too tough,’ suggested Peter Bohlin, FAIA, as he and his two fellow jurors were finalizing their decision on this year’s Studio Awards. From a roster of 65 unbuilt entries, the jury had selected only one for an award.

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Richard Payne’s Texas Towns

by: Thomas McKittrick, FAIA

In his most recent book, Texas Towns and The Art of Architecture: A Photographer’s Journey, Richard Payne, FAIA, chronicles beautiful examples of architecture in small, dying towns across Texas. At the same time, Payne’s images offer glimpses of the waning lives of people in those towns. Texas Architect asked Tom McKittrick, FAIA, to interview Payne about the underlying message he wanted to convey through the book’s black-and-white photographs and his essay that introduces them. Responding to fairly open-ended questions from his long-time friend, Payne touched upon some of these points. Excerpts follow.

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Design Awards 2007

by: Bryce A. Weigand, FAIA

Having observed this year’s Design Awards jury, I have several thoughts. One is, why doesn’t the Texas landscape/cityscape reflect more significantly the fine work that Texas architects submitted in this year’s design award program?

Photos by Ashley St. Clair
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Courthouse Emanates from His Concept But Without Predock’s Name as Designer

by: Ed Soltero, AIA

The U.S. Courthouse now under construction in this border city’s downtown will not look like the building designed by Antoine Predock, FAIA. In fact, Predock expects its appearance to be so different that he has officially requested that his name be removed from the project. And for the same reason, Predock may disassociate himself from the U.S. Courthouse he designed for Las Cruces, a project also currently being built.

Construction photo by Ed Soltero, AIA; illustrations courtesy GSA
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