Article Results for "Houston"

veloCity


Architect: Peter Muessig, Rice School of Architecture

Rice School of Architecture student Peter Muessig has been recognized as a winner in the “Conceptual Projects” category of the 2012 AIA Houston design awards program for his entry entitled “veloCity: Mapping Houston on the Diagonal” (see full awards story on page 18).

Page 24

Form Follows Market

by: Filo Castroe, AIA

More than 20 years after the last major high-rise building was completed in downtown Houston, the Bayou city skyline welcomes BG Group Place at 811 Main Street. Developed by the Hines CalPERS Green Development Fund and designed by Pickard Chilton, the graceful tower, completed in 2011, stands 46 stories tall at the core of the Central Business District (CBD) along the METRO light rail transit line and is strategically connected to the six-mile underground pedestrian tunnel system.

Peter Aaron/OTTO; Aker Imaging; Scott McDonald/Hendrick-
Blessing
Page 48

Clean Line Energy Partners

by: Noelle Heinze

Designed by Kirksey Architecture, Clean Line Energy Partners in downtown Houston is a 6,700-sf space housing an electricity transmission company that develops electrical transmission lines connecting wind farms to urban areas. Several factors guided the design, including a limited budget of $350,000. The client desired a sustainable, historic headquarters building with a design that would reflect the company’s fresh, hip brand.

Aker/Zvonkovic Photography
Page 72

EPA’s Annual Energy Star Buildings List Includes Three Texas Cities

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has released its annual listing of U.S. metropolitan areas featuring the most Energy Star certified buildings for 2011, and three Texas cities — Dallas, Fort Worth, and Houston — have made the list. Energy use in commercial buildings accounts for nearly 20 percent of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions at a cost of more than $100 billion per year.

Page 77

John S. Chase, FAIA (1925-2012)

by: Stephen Fox

John Saunders Chase died in Houston on March 29, 2012, at the age of 87. Chase was the first African American to enroll in and graduate from the architecture program at the University of Texas at Austin (March 1952), the first African American to be registered as an architect in Texas (1954), the first architect of his race in Texas to become a member of the American Institute of Architects (1954), and also the first architect of his race in Texas to be elected to Fellowship in the AIA (1990).

Archival photo courtesy Center for American History; Humanities Building © Gerald Moorhead, FAIA; Portrait by Robert Pandya, courtesy The Alcalde
Page 8

On the Road with Alexis McKinney, AIA, LEED AP

by: Noelle Heinze

For Alexis McKinney, AIA, the “road to registration” has led to the past. And today, her interest in historic preservation has led to downtown Houston, where McKinney and colleague Gerald Moorhead, FAIA, peruse two historic houses (1904 and 1905) that have been “mothballed” and relocated to a dramatic site yards from the city’s 42,000-seat baseball stadium. The project is one of several McKinney is working on.

Julie Pizzo
Page 61

James and Nancy Gaertner Performing Arts Center

The James and Nancy Gaertner Performing Arts Center at Sam Houston State University in Huntsville was designed to have a distinct identity in contrast to many of the simple flat-roofed buildings constructed on campus to accommodate as much program space as possible.

 Aker Imaging
Page 69

Worthy of the Mission

by: Gin Kappler-Peeler, AIA

The story of the Moran Family Health Center is larger than just the account of relocating the San Jose Clinic from its outdated and undersized 50-year-old facility in downtown. Its true telling reveals the comprehensive delivery of a range of services that are interconnected and focused on the overall well-being and soundness of families.

Aker Imaging
Page 44

The Big Picture

by: Val Glitsch, FAIA

In 2008 the YMCA of Greater Houston announced the imminent replacement of Kenneth Franzheim’s Italian Renaissance-inspired ten-story edifice that had provided classrooms, exercise facilities, and 132 single-room residential units since 1941. Aspiring to move in a more “family-friendly” direction, the organization stated the primary goal of the new 115,000-sf facility would be to assume a stronger community presence in downtown Houston.

Aker Imaging, Thomas McConnell
Page 50

For Goodness' Sake

by: Larry Paul Fuller

There is good architecture. And then there is good architecture … as in architecture for the public good. This year’s statewide design award winners — 13 projects from Dallas, Houston, San Antonio, and Austin — are a case in point. I was struck, during the awards jury process, by how intent the jurors were on recognizing certain entries, not only for their merit in terms of design (even design merit as broadly defined), but also for their capacity to fulfill client aspirations for the public good.

