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As Military Consolidates Operations, San Antonio Sees $3 Billion in Work

by: Raina Tilden

A total of $3 billion in new construction and renovation at San Antonio’s largest military installations – Fort Sam Houston, Lackland Air Force Base, and Randolph Air Force Base – is currently underway, funded mostly by a federal program that consolidates military facilities that are being closed in other parts of the country.

RTKL, Joint Program Management Office, Fort Sam Houston
Page 10

Options Approved for Governor’s Mansion

by: TA Staff

Plans to build an addition – albeit much smaller than one proposed earlier this year that sparked outcries of protest from some preservationists – to the Governor’s Mansion appeared to be moving forward at press time.

Page 15

Jury Selected for Design Awards

by: TA Staff

With the deadline having passed on April 23 for the 2010 TSA Design Awards, three jurors have been selected to review this year’s entries on May 21 at the TSA offices. The jurors are Adèle Naudé Santos, FAIA, dean of MIT’s School of Architecture and Planning and a principal of Santos Prescott and Associates in San Francisco; Tom Phifer, FAIA, of Thomas Phifer and Partners in New York; and Edward Bosley, director of the Gamble House in Pasadena, Calif., and an art historian on the faculty of the USC’s School of Architecture. They were chosen by the TSA Design Awards Committee, chaired by Michael Malone, AIA.

Page 23

Architecture as Art

by: Richard Payne

Over the last few years my wife, Amy Ladner, and I have photographed several of Corbusier’s buildings in France. Before these trips together I had been to India to see his work at Chandigarh, and I can honestly say after photographing architecture for over 40 years, Corbu’s buildings are among the most powerful structures I have seen. St. Pierre in Firminy is typical. It is not only an example of Corbu’s genius, but a wonderful story of the persistence of those who understand and love great architecture, and are willing to preserve it.

Richard Payne, Amy Ladner
Page 28

Making a Case for Research

by: Jesse Hager

In their recent book, Evidence-Based Design for Multiple Building Types, David Watkins, FAIA, and Kirk Hamilton, FAIA, offer case studies involving several built projects that illustrate the importance of empirical research for the benefit of architects and owners. Though often associated with healthcare design, the authors state that evidence-based design is a methodology that can be used in any sort of architectural practice.

Page 34

Beacon of Hope

by: Kurt Neubek
Architect: FKP Architects

In late 2006 the hospital announced its Vision 2010, a $1.5 billion investment in four facilities—“the largest investment and program expansion ever by a single pediatric organization,” according to Texas Children’s Hospital. The first completed of the four projects is the $120 million, eight-story vertical expansion of the Feigin Center, designed by FKP Architects and encompassing 206,000 square feet. The building is named for the late Dr. Ralph Feigin (pronounced FI gin, with a long “i” and a hard “g”), the hospital’s influential and well respected physician-in-chief, the position he held until his death in 2008.

Aker/Zvonkovic Photography
Page 36

Resolute Landmark

by: Eurico R. Francisco
Architect: CamargoCopeland Architects and Overland Partners

Also dotting the landscape are landmarks from a grander but almost forgotten earlier era—including the Masonic Temple (1941; Flint & Broad), the Weisfeld Center (1912; Hubbell & Greene; originally the First Church of Christ, Scientist), and the Scottish Rite Cathedral (1913; Hubbell & Greene). Dallas City Hall, designed in 1977 by I.M. Pei with the mission of awakening Dallas from its post- JFK assassination slump, mediates between this neglected corner of downtown and the inner city’s robust commercial district. There is hope, however, for this neighborhood’s renewal since the opening in 2008 of The Bridge, a homeless assistance center funded by the City of Dallas.

Charles David Smith
Page 42

Refit for Fitness

by: Brian McLaren
Architect: Good Fulton & Farrell Architects

As designed by Good Fulton & Farrell, the new Dallas facility reflects the idea of working out as if it were fashion and lifestyle more than losing weight and staying fit. Despite the people exercising everywhere and the array of equipment, this is much more about creating a retreat than it is about pumping iron.

Mark Knight Photography; GFF Media
Page 48

Improved Model

by: Nestor Ifanzon
Architect: 5G Studio Collaborative

The earnest attempt by city officials to codify the characteristics of the built environment proved challenging for the architects at 5G Studio Collaborative as they began designing an urgent care and emergency clinic called Legacy ER. Their concept did not fit within the typical stick-and-brick suburban aesthetic as outlined in the city’s development code, which called for commercial buildings to look not unlike Frisco’s pitched-roof residences. But the client, a group of young physicians, was pleased. According to one of them, Dr. Jay R. Woody, they didn’t want their clinic to be “your average care space, your average office, and most definitely not an everyday Frisco building.” Still, lengthy negotiations with city officials ensued to win them over to the idea.

Charles Davis Smith Architectural Photography; Michael Hemme Photography; Callahan Photography
Page 52

Architectural Workout

by: Steve McElhany
Architect: Butler Architectural Group

The project’s scope included stabilizing the structure, updating the storefront facade, and converting the front 3,000 square feet of the 5,000-sf building. Butler’s careful attention to detail demonstrates his thoughtful research into the fundamental concepts on which Joseph Pilates based his exercise system. So intrigued by what he learned, Butler began taking Pilates classes from Balance Studio owner Michelle Heinz after the work was completed.

