Article Results for "Technology"

Innovation and Design

by: Catherine Gavin

Digital fabrication is turning traditional architectural practice on its head, and as academics press forward into uncharted territories, communication and cross-pollination with practicing architects is increasingly important.

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Small Stuff

by: Ben Koush

Digital fabrication techniques have allowed three up-and-coming Texas firms to experiment with new, small-scale forms — but experience shows that technology only goes so far. Expertise and craft remain critical elements of architectural practice.

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by: Rita Catinella Orrell

Our first products roundup by Rita Catinella Orrell.

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by: Rita Catinella Orrell

Rita Catinella Orrell features a kitchen and bath products roundup.

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by: Texas Architect Staff

The 2012 Exhibit of School Architecture spon¬sored by the Texas Association of School Admin¬istration (TASA) and the Texas Association of School Boards (TASB) Convention awarded the Caudill Award to Lady Bird Johnson Middle School in Irving designed by Corgan Associates.

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Setting a New Standard

by: Audrey Maxwell, Associate AIA

The Perkins+Will-designed Zan Wesley Holmes Jr. Middle School (ZHMS) is a 202,000-sf progressive school that uses both technology and the building itself to teach and promote environmental stewardship to younger generations.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA
Page 60

Convention Sessions to Explore Latest Research in Digital Technology

TxA Interactive will bring experimental research and exploration among academics and practitioners to the Texas Architects 74th Annual Convention and Design Expo.

Page 121

Selecting the Best of Public Schools

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: Corgan Associates

John A. Dubiski Career High School, designed by Corgan Associates, is a 2,000-student career and technology school located in Grand Prairie. The school’s curriculum seeks to reduce the dropout rate and prepare graduates to enter college or the workforce. The four-story, 250,000-sf structure is designed to accommodate unique programmatic needs, including specific careertrack diploma programs.

Charles David Smith
Page 71

Selecting the Best of Public Schools

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: SHW Group

Giddings Independent School District hired SH W Group to design a technology-rich learning environment for its high school and middle school students, while optimizing space and resources. The proposed solution renovated and re-purposed the existing, but outdated high school into a middle school. The renovated building was joined to a new high school building, creating a single facility for the district’s 1,400 students in grades 6-12.

Paul Bardagiy; Brian Mihealsick
Page 73

Selecting the Best of Public Schools

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: SHW Group

Designed by SHW Group, Ennis Independent School District’s newly constructed junior high is a 195,000-sf facility on a 50-acre site. The design incorporates a contemporary feel and function. Classrooms are configured to be flexible to support interactive teaching through integrated technology. Large-group instruction spaces and a closed-circuit television studio are two significant features.

Mark McWilliams
Page 75

IT Infrastructure

by: John Jankowski

There was a time, not terribly long ago, when the telecommunications industry spoke of “convergence.” Voice and data would soon be one, and the complexity that goes with building and maintaining separate systems would evaporate. That time is upon us; actually, it has been for years. Why, then, is building the corporate information technology infrastructure still so complicated?

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Extending the Brand

by: Dan Searight
Architect: Powers Brown Architecture

“Be Brilliant Together” proclaims Logica, a leading business and technology service company employing 39,000 personnel worldwide. “This is not a slogan,” explains Mike Lewsley, chief operating officer of its Houston office. “It is a call to action for our clients and employees alike.” Logica’s newly completed office responds to the corporate tagline with an energetic and expressive design.

Dror Baldinger
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A&M Students Take Concept to Reality with Digitally Fabricated Installation

by: TA Staff

What began as a small furniture project undertaken by architecture students in a studio at Texas A&M ultimately evolved into an intricate plywood sculpture of curved components that now hangs in the Langford Architecture Center. Permanently installed in the ceiling on the first floor of Building A, the 18x16-foot Plywood Mesh #002 was produced with advanced digital fabrication technology available in the College of Architecture.

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KAUST Receives AIA/ALA Library Award

by: TA Staff

The American Institute of Architects and the American Library Association (ALA) recently bestowed the ALA Library Building Award to the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) in Thuwal, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Sam Fentress
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AIA LRGV Announces Design Awards

by: James Rodriguez

During its annual award banquet on Dec. 12, AIA Lower Rio Grande Valley announced the results of its 2009 Design Awards program. The selections were made by a jury that met in Houston during the TSA convention in October.

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TEX-FAB Advances Digital Fabrication

by: Brad Bell

With advancements in parametric design technology and digital fabrication reshaping the way designers think and create, a group of educators from Texas architectural schools have organized to sponsor activities for local professionals and the academic community.

Andrew Vrana
Page 16

Extremes on the High Plains

by: Mason Rogers

On the High Plains, dealing with extremes comes with the territory. Tell a northerner you are from the Texas Panhandle and they will ask how you ever survive the heat. A southerner will pity you for having to live on the frozen tundra. While summers can be scorching hot and winter snowfall can pile up unexpectedly, the High Plains – unlike everywhere else in Texas – enjoys four seasons.

