Article Results for "ARE"

Architectural Workout

by: Steve McElhany
Architect: Butler Architectural Group

The project’s scope included stabilizing the structure, updating the storefront facade, and converting the front 3,000 square feet of the 5,000-sf building. Butler’s careful attention to detail demonstrates his thoughtful research into the fundamental concepts on which Joseph Pilates based his exercise system. So intrigued by what he learned, Butler began taking Pilates classes from Balance Studio owner Michelle Heinz after the work was completed.

Page 56

Powerful Homage

by: Michael E. Allex
Architect: SmithGroup and F&S

Yet over several decades, the University of Texas–Pan American has developed a vernacular that directly flows from his genius. With its most recent addition, Kahn’s design principles are explored and allowed to mature in UTPA’s Wellness and Recreation Sports Complex designed by Smith Group/F&S (formerly F&S Partners).

BlackInk Architectural Photography by Craig Blackmon FAIA
Page 60

Morris Frank Library

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: m ARCHITECTS

The Morris Frank Library, designed by m Architects of Houston and completed in 2009, represents a new direction in services for the Houston Public Library System. Relocated from its original building, the library now resides on the ground floor of an existing atrium building in a revitalized low-income area of Houston.

G. Lyon Photography
Page 67

The Perils of Substitution

by: Jim Atkins, Grant A. Simpson

Substitutions of products and systems different from the architect’s original design are an ongoing reality in the construction industry today. In fact, it is rare when alternate products and building systems are not proposed by the owner, the contractor, or other parties.

Page 70

Legacy of Care

by: Stephen Sharpe

Renowned internationally for his breakthroughs in medical techniques, legendary heart surgeon Michael E. DeBakey, M.D., spent 60 years on the staff of Methodist Hospital and the faculty of Baylor College of Medicine at the Texas Medical Center in Houston. It is fitting that a new museum dedicated to his innovations and achievements sits at the heart of the medical center.

Gerald Moorhead
Page 80

Summer Groundbreaking Set For Piano’s Kimbell Expansion

by: Stephen Sharpe

The long-anticipated construction of Renzo Piano Building Workshop’s expansion of the Kimbell Art Museum is scheduled to break ground late this summer, with the opening of the new $125 million building slated for 2013

Kimbell Art Museum
Page 11

New Expansion of Ideson Library Follows Cram’s Original Scheme

by: Gerald Moorhead

The Julia Ideson Building, Houston’s historic downtown library, has received an addition that finally completes its original 1926 scheme. Designed by Gensler’s Houston office, the four-story south extension replicates a wing that was omitted from the Boston firm Cram and Ferguson’s plan for the library, the only facility completed of the projected five-building Civic Center focused around Hermann Square, a block donated to the city in 1914 by philanthropist George H. Hermann.

Gerald Moorhead, FAIA
Page 12

AIA Brazos Inaugurates School Program

by: Steven Schloss

Volunteer members of AIA Brazos inaugurated the chapter’s first “Architecture in Schools” program earlier this year, taking lessons about potential career opportunities to a total of 39 fourth-grade students.

Chrystal McLemore
Page 15

Recap: Gulf Coast Green 2010

by: Filo Castore

Held in mid-April at the University of Houston, the fifth annual Gulf Coast Green Symposium and Professional Expo brought together a diverse group – architects, engineers, contractors, developers, students, educators, and government officials – to share information and network across disciplines.

Page 15

Waller Creek Master Plan

“Tailor the District,” a concept for reinvigorating a downtrodden corner of downtown Austin, uses Waller Creek as the central seam around which patches of social fabric (i.e., places of local commerce, open space, and entertainment venues) are stitched together by a unified circulation network.

Page 20

Defense Redesigned

by: Steven Land Tillotson

British historian Arnold J. Toynbee observed that the border of an enlightened and ascendant civilization is a fluid zone of contact. But, he cautioned, when its power of self-determination and its creative influence upon neighbors wane so does the mutual cooperation and communication shared with those neighbors until hostility transforms the border into a rigid military line.

Page 26

Extremes on the High Plains

by: Mason Rogers

On the High Plains, dealing with extremes comes with the territory. Tell a northerner you are from the Texas Panhandle and they will ask how you ever survive the heat. A southerner will pity you for having to live on the frozen tundra. While summers can be scorching hot and winter snowfall can pile up unexpectedly, the High Plains – unlike everywhere else in Texas – enjoys four seasons.

Mason Rogers , AIA
Page 31

A Really Big Room

Cowboys Stadium is the largest column-free space in the world—a feat that allows clear sightlines to the playing field from every seat in the house. That achievement is made possible by a pair of gray steel arches, composed of 17x35-foot box trusses made of high-strength steel forged in Luxemburg, that extends the entire 1,225-foot length of the structure. The longest single-span arches ever built, they reach beyond the stadium walls and are buttressed by four angled, solid-concrete plinths that partially support the 660,800-sf dome weighing 14,100 tons.

Page 37

Environmental Impact

David Heymann concedes that the house is indeed very large, yet he is quick to point out the designs sustainable attributes. “It’s not smart growth, but its smarter to have one very big house than a dozen big houses,” he says. “Such houses are inevitable, and ignoring them for scalar impropriety does not resolve their environmental consequence.”

