Article Results for "Austin"

TSA Design Awards Jury Selected

by: TA Staff

Three highly respected designers will judge the entries in the 2009 TSA Design Awards program. The jurors will be Philip Freelon, FAIA, president of the Freelon Group in Raleigh-Durham, N.C.; Mary Margaret Jones, FASLA, president of San Francisco-based landscape architecture firm Hargreaves Associates; and Rick Joy, AIA, of Rick Joy Architects in Tucson. The jury is set to meet May 15 in Austin.

Page 17

The Art of Deference

by: Mark Oberholzer, AIA
Architect: Kallman, McKinnell & Wood Architects in association with Booziotis & Company Architects

A glimpse through the front doors of the Blanton Museum of Art reveals a soft blue light—it’s the new piece, Stacked Waters, a cast acrylic site-specific installation by artist Teresita Fernández. Wrapping around the walls of the atrium, Stacked Waters suffuses the space with unexpected and atmospheric light against the backdrop of the main stair hall. The effect illustrates how the Blanton is, in many ways, a deferential building— a backdrop not just to art on the inside but to the campus on the outside as well.

Emory Photography; Scott Melcer
Page 56

The Park on Barton Creek

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: Merriman Associates/Architects

The Park on Barton Creek combines corporate office functionality with the natural setting of the South Austin greenbelt. Designed by Merriman Associates/Architects, the project features two five-story, 100,000-squarefoot buildings set along the western edge of the site to minimize impact to the heavily wooded Barton Creek.

Squire Haskins Photography
Page 62

AIA Austin Awards 15 Projects

by: Rick Price

On April 18, AIA Austin recognized 15 projects at its 2009 Design Awards Gala held at the historic Browning Hangar on the redeveloped grounds of former Mueller Municipal Airport. Of the 115 submitted projects, 14 received Design Awards and one received a Studio Award.

Page 17

Archives of the Episcopal Church

The Archives of the Episcopal Church, designed by Studio 8 Architects of Austin, is a five-story, 70,000-sf building that will be the new home for the church’s national archives, which are currently housed in a late-1950s campus as part of the Southwest Episcopal Seminary

Page 21

Austin’s Upscale Downtown

by: Stephen Sharpe

On June 25 construction on the Austonian residential tower reached the height of 51 floors, making it the tallest building in Austin. The project, designed by Ziegler Cooper Architects, will ultimately top out later this year at 56 floors (683 feet with glass crown) above Congress Avenue.

Images courtesy Ziegler Cooper Architects
Page 32

Canyon Village

by: Lawrence Connolly
Architect: Alejandro Aravena; Cotera+Reed Architects

For St. Edward’s Universit y to achieve a desired national prominence as an institution of higher learning, President George E. Martin set out in 2001 to double the student enrollment to 4,000 by 2010. Martin knew that would require significant capital improvements, so he commissioned Philadelphia’s H2L2 to masterplan the 498-acre hilltop campus.

Cristobal Palma Photography; Andy Mattern,
Artimbo.com
Page 54

Design Awards 2009

The 2009 TSA Design Awards jury met in Austin on May 15 to view 261 submittals of built work. The jurors were Mary Margaret Jones, FASLA, of Hargreaves Associates (San Francisco, Cambridge, and New York); Rick Joy, AIA, of Rick Joy Architects (Tucson); and Philip Freelon, FAIA, of the Freelon Group (Durham, N.C.)

Illustrations by Bryce Weigand
Page 39

Eclectic Ensemble

by: Lawrence Connolly
Architect: Dick Clark Architecture with Michael Hsu Design Office

When Antoine Predock, FAIA, was in midst of conceiving the new Austin City Hall, he commented that the city was “terminally democratic.” He made the remark after his design survived a protracted review process that included more than a dozen town meetings and hearings before the City Council. A similar sort of public scrutiny – albeit on a smaller, neighborhood scale – resulted when Dick Clark Architecture added a zoning non-compliant residential building to its 1400 South Congress mixed-use project.

Paul Bardagjy; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 40

Enlightened Living

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: MJ Neal Architects

Wolfe Den, by MJ Neal, AIA, represents the Austin architect’s fifth TSA Design Award. The 2,300-sf residence, designed for a young professional couple, is a study in layers, light, and logic, and stands out in subtle contrast to Neal’s previous award-winning work, which includes Twin Peaks (2003), Ramp House (2004), Anthony Nak (2005), and Farley Studio (2007). “This is a much more subtle work than Ramp House and Twin Peaks. The division of space is central to this project,” says Neal, when asked to define the difference between this home and the three others (Twin Peaks comprises two side-by-side dwellings) on the same south Austin street. Sited in an eclectic neighborhood populated by mostly 1930s-era homes interspersed with hip makeovers, Wolfe Den is bordered on the east by a one-story bungalow and on the west by the strikingly modernist Ramp House. Further down the block are Twin Peaks.

Viviane Vives
Page 84

Ella Wooten Park Pool House

by: Susan Butler
Architect: Studio 8 Architects

The Ella Wooten Park Pool House, designed by Studio 8 Architects, is located within the redevelopment of Austin’s former Mueller Airport. The park serves as a public gathering place that embodies the city in both its locally derived design and emphasis on green technology.

Andy Mattern
Page 89

Feds Break Ground in Austin

The U.S. General Services Administration broke ground Sept. 2 on a long-awaited federal courthouse in downtown Austin, an event made possible by the federal lawmakers authorized $116 million for the project when Congress passed the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act earlier this year.