Mason Rogers , AIA
Page 31

BIM’s Progeny

by: Larry Kleinkemper , AIA

Only 20 years ago, architects and their clients were limited to drawings and models rendered by hand. Then the industry began to adopt CAD (computer-aided drafting) and digital modeling, technologies that brought about animation and rendering. Now there is BIM (building information modeling) that offers architects an entirely new set of tools for their practice.

Zebra Imaging
Page 61

Waxahachie Global High School

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: Huckabee & Associates

Waxahachie Global High School received the 2008 TASA /TASB Exhibit of School Architecture “Special Recognition for Outstanding School Renovation.” Huckabee and Associates restored the three-story, 1917 T.C. Wilemon building, transforming the 79,356-square-foot space into a high-tech campus equipped with the latest technology.

Paul Chaplo
Page 72

Neglected Territory

by: Jeffrey Brown, AIA

Ignored by many architects and most academics, tilt wall construction is nonetheless widespread. It is prevalent in the marketplace and ubiquitous on the landscape, yet tilt wall construction is considered a “low” form of building methodology utilized in commercial construction by “mainstream” architects and their co-conspirators in the building trades. As a result, tilt wall construction has been overlooked as an area for more extensive architectural exploration.

K.J. McNitt photo courtesy Elliott + Associates Architect s; TXU customer service center Photo Courtesy cunningham architect s
Page 74

The State of BIM

by: David Baldacchino

Change is the word of the moment. For the design and construction industry, change has been slowly brewing for the past several years. That change is by no means an easy and painless process, but our profession will come out stronger at the end.

Parkview Regional medical center rendering courtesy of hks architects; Woodsedge rendering courtesy morris architects
Page 74

Survey: Texas Slow to Adopt BIM

by: Andy MacPhillimy, AIA

The software capabilities that are the foundation for Building Information Modeling, or BIM, have been under development for more than 20 years, and in the last few years awareness and interest in BIM by the AEC industry have grown remarkably. However, a recent survey indicates that the AEC industry in Texas has been slow to adopt BIM. Those few in Texas who are now using BIM, survey respondents state that adoption of the new technology has resulted in wide-ranging changes in the way they design and deliver projects.

Page 74

Solar Control

by: J. Brantley Hightower

Jean-Paul Viguier’s Jane and Arthur Stieren Center for Exhibitions at the McNay Art Museum in San Antonio represents the latest example of what has become a growing typology in the state—the art museum with a glass ceiling. This development might seem odd in a state known for its blisteringly hot summers and intense sunlight, but the concept of lighting works of art from above is not a particularly new development.

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Center for the Intrepid

by: Susan Butler
Architect: SmithGroup

The 65,000-sf Center for the Intrepid, designed by SmithGroup is equipped with the most sophisticated amputee rehabilitation technology available—virtual reality, robotics, and simulators.

Timothy Hursley
Page 67

Bridging the Gap

by: Megan Headley

We’ll admit it, there’s a lot more to a building than just the glass. And while we as an industry are charged with knowing the ins and outs of all the countless types of glass products available— architects are being overwhelmed by the need to know so much more.

Photo: Shutterstock
Page 70

Constructed Ecologies

Rice University graduate students Zhan Chen and Brantley Highfill (with faculty sponsor Douglas Oliver) recently received second place for their design Constructed Ecologies in the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture “Concrete Thinking for a Sustainable World” International Student Design Competition.

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Ella Wooten Park Pool House

by: Susan Butler
Architect: Studio 8 Architects

The Ella Wooten Park Pool House, designed by Studio 8 Architects, is located within the redevelopment of Austin’s former Mueller Airport. The park serves as a public gathering place that embodies the city in both its locally derived design and emphasis on green technology.

Andy Mattern
Page 89

Shedding Light on Lighting

by: Charles Thompson, AIA

Many architects remember a time when incandescent and T12 fluorescent lamps occupied a large part of our light fixture schedules. It was not really all that long ago. But now, there is a new game in town. Well, actually, lots of new games.

top left photo by Chris Cooper; bottom right photo by Charles Thompson, AIA
Page 94

Innovation Catalyst

by: Stephen Sharpe

In October 2000, the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board adopted a report that outlined steps for the state to foster scientific and engineering research in its public universities, steps that the Texas Legislature deemed critical for strengthening the state’s economic base in the coming years. That report, “Closing the Gaps by 2015,” identified the need for generating more research funding from federal and private sources, attracting innovative faculty to lead research teams, and expanding collaboration between businesses and universities in the pursuit of breakthroughs in the multi-faceted fields of science and engineering.

