Article Results for "Dallas"

Trammell Crow (1914-2009)

by: Gregory Ibanez

The noted Dallas developer Trammell Crow passed away at his East Texas farm on Jan. 14. He was 94 years old and had apparently been in failing health for some time. While Crow’s reach in the commercial real estate world was international in scope, he left an inescapable legacy in his hometown of Dallas.

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Renewal of a Jewel

by: Duncan T. Fulton, AIA
Architect: ARCHITEXAS

he 16-story Dallas National Bank was a significant addition to Dallas’ burgeoning skyline in 1927. Its opening made headlines and its grandeur conveyed the prosperity and ambitions of both the young bank and the city around it. By the end of the century, however, its decrepit state and the indignities it had suffered also spoke volumes—not only about the building, but also about the state of Dallas’ urban core. Since then the fortunes of both have taken a happy turn for the better as exemplified in the building’s reincarnation as the Joule Hotel.

Eric Laignel, ARCHITEXAS
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Suburban Revival

by: Eurico R. Francisco
Architect: Omniplan

“Dallas is a place where the future looks better than the past,” states Ed Baum, the former dean of the University of Texas at Arlington’s School of Architecture and longtime Dallas resident. His description succinctly sums up both the regret of missed opportunities and the promise of better things to come. At the same time both sad and optimistic, his quip also captures the essence of the American city over the last 100 years or so—a place always expanding outward and leaving behind what came before, not just its downtown, but also its history. In short, the American city is forever searching for “a better future.” Dallas is a good example.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA
Page 64

EPA Extols Houston, D/FW for Efficiency

Houston and the Dallas-Fort Worth metropolitan area are among the top five cities in the nation with the most buildings enrolled in the Energy Star program administered by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The federal program promotes energy conservation and reduction of greenhouse gases by designing buildings to be more energy efficient.

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Vision 2030: West Dallas Gateway

Recognized with a 2009 Great Places Award, co-sponsored by the Environmental Design Research Association and Metropolis magazine, the West Dallas Gateway suggests redevelopment strategies for a blighted, post-industrial area of the city.

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Dallas Convention Center Hotel

In March, demolition and soil remediation began on the future site of the Dallas Convention Center Hotel, designed by Dallas architectural firm 5Gstudio_collaborative with BOKA Powell as the architect of record.

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Designs on Volunteering

by: Margine Biswas

The opportunity to offer one’s knowledge and skills to young people can be an exceptionally rewarding experience. When such an opportunity arose recently, I joined several members of AIA Dallas’ Women in Architecture in preparing a presentation for middle school-aged girls to help them realize their potential for professional careers. Our presentation was part of the national “Expanding Your Horizons” program sponsored by the American Association of University Women.

Photo by Penny
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Forwarding Dallas

Designed by Portugal firms Atelier Data and MOOV, Forwarding Dallas is one of three winning projects in Urban Revision’s Re:Vision Dallas competition to design a fully sustainable 2.5-acre block in downtown Dallas.

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Suburban Revolution

by: Gregory Ibanez

During our now-passed housing boom, it certainly felt as though the appreciation of Modern residential design gained wider acceptance, as evidenced by the emergence of Dwell magazine and the resurgence of classic mid-century furniture. It has long been the architect’s lament that if consumers really had a choice, many would prefer contemporary, architect-designed homes instead of those ubiquitous builder McMansions. Two ambitious and important developments in Dallas, Kessler Woods and Urban Reserve, set out to prove this point.

Photo at left by Jason Franzen, ©2008 Buchanan Architecture; photo at right by James F. Wilson courtesy Talley Associates
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Neighbors

by: Stephen Fox

Architectural historian Virginia McAlester; architect and historian Willis Winters, FAIA; journalist Prudence Mackintosh; and photographer Steve Clicque have produced an extraordinary work on the history and architecture of Dallas’ two best-known twentieth-century residential communities, Highland Park and University Park.

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Urban Complex

by: Brian McLaren
Architect: JHP Architecture/Urban Design

Cityville Southwest Medical Center embodies the pioneer spirit. When opened in 2007, the mixed-use development shared the neighborhood with industrial brownfields, rusting steel warehouses, and a red-light district.

Steve Hinds; Stan Wolenski Photography
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Baylor University Medical Center at Dallas – New Family Center

by: Susan Butler
Architect: HDR Architecture

Located on the seventh floor of Baylor University Medical Center’s Truett Tower in Dallas, the New Family Center is a 22,000-sf renovation specializing in postpartum healthcare services.

Mark Trew Photography
Page 69

New Opera House and Theater Opens; Dallas Arts District Nears Completion

by: Willis Winters, FAIA

October 12 marks the long-awaited grand opening of the Dallas Center for the Performing Arts (DCPA), a multiple-venue complex located in the Dallas Arts District that includes a new opera house and outdoor performance park designed by Foster + Partners, a multiform theater designed by REX/OMA (Kendall/Heaton was the associate architect for both projects), and a 10-acre public park designed by the French landscape architect Michel Desvigne.