Page 7

ArCh Hosts Inaugural Texas Student Biennial Exhibition

by: Texas Architect Staff

The Architecture Center Houston (ArCH) held an opening reception July 26 for its first “Texas Student Biennial Exhibition.” The exhibit features work from the eight accredited schools of architecture in Texas and includes project boards, slide shows, and architectural models.

Courtesy ArCh
Page 12

Houston Food Bank

by: Ardis Clinton, AIA

Hope. Simply stated, it is the message of a new facility, on a mission to ultimately end hunger. Nestled in a warehouse district outside of downtown, the Houston Food Bank (HFB) building gleams with its spirited green color and metal cladding. The new 308,000-sf facility is the nation’s largest Feeding America food bank and source of food for hunger relief charities in 18 southeast Texas counties. Beyond feeding the hungry, the Houston Food Bank provides community services and education programs aimed at promoting good nutrition, assistance with federal and state Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Programs, job training, and employment help — all in an effort to break the cycle of food insecurity.

Slyworks Photography
Page 62

BioScience Research Collaborative at Rice University

by: Jason T. Chan, AIA

At the intersection of Rice University’s historic and growth axes is the BioScience Research Collaborative, a ten-story 477,000-sf translational research facility designed to facilitate multi-institutional research collaboration between Rice and various institutes from Texas Medical Center. This interdisciplinary facility embraces a wide range of disciplines, from chemistry to bioengineering, from organizations supporting startup research companies to the National Space Biomedical Research Institute — all with emphasis on improving human wellness through research.

Cesar Rubio Photography
Page 66

Tellepsen Family Downtown YMCA

by: Adapted from “The Big Picture,” by Val Glitsch, FAIA Texas Architect, July/August, 2012

In 2008 the YMCA of Greater Houston announced the imminent replacement of Kenneth Franzheim’s Italian Renaissance-inspired ten-story edifice that had provided classrooms, exercise facilities, and 132 single-room residential units since 1941. Aspiring to move in a more “family-friendly” direction, the organization stated the primary goal of the new 115,000-sf facility would be to assume a stronger community presence in downtown Houston.

Aker Imaging, Thomas McConnell
Page 70

Military Hospital Addition

by: J. Brantley Hightower, AIA

Fort Sam Houston in San Antonio has served the medical needs of men and women in uniform since the 1870s. During that time, the complex grew incrementally until 1995 when a new facility was built to consolidate the Fort’s hospital operations. Containing over a million square feet of space, the massive Brooke Army Medical Center (BAMC – pronounced “Bam-See”) was clad in heavy masonry that gave it a somewhat institutional quality. While BAMC was functional, the needs of contemporary combat medical practice are constantly evolving and when the decision was made to absorb most of the operations of a nearby Air Force medical facility into the complex, a significant expansion became necessary to create what would eventually be known as the San Antonio Military Medical Center.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA
Page 74

University Branch Library

by: Texas Architect Staff

University Branch Library, designed by Bailey Architects, is a two-story, 40,000-sf building on approximately 4.2 acres of the University of Houston Sugar Land campus. The library — for both university and public use — includes a variety of children and young adult services, reference resources, meeting and study areas, and staff work spaces.

Aker Imaging
Page 86

Julia Ideson Building

by: Texas Architect Staff

The Julia Ideson Building — recently updated by Gensler and originally designed by Boston architects Cram & Ferguson (with associates Watkin and Glover) — opened its doors as Houston’s main library in 1926. However, Cram & Ferguson’s vision for the Ideson was not fully realized. A south wing and reading garden were eliminated due to budget constraints. In 2006, the Julia Ideson Library Preservation Partners raised $32 million to build a new archival wing for Houston Metropolitan Research Center and restore the Julia Ideson Building. The new wing opened in 2009 and follows Cram’s original plan, with some modification.

Courtesy of Gensler
Page 90

Preservation Texas Announces 2012 Honor Awards

Preservation Texas recently announced its 2012 Honor Awards, which includes 10 awards and a special commendation recognizing the best of preservation in Texas. Individuals and projects in Austin, Dallas, Galveston, Houston, Marshall, San Antonio, and West Texas received awards.