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LaGrone Advanced Technology Complex

by: Megan Braley
Architect: PBK Architects

The 120,792-square-foot LaGrone Advanced Technology Complex, located in the Denton Independent School District, includes 16 academies that provide students with trade-specific technical skills. PBK Architects of Dallas has uniquely designed each academy to reflect a specific professional working environment that facilitates increased learning through experience.

Jud Haggard
Page 65


(This article was adapted from “Sustainability & Green Building Design with Brick Masonry,” an article that originally appeared in the October 2007 edition of Brick in Architecture published by the Brick Industry Association.) Many of the objectives of sustainab le design do not impact building material selection, but instead focus on building systems such as plumbing, lighting, air conditioning, etc. However, the versatility and durability of brick facilitate the use of brick masonry as part of many elements of sustainable design.

Photo by Mark Trew ; Courtesy HDR
Page 69

Encouraging Excellence While Maintaining Standards

by: David G Woodcock, FAIA

In November 2004 the Association for Preservation Technology International (APT) held its annual conference in Galveston. The conference theme, “Raising the Grade for Preservation,” was a play on words easily understood by the participants who were familiar with the heroic aftermath of the Great Storm of 1900 that resulted in the building of a protective seawall, a seven-year effort that added several feet of sand across much of the city, and the lifting of many surviving buildings from the threat of future storms.

Photo by Jason Jennings courtesy The Williams Company Architects
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First Step to a New Campus

by: Ann Christensen
Architect: FKP Architects in association with John Lee, FAIA

People come to healthcare facilities to be healed , so it is reasonable for them to expect treatment based on the latest research and technology that will aid their recovery. Patients also might expect that facility to be an environment designed not only to prevent ill health but to promote a healthy lifestyle.

Aker/Zvonkovic Photography
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An Identifiable Heart

by: Mario L. Sanchez, PhD
Architect: Richter Architects in association with WHR Architects

Appearing more like a scattered outpost than an organized assemblage of buildings, Del Mar College’s West Campus in Corpus Christi lacked a “distinct architectural and academic identity,” says Dr. Lee Sloan, dean of the college’s division of business, professional, and technology education. To convey visual energy and instill a sense of community, Del Mar’s leadership charged Richter Architects in association with WHR Architects to design the Del Mar Health Sciences and Emerging Technologies Complex.

Aker/Zvonkovic Photography, Larry Rose
Page 58

Steel Stands Out

by: Maribeth Rizzuto

Adapted with permission from the Steel Framing Alliance, this article originally appeared in the December 2007 edition of Metal Construction News. In a report to the United Nations nearly 20 years ago, sustainability was defined as “progress that serves the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.” (“Our Common Future,” Brundtland Commission to the United Nations, 1988)

Photo by Joe Aker, Aker/Zvonkovic; courtesy Morris Architects
Page 72

Steel Recycling = LEED Points

The use of steel building products enables designers to earn LEED-NC points under Materials and Resources Credit 2.1 and 2.2: Construction Waste Management and Reduction. The recycled content value of the steel produced in facilities that use basic oxygen furnace (BOF) technology exceeds the five percent and 10 percent goals in LEED.

Page 73

Helix Pedestrian Bridge

The globally acclaimed architectural firm RTKL Associates, of Dallas has designed a pedestrian bridge in Macao, China, called The Helix. Inspired by the cultural intersections of technology and nature, the 161 meter curvilinear footbridge stands 11 meters over a developing tropical garden and water park, connecting two shopping malls within a large mixed-use entertainment superstructure.

Page 29

Biomedical Learning Center

by: TA Staff
Architect: SHW Group

The SHW Group, an Austin-based architectural and planning firm best known for its educational building design, developed the University of Texas at Brownsville’s Biomedical Research Laboratories and Community Sciences Building.

Mark Trew Photography
Page 102

The Hidden Risks OF LEED

by: J. David Odom; Richard Scott, AIA; and George H. DuBose

Adapted with permission from Liberty Building Forensics Group, this article originally appeared in NCARB’s Monograph Series. Yesterday ’s seal of approval for new products was “It was developed by NASA.” Today the seal of approval is: it’s “organically produced,” LEED certified, “earth friendly,” or some variation of the above.

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Modernism for the Borderland Exhibit Highlights Houses by Garland and Hilles

by: Laura Foster Kissack, AIA

Even two decades after architect Bill Palmore left his hometown of El Paso, a set of mid-century houses by two local designers still lingered in his memory. Later, as a professor of architecture at New York Institute of Technology (NYIT), Palmore revisited those modest residences and was struck at the exceptional integrity of the work of late El Paso architects Robert Garland and David Hilles.