Image Courtesy General Services Administration
Page 16

Natural Adaptation

by: Mark Oberholzer, AIA
Architect: GS&C

When Graeber Simmons & Cowan began the design of Advanced Micro Device’s (AMD) new campus in southwest Austin, it was with an appreciation of the environmentally sensitive nature of the site, consisting of 59 acres with varying topography and ecology. GS&C has set a new standard for the region’s corporate campuses in his attempt not just to satisfy environmental criteria but to incorporate them for the benefit of AMD’s culture and the buildings’ users.

Greg Hursley; Patrick Wong; Benedict Kim
Page 62

Efficient Infill

by: Carl Gromatzky, AIA
Architect: Jacobs

The University of Texas at Austin has a rich history of campus planning. Previous plans, especially those by Cass Gilbert and Paul Cret in the early twentieth century, contributed immeasurably to the overall quality of the campus environment. Buildings erected during that era both defined and responded to outdoor spaces, the two components coalescing to create the public realm of the UT campus.

Paul Bardagjy
Page 68

Efficient Infill

by: Carl Gromatzky, AIA
Architect: McKinney York Architects

The University of Texas at Austin has a rich history of campus planning. Previous plans, especially those by Cass Gilbert and Paul Cret in the early twentieth century, contributed immeasurably to the overall quality of the campus environment. Buildings erected during that era both defined and responded to outdoor spaces, the two components coalescing to create the public realm of the UT campus.

McConnell Photography
Page 68

Citibank Offices

by: Susan Butler
Architect: Marmon Mok

The 17,500-sf Citibank, built on an in-fill site at 5th and Rio Grande streets in downtown Austin, includes a street-level retail banking lobby, four drive-through lanes, and two upper floors for offices of commercial banking. Marmon Mok designed the $5 million project.

Dror Baldinger, AIA; Lawrence Lander
Page 74

AIA Fort Worth Awards 5 Projects

by: Ivonne Levin, AIA

The local chapter of the AIA recognized four projects in the General Design category and one project in the Mayor’s Award category in ceremonies that took place at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth. The members of the 2007 jury were Julie Eizenberg, AIA, of Koning Eizenberg Architecture in Los Angeles; Errol Barron, FAIA, of Errol Barron/Michael Toups in New Orleans; and Kevin Alter, Assoc. AIA, of Alterstudio Architects in Austin.

Page 18

Creole Influence Along the Border

by: Stephen Fox

The Lower Río Grande Valley chapter of the American Institute of Architects kicked off its fifteenth annual conference on Sept. 27 with a day-long tour of nineteenth-century architecture in the border cities of Brownsville and Matamoros, Tamaulipas. Called “A Tale of Two Cities,” the tour was led by Gregory Free, principal of an Austin design firm specializing in historical restoration.

Courtesy Wayne Bell, FAIA
Page 27

Quiet Standout

by: J. Brantley Hightower
Architect: Perkins+Will

The study of campus architecture in Texas is truly a lesson in cultural diversity. Just by sampling schools in the University of Texas System, one would observe everything from a Beaux-Arts rendering of Spanish Mediterranean motifs on the Austin campus to a playful reinterpretation of Bhutanese monasteries in El Paso.

James Steinkamp
Page 44

All Aboard!

by: Stephen Sharpe

Commuter rail is returning to Austin, bringing with it several transit oriented developments (TOD) that will drive the creation of new live/work/play neighborhoods centered around at least eight train stations. Perhaps as early as this fall, Austin will join Dallas and Houston in reviving urban rail travel as a means to reduce traffic congestion and as a catalyst for thoughtful intracity planning. That means more people in and around Austin will have the option of leaving their cars at home.

map courtesy City of Austin Neighborhood Planning & Zoning Department; rendering courtesy MWM Design Group
Page 5

AIA Honors Austin Firm’s Work

Anthony Nak Flagship Store, a high-end jewelry boutique designed by MJ Neal Architects of Austin, has been recognized with a 2008 AIA Honor Award for Interior Architecture. Located in downtown Austin, Anthony Nak represents the only project with a Texas connection among this year’s slate of winners.

Page 11

CNU Set to Convene in Booming Austin To See Changes, Honor Local Urbanist

by: Stephen Sharpe

When hundreds of architects and urban planners convene here in March for the Congress of the New Urbanism’s CNU XVI, one of their main topics of conversation will be: Can Austin be a truly great city?

Page 11

Pfluger Bridge Extension

The project will extend the James D. Pfluger Bicycle and Pedestrian Bridge northward to connect the Lady Bird Lake hike-and-bike trail to the Lamar Corridor and downtown. The bridge, completed in 2001, is named in the memory of James D. Pfluger, FAIA, who helped push the City of Austin’s development of the popular lakeside trail system.

Page 20

Urban Aerie on 2nd Street

by: Wendy Price Todd
Architect: Page Southerland Page

Casey Dunn
Page 38

Mixing It Up in SoCo

by: Lawrence Connolly
Architect: Dick Clark Architecture and Michael Hsu Design Office

Anyone who has visited Austin’s eclectic strip of retail and restaurants along South Congress knows the SoCo entertainment district to be a vortex of bohemian conviviality. The city’s head-long rush to grow and densify is readily apparent along the wide avenue that stretches below downtown. SoCo encompasses a few commercial blocks comprised of small buildings, none more than three stories tall. Residential neighborhoods back up to the businesses, and the homeowners are notorious for opposing the slightest change in the street frontage.

Paul Bardagjy
Page 50
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