Courtesy of Preservation Texas
Page 117

ArCH Hosts Deans’ Roundtable

by: Ardis Clinton, AIA

The Architecture Center Houston (ArCH) hosted a Deans’ Roundtable Discussion in September. Moderated by Larry Speck, FAIA, he opened the discussion with a national statistic that only 35% of architecture faculty are registered architects.

ArCH
Page 10

VeloCity: Mapping Houston on the Diagonal


Architect: Peter Muessig

This bold idea for elevating the bicycle culture of Houston was one of five winners from the 2012 Texas Architects Studio Awards program, which annually recognizes excellence in unbuilt, often strictly conceptual, architectural design.

Page 23

Honored Heritage

by: Anna Mod
Architect: Smith & Company Architects

The African American Library at the Gregory School is located in a former elementary school building in Houston’s Fourth Ward neighborhood immediately west of downtown. The two-story concrete-frame, brick-veneer Classical Revival-style building is a designated State of Texas Landmark, City of Houston Protected Landmark, and is located within the Freedmen’s Town National Register Historic District.

Gary Zvonkovic
Page 57

Extending the Brand

by: Dan Searight
Architect: Powers Brown Architecture

“Be Brilliant Together” proclaims Logica, a leading business and technology service company employing 39,000 personnel worldwide. “This is not a slogan,” explains Mike Lewsley, chief operating officer of its Houston office. “It is a call to action for our clients and employees alike.” Logica’s newly completed office responds to the corporate tagline with an energetic and expressive design.

Dror Baldinger
Page 40

Houston Announces Design Awards

by: Theodora Batchvarova

A diverse jury with a broad spectrum of interests and experience met at the Architecture Center Houston on Feb. 25 to evaluate a wide variety of submittals in this year’s AIA Houston Design Awards competition. Eligibility was limited to projects completed within the last five years and located in the Houston metropolitan area or designed by an architect working in the Houston metropolitan area.

Page 20

Prism Cloud


Architect: Logan/Johnson

Houston firm Logan/Johnson conceived Prism Cloud as an energy-generating landscape pavilion near Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates. The pavilion will appear to hover over the desert terrain, alternately casting shadows and light on the surface of the sand. Five concrete piers anchor the pavilion to the ground, with a steel cable net – embedded with thin-film photovoltaic panels and glass prisms – that stretches between the piers.

Page 26

Recap: Gulf Coast Green 2011

by: Filo Castore

More than 200 people gathered at the United Way of Houston on May 25 for the sixth annual Gulf Coast Green Symposium and Professional Expo. Attendees – including architects, engineers, contractors, developers, students, educators, and government officials – met to learn, share, and network at the event hosted by AIA Houston‘s Committee on the Environment.

Slyworks Photography
Page 21

Placemaking in Corpus Christi

by: Laura N. Bennett

Last December during a meeting of the City Council, representatives of a local grassroots organization presented their concept for developing a six-block stretch of Corpus Christi’s downtown bayfront into a vibrant, multi-purpose destination. They envision an expansive public place along the lines of Discovery Green in downtown Houston.

Page 24

Manner of Approach

by: Gerald Moorhead
Architect: leslie elkins architecture; Kendall/Heaton Associates

Until last year, it was always a little tricky to find Bayou Bend, the former home of Miss Ima Hogg that now serves as the American decorative arts branch of the Museum of Fine Arts Houston. Its hard-to-find entrance off the busy intersection of Memorial and Westcott in Houston’s West End was a narrow drive leading down to a parking lot alongside Buffalo Bayou. The recently completed Lora Jean Kilroy Visitor and Education Center eliminates this wayfinding problem, providing greatly enhanced public visibility and a number of much-needed facilities to expand the museum’s curatorial and educational programs.

Joe Aker
Page 58

Oak Forest Library

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: Natalye Appel + Associates Architects; Architect Works; James Ray Architects

Completed in January, the makeover of the City of Houston’s Oak Forest Library includes a 4,500-sf addition and a complete renovation of the original 7,500-sf structure. The project was a collaboration among three local firms—James Ray Architects, Natalye Appel + Associates Architects, and Architect Works.

