Article Results for "Dallas"

Illustrious Memorial

by: Julien Meyrat

According to Jack Craycroft, AIA, the idea for an architectural delineation competition and exhibit was partly inspired by the numerous architectural renderings that his firm, Craycroft-Lacy & Partners, produced as a means of selling projects to clients and financial lenders.

Illustration courtesy Ken Roberts Memorial Delineation Competition
Page 37

Terminal Clarity

by: Gregory Ibanez
Architect: Corgan with HKS and HNTB

Discussing Dallas Fort Worth International Airport Terminal D and its selection for a 2009 TSA Design Award, juror Philip Freelon, FAIA, said, “We thought that the project was a very good example of a public building, very prominent, but it still was handled with quite some sensitivity. We all have been in airports, probably more than we’d like, and this is one where you actually feel a sense of light and airy space, which is relaxing. Natural light was well used, and the high volume of the space gives it an open and comfortable feeling. We thought it was well worthy of an award.”

Craig Blackmon, FAIA; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 44

A Sonnet to Dwell In

by: Eurico R. Francisco
Architect: Buchanan Architecture

The area just north of downtown Dallas known as Oak Lawn is rich and diverse in demographics, land use, and building types. Having matured over time, Oak Lawn has evolved into a neighborhood of restaurants, churches, hotels, offices, and a varied assemblage of residential buildings.

Jason Franzen; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 48

Garden Spot

by: Michael Malone
Architect: Cunningham Architects

From the street Cunningham Architects’ House in the Garden is a beautifully conceived and executed object, partially shielded behind an iconic wall constructed of stainless-steel wire grid and filled with fragments of slag glass. This idealized garden villa – really a giant porch – provides a delightful way to both view and inhabit a highly personalized landscape. It’s a thoughtful and well organized bit of place making; surprisingly its greatest success is as a foil and extension of an outdoor space that was originally part of the adjacent house.

James F. Wilson, Gisela Borghi; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 52

Haven for Art

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: Laguarda Low Architects

Once just another nondescript, single-story building indistinguishable from its neighbors that together comprise a light-industrial district wedged between downtown Dallas and the Trinity River, the Light & Sie Art Gallery now stands out. The reconfigured entry, framed by a box of aluminum panels, asserts a refined presence that quietly commands attention amid the clutter of storefronts along Leslie Street on the city’s near-west side. The 13,000-sf project is one of the latest examples in a transformative trend for the area where a few of the shopworn buildings have been repurposed as showrooms for the design trade and retail galleries for contemporary art.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 60

Catalyst for Creativity

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: HKS

The comprehensive renovation of a circa-1970 Brutalist office building has yielded a comfortable and award-winning home for the innovate research being conducted by the University of Texas at Dallas Center for BrainHealth. Designed by HKS, with Kyley Harvey leading the effort, the 63,000-sf project was completed in late 2006.

Blake Marvin/HKS; Illustration by Bryce Weigand
Page 80

Light Show

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: Booziotis & Company, Thomas Phifer & Partners, nodesign

Craig Blackmon, FAIA
Page 96

AIA Dallas Celebrates Design Excellence

The Dallas chapter of the American Institute of Architects announced the 2007 design award winners during its annual Design Awards Announcement and Celebration Party in the AT&T Victory Plaza on Sept. 19, 2007.

Page 20

Interloop’s E-X-I-T Enters MoMA

On Nov. 7, 2007, the Museum of Modern Art in New York inducted into its permanent collection Interloop Architecture’s E-X-I-T sign custom designed for the Nasher Sculpture Center in Dallas. Fabricated with acrylic letters and illuminated by LED, the Houston firm’s creation joins other works in the MoMA Architecture and Design collection suchas Vignelli’s New York subway signage and the Flight Departure Panel from Solari di Udine.

Page 24

Trinity River Corridor Approved (Again)

by: Duncan T Fulton, FAIA

On Nov. 6, Dallas voters endorsed development of the Trinity River Corridor in general, and local government’s specific vision in particular. This was the second time in 10 years the electorate had been called to the polls on the issue. The first occurred in 1998 when the voters approved a $246 million bond issue for development of the corridor. The second election was a referendum challenging specific aspects of how the plan had developed since 1998.

Page 24

Jubilee Community Center

Planned in conjunction with a community resource center, the Jubilee Community Center is designed by brownarchitects of Dallas in collaboration with the Detroit Collaborative Design Center, a nonprofit that helped organize meetings with nearby residents.

Page 26

Anfield Stadium

When the Liverpool Football Club decided to expand its Anfield Stadium in Stanley Park, the British soccer club hired Dallas-based architect HKS to design the 60,000-seat sports arena.

Page 26

A Beauty with Brains

by: Nestor Ifanzon
Architect: Page Southerland Page, LLP

The new Natural Science and Engineering Research Laboratory at the University of Texas at Dallas creates an innovative scientific environment while simultaneously possessing an astonishing architectural presence. The design and construction of the four-story, 192,000-squarefoot research facility responds to UT Dallas’ strategic plan to establish a top-flight research institution that will serve as a catalyst for interdisciplinary research. University officials expect to fill the facility with high-level faculty and scientists from such disparate fields as electrical engineering, materials science and engineering, chemistry, biology, and behavioral and brain sciences.

Robert Canfield
Page 32

LaGrone Advanced Technology Complex

by: Megan Braley
Architect: PBK Architects

The 120,792-square-foot LaGrone Advanced Technology Complex, located in the Denton Independent School District, includes 16 academies that provide students with trade-specific technical skills. PBK Architects of Dallas has uniquely designed each academy to reflect a specific professional working environment that facilitates increased learning through experience.