Photos courtesy The Rubin Center
Page 12

Gauging Green

by: Lars Stanley, AIA and Lauren Woodward Stanley, AIA

t a time when our nation’s financial system seems to be imploding, it’s sometimes distressing to ponder what the future holds for the architectural profession. Our livelihoods are inextricably tied to the fortunes of the building industry, which quickly reacts to any economic downturn and in turn affects our work accordingly. Troubling, too, is the issue of global warming because our profession has an immediate and direct impact on the environment. And considering that buildings in the U.S. consume about 70 percent of the nation’s total electricity output and 12 percent of its water, it is evident that what we do as designers and builders in the future must be increasingly responsive to such grave issues.

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Ronald Goes Platinum

by: Laurie Zapalac
Architect: Eckols & Associates AIA

It is hard for most of us to imagine the range of emotions and needs that a family experiences when a child is sick enough to require hospitalization. The staff and designers of the new Ronald McDonald House in Austin have clearly given this a lot of thought. The project offers a welcome refuge for parents and loved ones who keep vigil as their child undergoes treatment nearby at the Dell Children’s Medical Center. The latest of a national network built by Ronald McDonald House Charities, the Austin facility also merges purposeful design with sustainability. The architects’ success in creating an energy-efficient building has been recognized with the highest rating by the U.S. Green Building Council, making the Ronald McDonald House in Austin one of only three buildings in Texas to achieve LEED Platinum.

Wade Griffith
Page 46

Commissioning Exterior Enclosures

by: Wagdy Anis, FAIA

Adapted with permission from the National Institute of Building Sciences/Building Enclosure Technology and Environment Council, this article originally appeared in the Winter 2008 issue of Journal of Building Enclosure Design. The commissioning process is a quality oriented process for achieving, verifying, and documenting that the performance of facilities, systems, and assemblies meets defined objectives and criteria. It assumes that owners, programmers, designers, contractors, commissioning team members, and operations and maintenance entities are fully accountable for the quality of their work.

Page 66

Concepts in Concrete

by: Vance Pool

Concrete is a versatile material whose aesthetic properties are often not understood. When architects think of concrete they all too often think of bland tilt-up concrete warehouses, plain concrete sidewalks, and boring structural properties. Fortunately, many architects are seeing the limitless boundaries of what concrete can do, not only structurally, but aesthetically.

photo by Joe Ak er - Ak er/Zvonkovic Photography
Page 62

Austin’s Search for Civic Substance

by: Dean Almy

IF all goes according to plan, on the morning of Feb. 25 the five-story structural frame that was once part of a planned $124-million office building for the Intel Corporation will be imploded to make way for a new federal courthouse. The skeletal remains of the unfinished project, abandoned by Intel in 2001 after a downturn in the technology sector, loomed for six years over the southwestern quadrant of downtown.

Page 22

Metal Shines as Design Solution

by: Toy Henson

WHEN architects and building owners require an attractive and affordable roof or wall system for a commercial or institutional project, chances are metal will be at or near the top their list of material candidates. To be sure, there’s no shortage of commercial metal roof or wall systems from which to choose. And metal is extremely competitive with other exterior facade options because of its low life-cycle cost.

photo Courtesy the metal initiative
Page 51

Glazing Options Abound

by: Hank Chamberlain

THE vast array of specifiable glazing compositions is now almost incomprehensible. Predictably, new product introductions have broadened the traditional categories of architectural glass, such as tinted, reflective, and low-emissivity.

photo Courtesy Vistawall; 54 photo Courtesy SCHOTT North America, Inc .; p.55 photo courtesy Thermique Technologies, LL C
Page 53

Clearly Welcoming

by: Donna Kacmar
Architect: PGAL

THE International Arrivals Building (IAB) by PGAL Architects at the George Bush Intercontinental Airport welcomes travelers and unites the federal Immigration and Customs functions within one large day-lit volume.

Richard Payne, FAIA
Page 58

Designing the Right Fit

by: Andy MacPhillimy, AIA

In my 30-plus years as an architect I have seen few moisture intrusion problems that were the result of product system failures. More frequently, failures occurred at the intersections and transition details between moisture barrier systems. Such failures were caused by a variety of issues, including trade craftsmanship, system product incompatibility, or failure in the “joint” design.

P. 91 image copyright Pali Rao and Andrew Johnson, 2007 istockphoto
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The Most Stylish Floors of Tomorrow Today

by: D. Christopher Davis

Linen textured tiles, century-old wood, bamboo rugs, buttery leather, and sponge are just some of the new looks that have donned the floors at the premium floor covering tradeshow, Surfaces, sponsored by the World Floor Covering Association. WFCA, the industry’s largest advocacy organization representing specialty floor covering retailers, manufacturers, distributors, and contractors, offers a top-line overview of the fashionable looks that are making their way to the floors of homes and businesses across the country this year.

P. 54 Photo Courtesy Anderson hardwood Floors; P. 55 Photo courtesy
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