Page 71

Tour Spotlights Mid-Century Beaumont

by: Stephen Fox

A recent t our sponsored by Houston Mod, a design advocacy group, highlighted the residential architecture of Beaumont’s leading mid-century modernists. The day trip was the culmination of a series of events highlighting April as Modern Month, in which affiliates of the international DoCo-MoMo (Documentation and Conservation of Buildings, Sites and Neighborhoods of the Modern Movement) celebrated modern heritage locally and regionally.

Top Photo Courtesy Houston Mod; Bottom Photo by Gerald Moorhead, FAIA
Page 22

fibrocity

The idea behind Perkins + Will’s entry in this year’s Living City Design Competition is the need for a sustainable model for Houston’s continued rapid growth.

Page 28

Brockman Hall for Physics

by: Donna Kacmar
Architect: KieranTimberlake

Kieran Timberlake has synthesized difficult technical requirements, environmental responsibility, and architectural craft in the new 110,000-sf Brockman Hall for Physics on the Rice University campus.

Peter Aaron/ESTO; Paul Hester; R. Kevin Butts
Page 52

Sam Houston Tollway Northeast Toll Plazas

by: Jesse Hager
Architect: RdlR Architects

Bridges are a cherished design problem. The clear span represents a common exercise for architecture students exploring essential concepts of structure, tension, and compression. Regrettably, architects are seldom commissioned to design a bridge project.

Chad McGhee; Mark Gaynor
Page 76

Methodist Hospital Research Institute

by: Noelle Heinze
Architect: WHR Architects with KPF and CO Architects

Completed in October 2010, the Methodist Hospital Research Institute (TMHRI) is a 440,000-sf facility dedicated to translational research and nano-medicine located within the Texas Medical Center in Houston.

Joe Aker
Page 94

After Sloughing Off Gray, Houston Courts Building Is Pink Once Again

by: Anna Mod

Following a $65 million restoration, the 1910 Harris County Civil Courts Building in downtown Houston was rededicated on Aug. 23. The 29-month project, partially funded by a grant through the Texas Historic Courthouse Preservation Program, returned the architectural luster to a building that had sustained significant deterioration over several decades due to deferred maintenance, overcrowding, and unsympathetic alterations.

Nash Baker/Vaughn Construction
Page 20

St. Emanuel House

by: Ben Koush, AIA

It has been quite some time since a modern house in Houston has received so much attention. In fact, it’s been more than 50 years since Bolton & Barnstone’s flat-topped, cool as a cucumber Gordon House (1955) was published as many times in the local, national, and international press.

Hester + Hardaway Photographers
Page 40

Inspired Inquiry

by: Stephen Sharpe, Hon. TSA

The best architecture combines the rigor of scientific inquiry with the inspired explorations of art. Equal amounts of science and art produced the four projects profiled on the following pages—two designed for scientific research and two related to the arts.

Page 47

Dance Partner

by: Geoffrey Brune, FAIA

What makes a building an icon? One characteristic is distinct contrast with its context, in form and/or exterior material, that draws attention to the building and away from its surroundings.

Nic Lehoux
Page 60

Notre Dame Catholic Church

by: Noelle Heinze

The Notre Dame Catholic Church in Houston, designed by Turner Duran Architects, replaces existing facilities with a 1,100-seat sanctuary and expanded parking on the existing 20-acre campus.

Geoff Lyon
Page 74

UTEP’s Green Roof Thrives in Desert; Modular System Monitored for Data

by: Lauren Woodward Stanley, Lars Stanley

As green roofs are increasingly explored and utilized, the range of their application is following suit. No longer only perceived as a technological option for regions with abundant rainfall (the Pacific Northwest, for example), they are making headway in hotter and drier climes, albeit with some tentativeness. Now, with a recent installation at the University of Texas at El Paso, the Lone Star State can claim significant green-roof forays on the institutional level from its east end (near Houston) to its westernmost point.

Javier Greigo, UTEP
Page 15

AIA LRGV Announces Design Awards

by: James Rodriguez

During its annual award banquet on Dec. 12, AIA Lower Rio Grande Valley announced the results of its 2009 Design Awards program. The selections were made by a jury that met in Houston during the TSA convention in October.

Page 16

Oliver Named UH Architecture Dean

by: TA Staff

Patricia Belton Oliver, FAIA, who served from 2001-2008 as senior vice president of educational planning and architecture at the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, Calif., has been named dean of the Gerald D. Hines College of Architecture at the University of Houston. Oliver succeeds Joe Mashburn, AIA, who held the post for the last 11 years.