Photos by Willis Winters, FAIA
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Foster + Partners Exhibit at Nasher

by: Gregory Ibanez

The Nasher Sculpture Center in Dallas has shown a significant interest in architecture during its relatively brief history.

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San Antonio Military Medical Center

Construction of the 1.1 million-sf San Antonio Military Medical Center at Fort Sam Houston, designed by RTKL’s Dallas office, began in December. Scheduled for completion in July 2011, the $556 million integrated design-bid-build contract is a result of the 2005 Defense Base Closure and Realignment Commission’s recommendations.

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Illustrious Memorial

by: Julien Meyrat

According to Jack Craycroft, AIA, the idea for an architectural delineation competition and exhibit was partly inspired by the numerous architectural renderings that his firm, Craycroft-Lacy & Partners, produced as a means of selling projects to clients and financial lenders.

Illustration courtesy Ken Roberts Memorial Delineation Competition
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Terminal Clarity

by: Gregory Ibanez
Architect: Corgan with HKS and HNTB

Discussing Dallas Fort Worth International Airport Terminal D and its selection for a 2009 TSA Design Award, juror Philip Freelon, FAIA, said, “We thought that the project was a very good example of a public building, very prominent, but it still was handled with quite some sensitivity. We all have been in airports, probably more than we’d like, and this is one where you actually feel a sense of light and airy space, which is relaxing. Natural light was well used, and the high volume of the space gives it an open and comfortable feeling. We thought it was well worthy of an award.”

Craig Blackmon, FAIA; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
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A Sonnet to Dwell In

by: Eurico R. Francisco
Architect: Buchanan Architecture

The area just north of downtown Dallas known as Oak Lawn is rich and diverse in demographics, land use, and building types. Having matured over time, Oak Lawn has evolved into a neighborhood of restaurants, churches, hotels, offices, and a varied assemblage of residential buildings.

Jason Franzen; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 48

Garden Spot

by: Michael Malone
Architect: Cunningham Architects

From the street Cunningham Architects’ House in the Garden is a beautifully conceived and executed object, partially shielded behind an iconic wall constructed of stainless-steel wire grid and filled with fragments of slag glass. This idealized garden villa – really a giant porch – provides a delightful way to both view and inhabit a highly personalized landscape. It’s a thoughtful and well organized bit of place making; surprisingly its greatest success is as a foil and extension of an outdoor space that was originally part of the adjacent house.

James F. Wilson, Gisela Borghi; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
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Haven for Art

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: Laguarda Low Architects

Once just another nondescript, single-story building indistinguishable from its neighbors that together comprise a light-industrial district wedged between downtown Dallas and the Trinity River, the Light & Sie Art Gallery now stands out. The reconfigured entry, framed by a box of aluminum panels, asserts a refined presence that quietly commands attention amid the clutter of storefronts along Leslie Street on the city’s near-west side. The 13,000-sf project is one of the latest examples in a transformative trend for the area where a few of the shopworn buildings have been repurposed as showrooms for the design trade and retail galleries for contemporary art.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 60

Catalyst for Creativity

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: HKS

The comprehensive renovation of a circa-1970 Brutalist office building has yielded a comfortable and award-winning home for the innovate research being conducted by the University of Texas at Dallas Center for BrainHealth. Designed by HKS, with Kyley Harvey leading the effort, the 63,000-sf project was completed in late 2006.

Blake Marvin/HKS; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 80

Light Show

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: Booziotis & Company, Thomas Phifer & Partners, nodesign

Craig Blackmon, FAIA
Page 96

AIA Dallas Celebrates Design Excellence

The Dallas chapter of the American Institute of Architects announced the 2007 design award winners during its annual Design Awards Announcement and Celebration Party in the AT&T Victory Plaza on Sept. 19, 2007.

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Interloop’s E-X-I-T Enters MoMA

On Nov. 7, 2007, the Museum of Modern Art in New York inducted into its permanent collection Interloop Architecture’s E-X-I-T sign custom designed for the Nasher Sculpture Center in Dallas. Fabricated with acrylic letters and illuminated by LED, the Houston firm’s creation joins other works in the MoMA Architecture and Design collection suchas Vignelli’s New York subway signage and the Flight Departure Panel from Solari di Udine.

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Trinity River Corridor Approved (Again)

by: Duncan T Fulton, FAIA

On Nov. 6, Dallas voters endorsed development of the Trinity River Corridor in general, and local government’s specific vision in particular. This was the second time in 10 years the electorate had been called to the polls on the issue. The first occurred in 1998 when the voters approved a $246 million bond issue for development of the corridor. The second election was a referendum challenging specific aspects of how the plan had developed since 1998.

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