Article Results for "Landmarks"

Texas Legislature Passes Historic Preservation Bills

During the 83rd Texas Legislative Session, lawmakers passed two bills in support of historic preservation: HB 500 and SB 111, both will potentially provide new tools for developers and property owners interested in revitalizing historic districts and landmarks.

Page 88

Campus Public Art Programs

by: Audrey McKee

The University of Texas at Austin’s Landmarks and Rice University’s Public Art Program both feature successful public art installations that offer lessons for architects.

photos by Julie Pizzo Wood.
Page 18

Lines, Numbers, and Colors

by: Matt Fajkus, AIA

The University of Texas at Austin’s Landmarks program recently procured a pair of works by Sol LeWitt and a new “Skyspace” by James Turrell — impressive additions to an already respectable collection of sculptures

“CIRCLE WITH TOWERS” COURTSEY THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN. PHOTO BY MARK MENJIVAR.
DETAILS OF “THE COLOR INSIDE.” COURTSEY THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN. PHOTO BY PAUL
BARDAGJY. WALL DRAWINGS COURTESY OF THE ESTATE OF SOL LEWITT. PHOTOS BY MARK MEJIVAR.
Page 20

Marking the Land

by: Matt Fajkus, AIA

Modernist sculptor Constantin Brancusi famously said, “Architecture is inhabited sculpture.” That raises the question: Is sculpture uninhabitable architecture?

Paul Bardagjy, Jacob Termansen, Robert Boland, Marsha Miller, Overland Partners | Architects
Page 24

A Life-Changing Encounter

by: Reagan W. George

Recently I was traveling north on Interstate 35 and caught view of several old landmarks. These, in turn, brought back the memory of another road trip: it was along U.S. 77 and I was on my way north to Oklahoma. That earlier trip started when one of my classmates at Texas A&M noticed an announcement on the bulletin board outside of the Architectural Library. It stated that Frank Lloyd Wright would be giving a lecture at the University of Oklahoma in about two months.

Page 24

Wright-Influenced NASA Landmark Redone as Offices for Houston Parks

by: Gerald Moorhead

One of Houston’s landmarks of modern architecture has been rededicated after a $16 million renovation. The historic Farnsworth & Chambers Co. building, designed by MacKie & Kamrath and completed in 1957, has been the home of Houston’s Parks and Recreation Department since 1977. Known as the Gragg Building after the donor of adjacent parkland, it is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and is a Registered Texas Historic Landmark and a City of Houston Landmark.

Houston Parks and Recreation, NASA
Page 16

Fading Music

by: Steve Dean

In many small towns across Central Texas, settled along the well-worn paths of nineteenth-century Czech, Polish, and German immigration routes, one of the most prominent landmarks is the dance and/or community hall. These émigrés from Central Europe brought with them traditional, artisanal building crafts and, just as importantly, a powerful desire to reproduce and maintain their cultural heritage, from language to vernacular architectural styles.

Page 28

Resolute Landmark

by: Eurico R. Francisco
Architect: CamargoCopeland Architects and Overland Partners

Also dotting the landscape are landmarks from a grander but almost forgotten earlier era—including the Masonic Temple (1941; Flint & Broad), the Weisfeld Center (1912; Hubbell & Greene; originally the First Church of Christ, Scientist), and the Scottish Rite Cathedral (1913; Hubbell & Greene). Dallas City Hall, designed in 1977 by I.M. Pei with the mission of awakening Dallas from its post- JFK assassination slump, mediates between this neglected corner of downtown and the inner city’s robust commercial district. There is hope, however, for this neighborhood’s renewal since the opening in 2008 of The Bridge, a homeless assistance center funded by the City of Dallas.

Charles David Smith
Page 42

Homage to the Square

by: Michael Malone
Architect: Morrison Seifert Murphy; Corgan Associates

Anchoring the eastern edge of downtown Dallas , One Arts Plaza is a defining presence as the tallest building in the expanding Dallas Arts District. As difficult as it is for any single building to define an edge, this outwardly restrained building could be seen as a textbook lesson on how a tall building, handled skillfully, can contribute to the urban fabric. At this moment, while construction just now begins on significant cultural landmarks but before those adjacent projects grab all the attention within the Arts District, the 24-story One Arts Plaza cannot be missed.

Charles Smith, AIA
Page 26
View: 25 50 100 All