Page 56

Powerful Homage

by: Michael E. Allex
Architect: SmithGroup and F&S

Yet over several decades, the University of Texas–Pan American has developed a vernacular that directly flows from his genius. With its most recent addition, Kahn’s design principles are explored and allowed to mature in UTPA’s Wellness and Recreation Sports Complex designed by Smith Group/F&S (formerly F&S Partners).

BlackInk Architectural Photography by Craig Blackmon FAIA
Page 60

Morris Frank Library

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: m ARCHITECTS

The Morris Frank Library, designed by m Architects of Houston and completed in 2009, represents a new direction in services for the Houston Public Library System. Relocated from its original building, the library now resides on the ground floor of an existing atrium building in a revitalized low-income area of Houston.

G. Lyon Photography
Page 67

The Perils of Substitution

by: Jim Atkins, Grant A. Simpson

Substitutions of products and systems different from the architect’s original design are an ongoing reality in the construction industry today. In fact, it is rare when alternate products and building systems are not proposed by the owner, the contractor, or other parties.

Page 70

Legacy of Care

by: Stephen Sharpe

Renowned internationally for his breakthroughs in medical techniques, legendary heart surgeon Michael E. DeBakey, M.D., spent 60 years on the staff of Methodist Hospital and the faculty of Baylor College of Medicine at the Texas Medical Center in Houston. It is fitting that a new museum dedicated to his innovations and achievements sits at the heart of the medical center.

Gerald Moorhead
Page 80

Summer Groundbreaking Set For Piano’s Kimbell Expansion

by: Stephen Sharpe

The long-anticipated construction of Renzo Piano Building Workshop’s expansion of the Kimbell Art Museum is scheduled to break ground late this summer, with the opening of the new $125 million building slated for 2013

Kimbell Art Museum
Page 11

New Expansion of Ideson Library Follows Cram’s Original Scheme

by: Gerald Moorhead

The Julia Ideson Building, Houston’s historic downtown library, has received an addition that finally completes its original 1926 scheme. Designed by Gensler’s Houston office, the four-story south extension replicates a wing that was omitted from the Boston firm Cram and Ferguson’s plan for the library, the only facility completed of the projected five-building Civic Center focused around Hermann Square, a block donated to the city in 1914 by philanthropist George H. Hermann.

Gerald Moorhead, FAIA
Page 12

AIA Brazos Inaugurates School Program

by: Steven Schloss

Volunteer members of AIA Brazos inaugurated the chapter’s first “Architecture in Schools” program earlier this year, taking lessons about potential career opportunities to a total of 39 fourth-grade students.

Chrystal McLemore
Page 15

Recap: Gulf Coast Green 2010

by: Filo Castore

Held in mid-April at the University of Houston, the fifth annual Gulf Coast Green Symposium and Professional Expo brought together a diverse group – architects, engineers, contractors, developers, students, educators, and government officials – to share information and network across disciplines.

Page 15

Waller Creek Master Plan

“Tailor the District,” a concept for reinvigorating a downtrodden corner of downtown Austin, uses Waller Creek as the central seam around which patches of social fabric (i.e., places of local commerce, open space, and entertainment venues) are stitched together by a unified circulation network.

Page 20

Defense Redesigned

by: Steven Land Tillotson

British historian Arnold J. Toynbee observed that the border of an enlightened and ascendant civilization is a fluid zone of contact. But, he cautioned, when its power of self-determination and its creative influence upon neighbors wane so does the mutual cooperation and communication shared with those neighbors until hostility transforms the border into a rigid military line.

Page 26

Extremes on the High Plains

by: Mason Rogers

On the High Plains, dealing with extremes comes with the territory. Tell a northerner you are from the Texas Panhandle and they will ask how you ever survive the heat. A southerner will pity you for having to live on the frozen tundra. While summers can be scorching hot and winter snowfall can pile up unexpectedly, the High Plains – unlike everywhere else in Texas – enjoys four seasons.

Mason Rogers , AIA
Page 31

A Really Big Room

Cowboys Stadium is the largest column-free space in the world—a feat that allows clear sightlines to the playing field from every seat in the house. That achievement is made possible by a pair of gray steel arches, composed of 17x35-foot box trusses made of high-strength steel forged in Luxemburg, that extends the entire 1,225-foot length of the structure. The longest single-span arches ever built, they reach beyond the stadium walls and are buttressed by four angled, solid-concrete plinths that partially support the 660,800-sf dome weighing 14,100 tons.

Page 37

Environmental Impact

David Heymann concedes that the house is indeed very large, yet he is quick to point out the designs sustainable attributes. “It’s not smart growth, but its smarter to have one very big house than a dozen big houses,” he says. “Such houses are inevitable, and ignoring them for scalar impropriety does not resolve their environmental consequence.”

Page 41

Living High on the Coast

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: Michael G. Imber, Architect

Though ravaged by periodic hurricanes and economic doldrums for over a century, much of Galveston’s magnificent architecture survives. The island city’s glory days, the three decades that preceded the devastating storm of 1900, are recalled in its richly detailed commercial edifices and stately Victorian-era homes.

Coastal Living
Page 48

Silo

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: Sprinkle & Co. Architects (formerly Sprinkle Robey Architects)

Designed by Sprinkle & Co. Architects and completed in 2008, Silo’s second San Antonio location occupies 8,900 square feet and two floors within a suburban retail development. The owners requested that the architects preserve but also refresh the restaurant’s identity.

Chris Cooper; Paul Hester
Page 58
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