Page 23

Sakowitz Apartments

With its mission to build and operate high-quality affordable housing for more than 1,000 adults in Houston, the not-for-profit developer New Hope Housing will move closer to its goal late next year with completion of the Sakowitz Apartments.

Page 26

Seamless Expansion

by: Fernando Brave
Architect: Hopkins Architects with Hanbury Evans Wright Vlattas + Company

While other prominent universities in the U.S. comprise a fusion of signature stylistic expressions, Rice University has focused on architecture that reinforces the well synchronized, harmonious feel of its campus. Aside from some unique buildings – such as Thomas Pfeiffer’s Brochstein Pavilion and the school’s off-site Data Center and the Library Service Center by Carlos Jimenez – that provide interesting drama to the otherwise prevailing architectural uniformity,

Robert Benson Photography
Page 38

Vertical Challenge

by: Edward Richardson

My four-year-old niece, Jocelyn, compares them to “those pads that frogs jump on” and likes to imagine herself as some sort of energized amphibian as she climbs, leaps, and hops her way to the top. Her description is in reference to the new climbing installation or “climber” at the Children’s Museum of Houston’s recently completed expansion (by Jackson & Ryan Architects). The climber, designed and constructed by Spencer Luckey, frames an almost constant ingress of squealing, gleeful adventurers as they navigate the varied vertical pathways rising from the basement level of the addition. Boasting more than 70,000 linear feet of cable, 120,000 ring connectors, and 130 levels, the intricate assemblage plays a central role in the new exhibition space at the museum.

Paul Finkel/Piston Design
Page 76

AIA Recognizes Brochstein Pavilion

One Texas project – the Brochstein Pavilion at Rice University by Thomas Phifer and Partners – is among 14 projects recognized with 2010 Institute Honor Awards for Architecture.

Page 11

Malarkey Named ‘Young Architect’

Brian Malarkey, AIA, of Kirksey in Houston is among nine honorees in this year’s list of AIA “Young Architects.” The Young Architects Award is given to individuals who have shown exceptional leadership and made significant contributions to the profession in an early stage of their architectural career.

Page 12

Cynthia Woods Mitchell (1922-2009)

by: Barrie Scardino

Cynthia Woods Mitchell – like Ima Hogg, Dominique de Menil, and Jane Blaffer Owen – was an influential and discerning woman who changed the cultural and architectural landscape of the Houston area. Also like the others, Cynthia Mitchell had an eye for aesthetic perfection and a passion for beauty.

Mitchell Family
Page 15

Wright-Influenced NASA Landmark Redone as Offices for Houston Parks

by: Gerald Moorhead

One of Houston’s landmarks of modern architecture has been rededicated after a $16 million renovation. The historic Farnsworth & Chambers Co. building, designed by MacKie & Kamrath and completed in 1957, has been the home of Houston’s Parks and Recreation Department since 1977. Known as the Gragg Building after the donor of adjacent parkland, it is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and is a Registered Texas Historic Landmark and a City of Houston Landmark.

Houston Parks and Recreation, NASA
Page 16

Reprise of a Classic

by: Anna Mod
Architect: Stern and Bucek Architects

Schulenburg, situated about 100 miles west of Houston along Interstate 10, was founded in 1873 after Louis Schulenburg donated land surrounding the planned Galveston, Harrisburg and San Antonio Railway. Typical of late-nineteenth-century railroad towns, Schulenburg developed a wide commercial street lined with several blocks of one- and two-story masonry buildings facing the tracks. Architecturally, the downtown is still intact today although only a few businesses remain open due to the routine exodus for the nearby highway.

Hest + Hardaway
Page 60

Big Art

by: Mark Lam

Amongst its many fountains, gardens, and playgrounds, Houston’s Hermann Park is playing host to 15 newly installed monumental sculptures that have transformed the grounds into a landscape of exploration. Made possible by the Texan-French Alliance for the Arts, the works by French sculptor Bernar Venet will remain on display until October. (Three Indeterminate Lines is shown at top; the inset shows Random Combination of Indeterminate Lines.)

Nash Baker, McClain Gallery
Page 80
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