Page 41

Living High on the Coast

by: Stephen Sharpe
Architect: Michael G. Imber, Architect

Though ravaged by periodic hurricanes and economic doldrums for over a century, much of Galveston’s magnificent architecture survives. The island city’s glory days, the three decades that preceded the devastating storm of 1900, are recalled in its richly detailed commercial edifices and stately Victorian-era homes.

Coastal Living
Page 48

Silo

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: Sprinkle & Co. Architects (formerly Sprinkle Robey Architects)

Designed by Sprinkle & Co. Architects and completed in 2008, Silo’s second San Antonio location occupies 8,900 square feet and two floors within a suburban retail development. The owners requested that the architects preserve but also refresh the restaurant’s identity.

Chris Cooper; Paul Hester
Page 58

Paggi House

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: J Square Architecture

Sited on a bluff overlooking Austin’s downtown skyline and Lady Bird Lake, the Paggi House recently underwent renovations that restore the original 1840s structure while adding a contemporary twist. Re-imagined by J Square Architecture, the 5,523-sf restaurant, which once served as an inn and a family home, gained a new roof, outdoor bar/dining space, restroom, and office.

J Square Architecture; Rebecca Fondren Photography
Page 58

August E’s

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: Mustard Design

August E’s was an established restaurant in need of a new location. In 2008, the business moved to an existing building one block off historic Main Street in Fredericksburg. Designed by Andrew E. Bray of Mustard Design, the project injected new life into a 4,900-sf structure that previously housed a 1950s automotive repair shop and later a furniture warehouse.

Green Dog Pictures
Page 60

Intentional Grounding

by: Stephen Sharpe

Texas St adium collapsed on April 11 in a well-executed implosion detonated at 7:08 a.m. that ended a storied 37-year career as the home of the Dallas Cowboys. In less than 30 seconds and before more than 20,000 witnesses, a spectacular series of blasts from 2,715 lbs. of explosives reduced the 65,675-seat arena to rubble.

The City of Irving
Page 68

The Collector

The Collector, a conceptual project by Brendan O’Grady, AIA, of RTKL Associates in Dallas, is a mixed-use development imagined for construction in Shanghai. Planned to encompass more than 2.7 million square feet, the project is “designed to harness the energy of business, culture, and nature.”

Page 25

ADA @ 20

by: Brion Sargent, AIA

Civil rights movements in America are as varied as the people they serve to protect, each group seeking justice or parity for those overlooked by the political establishment. Often unpopular in their initial stages, such movements have transformed our society and over time their triumphs have come to be accepted as integral to our social fabric.

Page 27

Survivors

by: Mort Levy, FAIA

Following the devastation of Hurricane Ike in September 2008, an engineer emerged from under the battered substructure of Galveston’s First Presbyterian Church to apprise Rev. David Green of the damage. “Pastor, your church has no foundation,” he said, apparently without thinking his statement’s underlying irony. Yes, perhaps its structural foundation was in need of repair, but the spiritual foundation of First Presbyterian, a survivor of more than a century of catastrophic weather events, has never weakened.

(Above) Photo Courtesy Library of Congress, LC-US Z62-126820 DLC, Prints & Photographs Division, HABS LC-US Z62 -126820 (Below) ‘Ike’ photo Courtesy FEMA; ‘1900’ Photo Courtesy Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, HABS LC-US Z62-120220
Page 30

The Lance Armstrong Foundation Headquarters

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: Lake/Flato Architects in collaboration with the Bommarito Group

Entering the Lance Armstrong Foundation (Livestrong) headquarters is an exercise in transition—from busy streetscape through serene garden to an open, sunlit interior. Transition also characterizes the conversion of the 1950s-era warehouse into the Livestrong offices, considering that a wide variety of the project’s materials were salvaged from the original structure.

Casey Dunn; Paul Hester
Page 44

PSU Overlook Pavilion

by: Sean Burkholder
Architect: Overland Partners Architects

Integrating architecture into any given context while maintaining design integrity is a fine art. Architects must constantly walk the line between over- or under-contextualizing a building to support its strength as a unique entity within its environment. Somewhere between total disregard to surroundings and cliché facsimiles of geologic or biologic imagery, a good architect can find a project’s meaning without being overt. Such sought-after balance has been gracefully achieved by Overland Partners with the firm’s new Overlook Pavilion at Penn State University.

Jeffrey Totaro
Page 56

Sid W. Richardson Visual Arts Center

by: Rebecca Boles
Architect: Gideon Toal

Fort Worth Country Day ha s the cache t of bei ng one of the premier college preparatory programs in North Texas. In existence since 1963, Fort Worth Country Day offers K-12 instruction on its campus in southwest Fort Worth. Students become accustomed to the feel of a college campus as they change classes and circulate among separate academic buildings throughout the school day. Covered walkways, an abundance of trees, and landscaping with mature plantings are evidence that the school’s leadership sees the importance of an appropriate setting in creating an environment for learning.

Craig Kuhner
Page 64
View: 25 50 100 All