Jud Haggard
Page 65

All Aboard!

by: Stephen Sharpe

Commuter rail is returning to Austin, bringing with it several transit oriented developments (TOD) that will drive the creation of new live/work/play neighborhoods centered around at least eight train stations. Perhaps as early as this fall, Austin will join Dallas and Houston in reviving urban rail travel as a means to reduce traffic congestion and as a catalyst for thoughtful intracity planning. That means more people in and around Austin will have the option of leaving their cars at home.

map courtesy City of Austin Neighborhood Planning & Zoning Department; rendering courtesy MWM Design Group
Page 5

Winner Selected for Dallas Center for Architecture Competition

by: W. Mark Gunderson, AIA

AIA Dallas, following examples from across the country (New York City and Houston considered obvious prologue) has taken the first steps towards the construction of a new 7,500-square foot venue intended to house its own activities as well as those of multiple organizations aligned with the architectural mission of the chapter including the Dallas Architectural Foundation and the Dallas Architecture Forum.

Rendering courtesy Peter Doncaster, AIA
Page 14

Bygone Big D

by: James Pratt

Mark Rice is as fascinated with downtown Dallas history as I am. As a boy of four, I first saw big downtown buildings when I was brought across the Houston Street bridge, then Highway 80, from Fort Worth. A couple of years later, I saw the new winged red horse installed on the top of the Magnolia Petroleum Company headquarters.

Page 22

A City’s Vision Becomes Reality

by: Stephen Sharpe

As reported on the following pages, One Arts Plaza represents the first major commercial venture to open for some time in the Dallas Arts District. Construction continues to swirl around the new project, designed by Morrison Seifert Murphy, as crews work on several significant buildings immediately adjacent to its site. One Arts Plaza, shown at the far left in the rendering provided by the Dallas Center for the Performing Arts, is set at the northeast end of Flora Street that bisects the Arts District. At the street’s other terminus is the Dallas Museum of Art, which, since the Edward Larrabee Barnes-designed complex opened in 1984, has been joined by neighboring cultural venues designed by other highly renowned architects.

Winspear Opera House and Annette Strauss Artist Square Renderings courtesy Foster + Partners; Wyly Theatre And Performance Park Renderings Courtesy Luxigon; Dallas Arts District Rendering Courtesy Dallas Center for the Performing Arts
Page 24

Homage to the Square

by: Michael Malone
Architect: Morrison Seifert Murphy; Corgan Associates

Anchoring the eastern edge of downtown Dallas , One Arts Plaza is a defining presence as the tallest building in the expanding Dallas Arts District. As difficult as it is for any single building to define an edge, this outwardly restrained building could be seen as a textbook lesson on how a tall building, handled skillfully, can contribute to the urban fabric. At this moment, while construction just now begins on significant cultural landmarks but before those adjacent projects grab all the attention within the Arts District, the 24-story One Arts Plaza cannot be missed.

Charles Smith, AIA
Page 26

Justice Served

by: Jonathan P. Rollins, AIA
Architect: Rees Associates, Inc.

The addition to and renovation of the George Allen Sr. courthouse consolidates all 45 of the Dallas County civil courts, formerly located in three buildings, into one central location. Providing 210,000 square feet of new space, the addition stacks its program with the highest traffic family court spaces on the bottom, served by escalators.

Craig Blackmon, FAIA
Page 66

‘Horizons’ Program Introduces Girls To Future Professional Opportunities

by: Margine Biswas

For the past eight years, AIA Dallas’ Women in Architecture has reached out to girls in elementary and middle-school grades through a national program called Expanding Your Horizons. The program encourages girls to continue their studies in math and science by introducing them to interesting career options in technical subjects.

photo by Penny Ball
Page 14

Four by 4

Nocturnal: Design Lab of Dallas describes its Four by 4 as a suburban tree house. It was selected by Lauritzen Gardens, Omaha’s Botanical Center, as a winner in the 2008 KidStructure Competition. Four by 4 is intended to inspire creative play among the young and the young-at-heart. The exterior is composed of a series of 4x4-inch pressure-treated timbers of various lengths.

Page 23

First Step to a New Campus

by: Ann Christensen
Architect: FKP Architects in association with John Lee, FAIA

People come to healthcare facilities to be healed , so it is reasonable for them to expect treatment based on the latest research and technology that will aid their recovery. Patients also might expect that facility to be an environment designed not only to prevent ill health but to promote a healthy lifestyle.

Aker/Zvonkovic Photography
Page 46

Statler Hilton Listed as ‘Endangered’

When first opened in 1956, the sheer size and bold form made the Statler Hilton one of downtown Dallas’ crown jewels. Fifty-two years later, the former icon of mid-century design sits vacant and threatened by encroaching development. However, with its recent inclusion on the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s 2008 list of 11 Most Endangered Places, the old hotel may survive the increasing pressure for its destruction.

Hilton Photo Copyright John Rogers Photography, courtesy Kate Singleton
Page 12

Cloepfil Addresses Dallas Forum On Booker T. Washington School

by: Michael Malone

As part of the events celebrating the opening of the Booker T. Washington High School for the Performing and Visual Arts, the Dallas Architectural Foundation invited Brad Cloepfil to speak about his firm’s project located in the Dallas Arts District. Cloepil, principal of Allied Works in Portland, Ore., presented the lecture on June 6 at the Dallas Museum of Art.

Photos by Jeremy Bittermann, courtesy Allied Works Architecture
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